ENTOMOLOGY Program Book NOVEMBER 11 14, KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE KNOXVILLE CONVENTION CENTER ESA 60TH ANNUAL MEETING

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1 ENTOMOLOGY 202 ESA 60TH ANNUAL MEETING NOVEMBER 4, KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE KNOXVILLE CONVENTION CENTER A Global Society for a Global Science ENTOMOLOGY 202 Program Book Check ESA s mobile app Entomology2 for updates.

2 Any way you look at it! BioQuip offers the highest quality and greatest diversity of curating, field and lab equipment, educational materials, and books you need to work successfully in your chosen field of entomology. 35K 029M Visit us at the ESA Convention Knoxville, TN November - 4, 202 Booth # s, 3, 5 38P Aspirator Kit Insect Mounting Kit 28B Advanced Collecting/Mounting Kit 03AFP Caliper Foam Sp. Boards Cornell Drawer, basswood Loupe 00 Standard Insect Box Forceps Mosquito Dipper 2888A 00CMP InsectaZooka Cal. Academy Drawer, poplar 04AM USNM Drawer, basswood 450DS Collapsible Cages Mosquito Resting Trap 232 Gladwick St. Rancho Dominguez, CA Ph: Fax: Now offering more than,000 live and papered arthropod items for your institution or personal enjoyment. We have many items in our booth for you to see. Come on by for a visit with Brent the Bug Guy ESA Booth #09

3 ENTOMOLOGY th Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America Contents November 4, 202 The Knoxville Convention Center Knoxville, Tennessee Messages... 3 President s Message...3 Program Co-Chairs Welcome...4 About Knoxville... 6 Ground Transportation...6 Airport Shuttles...6 Taxi Service...6 Conference Shuttles...6 Knoxville Trolley...6 Parking...6 Hotels...7 General Information... 8 Registration Information & Information Desk...8 Business Center...8 Career Center...8 Coat/Bag Check...8 Cyber Café...8 Daily Announcements and Messages...8 ESA Central Exhibit Booth...8 First Aid/Medical Emergencies...8 Guest Hospitality...8 Internet Access...8 Lost and Found...8 Meeting ReLeaf...8 Mobile App...9 Mother s Room...9 Photography Policy...9 Press...9 Refreshments and Concessions...9 Social Media...9 Smoking Policy...9 Tours...9 University of Tennessee Volunteers vs. University of Missouri Tigers (Tailgate party and football game)...9 University of Tennessee Forensic Anthropology Center...9 Discover Life in America s Field Trip to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park Science and Education Center... 0 University Entomology Clubs... 0 YouTube Videographers... 0 Program Information... 0 Uploading Presentations... 0 Moderator Training... 0 Judges Training... 0 Lunch-and-Learn Sessions... 0 Opening Plenary Session... Closing Plenary Session... Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) Training... Insect Photo Salon... 2 Under The Lens: The Science of Urban Pest Management 2 ACE Prep Course and Exam... 2 Poster Presentations...2 Printed Posters... 2 Virtual Posters... 3 Social Activities and Mixers...3 New Member Meet and Greet... 3 Welcome Reception... 3 Social Events... 3 Student Activities... 3 Linnaean Games... 3 Student Competition for the President s Prize... 3 Student Debate... 3 Student Awards... 3 Student Reception... 3 Student Volunteers... 4 Awards and Honors...4 Honorary Membership... 4 Fellows of the ESA... 4 Founders Memorial Award... 4 ESA Professional Awards... 5 ESA Student Awards... 5 Stinger Awards... 6 Entomological Foundation Professional Awards... 6 Entomological Foundation Student Awards... 6 Award Sponsors... 6 Entomological Foundation...6 Exhibitors, Sponsors, and Sustaining Associates...8 Exhibit Hall... 8 Exhibitors... 8 ESA Sponsors Sustaining Associates ESA Governing Board, Sections, Branches, Committees, and Editorial Boards...23 ESA Staff...27 Daily Schedules...28 Daily Schedule of Meetings and Functions Daily Schedule by Date and Time Daily Schedule by Scientific Program Virtual Posters Presentations: Oral and Poster Displays...54 Sunday...54 Oral Presentations Monday...7 Student Competition Poster Presentations VP27 VP34 and D000 D Virtual Poster Display Presentations... 7 Student Competition Oral Presentations Section Networking Tuesday...00 Poster Presentations D0209 D Oral Presentations Wednesday...40 Poster Presentations D043 D Oral Presentations Indices...72 Author Index Common Names Index Scientific Names Index Maps and Floor Plans Please bring this program with you. Additional copies will cost $0.00 on site

4 PICK UP AD FROM AMERICAN ENTOMOLOGIST FALL 20, PAGE 5.

5 Messages Messages President s Message Welcome to Knoxville and ENTOMOL- OGY 202 the 60th Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America. This is the first time that the ESA has met in this fine city, and it has much to recommend as a venue. It is within easy driving distance for much of our membership; many small restaurants and pubs are nearby; the Convention Center is a beautiful and relatively new facility with a highly competent and professional staff. We will have a great meeting in Knoxville! The meeting s theme for this year, A Global Society for a Global Science, celebrates a new vision for the Society. The ESA has begun to transition from a predominantly national society to one that is truly international. Our International Branch is increasing its membership by 50% per year and is the fastest growing of our six branches. More than half of our manuscript submissions are from authors outside the United States. Attendees at this meeting will come from more than 50 countries and live presentations will be delivered from every continent except Antarctica. In addition to these international trends, several important new developments will accelerate ESA s leadership role on the global stage. These include new membership models for international members, more services for non-u.s. members, new programs, and international meetings. These will be announced at the Opening Session on Sunday night, and you do not want to miss that session! This theme for ENTOMOLOGY 202 has been successful in attracting a large number of high-quality symposia. 98 symposia will be presented at this meeting a new record for the Society! The Program Symposia, in particular, are exciting symposia and were chosen from 05 entries. Please see the Program Chairs Message for more details on these symposia. The level of symposium interest often correlates with degree of interest in the meeting, and this year is no exception. In addition to the large number of symposium submissions, we have 2,400 total presentations, substantially more than some recent annual meetings. Along with the exhibitor interest and early registration rates, this submission level indicates that ENTOMOLOGY 202 will be one of our largest meetings in years! Grayson Brown If you enjoy the program as much as I believe that you will, please remember to thank these hard-working folks. Another group that deserves our thanks is our ESA staff. Our still relatively-new Executive Director, David Gammel, has just completed his first full year at the helm of the ESA office; and he has brought much vision and leadership to that position. Our other director-level professional staff includes familiar names such as Alan Kahan (Publications), Neil Willoughby (Finance), and Debi Sutton (Membership). We also welcome back Chris Stelzig (Certification) as a member of our staff again (although he never really left). All of these folks and the other ESA staff are highly professional and essential members of our team again this year. The modern ESA simply could not function without them. They, too, deserve our thanks. One staff item of special interest to the Annual Meeting is that of Director of Meetings. The Director of Meetings arranges every nonscientific aspect of the meeting: The décor, contracts with the hotels and convention center, menus at receptions, the audio -visual arrangements, exhibit hall booths, and a million other details. We have outsourced this critical activity for the past six years; but this year, we decided to bring a Director of Meetings back in-house. I am pleased to introduce Rosina Romano as our new director, and this is her first ESA meeting here in Knoxville. She has done a superb job, and I hope will continue to do so for many years into the future. One challenge that we have this year is that, in addition to hosting our meeting, Knoxville (home of the University of Tennessee) is also hosting a home football game between Tennessee and the University of Missouri on Saturday night. The football stadium, which seats 05,000, is very near the Convention Center (easy walking distance). Thus, the game has complicated our housing arrangements for Saturday night and will affect some of our premeeting functions. To compensate for the inconvenience, we are holding a tailgate party on the terrace of the Convention Center featuring barbeque, beverages, and entertainment. It is an opportunity to connect with old friends before the meeting gets underway. We also have a block of tickets for the game that are available on a first-come-first-served basis. See the ENTOMOLOGY 202 Web site for more details. As always, our meetings are heavily dependent on selfless dedication of our colleagues who have invested enormous amounts of time, energy, thought, and effort into making this a memorable and successful meeting. Among the many people who have served, none have given more than our Program Co-Chairs, Mike Jackson and Jerome Grant. Program Chairs lead the Program Committee, which assembles the scientific program for the meeting, scheduling every paper and scientific session; and they write the program book program book manuscript. Their efforts began at the end of the 200 meeting and will continue to the end of the 203 meeting. Their only compensation for the hundreds of hours they invest in this massive effort is the thanks they receive from the membership. You will be hearing more about ENTOMOLOGY 202 over the next few weeks. I m quite sure that, as the excitement builds toward this meeting, you will be glad that you decided to attend. This meeting will be a historic one for the Society; and years from now, you will be proud to say that you were at the Knoxville meeting in 202! See you there, Grayson Brown 3

6 Messages Program Committee Co-Chairs Welcome Messages On behalf of the 202 ESA Program Committee, we welcome you to ENTOMOL- OGY 202, the 60th Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America the largest annual gathering of entomologists in the world! Our meeting continues to grow, and this year more than 2,400 oral papers and posters will be presented by entomologists from around the world. With this many presentations, it is necessary to have a full schedule for each of the four days of the meeting. Attendees can expect each day to contain a diverse, relevant, and interesting program; and we encourage you to stay for the entire meeting. Pre and post-conference activities may tempt you to stay even longer! At the close of last year s annual meeting in Reno, President Grayson Brown introduced the theme for ENTOMOLOGY 202, A Global Society for a Global Science. This theme is especially relevant in the society in which we live, where innovations in transportation and communication have shrunk our world and made it necessary to think globally. Many entomological problems are intrinsically global in nature and must be approached as such. Several symposia at this meeting will address relevant issues of the global science of entomology and provide insight into many of the world s most vexing entomological problems. This ESA meeting promotes opportunities for these entomologists to share their science with the world. Thousands of entomologists from more than 50 countries will gather for four days to network, learn, and share our science. Covering all aspects of the science, we truly are now a global society. We encourage you to visit the ESA Web site and read more from President Brown about this year s theme. When the 202 Program Committee solicited proposals for program symposia that exemplified the global theme, we were pleased to receive 05 proposals. From that list and additional submissions, we selected 6 Program Symposia, 33 Section Symposia, and 59 Member Symposia that contain 934 exciting presentations. We also selected one Virtual Section Symposium with seven speakers from four countries. Many of these symposia are excellent examples of how we, as a global society, can provide cutting-edge information to conserve insect biodiversity, solve worldwide pest problems, and inform policy makers to improve their decision-making. Many great examples are found throughout the program, and each of the six featured Program Symposia has a global theme: Jerome Grant and D. Michael Jackson Organizers: Eleanor Blitzer, Mia G. Park, and Jessica D. Petersen, Cornell University. Genetic Pest Management: Global Strategies, Hurdles, and Future Directions. Organizers: Brian G. Rector, USDA ARS; and Fred Gould, North Carolina State University. We especially are honored to facilitate two symposia that pay tribute to recently deceased ESA members who were outstanding scientists. They are A Celebration of the Life and Scientific Contributions of Carl Jones (Organizers: David Taylor and Jerome A. Hogsette, USDA ARS), and Remembering the Life and Work of Nancy Beckage (Organizers: Florence Dunkel, Montana State University; and Karen M. Kester, Virginia Commonwealth University). Other special symposia celebrate the 50th anniversary of the United States Department of Agriculture and the 00th anniversary of the Entomology Department at Purdue University. The rest of the 202 program is also very exciting. For instance, we are delighted that on Sunday, Dr. Gene Kritsky will present the 202 Founders Memorial Award Lecture that will honor the career of Charles Darwin. We are also excited that we have 486 regular 0-minute presentations arranged according to ESA Section into 33 sessions. In addition, 46 regular posters will be displayed on Tuesday and Wednesday. The four ESA Sections will have Monday afternoon for section business, special presentations, and highlights of section activities. Student entomologists continue to play a vital role in our society; and their participation is reflected throughout our annual meeting. We have 42 student 0-minute presentations and 20 student posters competing for the President s Prize. Student presentations will be delivered on Monday morning, and the competition posters will be available for viewing all day Monday. We are looking forward to the three timely student debates entitled, What is the best individual solution to feeding the world s growing population?, What is the best individual solution to solving the threat of global climate change?, and What is the best individual solution to meeting the world s growing energy demand? to be held Tuesday afternoon in the Lecture Hall. The preliminary round of the Linnaean Games takes place on Sunday; the final round is Tuesday evening, followed by the Student Awards Presentation and Student Reception on the Plaza Terrace. Linkages between Climate Change and Global Insect Pestilence: From Theory to Practice. Organizers: Aaron S. Weed and Lauren E. Culler, Dartmouth College; Tobin Northfield, University of California Davis; and Sanford D. Eigenbrode, University of Idaho. Ecological and Evolutionary Origins of Insect Pests in Agriculture: The Role of Crop Domestication and Global Crop Translocation. Organizers: Yolanda H. Chen, University of Vermont; and Raul F. Medina, Texas A&M University. RNAi: From Basic Science toward Application. Organizers: Qisheng Song, University of Missouri; Subba R. Palli, University of Kentucky; Yongping Huang, Chinese Academy of Sciences; and David Denlinger, The Ohio State University. Current Global Trends in Forensic Entomology. Organizer: Ralph E. Williams, Purdue University. Linking Global Agricultural Production with Pollination Services. 4 Due to the success of the Lunch-and-Learn sessions over the past two years at San Diego and Reno, we are happy to continue with them for ENTOMOLOGY 202. These sessions provide practical advice and topics for discussion in an informal setting that should be of interest to a wide cross-section of our membership. This year s sessions will cover a range of topics: How to Navigate the Annual Meeting and How to Get the Most Out of ESA, Interview Techniques with Scott Hutchinson, Lunch and Learn with Sonny Ramaswamy and Colleagues from NIFA, a Hands-on Photography Demonstration organized by Cheri Abraham and Ric Bessin and Politics and Science: How Congress and the President Impact Your Work (and what you can do about it) with Robert Gropp from the American Institute of Biological Sciences. We continue to take advantage of recent technology to improve the

7 Messages Messages program and make it more accessible to attendees. An enhanced mobile app will feature an easy search option for the entire program and connect to your online personal scheduler (if you created one!). The QR code scanner will allow you to learn more about a session, poster, or exhibitor right on your mobile device. As in previous years, virtual posters will give even more international entomologists an opportunity to present their work; attendees in Knoxville will be able to view the posters and interact remotely with the presenters and discuss their research. We also have dedicated two rooms at the conference site to handle remote video audio links that allow international presenters to speak and interact with the audience in Knoxville from a location abroad in real time. Both capabilities will strengthen the presence of ESA internationally. We invite you to take advantage of the many opportunities, entomological and otherwise, that the Knoxville area has to offer. We are pleased to offer three tour/activity options for ENTOMOLOGY 202. The first activity is a Tailgate Party and tickets to the inaugural college football game between SEC rivals, the University of Tennessee and the University of Missouri on Saturday (November 0). The party will feature bluegrass music, Tennessee barbeque, and a few surprises! The university is adjacent to the Knoxville Convention Center, and the stadium is within walking distance from most of the downtown Knoxville hotels. Enjoy the pageantry of the football game with more than 00,000 football fans at the third largest non-racing stadium in the United States On Tuesday and Wednesday (November 3 and 4), tours will go to the University of Tennessee s Body Farm (the University of Tennessee Anthropological Research Facility), the premier research facility for studying the decomposition of human remains under various conditions. The final tour will be to the Discover Life in America Facility on Thursday (November 5). The Discover Life in America center is part of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the most visited national park in the United States. In addition, the Knoxville area has much to offer in the way of Americana history, including the roots of bluegrass music. Market Square and the Old City, just a short walk from the Convention Center and downtown hotels, are home to several unique restaurants, bars, clubs, and shops. Knoxville was home to the 982 World s Fair. You can still visit the World s Fair Park and explore the iconic Sunsphere, where you can take an elevator to the Observation Deck for a glimpse of Knoxville the way it is today and the way it was in 982. It has been a pleasure working with the entire 202 Program Planning Committee, which includes Student Competition Cochairs (and next year s Program Co-chairs) Marianne Alleyne and Luis Cañas; Poster Co-chairs (and last year s Program Cochairs) Andrew Norton and Paul Ode; MUVE (Medical, Urban, and Veterinary Entomology) Section President Chris Geden and Vice-President Edward D. Walker; PBT (Physiology, Biochemistry, and Toxicology) Section President S. Reddy Palli and Vice- President Michael Strand; P IE (Plant Insect Ecosystems) Section President Bonnie Pendleton and Vice-President Gary Thompson; SEB (Systematics, Evolution, and Biodiversity) Section President Kelly Miller and Vice-President Christiane Weirauch; and Student Liaison Joy Newton. President Brown has been an active member of the committee throughout the process. We thank ESA headquarters for providing more than $55,000 in program enhancement funds to encourage participation by nonentomologists and foreign scientists in ENTOMOLOGY 202. We are particularly indebted to ESA staff, including C. David Gammel, CAE (Executive Director), Rosina Romano, CMP (Director of Meetings), Debi Sutton (Director of Membership and Marketing), Alan Kahan (Director of Publications and Communications), Cindy Myers (Manager of Meetings and Exhibits), Chris Selzig (Director of Certification), Pamela Reid (Manager of Membership and Member Relations), Neil Willoughby (Director of Finance), Richard Levine (Communications Program Manager), Adele Compton (Finance Assistant), and Elizabeth Caesar (Desktop Publisher/ Web Coordinator). The staff at Confex has done a tremendous job supporting the Program Committee, and we especially thank Tori Daigle for her diligent assistance. Special thanks go to Beth Mitchell of Starrmark Communications for assistance in editing and proofing this year s program. When you see each of these hard-working individuals in Knoxville, please thank them in person for their efforts to make this meeting as informative, timely, diverse, beneficial, enjoyable, and global, as possible. We hope you reap the benefits of their hard work! We look forward to seeing you in Knoxville! D. Michael Jackson and Jerome Grant 202 ESA Program Committee Co-Chairs Standing, back row (left to right): Chris Geden, Christiane Weirauch, Kelly Miller, Wes Watson, Gary Thompson, Bonnie Pendleton, Joy Newton Standing, front row: Paul Ode, Andrew Norton, Subba Reddy Palli, Mike Jackson, Grayson Brown, Jerome Grant, Luis Canas (not pictured: Marianne Alleyne, Michael Strand) 5

8 General About Information Knoxville ABOUT KNOXVILLE General About Information Knoxville Knoxville, Tennessee Welcome to Knoxville, the perfect mix of small town charm and big city fun. Surrounded by unsurpassed natural beauty and filled with great places to go, Knoxville has something for everyone. The city rests on the banks of the Tennessee River in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains. The beauty and natural resources surrounding Knoxville offer limitless opportunities for fun and adventure. Enjoy land and water activities year-round with Knoxville s temperate climate. Visitors can take advantage of the numerous parks, gardens, and greenways located within the heart of the city. ENTOMOLOGY 202 takes place in downtown Knoxville at the Knoxville Convention Center. Several of the downtown properties are within walking distance of the convention center including the Holiday Inn Downtown Knoxville, the Hilton Knoxville, the Crowne Plaza Knoxville, and the Four Points by Sheraton. Ground Transportation Airport Shuttles Chariots for Hire will be providing shuttle service to and from the McGhee Tyson Airport in Knoxville. They will provide hourly service for arrivals on November 0th th from 0 AM to midnight and for departures November 3 4, 4:30 AM 4:30 PM. Service to the downtown Knoxville Hotels will cost $25 each way or $45 roundtrip. Shuttle service to the hotels located on North Merchant Drive will be $30 each way or $50 roundtrip. Reservations should be made in advance. To make reservations, visit: Please note that payments are due onsite, not at the time of the reservation. Walk ups are accepted but will be based on available unreserved seats. After retrieving your luggage, check in at the Chariots for Hire counter located on the first level of the airport across from the Delta baggage claim area (you can also turn right at the foot of the escalator). Be prepared to provide the following information: the hotel where you will be staying, the date, location, and time you will need to be picked up for departure. Return pick up times will be based on flight departure times. Hotel Downtown Knoxville North Merchant Dr. West Knoxville/ Cedar Bluff Shuttle $25 one-way $45 round-trip $25 one-way $45 round-trip N/A Taxi Rates (approximate) $30 35 one-way $35 40 one-way $40 45 one-way Taxi Service Taxi service to and from the airport will cost $30 40 each way depending on traffic to the downtown hotels. To get to the taxi services upon arrival at the Knoxville Airport, take the elevator or escalator to the first level. When exiting the elevator or escalator, turn left and follow the ground transportation signs. A-/Cloud 9, (865) A&B Ground Transportation, (865) Benchmark Taxi, (865) Blount Taxi, (865) Connections Taxi, (865) or (800) TAXICAB Discount Taxi, (865) Gold Cab, (865) International Taxi, (865) Odyssey Airport Taxi, (865) or (865) Overland Taxi, (865) Royal Taxi, (865) Tennessee Taxi Service, (865) United Airport Taxi, (865) ESA Conference Shuttles Shuttle service will be provided from the following properties: Downtown: Crowne Plaza Knoxville Marriott Knoxville North/Merchant Drive: Best Western Knoxville Suites Clarion Inn Comfort Suites Days Inn MainStay Suites Red Roof Inn West Knoxville/Cedar Bluff: Country Inn & Suites Hampton Inn Holiday Inn Service will run during the following times: Saturday, November 0: 6:00 AM 0:00 PM Sunday, November : 7:00 AM 0:30 PM Monday, November 2: 5:45 AM :45 PM Tuesday, November 3: 7:00 AM :45 PM Wednesday, November 4: 7:00 AM :45 PM Thursday, November 5: 7:00 AM 8:30 PM Friday, November 6: 7:00 AM 3:00 PM Knoxville Trolley In addition to the ESA Conference Shuttle, the city features a complimentary Knoxville Trolley. Find a trolley stop with the line you want displayed. When the trolley comes, look for the round sign on the front (or the electronic sign on the top-front of the newer trolleys). If it s the route you want, wave to the bus operator, hop on and relax. It s Free! You can review the trolley map and schedule on page 208. Parking Parking rates vary at each hotel. One street lot and one parking garage are available for attendees who want to park near the Knoxville Convention Center. Poplar Street Parking Lot Parking will be $6 per vehicle, per day at the Poplar Street Lot and will open each morning at 7:00 AM from Saturday, November 0 Wednesday, November 4. Rates are per entry with no in-out privileges. Directions to Poplar St. Parking Lot Via I-40E: Exit 388/Henley St. Pass Clinch intersection Turn right onto Cumberland Ave. (KCC on right) Turn left at traffic light (Poplar St.) Parking lot is on right Via I-40W: Exit 388A/James White Parkway Summit Hill Exit, right onto Summit Hill Dr. Summit Hill Dr. to Henley St./Broadway Turn left onto Henley St. 6

9 General About Information Knoxville General About Information Knoxville Pass Clinch intersection Turn right onto Cumberland Ave. (KCC on right) Turn left at traffic light (Poplar St.) Parking lot is on right Locust Street Parking Garage Parking is free at the city-owned Locust St. garage after 6 PM on weekdays and throughout the weekend except for specific special events including the UT football game on Saturday when the rate will be much higher. During the week, the Locust Street garage is $/hour. Directions to Locust St. Parking Garage Eastbound on I-40: Take Exit 388A onto 44 South (Henley St.). Get in the left hand lane and make a left turn onto Clinch Ave. Go thru traffic light at Locust/ Clinch intersection. Make a left turn at the 4-way stop onto Walnut Ave. The Locust St. Parking Garage entrance is on the left. Walk across pedestrian bridge to the convention center at the corner of Henley and Clinch Ave. Westbound on I-40: Take Exit 387. Turn right onto Western Ave. At the third traffic light, turn right onto Henley St. Get in the left hand lane and make a left turn onto Clinch Ave. Go thru traffic light at Locust/Clinch intersection. Make a left turn at the 4-way stop onto Walnut Ave. The Locust St. Parking Garage entrance is on the left. Walk across pedestrian bridge to the convention center at the corner of Henley and Clinch Ave. Southbound on I-275: At the I-275/I-40 interchange, bear right onto 44 South (Henley St.). Get in the left hand lane and make a left turn onto Clinch Ave. Go thru traffic light at Locust/Clinch intersection. Make a left turn at the 4-way stop onto Walnut Ave. The Locust St. Parking Garage entrance is on the Left. Walk across pedestrian bridge to the convention center at the corner of Henley and Clinch Ave. Northbound (from airport): Take 29 North. Exit Cumberland Ave. Turn right and travel to Henley St. The convention center is on the left at the corner of Henley St. and Cumberland Ave. Continue past the convention center and make a right turn onto Clinch Ave. Go thru traffic light at Locust/Clinch intersection. Make a left turn at the 4-way stop onto Walnut Ave. The Locust St. Parking Garage entrance is on the left. Walk across pedestrian bridge to the convention center. Hotels Downtown Knoxville Holiday Inn Downtown Knoxville 525 Henley Street Knoxville, TN Phone: (865) Hilton Knoxville 50 West Church Ave. Knoxville, TN Phone: (865) Four Points by Sheraton Knoxville 09 White Ave. Knoxville, TN 3796 Phone: (865) Crowne Plaza Knoxville 40 W. Summit Hill Drive Knoxville, TN Phone: (865) Marriott Knoxville 50 E. Hill Ave. Knoxville, TN 3795 Phone: (865) North/Merchant Drive Best Western Knoxville Suites 537 Pratt Road Knoxville, TN 3792 Phone: (865) Clarion Inn 5634 Merchant Center Blvd. Knoxville, TN 3792 Phone: (865) Comfort Suites North 5466 Central Ave. Pike Knoxville, TN 3792 Phone: (865) Days Inn Knoxville North 5335 Central Ave. Pike Knoxville, TN 3792 Phone: (865) MainStay Suites 44 Merchant Drive Knoxville, TN 3792 Phone: (865) Red Roof Inn 5334 Central Ave. Pike Knoxville, TN 3792 Phone: (865) West Knoxville/Cedar Bluff Country Inn & Suites 937 Cross Park Drive Knoxville, TN Phone: (865) Hampton Inn 928 Executive Park Drive Knoxville, TN Phone: (865) Holiday Inn 304 N. Cedar Bluff Road Knoxville, TN Phone: (865) Entomology 202 Is Mobile! Use your smart phone to access program information, announcements and more. Stop by the Social Media Desk for details. 7

10 General Information GENERAL INFORMATION General Information ESA Registration and Information Center Registration will be held at the Knoxville Convention Center, Clinch Concourse, during the following times: Saturday, November 0, 2:00 PM 6:00 PM* Sunday, November, 7:00 AM 9:00 PM Monday, November 2, 7:00 AM 5:00 PM Tuesday, November 3, 7:00 AM 5:00 PM Wednesday, November 4, 8:00 AM 2:00 Noon Registration and Information Center phone number: (865) Attendees can pick up their registration materials at the Registration Center. ESA staff are always available here to answer your questions. *Note: Pre-registrants may pick up their Annual Meeting badge and credentials from 9:00 AM 2:00 Noon on Saturday in the Clinch Concourse of the Knoxville Convention Center. Cancellation and Refund Policy ESA will honor cancellation refunds in full for its Annual Meeting until 5:00 pm EST, October 5, 202. Partial refunds will be granted for requests submitted from October 6 9, 202 (20% service charge will apply). No refunds will be granted for cancellations received after October 9, 202. Please submit cancellation requests via to Requests can also be faxed to + (30) Information Desk The Information Desk is part of the ESA Registration Center and will be staffed the same hours as registration. Stop by and let us help you out! Phone number: (865) Business Center The Business Center is located in the Clinch Concourse on the upper level, near the main corner entrance. Copying and shipping services are available here each day from :00 AM 5:00 PM, provided by the UPS Store. Phone number: (865) Career Center The career center will be set up in Exhibit Hall A in the Knoxville Convention Center. Review current position openings and/or drop off your resumé. Operating hours are: Sunday, November, 7:30 9:30 PM Monday, November 2, 9:00 AM 6:00 PM Tuesday, November 3, 9:00 AM 6:00 PM Wednesday, November 4, 9:00 AM 2:00 PM Coat/Bag Check Attendees will be able to check their coats and bags at the Coat/ Bag Check located near the main entrance of the Convention Center near the ESA Registration Center, Clinch Concourse. ESA provides this complimentary service to you. Cyber Café sponsored by BASF If you left your laptop at home, we still have you covered! Just head to the rear of the ESA Exhibit Hall (Hall A) during regular exhibit hours where you can use the computer stations located in the Cyber Café to check your . Daily Announcements and Messages In addition to using the ENTOMOLOGY 202 mobile app, you may check last-minute announcements and messages on the bulletin board located outside the Preview Presentation Room (PPR), Convention Center, Room 30-E. ESA Central Exhibit Booth Be sure to stop by the ESA booth #209 in the center of the exhibit hall. Come rest your feet, learn about the many benefits of ESA membership, meet with colleagues and friends, learn about the certification program, and grab a small treat. Renew your membership and receive a fun gift, purchase a 203 World of Insects calendar, enter for your chance at winning a prize during the Passport Drawing, and learn more about Society programs and services. We have a special gift for the first 00 members to stop by and renew their membership or to join for 203! Be sure to be in the ESA booth on Wednesday at :00 PM for the Passport Drawing where you ll have the opportunity to win valuable prizes donated by our exhibitors, or a $00 AMEX gift card! Drop your completed passport card in the prize hopper. You must be present on Wednesday to win good luck! Stop by the ESA booth on Monday from 4-6 pm and purchase a copy of the new Handbook of Turfgrass Insects, Second Edition. Co-editor Callie Freeman will be on hand to sign the book. First Aid/Medical Emergencies If first aid services are needed while in the Convention Center, please call Please have the following information ready: () your exact location, (2) the nature of the emergency, (3) whether the patient is conscious, and (4) whether there are lifethreatening injuries, bleeding, etc. Guest Hospitality Registered guests are allowed access to the exhibit hall, Welcome Reception, Opening and Closing Plenary Sessions, the Linnaean Games, the Student Awards program, and to the presentation given by the primary registrant. For more information, please visit the ESA Registration Center. Internet Access Returning this year! ESA is offering complimentary Wi-Fi throughout the convention center including the exhibit hall, Hilton Knoxville, and Holiday Inn Downtown Knoxville. Plenty of networking tables will be positioned at various locations in the convention center including the Cyber Café, so take a break with friends, network, check your , or Skype with the family back home. Password login is not required at the Knoxville Convention Center, Hilton Knoxville, or Holiday Inn Downtown Knoxville. Lost and Found Check in with the staff at the ESA Registration Center if you have lost something or have found a treasure and need to turn it in. We ll do our best to help you! Meeting ReLeaf by American Forest American Forests, the oldest national nonprofit conservation organization in the U.S., will plant a tree in honor of every attendee of Entomology 202 in a forest restoration project in the U.S. to help offset the carbon footprint of the meeting and to enhance air and water quality, promote biodiversity, and expand animal habitat. To learn more about their programs, visit 8

11 General Information General Information ENTOMOLOGY 202 Mobile App Updated and Improved for this year! You can access the latest program information and schedules, news and announcements, create a personal schedule, link to exhibitors, connect with other attendees, and provide feedback to ESA all from your Smart Phone. The app is available via the iphone App Store or the Android Market as a mobile app. Visit to view the mobile website. The app is fully integrated with the Confex abstract management system so you have the latest information at your fingertips, as well as the personal scheduler you created online! In addition to the online schedule, you can use the QR Code feature to learn more about a poster or presentation or get walking directions! The app will be available two weeks before the meeting and two weeks afterward. The ENOTOMOLOGY 202 mobile application is made possible through support from Taylor & Francis. Mother s Room This year at ENTOMOLOGY 202 ESA is offering a comfortable private place for nursing mothers the Green Room at the Knoxville Convention Center, near the lecture hall. Please stop by the ESA Registration Desk to pick up a key to the room. No Photographs Please ESA requests that attendees not take photographs or videos during sessions because they are disruptive to the presenters. If you wish to take photographs of a poster, please contact the poster presenter for permission. ESA reserves the right to use photographs and videos taken during the ENTOMOLOGY 202 meeting for informational and promotional purposes. Press The ESA Information Booth, located in the ESA Registration area (Convention Center, Clinch Concourse), serves as the press desk for the meeting. Reporters and other members of the media must register at the Information Booth. Proper media credentials must be presented upon arrival at ENTOMOLOGY 202, and the credentials must show a direct affiliation with an accredited news organization (print, TV, or radio) or membership with the National Association of Science Writers. Public Information Officers from universities also may receive press passes with proper credentials and ID. Freelance journalists who do not have media credentials and a professional affiliation will probably not receive press passes, but exceptions may be made on a case-by-case basis. Interviews can be arranged by calling + (30) Please refer to the ESA press policy at index.htm. Companies or organizations producing publications, videos, and/or other electronic media intended for marketing, advertising, financial analysis, or public relations purposes may not register as members of the media. ESA reserves the right to bar from this and future meetings any registered media personnel who, at the determination of the Executive Director of the ESA, misuse media privileges to engage in activities other than journalistic pursuits. No member of the media will be permitted to record symposia, lectures, meetings, or other events without prior written permission from the ESA; and no film or videotape may be broadcast or rebroadcast without prior review and written permission from the ESA. The press contact for the ESA Annual Meeting is Richard Levine, + (30) Refreshments and Concessions Hungry or thirsty? Need that morning cup of coffee? SAVOR Knoxville, the official caterer at the Knoxville Convention Center, will be there for you. For those early morning sessions, stop by the concession cart in the Clinch Concourse Sunday through Wednesday for a quick cup of coffee, juice, Danish, and more. Concessions will be available throughout the day, including for the Lunch-and- Learn sessions in the Exhibit Hall and at locations throughout the convention center. Social Media at ENTOMOLOGY 202 Get connected to ENTOMOLOGY 202 before you arrive in Knoxville. ESA is connected to you via social media in a variety of ways. Twitter: ESA staff and volunteers will be using Twitter for live updates, highlights from sessions, and more. You can follow us by visiting Twitter users can just login and click follow. View conversations about ENTOMOLOGY 202 on Twitter by using the hashtag, #entomology202. If you don t have a Twitter account, you can still view our updates and even bookmark the ESA Twitter webpage. LinkedIn and Facebook: ESA is on LinkedIn (link: and Facebook (link: Join our groups to connect to colleagues, friends, and new contacts in advance of the conference and start making plans for Knoxville! YouTube: View videos from previous conferences on our YouTube Channel (link: View the ENTOMOLOGY 202 videos as they are posted! Or hear the highlights planned for this year s conference! Smoking Policy Smoking is not allowed in any of the public meeting space at the Knoxville Convention Center. Check with the front desk of your hotel about the smoking policy in guest rooms. Tours All tours are held rain or shine and require a minimum number of participants. Please stop by the ESA Registration and Information Center to check tour availability. Tour buses leave from the Clinch Concourse outside the main entrance of the convention center, facing the Holiday Inn Downtown Knoxville. Please arrive a few minutes early to board the bus and have your tour ticket(s) with you. University of Tennessee Volunteers vs. University of Missouri Tigers Date: Saturday, November 0 Time: TBD by the University Fee: $85.00 per person for tailgate and game ticket $47.50 for tailgate only $37.50 for game ticket The University of Missouri s Mizzou Tigers have just joined the Southeastern Conference and will face the Tennessee Volunteers for the first time in program history! ESA wants to help you be a part of this historical moment at Neyland Stadium. Join us for a pregame tailgate at the convention center featuring traditional southern BBQ and local Tennessee mountain music. Before the start of the game, ESA attendees will walk to the stadium together and sit in a group area. A limited number of game tickets are available. University of Tennessee Forensic Anthropology Center Dates: Tuesday, November 3, and Wednesday, November 4 Time: 8:30 0:30 AM and 0:00 AM 2:00 Noon Fee: $45 per person 9

12 Program Information Program Information The University of Tennessee Anthropological Research Facility (the Body Farm ), part of the Forensic Anthropology Center, is the first of its kind to permit systematic study of human decomposition. For more than three decades, the Forensic Anthropology Center has garnered an international reputation for research on human decomposition and modern human variation. The Body Farm, an outdoor field laboratory founded by Dr. William Bass, enables the investigation of parameters that are crucial in-time-since-death estimates. This facility also is used to train the medico medical legal community and law enforcement officers in recovery of human remains. The forensic anthropology center s body donation program enables the educational and research activities that have contributed to a better understanding of insects as forensic tools. A limited number of ENTOMOLOGY 202 attendees will have the unique opportunity to tour this facility and get a behind-the-scenes overview of the Body Farm and learn about its role in advancing forensic anthropology. Discover Life in America s Field Trip to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park Science and Education Center Date: Thursday, November 5 Time: 8:30 AM 5:30 PM Fee: $60 per person This day-long tour includes a visit to the Twin Creeks Science and Education Center in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, a presentation on the Smokies All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory (ATBI) by Discover Life in America, lunch, and a hike into the park for capture-and-release of insects! The Science and Education Center is the new home of the ATBI project, a decade-long project to document the estimated 00,000 species of living organisms in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Lunch will be provided. University Entomology Clubs Club representatives will be available to sell T-shirts and more in ESA s Exhibit Hall (Hall A) during normal exhibit hall hours. As of August, the list of clubs participating includes: Auburn University, F. S. Arant Entomology Club Kansas State University, Popenoe Entomology Club Louisiana State University, Entomology Club Michigan State University, Graduate and Undergraduate Entomology Student Society North Carolina State University, Entomology Graduate Student Association (EGSA) Rutgers University, Entomology Club Rutgers University, Graduate Entomology Student Association The Ohio State University, Entomology Graduate Student Association University of California Berkeley, Entomology Student Organization University of California Davis, Entomology Graduate Students Association University of California Riverside, Entomology Graduate Student Association University of Florida, Entomology and Nematology Graduate Student Organization University of Idaho, Aldrich Entomology Club University of Illinois, Entomology Graduate Student Association (EGSA) University of Kentucky, H. Garman Entomology Club University of Nebraska, Lincoln s Bruner Entomology Club University of Maryland, College Park, Entomology Student Organization University of Wisconsin Madison, Entomology Graduate Student Association (EGSA) Virginia-Tech, W. B. Alwood Entomological Society YouTube Videographers Student volunteers will be shooting video throughout the meeting to upload to the ESA Channel on YouTube. Videographers also will be interviewing presenters and others during the meeting. You could be on ESA s YouTube channel! 0 PROGRAM INFORMATION Uploading Presentations U pload your presentation at least 24-hours before your presentation. It is always a good idea to bring a backup copy of your presentation on a flash drive. PPR Room (Knoxville Convention Center, Room 30-E) operating hours are: Saturday, November 0, 2:00 8:00 PM Sunday, November, 6:30 AM 6:00 PM Monday, November 2, 6:30 AM 6:00 PM Tuesday, November 3, 6:30 AM 6:00 PM Wednesday, November 4, 6:30 AM 4:00 PM PPR Room phone number: (865) Moderator Training Moderators for symposia, student competition sessions, and 0-minute paper sessions must attend one of the moderator training sessions. Here you will receive details on equipment operation, light controls, and other responsibilities. The audio visual and Confex representatives will be available to answer your questions. Moderators must keep the program on schedule and not move up talks if one is withdrawn. All moderator training sessions will be held in Room 30-D at the Knoxville Convention Center. The dates and times for the training sessions are: Sunday, November, 7:00 7:30 AM or 2:00 Noon 2:30 PM Monday, November 2, 7:00 7:30 AM or 2:00 Noon 2:30 PM Tuesday, November 3, 7:00 7:30 AM or 2:00 Noon 2:30 PM Wednesday, November 4, 7:00 7:30 AM Judges Training Judges for the student competitions must attend one of the judges training sessions. Here you will receive details regarding the judging process and criteria. All judges trainings will be held in Room 30-C at the Knoxville Convention Center. The dates and times for the training sessions are: Sunday, November, 4:45 5:5 PM Monday, November 2, 7:00 7:30 AM Lunch-and-Learn Sessions Once again you have a great opportunity to get together with friends and colleagues after the morning sessions, have lunch together, and learn something new all at the same time. Catering will be available near the Lunch-and-Learn meeting rooms, so you can quickly purchase your lunch and enjoy it during the presentation. There will be five Lunch and-learn sessions this year: How to Navigate the Annual Meeting and How to Get the Most Out of ESA Sunday, November, 2:5 :5 PM Lecture Hall, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center With so much taking place in just four days, ESA s Annual Meeting can be overwhelming for even the most seasoned attendee. So take an hour while you eat lunch to become familiar with highlights of the meeting, learn how to get around the convention center and downtown Knoxville, and get tips from a local entomologist on where to eat and what to see (along with discounted coupons!). You ll leave this session much more informed and ready to tackle the week head-on. Presenters: Jerome Grant, University of Tennessee, Joy L. Newton, University of Nevada, Debi Sutton, Entomological Society of America, and Kelli Gibson, Visit Knoxville

13 Program Information Program Information Interviewing Techniques Monday, November 2, 2:45 :45 PM Ballroom B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center You got the call. You got the interview. Now learn how to market yourself and land the perfect position! The best advice is to be prepared. This session will help you plan for the interview and set yourself above the competition. Presenter: Dr. Scott Hutchins, BCE, Dow AgroSciences Sonny Ramaswamy and colleagues from the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) Tuesday, November 3, 2:5 :5 PM Ballroom B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Bring your lunch and join your fellow entomologist, Sonny Ramaswamy, the new director of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, in a conversation about grant opportunities at NIFA. Presenter: Dr. Sonny Ramaswamy, Director, National Institute of Food and Agriculture Special Session: Student Session with Sonny Ramaswamy and Colleagues from NIFA Tuesday, November 3, 2:30 4:00 PM Students should plan to join your fellow entomologist, Sonny Ramaswamy, the new director of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, in a conversation about grant opportunities at NIFA. Presenter: Dr. Sonny Ramaswamy, Director, National Institute of Food and Agriculture Hands-On Photography Demonstration Tuesday, November 3, 2:5 :5 PM Ballroom A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Continuing with the theme of the symposium about insect macrophotography, you will have the chance to greet, meet, and talk to these awesome photogs and chat one on one and in groups about your queries, interests and about how to click the next best insect photograph with the best equipment which is just what you have. Be there to make sure that your next sighting of a pretty insect is documented into a joy forever! Presenter: Cheri Abraham, University of Georgia and Ric Bessin, University of Kentucky Politics and Science: How Congress and the President Impact Your Work (and what you can do about it) Tuesday, November 4, 2:5 :5 PM Ballroom B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center National politics and policy priorities influence the conduct of science (e.g., funding for research), and how or whether scientific information is used to inform policy decisions. Scientists can and should play a role in ensuring that lawmakers understand the ramifications of their decisions on science and society. To do this, scientists need to know how, who, when, and where to communicate with lawmakers. This program will provide information about key national players influencing science policy and will consider the potential ramifications of the November elections. Presenter: Robert Gropp, Director of Public Policy, American Institute of Biological Sciences Opening Plenary Session Sunday, November, 5:30 7:30 PM Exhibit Hall B, Knoxville Convention Center Call to Order, Welcome, Introductions, Remembrance Grayson C. Brown, President State of the Society/Presidential Address Grayson C. Brown, President ESA Executive Director s Report C. David Gammel, CAE, Executive Director Entomological Foundation Report Tom Green, Entomological Foundation President ESA Professional Awards Program Grayson C. Brown, President, and Rob Wiedenmann, Vice-President Insect Photo Salon Winners James Appleby, University of Illinois Annual Founders Memorial Lecture Dr. Gene Kritsky, editor-in-chief of ESA s American Entomologist and a professor of biology at Cincinnati s College of Mount St. Joseph, will deliver the Founders Memorial Award lecture and honor Charles Darwin. Although not often remembered as an entomologist, Darwin published numerous articles on insects, used entomological examples to support his theories of species origin and sexual selection; and he made countless references to insects in his books. His fascination with insects began in his youth and continued throughout his lifetime. Dr. Kritsky has published on Darwin for 35 years, including working closely with members of the Darwin family. He curated the exhibit Charles Darwin: A Portrait Biography, which has been on tour in the United States and England for the past 27 years. His work on Darwin has received international attention, with articles appearing in Scientific American, Discover, The New York Times, and Der Spiegel. Dr. Kritsky will discuss Charles Darwin s work and how it affects entomologists today. Closing Remarks Grayson C. Brown, President Adjourn to Welcome Reception, Exhibit Hall A, Knoxville Convention Center Closing Plenary Session with Old Masters Linnaean Games Wednesday, November 4, 5:30 7:30 PM Exhibit Hall B, Knoxville Convention Center Join President Brown as he thanks those who have made ENTO- MOLOGY 202 a success; those who have served their Branches and Sections throughout the year; and Governing Board members and other Society leaders for their valuable service to ESA. He ll then pass the gavel to Vice President Dr. Rob Wiedenmann who will announce his theme and thoughts for ENTOMOLOGY 203. Then stay in your seat for the fun-filled All Stars Linnaean Games featuring the 202 winners versus the Old Masters. Make sure your name is in the prize drum for a chance to win a free registration to ENTOMOL- OGY 203 in Austin, Texas. You must be present to win! Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) Training Sunday, November, 0:00 AM 2:30 PM Ballroom A, Knoxville Convention Center Why RCR Training? Section 7009 of the 2007 America Creating Opportunities to Meaningfully Promote Excellence in Technology, Education, and Science (COMPETES) Act (42 U.S.C. 862o-) requires that each institution that applies for financial assistance from the National Science Foundation [NSF] for science and engineering research or education describe in its grant proposal a plan to provide appropriate training and oversight in the responsible and ethical conduct of research to undergraduate students, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers participating in the proposed research project ( Furthermore, RCR is critical for excellence, as well

14 Program Information Program Information as public trust, in science and engineering. Consequently, education in RCR is considered essential in the preparation of future scientists and engineers. Who, Me? RCR training is required by NSF ( policy/rcr.jsp) for all postdoctoral researchers, graduate students, technicians, and undergraduate students who are supported on an NSF grant that was submitted on or after 4 January 200. Appropriate and on-going oversight by the Principal Investigator is also essential. ESA Policy Ethical and responsible conduct of research is such an important element of preparation for a professional career in science that ESA recommends that all students take RCR training, even if not currently supported by a grant. ESA RCR Training Topics: Data Management Conflict-of-Interest Protection of Human Subjects Animal Welfare Research Misconduct Publication and Authorship Mentor Trainee Responsibilities Peer Review Collaborative Science Intellectual Property Plagiarism Scientists as Responsible Members of Society Environmental and Societal Impacts of Scientific Research A certificate of completion will be issued to each student who finishes the training. Important: Students must check with their universities to ensure that ESA RCR Training will be accepted as meeting the requirements of that university. Preregistration is required via the ENTOMOLOGY 202 registration site, space is limited. Please stop by the ESA Registration and Information Center to check onsite availability. Insect Photo Salon Sunday, November, 2:00 3:00 PM Tuesday, November 3, 8:00 9:00 PM Cumberland, Holiday Inn Downtown Knoxville Some of the most beautiful insect photos will be presented twice this year in the Insect Photo Salon. Plan on joining the Photographic Society of America and fellow ESA members and guests for the Insect Photo Salon. You ll witness a terrific show of insects, spiders, and other arthropods. Under The Lens: The Science of Urban Pest Management Wednesday, November 4, Salon C, Hilton Knoxville. A new training offered by ESA for pest management professionals, this day will be full of educational sessions on emergent topics such as Invasive Urban Pests, Impacts of Recent Label Changes, New Developments in Bed Bug Management, and Entomology 0. The course will be eligible for CEUs for PMPs in the states of Tennessee, Kentucky, Alabama, Mississippi, and Virginia. We are also seeking CEU approval in other states in the region. Consult the ESA website for a list of states where the course was approved for CEUs ( Register online or stop by the ESA registration booth. Associate Certified Entomologist (ACE) Prep Course and Exam Prep Course, November 5, 8:00 AM 5:00 PM, Hilton Knoxville, Salon D ACE Exam, November 5 and 6, 9:00 AM 2:00 PM, Holiday Inn Downtown Knoxville, Cumberland Ballroom Associate Certified Entomologist certification through ESA can help pest management professionals gain higher recognition in the field, personal satisfaction, and greater career opportunities. If you have thought about becoming ACE certified, this is your chance! On Thursday, November 5 attend the ACE Prep Course. Speakers will review material that is likely similar to what is covered on the ACE exam and get you in the best frame of mind to be a successful ACE candidate. Then on Thursday and Friday mornings (9:00 AM 2:00 PM), ESA will host a proctored ACE exam. Successful candidates can have their new ACE materials printed immediately. BCE applicants may also use this proctored setting to sit for their exam(s). There are significant discounts for adding this course on to your ESA meeting registration. Pick up an application at the ESA registration booth, or download one from online at Poster Presentations Printed Posters The Program Committee has scheduled three sessions of poster presentations for the Annual Meeting. Posters are numbered sequentially in the Program Book and where possible, grouped according to ESA Section and subject matter. Authors must display their posters on the board bearing the same number as that indicated in the Program Book for each poster. Poster Size: Each poster must be contained within the inch (7 7 cm) space provided. Two posters will be displayed on each side of a single board (four posters per board). The poster must NOT exceed the size limit. Please be considerate of the person with whom you are sharing a display space. Set Up: Your poster must be placed in the assigned space in the exhibit hall the night before your poster is scheduled, i.e., Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday between 7:30 and 9:30 PM. Bring your own Velcro strips (push pins are not allowed in the exhibit hall) to secure your display to the poster board. The poster board is covered with felt cloth, and the frame is aluminum. Please do not attach anything to the metal frame. Poster Presentation Times: Because the Exhibit Hall becomes quite congested during midday presentation hours, presenters of posters with odd and even numbers are assigned specific times to be present at their posters. Attach a card to your poster listing additional times that you will be present. Authors of all Monday posters are scheduled to be available early in the day to avoid conflicts with the Section meetings in the afternoon. Presenters are expected to be available at their displays during the Presenters Present time slot for questions and discussion. Poster Removal: Posters should be removed promptly between 6:00 and 7:00 PM on Monday and Tuesday, and between 2:00 and 3:00 PM on Wednesday. Do not remove poster numbers when removing posters from boards. Student Competition authors should not remove the student competition cards when removing posters. Monday Posters: Set up: Sunday, 7:30 9:30 PM Viewing: Monday, 8:00 AM 6:00 PM Authors Present: 2

15 Program Information Program Information Posters with odd numbers: :00 :45 AM Posters with even numbers: :45 AM 2:30 PM Take down: Monday, 6:00 7:00 PM Tuesday Posters: Set up: Monday, 7:30 9:30 PM Viewing: Tuesday, 8:00 AM 6:00 PM Authors Present: Posters with odd numbers: 9:00 0:00 AM Posters with even numbers: 0:00 :00 AM Take down: Tuesday, 6:00 7:00 PM Wednesday Posters: Set up: Tuesday, 7:30 9:30 PM Viewing: Wednesday, 8:00 AM 2:00 PM Authors Present: Posters with odd numbers: 9:00 0:00 AM Posters with even numbers: 0:00 :00 AM Take down: Wednesday, 2:00 3:00 PM Virtual Posters The number of Virtual Posters is growing each year! These electronic posters provide a unique opportunity to view the research of entomologists from outside of the United States who cannot attend the ESA Annual Meeting in person. Virtual posters are presented electronically via Skype, and there will be opportunities for you to interact online with the presenters during prescheduled times. You can view the Virtual Posters from special computers located near the Presentation Preview Room in the Knoxville Convention Center, Floor Three (next to Room 30-E on the Henley Concourse). In addition, virtual poster viewing will be available in Knoxville Convention Center Room 30-E beginning at 2:00 PM, Tuesday, November 3, and all day Wednesday, November 4. See page and 7 for a complete listing of Virtual Posters. SOCIAL ACTIVITIES & MIXERS New Member Meet and Greet Sunday, November, 4:30 5:5 PM Ballroom A, Knoxville Convention Center If you are a new ESA member this year, pick up your new member ribbon at the registration desk and join us at the New Member Meet and Greet Ice Cream Sundae Reception. Mingle with other new members, ESA leaders, and staff. Learn about the benefits of ESA membership and important details about the ENTOMOLOGY 202 Annual Meeting. New members should have received a special invitation to the reception in the mail bring it and exchange it for a special ESA welcome gift! ENTOMOLOGY 202 Welcome Reception Sunday, November, 7:30 9:30 PM Exhibit Hall A, Knoxville Convention Center You are cordially invited to attend the Welcome Reception on Sunday evening in ESA s Exhibit Hall (Exhibit Hall A) immediately following the Opening Plenary Session (Exhibit Hall B). This is a great opportunity to have time with the exhibitors and colleagues and learn about the latest resources and tools available to entomologists. Grab some light refreshments and a drink, network with friends, and check out the displays. What a way to kick off ENTOMOLOGY 202 in Knoxville! Social Events See the complete schedule of social functions on page Everyone has the opportunity to network at numerous receptions throughout the week. Monday night is the traditional time for receptions with no scientific sessions scheduled for the evening. STUDENT ACTIVITIES Linnaean Games Preliminary Round: Sunday, November, 2:00 5:00 PM Exhibit Hall B, Knoxville Convention Center Final Round: Tuesday, November 3, 5:30 7:30 PM Exhibit Hall B, Knoxville Convention Center, followed immediately by the Student Awards Session and Student Reception. Be sure to check out the Linnaean Games, a College Bowl -type competition that is one of the more spirited sessions of our annual meetings. Stop in and cheer on your favorite team! Winners and runners-up will be recognized at the Student Awards Session immediately following the Linnaean Games Finals on Tuesday evening. Student Competition for the President s Prize Monday, November 2, 8:00 AM 2:30 PM Knoxville Convention Center and Holiday Inn Downtown Knoxville, various locations To support ESA s student members and encourage them to become more involved in the world of entomology, Monday morning is dedicated to student paper competition. There are 26 sessions containing graduate and undergraduate student oral presentations, 9 sessions of student posters and one virtual poster session a new competition this year. Stop by and show your support for ESA s students! This year first place winners will receive a $75 cash award and second place will receive a $50 cash award. ESA would like to thank Monsanto for their sponsorship of the Student Competition for the President s Prize. Student Debate Tuesday, November 3, :30 4:30 PM Lecture Hall, Knoxville Convention Center The 202 Student Debate Topic is Student s Perspectives on Scientific Tools to Solve Global Issues. Student teams chose what they think is the best scientific solution to the major global issues of feeding the world s growing population, solving the threat of global warming, and meeting the energy demands of the world. The solutions to these problems are complex and how to solve them is highly contested in the political realm. Attend the debate to see what the student teams think will be the best solutions and learn about some of the strategies already being investigated by science. Student Awards Tuesday, November 3, 7:30 8:30 PM Exhibit Hall B, Knoxville Convention Center, Floor One The winners of the President s Prize, Entomological Foundation awards, Entomological Society of America student awards, as well as Linnaean Game winners and second place teams will be recognized. Student Reception Tuesday, November 3, 8:30 :30 PM Park Concourse/Plaza Terrace, Knoxville Convention Center All students are invited to a fun-filled Student Reception. The evening s festivities will include plenty of music, dancing, games, prizes, food, and beverages. This is a fantastic opportunity to see old friends and to meet new ones. Join us for a great time celebrating entomology! ESA thanks BASF and Monsanto for their sponsorship of this reception. 3

16 Program Information Program Information Student Volunteers All volunteers should report to their designated assignments 30 minutes before the start of their shift. All needed materials will be provided by ESA. All proof-of-attendance forms should be turned in to your supervisor at the completion of your shift. If you cannot make it to your assignment or you need additional information, please visit the ESA Registration and Information Center. AWARDS & HONORS All award recipients are profiled in the Awards Program brochure, which will be distributed at the Sunday evenings Opening Plenary Session. Honorary Membership Dr. Elizabeth F. Beckemeyer, Dr. Steve Clement, and Dr. Victoria Y. Yokoyama have been elected as Honorary Members this year. The purpose of Honorary Membership is to acknowledge those who have served the ESA for at least 20 years through significant involvement in the affairs of the Society that has reached an extraordinary level. The newly elected Honorary Members will be honored at the ESA Plenary, Founders Memorial Lecture Awards Session, Sunday, November, 202, 5:30 PM 7:30 PM, Exhibit Hall B, Knoxville Convention Center. Fellows of the ESA The designation of ESA Fellow recognizes individuals who have made outstanding contributions to entomology. The 202 Fellows will be honored at the Opening Plenary Session, Sunday, November, 5:30 7:30 PM, Exhibit Hall B, Knoxville Convention Center. The 202 ESA Fellows are: Dr. Christian Borgemeister Dr. Henry H. Hagedorn Dr. Joseph G. Morse Dr. Robert E. Page, Jr. Dr. Kenneth F. Raffa Dr. Hugh M. Robertson Dr. Richard M. Roe Dr. Thomas C. Sparks Dr. Michael R. Strand Dr. Walter R. Tschinkel Founders Memorial Award Dr. Gene Kritsky, editor-in-chief of ESA s American Entomologist and a professor of biology at the College of Mount St. Joseph, Cincinnati, will deliver the Founders Memorial Award lecture. This year s honoree is Charles Darwin ( ), whose theory of evolution by natural selection helped to transform entomology from a hobby for collectors to a science. Dr. Gene Kritsky is the author of more than 25 peer-reviewed papers and six books, and he is the lead scientist on five traveling museum exhibits. Dr. Kritsky received his B.A. degree in biology in 974 from Indiana University; he received his M.S. degree and Ph.D. in 976 and 977, respectively, in entomology from the University of Illinois. His research has made significant contributions to the understanding of the history and evolution of periodical cicadas, the history of entomology, and apiculture. Dr. Kritsky has worked on periodical cicadas for 35 years and is the author of Periodical Cicadas: the Plague and the Puzzle. His prediction in 2000 of a four-year acceleration of Brood X proved true. That research permitted a detailed survey of off-year accelerations, which verified that such accelerations can result in populations that survive intense predation and are able to sing, mate, and reproduce. With the emergence of these cicadas in 207, Dr. Kritsky will have documented the origin of a new brood in Ohio. His other 4 findings include the verification of the plasticity of nymphal cicada growth, the discovery of a 3-year brood in northern Kentucky and southwestern Ohio, and the development of a model to predict when in May a brood should emerge; this model makes it possible for arboreta, parks, and cemeteries to schedule events accordingly. Finally, Dr. Kritsky, collaborating with Dr. George Poinar, Jr., codescribed the oldest definitive fossil cicada nymph. Dr. Kritsky s apicultural contributions focus on the history of beekeeping. He was a contributor to the American Bee Journal, and his most recent book, The Quest for the Perfect Hive, challenges the beekeeping industry to reexamine hive designs and practices for innovations that could help deal with the many problems facing beekeeping today. The critically successful book was selected by Seed Magazine as a February 200 book to read now. The Capital Area Beekeepers Association review read, This is one of those books that will become a classic of beekeeping literature for its content, design, illustrations, and pure quality of the writing. No beekeeper should be without it. More recently, Dr. Kritsky completed a major review of beekeeping in ancient Egypt. This research started when he was a Fulbright scholar to Egypt during and continued with recent travels to Egypt and Europe. Dr. Kritsky also learned how to translate hieroglyphs to better interpret Egyptian reliefs, leading to a better understanding of how beekeeping was performed more than 4,500 years ago. He also corrected earlier reconstructions of beekeeping scenes from two tombs. In addition to bees, Dr. Kritsky examined all the insects that played a role in Egyptian mythology, developing new explanations for their mythological importance. The quality of this work is documented by its inclusion as a reference in the Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt. As a teacher, Dr. Kritsky has designed entomology courses at three institutions and is coauthor of an entomology textbook for undergraduate biology students. He has published more than 25 papers with undergraduate student coauthors, and this has encouraged several students to seek advanced entomology degrees. In 985, Dr. Kritsky received the College of Mount St. Joseph s highest teaching award, and in 999, he received the College s Alumni Appreciation Award. His efforts to promote science education through the National Association of Academies of Science were responsible for his election as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Kritsky s teaching is not limited to the classroom setting. He has served as a consultant for several television programs, including Sir David Attenborough s Life in the Undergrowth and Supersense. He has appeared on several news programs, including the CBS Evening News, ABC Evening News, The Today Show, Good Morning America, A&E s Biography, and CBS Sunday Morning. In 2004, he was America Online s cicada expert for the Brood X emergence, and his cicada Web site received more than 7 million hits. He also served as the lead scientist for the Cincinnati Museum s Center s traveling exhibits The Weakening Web, In the Dark, and Beakman s World. Kritsky has published on Darwin for 35 years, and he has worked closely with members of the Darwin family on a number of projects. During , he spent his sabbatical at Cambridge University working with the Darwin Correspondence Project to transcribe Darwin s research notes for The Descent of Man, a publication with numerous insect references. This project led to his appointment as a contributing editor of the American Museum of Natural History s Darwin manuscripts project; Dr. Kritsky s Descent transcription has been published online by AMNH. In 2008, he published a review of the 9th-century entomological reaction to Darwin s Origin of Species in the Annual Review of Entomology. Dr. Kritsky s work on Darwin has received international attention with features appearing in Scientific American, Discover, The New York Times, and Der Spiegel. His ESA publication on Darwin s Madagascan hawk moth was selected by several organizations as one of the top zoology news stories of 993. Dr. Kritsky curated the exhibit Charles

17 Program Information Program Information Darwin: a Portrait Biography in 985; it has been on exhibit for the past 27 years, including at the ESA meeting in Dallas and the AAAS meeting in Los Angeles. It was exhibited for extended periods at more than 20 museums, including the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard University, the Cincinnati Museum of Natural History, the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, and in Darwin s bedroom at Down House. It is currently on extended loan to the University of Nebraska State Museum. In 2009, Dr. Kritsky curated the exhibit Darwin s Revolution for the Cincinnati Museum of Natural History as part of the celebration of the bicentennial of Darwin s birth. Charles Darwin Although some may not think of Darwin as an entomologist, in fact, he published numerous articles on insects, used entomological examples to support his theories of species origin and sexual selection, and made countless references to insects in his books. Fifty years ago, the Annual Review of Entomology featured an article on Darwin s contributions to entomology, in which the authors noted that the Origin of Species contains about 50 references to insects, including Darwin s own observations on the similarity of British and Brazilian fresh water insects, the importance of insects as pollinators (a topic he later expounded on in his book, On the Various Contrivances by which British and Foreign Orchids are Fertilised by Insects), and the evolution of cellmaking in honey bees, among other topics. The authors asserted that, Darwin s direct contributions to entomology during his lifetime were outstanding, and added that his theory of evolution has had a profound impact on the direction of entomological research. Darwin drew on insects extensively for The Descent of Man and cited 85 entomologists whose work encompassed the globe. In Insectivorous Plants, he discussed the types of insects captured by the various plants. Darwin also advanced research in the discipline by reviewing favorably and encouraging the work of his entomological colleagues H. W. Bates, Alfred Russel Wallace, and John Lubbock. A list of publications resulting from the insects Darwin collected, including those from his five-year voyage aboard the HMS Beagle, is available online. Darwin s interest in insects began when he was 0-years old and noticed the insects along the English coast. By the time he entered Christ College in Cambridge, he was an avid collector, hiring young boys to procure specimens for his collection. He had a special cabinet built to house his beetle collection and provided new county records for James Francis Stephen s Illustrations of British Insects. He maintained a friendly but fierce competition for insect collecting with his cousin, and collected with the Rev. Frederick William Hope, who established the entomology professorship at the University of Oxford. Darwin was a charter member of the Entomological Society of London (later the Royal Entomological Society) and was an honorary member of the Entomological Society of France. He had direct contact (correspondence and/or personal meetings) with previous ESA Founders honorees C. V. Riley, J. H. Comstock, and B. D. Walsh. Darwin continued this avid interest in collecting while traveling around the world on the HMS Beagle. It was during this time that Professor Hope wrote to Darwin that he had been named a charter member of the newly formed Entomological Society of London. Upon reading this, Darwin informed his cousin, I look at the Orange Cross [the society s crest] as the emblem of Entomological Knighthood. Upon his return to England, Darwin began to use insects as evidence for his research on species. To verify his assumptions, Darwin wrote to entomologists all over the world with questions about species diversity, honey bee comb construction, insect plant associations, and insect sexual dimorphism. With the publication of his On the Origin of Species in 859, he included numerous insect examples to support his views on ecological relationships, instincts, and speciation. This work inspired entomologists like no other work before or since. Henry Bates used it to develop his theory on mimicry. Benjamin Walsh, the Founders Memorial Award honoree for 987, was a classmate of Darwin s, and was inspired to apply Darwin s work to his own research. Walsh became one of Darwin s strongest allies in the 860s and his greatest American proponent, challenging Louis Agassiz at every opportunity. Darwin s impact on entomology in the United States grew during the 860s. Charles V. Riley, the second ESA Founders Memorial Award honoree (honored in 959), visited Darwin at his home outside London. Riley peppered his annual reports with numerous observations that supported Darwin s views. The third Founders Memorial Award honoree, John H. Comstock (honored in 960), corresponded with Darwin and also sent Darwin his cotton report. Darwin corresponded with many of the early American entomologists, including Alpheus Packard and Samuel Scudder, inviting the latter to visit him in England. Darwin s influence on many of the later Founders Memorial Award honorees can be seen in their writings. Vernon Kellogg (honored in 973) and Herbert H. Ross (honored in 98) wrote textbooks on evolutionary biology. Robert E. Snodgrass (honored in 969) and T. D. A. Cockerell (honored in 978) applied evolution to their work on insect morphology and paleoentomology, respectively. Darwin s entomology was not limited to On the Origin of Species. His book On the Various Contrivances by which British and Foreign Orchids are Fertilised by Insects documented insect plant coevolution, and The Descent of Man included two chapters about sexual dimorphism in insects. For Darwin, entomology was a global science, and American entomologists are still feeling his impact today. ESA Professional Awards The 202 ESA professional awards will be presented at the Opening Plenary Session, Sunday, November, 5:30 PM 7:30 PM, Exhibit Hall B, Knoxville Convention Center. The following ESA award winners will be honored: Dr. John A. Byers, Nan-Yao Su Award for Innovation and Creativity in Entomology Dr. Loganathan Ponnusamy, Early Career Innovation Award (sponsored by BASF) Dr. Donald A. Rutz, Distinguished Achievement Award in Extension Dr. Kevin M. Heinz, Distinguished Achievement Award in Horticultural Entomology (sponsored by Gowan Company) Dr. Florence V. Dunkel, Distinguished Achievement Award in Teaching Ms. Judith B. Black, Distinguished Service Award to the Certification Program Dr. Franklin H. Arthur, Recognition Award in Entomology (sponsored by Syngenta Crop Protection, Inc.) Dr. Jeffrey G. Scott, Recognition Award in Insect Physiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology (sponsored by Apex Bait Technologies, Inc.) ESA Student Awards The winners of the President s Prize, Entomological Foundation awards, Entomological Society of America student awards, as well as Linnaean Game winners and second-place teams will be recognized Tuesday, November 3, 7:30 PM 8:30 PM, Exhibit Hall B, Knoxville Convention Center. The following ESA student award winners will be honored: Joy Lynn Newton, Student Activity Award (sponsored by Monsanto Company) John Henry Comstock Graduate Student Awards: Sarah E. Jandricic, Eastern Branch Md. Panna Ali, International Branch 5

18 Program Information Program Information Julie Ann Peterson, North Central Branch Joyce E. Parker, Pacific Branch Dustin A. Swanson, Southeastern Branch Apurba K. Barman, Southwestern Branch Student Travel Award Program Recipients (sponsored by Monsanto) Stinger Awards These awards are given to the winners of the YouTube Your Entomology video contest. This contest gives ESA members the opportunity to showcase their talents and creativity through video. The winners will be announced at the ESA Opening Plenary Session, Sunday, November, 5:30 7:30 PM, Exhibit Hall B, Knoxville Convention Center. Winners will be determined from the following finalists in each of the four categories: Outreach (extension-based); Discovery (research-based); Instruction (teaching-based); and Open (anything goes, for the creative entomologist). Entomological Foundation Professional Awards The Entomological Foundation Professional Awards will be presented at the Entomological Foundation Awards Reception, Monday, November 2, 6:00 PM 8:30 PM, Ballroom F, Knoxville Convention Center. The following Foundation award winners will be honored: Dr. Bhadriraju Subramanyam, Award for Excellence in Integrated Pest Management (sponsored by Syngenta Crop Protection) Dr. Nan-Yao Su, Entomological Foundation Medal of Honor Ms. Kerry Mauck, Henry & Sylvia Richardson Research Grant Zebra Chip Research Team (team members include: Dr. John Trumble, Dr. Charlie Rush, Dr. Neil Gudmestad, Dr. Gerhard Bester, Dr. Casey Butler, Dr. Joe Munyaneza, Dr. Jim Crosslin, Dr. John Goolsby, Dr. Don Henne, Dr. Fekede Workneh), Integrated Pest Management Team Award (sponsored by Dow AgroSciences) Ms. Babette Farrar, President s Prize for Outstanding Achievement in Primary Education (sponsored by the Entomological Society of America) Mr. Kevin Crosby, President s Prize for Outstanding Achievement in Secondary Education (sponsored by the Entomological Society of America) Dr. Gregg Henderson, Recognition Award in Urban Entomology (sponsored by S.C. Johnson & Son) Entomological Foundation Student Awards The Entomological Foundation Student Awards will be presented in conjunction with the ESA Student Awards on Tuesday, November 3, 7:30 8:30 PM, Exhibit Hall B, Knoxville Convention Center. The following Foundation student award winners will be honored: Amanda Skidmore, BioQuip Undergraduate Scholarship (sponsored by BioQuip Products) Elina Lastro Nino, International Congress on Insect Neurochemistry and Neurophysiology (ICINN) Student Recognition Award in Insect Physiology, Biochemistry, Toxicology, & Molecular Biology (sponsored by ICINN) Paul Bardunias, Jeffery P. LaFage Graduate Student Research Award (established by Rousell Bio, Dow AgroSciences, FMC, and the friends and family of Dr. Jeffery P. LaFage) Alejandro Del Pozo, Larry Larson Graduate Student Award for Leadership in Applied Entomology (sponsored by Dow AgroSciences) Julie Hopper, Lillian and Alex Feir Graduate Student Travel Award Physiology, Biochemistry, Toxicology, and Molecular Biology (established by Dorothy Feir) Ian Grettenberger, Kenneth & Barbara Starks Plant Resistance to Insects Graduate Student Research Award Dawn Calibeo, Shripat Kamble Urban Entomology Graduate Student Award for Innovative Research 6 Marie Djernaes, Snodgrass Memorial Research Award Seung Chung, Stan Beck Fellowship Award Sponsors ESA and the Entomological Foundations thank the following list of sponsors for their continued support of ESA s and the Foundation s Award programs: Apex Bait Technologies BASF BioQuip Products Dow AgroSciences Entomological Society of America Gowan Company International Congress on Insect Neurochemistry and Neurophysiology Monsanto S. C. Johnson & Sons Syngenta Crop Protection The Entomological Foundation ENTOMOLOGICAL FOUNDATION Entomological Foundation Silent Auction & Raffle Exhibit Hall A, Knoxville Convention Center Booth Sunday, November, 7:30 9:30 PM (Welcome Reception) Monday, November 2, 9:00 am 5:00 pm Tuesday, November 3, 9:00 am 5:00 pm Wednesday, November 4, 9:00 am Noon Meet the Entomological Foundation s volunteers and participate in the Entomological Foundation s Raffle and Silent Auction to support programs that educate and excite young people about science through insects. The Raffle and Auction will commence on Monday and close with final bids placed by noon on Wednesday. Entomological Foundation Board of Directors Monday, November 2, 8:00 9:30 AM (Board of Directors only) Salon D, Hilton Knoxville Entomological Foundation Development Committee Meeting Monday, November 2, 9:45 AM 0:45 AM Salon D, Hilton Knoxville Entomological Foundation Awards Reception Monday, November 2, 6:00 8:30 PM Ballroom F, Knoxville Convention Center Join us for the Entomological Foundation s 202 Awards Reception honoring the Foundation s 202 Medal of Honor recipient Dr. Nan- Yao Su and our 202 Professional Award Winners. This Annual Event pays tribute to individuals who have demonstrated outstanding support and commitment to entomology. It is through our awards that we recognize the special educators and entomologists who have advanced the field of entomology, the science, and the quality of education for our nation s youth. Plenty of hors d oeuvres, desserts, beverages, and more for all! Door prizes too. Come join the fun! This FREE event is made possible by the generous support of our Event Sponsors. If you would like to attend, register via to or stop by the Entomological Foundation s booth ( ) in the ESA Exhibit Hall at the Convention Center Entomological Foundation Board of Counselors Meeting Tuesday, November 3, :00 3:00 PM Board Room, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Entomological Foundation s Education Symposium: The Entomological Foundation and You: A Global Outlook on Entomology Education and Outreach Wednesday, November 4, 8:00 AM 2:00 PM Ballroom A, Convention Center

19 Program Information Program Information This Symposium is a unique opportunity for graduate students and established professionals to hear from special guests about exciting models entomologists can pursue to incorporate educating young people into their careers. Special guest Marut Jatiket, director of the Thai Education Foundation, will open the Symposium with Rural Ecology and Agricultural Livelihoods (REAL) Education: Teaching young people about nature and IPM in field schools in Thailand. Presidents Prize for Education winners Babette Farrar, Eugene Field Elementary School, Springfield, MO, and Kevin Crosby, Independence High School, Bakersfield, CA, will explain and demonstrate techniques they use in their classrooms. ESA members John Guyton, Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Entomology and Plant Pathology, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS and Stephanie Larrick, Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL will present A passion for bugs: What a camper and bug camp director learned along the way. Next, a Behind the scenes view of an insect zoo! will be provided by Daniel Babbitt, Orkin Insect Zoo and Smithsonian Butterfly Pavilion, Washington, DC and Andrine A. Shufran, Entomology and Plant Pathology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK. Finally, Rebecca Baldwin, Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, will provide Free from the Entomological Foundation: Tools you can use! Tom Turpin, Purdue University, will open and close the Symposium. Please join us for this stimulating session designed to demystify entomological outreach, illustrate successful models, and increase your comfort level and competence in exciting young people about science through insects! Break refreshments provided. Entomological Foundation Corporate Funding Partners (as of 7/3/202) Adams Pest Control, Inc. BASF Corporation Bayer Benzon Research, Inc. BioQuip Products Central Life Sciences Clarke Cornell University, Department of Entomology Dow AgroSciences DuPont Entomological Society of America ESA Section: Medical, Urban and Veterinary Entomology FMC Corporation Gylling Data Management, Inc. IPM Institute of North America Master Gardeners (Skagit County) North Caroline State University, Department of Entomology Pioneer Hi-Bred International (a DuPont business) Potomac Garden Club S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc. Spectrum Technologies Syngenta, Vero Beach Research Station Target Specialty Products United Phosphorus, Inc. University of Missouri, College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Virginia Tech University, Department of Entomology Enhancement Fund Science Literacy Benefactors (as of 7/3/202) PLATINUM $30,000 Sharron S. Quisenberry SILVER $0,000 -$9,999 Bruce & Becky Monke S. Bradleigh & Pat Vinson BRONZE $5,000- $9,999 Thomas & Susan Anderson Paul W. & Sandy Borth April & David Getz Fred Knapp Thomas L. Payne COPPER $3,000-$4,999 Richard Jones Lynn Riddiford & James Truman Thomas E. (Gene) Reagan John & Mary Beth Reese Tom & Christine Turpin PARTNER $,000-$2,999 Ricardo Bessin Mary Rob Clarke Tom Green & Erin Mackesey Scott Hutchins George Kennedy Pam Marrone Eldon & Margene Ortman John Osmun Michelle Smith SAPPHIRE $500-$999 Elaine Backus Michael Gray Gary Mullen Tom Myers Evan Preisser RUBY $00-$499 John Anderson Benzon Research Elaine Backus David Boethel George Byers Alan & Jule Cameron Joel Coats David Cook Sanford Eigenbrode Dale Gelman Dawn Gouge Albert Grable Great Lakes IPM, Inc. James Harper Stephen Hight John Hildebrand David Hogg William Hutchison James Jarvis Lloyd Knutson Michael Kosztarab Rayda Krell Roger Leopold Donald Lewis Phyllis Martin Fowden Maxwell J.E. McPherson Patrick Moran Phil Mulder Bonnie Pendleton John Reed Marlin Rice Robert Riley Carl Schaefer Thomas Skelton Lincoln Smith Donald Sundquist Yoshinori Tanada Maurice & Catherine Tauber Terminix International, Norman Goldenberg Ellen Thoms Richard Vineyard Michael O. Way David Wood William H. Wymer 7

20 Program Information Program Information ESA EXHIBITORS, SPONSORS, & SUSTAINING ASSOCIATES Exhibit Hall Please plan to visit the exhibits, poster presentations, and more in Exhibit Hall A at the Knoxville Convention Center on the first floor. See the latest in entomological equipment, supplies, gifts, and reference materials. A map of the exhibit hall and location of exhibit booths is on page 22. Exhibit hours are Sunday, November, 7:30 9:30 PM (Welcome Reception) Monday, November 2, 9:00 AM 5:00 PM Tuesday, November 3, 9:00 AM 5:00 PM Wednesday, November 4, 9:00 AM 3:00 PM Exhibitors The following exhibitors are participating in ENTOMOLOGY 202 as of August, 202. Alpha Scents Booth #400 Dr. Dariusz Czokajlo, 089 Willamette Falls Dr., West Linn, OR ; Phone: (97) ; Fax: (34) ; alphascents.com; Web: A global supplier of quality insect monitoring systems traps, lures, attract & kill, MalEx, designed to reduce toxic pesticide use. Products for most native and exotic species in agriculture, horticulture, ornamentals, forestry, and the home & garden PestWizard brand. Custom pheromone synthesis for research, manufacturing, and government. Made with high-purity pheromones per recommendations from the research community. Meets, or exceeds, industry standards. Pricing is attractive and competitive. American Peat Technology Booth #405 Ryan Menzel, th Ave., Aitkim, MN 5643; Phone: (28) ; Fax: (28) , com; Web: American Peat Technology, LLC is a manufacturing and technology company specializing in the development and production of peatbased products that are environmentally beneficial. The BioAPT line of products comprises granular and powder media used to carry micro-organisms to field in biocontrol, bioremediation, and inoculation applications. Army Medical Recruiting Booth #58/520 Ina Tyler, Munoz Bldg 206, 9Th Calvary Regiment Rd., Fort Knox, KY 402; Phone: (502) ; Fax: (502) ; Ina. Web: Atlas Screenprinting Booth #39/48 Paul Wales, 3 SE 0th Ave., Gainesville, FL ; Phone: (352) ; Fax: (352) ; Web: We have the fun stuff! T-shirts, jewelry, kids stuff, puzzles, mugs, magnets, tote bags, caps, and much more. Just a few three-forone grab bags. Come early, come often. Most products endemic to this show, Christmas presents you will find nowhere else! Austin Convention and Visitors Bureau Booth #402 Lori Whidden, 30 Congress, Suite 200, Austin, TX 7870; Phone: (52) ; Fax: (52) ; Web: You re invited to experience the unique ambiance of a city that celebrates its cultural diversity, creativity, music, the outdoors and cutting-edge technology with a sophisticated, yet laid-back approach. Stop by the Austin Convention and Visitors Bureau booth to learn more about next year s convention destination. You ll find that Austin is far from ordinary! Bio Chambers Inc. Booth #24 Rob Pauls, 477 Jarvis Ave., Winnipeg, MB R2W 3A8, Canada; Phone: (204) ; Fax: (204) ; com; Web: BioChambers manufacturers quality chambers and rooms for plant growth, tissue culture, entomology, and other areas of research. Our Vnet control system offers precise control of temperature, light and humidity (opt) as well as other functions. Please stop by our booth to pick up our latest information. BioQuip Products, Inc. Booth #09//3/5 Chris Fall, 232 E. Gladwick St., Rancho Dominguez, CA ; Phone: (30) ; Fax: (30) ; com; Web: BioQuip has been providing equipment and books for use in the field, lab, museum, and classroom since 947. Our 28 employees hold a valuable diversity of knowledge with more than 395 years of combined experience. Please stop by our booths at ENTOMOLOGY 202 for a visit and to see what s new. Bio-Serv Booth #22 Tim Fisher, 8th St Ste, Frenchtown, NJ ; Phone: (908) , ext. 20; Fax: (908) ; com; Web: Supplying insect diets and rearing supplies for more than 40 years. Also supplying Lepidoptera eggs and larvae from Chesapeake PERL, including Beet armyworm, cabbage looper, corn earworm, diamondback moth, fall armyworm, and tobacco budworm an efficient way to have insects when you need them without the cost of rearing operations. Blackhole Collections Booth #222 Scott Montague, Malaview Avenue, Sidney, BC V8L 5X6, Canada; Phone: (250) ; blackholecollections.com Need more Funding? Electronic presentation, outreach, and education tools that bring emotion, clarity, and engagement to the conversation. Collaborate with colleagues, students, and those government officials responsible for funding allocations. In a world of budget-cuts, enable citizen-scientists to assist surveying invasive species. Provide world-wide access to your most sensitive specimens. We truly help you to Communicate, Educate, and Persuade more effectively. CABI/CSIRO Booth #9 Patricia Webb, Quicksilver Dr., Sterling, VA ; Phone: (703) ; Fax: (703) ; styluspub.com; Web: CABI is a not-for-profit international organization that improves people s lives by providing information and applying scientific expertise to solve problems in agriculture and the environment. Our mission and direction is influenced by our member countries who help guide the activities we undertake. Cambridge University Press Booth #43 James Murphy, 32 Avenue of The Americas, Bldg, New York, NY ; Phone: (22) ; Fax: (22) ; Web: Cambridge s publishing in books and journals combines state-ofthe-art content with the highest standards of scholarship, writing, and production. Visit our stand to browse new titles, available at a 20% discount, and to pick up sample issues of our journals. Visit our Web site to see everything we do: Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health Booth #223 Charles Bargeron, 2360 Rainwater Rd., Tifton, GA ; Phone: (224) ; Fax: (229) ; uca.edu; Web: 8

21 Program Information Program Information Conviron Booth #45 Laura Frederick, 590 Berry St., Winnipeg, MB R3H OR9, Canada; Phone: (204) , Fax: (204) ; conviron.com; Web: Conviron is a global supplier of controlled environment systems with primary application in Agricultural Biotechnology research. Our extensive product portfolio includes single and multi-tier chambers and rooms, and research greenhouses. Services encompass the entire project life cycle from early-stage design through to installation, project commissioning, and on-going maintenance and support. Cricket Science Booth #30 Robert Anderson, 6 Shane Dr., Pocatello, ID ; Phone: (208) ; Fax: (208) ; com; Web: Cricket Science offers a variety of ONE-OF-A-KIND eclectic items of interest to insect enthusiasts and entomologists, including Antiquarian Books, Prints, Jewelry, Baltic Amber, Cards, Cricket Cages, Checkbook Covers, Stamps, etc. Prepaid shipping available; All Credit Cards Accepted. See the anderobe Store on ebay or send for Books and other items not at the Convention. Decagon Devices, Inc Booth #508 Ashley Fickenwirth, 2365 NE Hopkins Ct, Pullman, WA ; Phone: (509) ; Web: www. decagon.com Decagon Devices is a world leader in biophysical instrumentation and is proud to celebrate its 30th anniversary this year. Decagon specializes in instrumentation for microclimate monitoring, biomass modeling, photosynthetic capabilities of plants, total leaf cover in a canopy, and many other applications. Stop by our booth for a catalog. Discover Life in America Booth #42 Todd Witcher, 36 Cherokee Orchard Rd., Gatlinburg, TN ; Phone: (865) ; Fax: (865) ; dlia.org; Web: Discover Life in America (DLIA) is a nonprofit organization based in Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). DLIA, through a partnership with the National Park Service, coordinates the All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory the effort to identify every single species within the Park bringing the world s top researchers into the Smokies. Doctor of Plant Medicine Program Booth #2 Amanda Hodges, 970 Natural Area Dr., Gainesville, FL 326; Phone: (352) ; Fax: (352) ; Web: The multidisciplinary Plant Medicine Program at the University of Florida offers courses and practical training in all relevant departments such as Agronomy, Entomology/Nematology, Horticultural Sciences, Plant Pathology, and Soil and Water Science to prepare students in the science, practice and business of the profession of plant medicine. DuPont Pioneer Booth #28 Dan McElroy, 7250 NW 62nd Ave., PO Box 552, Johnston, IA ; Phone: (55) ; Fax: (55) ; dan. Web: DuPont Pioneer is the world s leading developer and supplier of advanced plant genetics, providing high-quality seeds to farmers in more than 90 countries. Pioneer provides agronomic support and services to help increase farmer productivity and profitability and strives to develop sustainable agricultural systems for people everywhere. Science with Service Delivering Success. Elsevier Booth #0 Katherine Boulter, 360 Park Ave. S., New York, NY ; Phone: (22) ; Fax: (22) ; elsevier.com; Web: Browse our recently published books in entomology, including Manual of Techniques in Invertebrate Pathology, Insect Pathology, and Insect Pests of Potato. Our innovative electronic product, SciVerse ScienceDirect provides cutting-edge online content for all of your needs. Our leading journals include Journal of Insect Physiology, Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Journal of Asia Pacific Entomology, and Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology. EmCal Scientific Booth #304 Judie Orloff, PO Box 2705, San Diego, CA ; Phone: (858) ; Fax: (858) ; com; Web: EmCal manufactures micro and macro video imaging systems and is a distributor for several major microscope brands. We are showing our new line of stereo microscopes and our Mycrolyte and GeoLyte Video Imaging systems that feature our patented Varilyte Variable brightfield/darkfield illumination for macro imaging entomological specimens at high magnification. Entomological Foundation Booth #320/322 Thomas Green, 450 Regent St., Madison WI 53705; Phone: (608) ; Web: org The Entomological Foundation develops and implements a blend of programs designed to spark interest in science and insects among elementary school children. We work to sustain that interest through educational programs and outreach activities; scholarships and student awards to recognize excellence in entomology; and awards to recognize professional accomplishments. The Entomological Foundation is a national 50 (c)3 not-for-profit organization governed by a Board of Directors made up of representatives from the public and private sectors including academic institutions, government, and business and industry. Our mission is to: Build a Future for Entomology by Educating Young People About Science Through Insects. Entomological Society of America Booth #209 Debi Sutton, 000 Derekwood Lane, Suite 00, Lanham, MD 20706; Phone: + (30) , ext. 302; Fax: (30) ; Web: Stop by to rest your feet, grab a bag of popcorn, meet with colleagues and friends, learn about ESA programs and services, spend time catching up with the headquarters professional staff, renew your membership (and receive a nice gift!) and more. Environmental Growth Chambers Booth #205 Steve Griggs, 50 Washington St, Chagrin Falls, OH ; Phone: (800) ; Fax: (440) ; com; Web: ECG is celebrating 60 years of design and manufacturing experience with the largest selection of plant growth chambers of any company worldwide. We produce entomological research chambers, controlled environmental rooms, tissue culture chambers, lighted and refrigerated incubators, gas-exchange chambers, Day-lit chambers, and Root Zone cabinets. Stop by Booth 205. Gylling Data Management, Inc. Booth #29 Steve Gylling, 405 Martin Blvd., Brookings, SD ; Phone: (605) ; Fax: (605) ; Web: ARM 9 was released in 202. See newest ARM computer software to establish, manage, analyze, and report research information, ARM ST to summarize across multiple trials, and handheld computer data entry. For 30 years, GDM has offered research data management solutions to clients worldwide. Innovative Pest Control Products Booth #422 Alan Bernard, PO Box 88026, Boca Raton, FL ; Phone: (56) ; Web: Innovative Pest Control Products is a provider of Innovative, Environmentally Friendly Pest Control Products that uses a pests natural behaviors to apply targeted control agents while minimizing 9

22 Program Information Program Information pollution, contamination and non target animal exposures. We feature low toxicity baits and unique bait delivery systems. ISCA Technologies, Inc. Booth #20 Richmond Reyes, 230 W Spring St., Riverside, CA ; Phone: (95) ; Fax: (85) ; richmond. Web: ISCA Technologies provides innovative IPM solutions that are effective, economical, and ecologically friendly. Insect semiochemicals (pheromones, repellants, attractants) Monitoring traps Controlled release formulations such as SPLAT for mating disruption, repellants and attract & kill control products IPM tools such as SMART Traps, ISCA s automated insect counting devices Living Systems Instrumentation Booth #504 Lesley Pfindel, PO Box 00, Saint Albans, VT ; Phone: (802) ; Web: Conference Survival Kit Includes: Expandable poster tube, water bottle, USB memory stick, lanyard, Lake Champlain chocolates, Vermont maple syrup, ruler, pen. Martin Microscope Company Booth #203 Aaron Cunningham, 207 S Pendleton St, Easley, SC 29640; Phone: (864) ; Web: We are a leading distributor of microscopes and imaging equipment, in the microscopy business for over sixty years. Our large inventory of new and used microscopes and accessories, combined with our own innovative products, enable us to provide the best combination of quality and affordability to our customers. MegaView Science Co Ltd Booth #200/202 Eddy Lin, PO Box , Taichung, 40799, Taiwan; Phone: ; Fax: ; tw; Web: m Traps & Cages. Please visit more from their land while conserving more of our world s natural resources such as water and energy. To learn more about our business and our commitments, please visit: National Pest Management Association Booth #23 Alexis Wirtz, 0460 North St., Fairfax, VA ; Phone: (703) ; Fax: (703) ; Web: The National Pest Management Association (NPMA), a nonprofit organization with more than 7,000 members, was established in 933 to support the pest management industry s commitment to the protection of public health, food, and property. Visit us at www. npmapestworld.org. Natural Industries, Inc. Booth #500 Sandee Flores, 2320 Cutten Rd., Houston, TX ; Phone: (28) ; Fax: (28) ; naturalindustries.com; Web: Natural Industries continues to develop the most powerful beneficial microbes on the market. Our flagship product, Actinovate, is in use all over the world to combat foliar and root diseases in crops. Our products are chemical-free and safe for people and pets. To keep up with global demand, Natural Industries recently opened a new research and lab facility in Houston, Texas. Noldus Information Technology Booth #204 Paige Roderick, 503 Edwards Ferry Rd. NE, Ste 20, Leesburg, VA ; Phone: (703) ; Fax: (703) ; Web: Noldus Information Technology offers systems for recording, tracking, coding, and analysis of insect behavior. Our solutions include EthoVision XT, The Observer XT, DanioVision, and Track3D, our innovative system for tracking insect flight in 3D in a wind tunnel. Stop by our booth for a FREE demonstration. Oxford University Press Booth #323 Robin Hesselink, 98 Madison Ave., Fl 8, New York, NY ; Phone: (99) ; Fax: (99) ; robin. Web: Michigan State University Booth #220 Heather Lenartson-Kluge, Dept. of Entomology, 243 Natural Science, East Lansing, MI ; Phone: (57) ; Fax: (57) ; Web: Michigan State University s Department of Entomology offers B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. Degrees, with degrees in a vast number of areas such as integrated pest management, medical entomology, ecology and ecosystems management, molecular entomology, forensic entomology, apiculture, and specialty crop entomology and nematology. The department s display provides program information, as does its web site: Midwest Photo Booth# 49 Jim Andracki, 333 N. High St., Columbus, OH, 43202; Phone: (866) ; Web: Midwest Photo caters to your needs! Macro and micro images we can help! Whether its a Macro lens for your existing camera or a latch key digital set up for extreme Entomology Photography for research and web based imagery. PO s are welcomed! Digital cameras, lighting, copy stands, scanners, printers. Monsanto Booth #305 Carlos Gomez, 800 N. Lindbergh Blvd., Saint Louis, MO ; Phone: (636) ; (636) ; monsanto.com; Web: and Monsanto Company is a leading global provider of technologybased solutions and agricultural products that improve farm productivity and food quality. Monsanto remains focused on enabling both small-holder and large-scale farmers to produce 20 Pan American Research & Development, LLC Booth #404 Stephen White, Ph.D., 3485 NE State Rd. 6, Madison, FL ; Phone: (850) , com Pan American R&D is a contract research organization, with capabilities in Efficacy, Bio-Assays, Laboratory Studies, GLP Regulatory Studies. Located in N.Central Florida. Extensive International capabilities in Latin America. Crops: Vegetables, Tropical Crops, Row Crops. Aerial Application Studies. Percival Scientific Booth #303 Joni Campidilli, 505 Research Dr., Perry, IA ; Phone: (55) ; Fax: (55) ; Web: Percival Scientific represents a rich tradition of product ingenuity and reliability throughout the world. Our facility encompasses all engineering, design, fabrication, and construction of the product line. We take American pride in engineering and manufacturing the best environmental incubators and growth chambers used throughout the world. PhbeaD Booth #22 Melissa Senetar, 68 Wallacetown Rd., Paint Lick, KY ; Phone: (859) ; Web: Dr. Melissa Senetar of PhbeaD is a self-taught artist who combines her love of science with fashion by creating resin jewelry with insect wings. Each piece is individually handcrafted and meticulously sealed to make a perfectly enveloped wing that is resistant to wearand-tear; no two pieces are ever alike.

23 Program Information Program Information Purdue University Booth #32 Dr. Steve Yaninek, Department of Entomology, 90 W. State St., 23 Smith Hall, West Lafayette, IN ; Phone: (765) ; Fax: (765) ; Or Melissa Shepson, Phone: (765) ; Please stop by to check out opportunities for undergraduate and graduate studies, information on programs in teaching, research, extension and outreach education, and receive updates on the 203 Centennial Celebration plans. Rad Source Technologies, Inc. Booth # Brogdon Road, Ste 500, Suwanne, GA, 30024; Phone: (678) ; Web: Rad Source Technologies develops and manufactures X-ray irradiators specific for the irradiation of insects for sterile insect technique. Current irradiators accommodate the medfly, moths (cold-room), and soon Old World Screwworm. In addition to SIT, the irradiators can be used for phytosanitation research and various other scientific applications. Royal Society Publishing Booth #38 Victoria Millen, 6-9 Carlton House Terrace, London, SWY SAG, England; Phone: +44(0) ; Fax: +44(0) ; Web: The Royal Society publishes four journals of interest to the entomology community our broad biology journals, Proceedings B, Biology Letters, and Philosophical Transactions B; and Open Biology, a fast, open-access journal covering biology at the molecular and cellular level. See for more information or visit us at booth #38. Sable Systems International Inc. Booth #409 Janeta Wendelboe, 6000 S Eastern Ave., Ste, Las Vegas, NV ; Phone: (702) ; Fax: (702) ; sablesys.com; Web: Silverspot Studio Booth #52 Jesse Smith, 99 Neeb Rd., Cincinnati, OH ; Phone: (53) ; Web: Silverspot Studio features a wide range of handmade sterling silver and mixed-metal jewelry inspired by insects and their arthropod relatives, as well as insect-related artwork and selected books. Springer Booth #300/302 Acasia Dalmau, 233 Spring St., Fl 6, New York, NY ; Phone: (22) ; Fax: (22) ; springer.com; Web: Get hands-on experience with Springer s multi-format publishing model: print ebook MyCopy (printed ebooks for US$ 24.95). Our mission is to support your research. Come browse our books in your preferred format: print, online, or on an ereader or ipad. Ensure optimized print and electronic dissemination of your work! Get Read. Publish With Springer. Taylor & Francis CRC Press Booth #208/20 Nancy Logal, 6000 Broken Sound Pkwy NW, Ste 300, Boca Raton, FL ; Phone: (56) ; Fax: (56) ; Web: Taylor & Francis is dedicated to the dissemination of scholarly information, using skills and expertise honed since we first began publishing learned journals in 798. Today, we publish more than,600 scholarly journals in association with 460 societies and institutions. United States Department of Agriculture, Animal Plant Health Inspection Service, Plant Protection and Quarantine Booth# 4 Chris Bembenek, 4700 River Rd Unit 33, Riverdale, MD ; Phone: (30) ; Plant Protection & Quarantine (PPQ) is a program within the Animal & Plant Health Inspection Service. PPQ safeguards agriculture and natural resources from the entry, establishment, spread of animal and plant pests and noxious weeds into the United States of America; and supports trade and exports of U.S. agricultural products. University of Arkansas Booth #420 Rob Wiedenmann, 39 AGRI, Fayetteville, AR 7270; Phone: (479) ; Fax: (479) ; The Department of Entomology at the University of Arkansas offers M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, with strengths in systematics, host- plant interactions, applied insect ecology, and other research areas. The department s display provides information on graduate study, available fellowships, and other opportunities. University of Maryland Insect Transformation Facility Booth #502 Rob Harrell, 9600 Gudelsky Dr., Rockville, MD ; Phone: (240) ; Fax: (240) ; The University of Maryland s Insect Transformation Facility specializes in transforming nonmodel insects. Services include fee for service transformation (with established protocols), collaboration (to develop new protocols), training (microinjection, insect rearing) and consultation. The facility has a staff with broad and deep experience in insect biology and transformation technologies. WildScape Inc. Booth #54 Kathy Stout, 30 22nd St., Wheeling, WV ; Phone: (304) ; Web: WildScape Inc. is a company dedicated to the promotion of and education about the caddisfly. Wildscape Inc., developed by Kathy Kyle Stout, provides a beautiful display of jewelry made by caddisfly larvae. In a simulated stream, Kathy raises caddisfly larvae and provides them gemstones from around the world to create beautiful pieces of art. Kathy also does many educational programs at schools and organizations to enhance the public s knowledge about the caddisfly and how important this insect is to our steam ecosystem. Wiley-Blackwell Booth #03/05 Taryn Walsh, 350 Main St., Malden, MA ; Phone: (78) ; Web: Wiley-Blackwell is the international scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly publishing business of John Wiley & Sons, with strengths in every major academic and professional field and partnerships with many of the world s leading societies. For more information, please visit ESA is excited about hosting ICE 206. For information about sponsoring or exhibiting at this event, contact Cindy Myers at or , ext Visit for more details. 2

24 Program Information Program Information EXHIBIT HALL ESA Sponsors ESA thanks the following sponsors of ENTOMOLOGY 202: Sustaining Associates Gold Level BASF PO Box 3528, 26 Davis Dr., Durham, NC Representative: Mr. J. Thomas Wofford Web: At BASF, we create chemistry for a sustainable future. We combine economic success, social responsibility, and environmental protection. Through science and innovation, we enable our customers in almost all industries to meet the current and future needs of society. Dow AgroSciences 753 Highway 438, Greenville, MS Representative: Dr. Melissa Willrich Siebert Web: Dow AgroSciences LLC is a global leader in providing pest management and biotechnology products that improve the quality and quantity of the Earth s food supply; and contribute to the safety, health, and quality of the life of the world s growing population. Dow AgroSciences is supported by more than 6,000 employees in 50 countries. Bayer CropScience PO Box 204, 2 T W Alexander Dr., Durham, NC Representative: Dr. Amanda Beaudoin Web: Bayer CropScience strives to be the global innovation leader, providing sustainable crop solutions from seed to harvest. We help farmers worldwide meet the ever-increasing demand for affordable and high-quality food, feed, fiber, and energy crops. We help shape the future of agriculture and create value for our customers and society. This is how we live Science for a Better Life. DuPont Crop Protection 8295 Tournament Dr., Ste. 300, Memphis, TN Representative: Dr. Daniel Sherrod Web: 22

25 Program Information Program Information crop-protection.html DuPont Crop Protection is a business unit of DuPont, a sciencebased products and services company. Founded in 802, DuPont puts science to work by creating sustainable solutions essential to a better, safer, healthier life for people everywhere. Operating in more than 90 countries, DuPont offers a wide range of innovative products and services for markets including agriculture and food; building and construction; communications; and transportation. Syngenta Crop Protection, Inc. 40 S Swing Rd., Greensboro, NC Representative: Dr. Roy Boykin Web: Syngenta is one of the world s leading companies with more than 26,000 employees in more than 90 countries dedicated to our purpose: Bringing plant potential to life. Through world-class science, global reach, and commitment to our customers, we help increase crop productivity, protect the environment, and improve health and quality of life. For more information about us, please go to Monsanto 800 N. Lindbergh Blvd., Saint Louis, MO Representative: Carlos Gomez Web: Careers Page: Monsanto Company is a leading global provider of technologybased solutions and agricultural products that improve farm productivity and food quality. Monsanto remains focused on enabling both small-holder and large-scale farmers to produce more from their land while conserving more of our world s natural resources such as water and energy. To learn more about our business and our commitments, please visit: Silver Level FMC Corporation 820 Bridge Ave., Davenport, IA Representative: Dr. Lamar Buckelew Web: FMC Corporation is one of the world s foremost, diversified chemical companies in agricultural, industrial, and consumer markets. FMC uses advanced technologies in research and development to improve the delivery of medications; enhance foods and beverages; power batteries; protect crop yields, structures, and lawns, and advance the manufacture of glass, ceramics, plastics, pulp and paper, textiles, and other products. Bronze Level AMVAC Chemical Corp Macarthur Ct., Ste 200, Newport Beach, CA Representative: Dr. John A. Immaraju Web: AMVAC Chemical Corporation, a subsidiary of American Vanguard Corporation (NYSE:AVD) is a diversified specialty and agricultural products company. With annual revenues of more than$300 million, AMVAC s successful business model has emphasized manufacturing of key active ingredients in the US, acquiring or licensing both new and well established product lines that serve high valued niches in crop protection, turf & ornamental and the public & animal health segments. AMVAC has positioned itself to capitalize on developing trends in the global markets. Gylling Data Management 405 Martin Blvd., Brookings, SD Representative: Dr. Steven Gylling Web: Research management software since 982. Use ARM to establish, manage, analyze, and report information for crop experiments including field and greenhouse protocols and trials. Use Summary Across Trials to summarize and report a trial series across locations and/or years; link with ARM Trial Database to select trials based on information in any trial data entry field. Use Psion Workabout Pro with Enhanced Rating Shell to enter trial assessments and description into Excel worksheet, and then pull data into ARM on a PC. Contributor Bellspray Inc. R&D Sprayers 49 Highway 04, Opelousas, LA Representative: Mr. Linzay Nezat Web: For more than 25 years R&D Sprayers has been an authority in the research, design, and manufacturing of pesticide spray units. Today, the company prides itself on providing a wide range of sprayers and designing products for special needs. R&D s product base is expanding to meet our customer s high expectations. Superior service is our priority; providing great sprayers is our business. ESA GOVERNING BOARD, SECTIONS, BRANCHES, COMMITTEES, and EDITORIAL BOARDS See the schedule of Board, Section, committee, and editorial board meetings on page ESA Officers and Committee Members Governing Board Grayson C. Brown, President, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY Robert N. Wiedenmann, Vice President, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR Frank G. Zalom, Vice President Elect, University of California Davis, Davis, CA Ernest S. Delfosse, Past President, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI Ricardo T. Bessin, Treasurer, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY Douglas G. Pfeiffer, Eastern Branch Representative, Virginia Tech University, Blacksburg, VA Charles Vincent, International Branch Representative, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada, Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, QC, Canada Timothy J. Lysyk, Medical, Urban, & Veterinary Entomology Representative, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge, AB, Canada John J. Obrycki, North Central Branch Representative, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY Michael P. Parrella, Pacific Branch Representative, University of California Davis, Davis, CA Carol M. Anelli, Physiology, Biochemistry, and Toxicology Representative, Washington State University, Pullman, WA Robert K. Peterson, Plant-Insect Ecosystems Representative, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT John D. Oswald, Systematics, Evolution, & Biodiversity Representative, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX Nancy C. Hinkle, Southeastern Branch Representative, Athens, GA Bastiaan M. Drees, BCE, Southwestern Branch Representative, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX Wendy A. Johnson, Student Representative to the Governing Board, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS C. David Gammel, CAE, Executive Director, Entomological Society of America, Lanham, MD 23

26 Program Information Program Information Medical, Urban and Veterinary Entomology Section Officers Christopher J. Geden, President, USDA ARS CMAVE, Gainesville, FL Edward D. Walker, Vice President, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI Douglas E. Norris, Past President, The John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD Michelle S. Smith, BCE, Treasurer, Dow Agro Sciences, Indianapolis, IN Timothy J. Lysyk, Governing Board Representative, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge, AB, Canada Physiology, Biochemistry, Toxicology Section Officers Subba Reddy Palli, President, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY Michael R. Strand, Vice President, University of Georgia, Athens, GA Jeffrey G. Scott, Past President, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY Richard W. Mankin, Treasurer, USDA, ARS, CMAVE, Gainesville, FL Carol M. Anelli, Governing Board Representative, Washington State University, Pullman, WA Plant Insect Ecosystems Section Officers Bonnie B. Pendleton, President, West Texas A&M University, Canyon, TX Gary D. Thompson, Vice President, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN B. Rogers Leonard, Past President, LSU AgCenter, Winnsboro, LA Melissa Willrich Siebert, Secretary, Dow AgroSciences, Greenville, MS Robert K. Peterson, Governing Board Representative, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT Systematics, Evolution, and Biodiversity Section Officers Kelly B. Miller, President, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM Christiane Weirauch, Vice President, University of California Riverside, Riverside, CA Jason R. Cryan, Past President, North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, Raleigh, NC Maria Alma Solis, Treasurer, Systematic Entomology Laboratory USDA, ARS, Washington, DC John D. Oswald, Governing Board Representative, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX Eastern Branch Officers J. Christopher Bergh, President, Virginia Tech AHS AREC, Winchester, VA Eric R. Day, President-Elect, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA George C. Hamilton, Past President, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ Daniel Gilrein, Secretary, Cornell University Coop Extension of Suffolk CO, Riverhead, NY Mark C. Taylor, Treasurer, Maryland Dept. of Agriculture, Salisbury, MD Douglas G. Pfeiffer, Governing Board Representative, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA International Branch Officers Christian Borgemeister, President, ICIPE, Nairobi, Kenya Tong-Xian Liu, President-Elect, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, China Charles Vincent, Past President and Governing Board Representative, Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada, Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, QC, Canada Srinivas Parimi, Treasurer, Maharashtra Hybrid Seeds Co. Ltd., Jalna, MS, India Margaret C. Hardy, Secretary, Institute for Molecular Bioscience/ University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD, Australia North Central Branch Officers Billy W. Fuller, President, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD Sue L. Blodgett, President-Elect, Iowa State University, Ames, IA Frederick P. Baxendale, Past President, University of Nebraska Lincoln, Lincoln, NE Mark A. Boetel, Secretary-Treasurer, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND John J. Obrycki, Governing Board Representative, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY Erin W. Hodgson, Member at Large, Iowa State University, Ames, IA Linda J. Mason, Member at Large, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN Pacific Branch Officers Elizabeth H. Beers, Member at Large, Washington State University, Wenatchee, WA Brian L. Bret, President, Dow AgroSciences, Roseville, CA James A. Bethke, Member at Large, UC Cooperative Extension, San Marcos, CA Sujaya Rao, Past President, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR Steven E. Naranjo, President-Elect, USDA ARS, Maricopa, AZ Michael P. Parrella, Governing Board Representative, University of California Davis, Davis, CA Harvey A. Yoshida, Member at Large, Dow Agrosciences, Richland, WA Richard S. Zack, Jr., Member at Large, Washington State University, Pullman, WA Boris A. Castro, Secretary-Treasurer, Dow AgroSciences, Fresno, CA Silvia I. Rondon, Member at Large, Oregon State University, Hermiston, OR Vaughn M. Walton, Member at Large, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR Southeastern Branch Officers G. David Buntin, President, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA David G. Hall, President-Elect, USDA ARS, Fort Pierce, FL Norman C. Leppla, BCE, Past President, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL Juang-Horng Chong, Secretary-Treasurer, Clemson University, Florence, SC Nancy C. Hinkle, Governing Board Representative, Athens, GA Eileen A. Buss, Member at Large, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL Natalie A. Hummel, Member at Large, LSU AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA Melissa Willrich Siebert, Member at Large, Dow AgroSciences, Greenville, MS Southwestern Branch Officers C. Scott Bundy, President, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM Jesus F. Esquivel, Vice President, USDA ARS, Areawide Pest Mgmt. Res. Unit, College Station, TX Allen E. Knutson, Past President, Texas AM University, Dallas, TX Robert W. Davis, BCE, Secretary-Treasurer, BASF Specialty Products, Pflugerville, TX Bastiaan M. Drees, BCE, Governing Board Representative, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX Committee on Audit Frank G. Zalom, Chair, University of California Davis, Davis, CA James J. Smith, Member, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI Lynell K. Tanigoshi, Member, Washington State University, Mount Vernon, WA C. David Gammel, CAE, Executive Director, Entomological Society of America, Lanham, MD Neil Willoughby, Headquarters Staff Liaison, Entomological Society of America, Lanham, MD Committee on Annual Meeting Program Jerome F. Grant, Co-Chair, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN D. Michael Jackson, Co-Chair, USDA ARS, Charleston, SC Grayson C. Brown, President, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY Marianne Alleyne, Student Competition Co-Chair, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL Luis A. Cañas, Student Competition Co-Chair, The Ohio State 24

27 Program Information Program Information University, Wooster, OH Andrew P. Norton, Poster Co-Chair, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO Paul J. Ode, Poster Co-Chair, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO Joy Lynn Newton, Student Liaison, University of Nevada Reno, Cooperative Ext., Yerington, NV Christopher J. Geden, President, Medical, Urban, and Veterinary Entomology, USDA ARS CMAVE, Gainesville, FL Edward Walker, Vice-President, Medical, Urban, and Veterinary Entomology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI Subba Reddy Palli, President, Physiology, Biochemistry, and Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY Michael R. Strand, Vice-President, Physiology, Biochemistry, and Toxicology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA Bonnie B. Pendleton, President, Plant-Insect Ecosystems, West Texas A&M University, Canyon, TX Gary D. Thompson, Vice-President, Plant-Insect Ecosystems, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN Kelly B. Miller, President, Systematics, Evolution & Biodiversity, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM Christiane Weirauch, Vice-President, Systematics, Evolution and Biodiversity, University of California Riverside, Riverside, CA Rosina Romano, CMP, Headquarters Staff Liaison, Entomological Society of America, Lanham, MD Committee on Awards and Honors Lisa M. Knolhoff, Chair, Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Johnston, IA Elizabeth F. Beckemeyer, Physiology, Biochemistry, and Toxicology Representative, Georgia Perimeter College, Greensboro, GA Diane G. Alston, Pacific Branch Representative, Utah State University, Logan, UT Carol M. Anelli, Governing Board Representative, Washington State University, Pullman, WA Donald C. Weber, Eastern Branch Representative, USDA ARS Insect Biocontrol Lab, Beltsville, MD Kathleen A. Kidd, Southeastern Branch Representative, NCDA & CS, Raleigh, NC Jesus F. Esquivel, Plant-Insect Ecosystems Representative, USDA ARS, Areawide Pest Mgmt. Res. Unit, College Station, TX Kelly V. Tindall, North Central Branch Representative, Conservation Seeding and Restoration, Kimberly, ID Marc L. Fisher, Medical, Urban, and Veterinary Entomology Representative, Dow AgroSciences, Lantana, TX Jessica L. Ware, Systematics, Evolution, & Biodiversity Representative, Newark, NJ Joy Lynn Newton, Student Liaison, University of Nevada Reno Cooperative Ext., Yerington, NV Cindy Myers, Headquarters Staff Liaison, Entomological Society of America, Lanham, MD Committee on the Common Names of Insects Eric J. Rebek, Chair, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK John D. Oswald, Governing Board Representative, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX Craig M. Brabant, Member, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI Gregory A. Dahlem, Member, Northern Kentucky University, Newport, KY Eric R. Day, Member, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA Susan E. Halbert, BCE, Member, FDACS/Division of Plant Industry, Gainesville, FL Arnold H. Hara, Member, University of Hawaii, Hilo, HI Therese M. Poland, Member, USDA Forest Service NRS, East Lansing, MI James A. Reinert, Member, Texas A&M University (Retired), Plano, TX Erik J. Wenninger, Member, University of Idaho, Kimberly, ID Alan Kahan, Headquarters Staff Liaison, Entomological Society of America, Lanham, MD Committee on Education and Outreach Faith B. Kuehn, Chair, Delaware Dept of Agriculture, Dover, DE John J. Obrycki, Governing Board Representative, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY Mustapha El Bouhssini, International Branch Representative, ICARDA, Aleppo, Syrian Arab Republic Daniel K. Young, North Central Branch Representative, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI Peter Warren, Pacific Branch Representative, University of Arizona Cooperative Extension, Tucson, AZ Raymond A. Cloyd, Plant-Insect Ecosystems Representative, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS Patricia Zungoli, Southeastern Branch Representative, Clemson University, Clemson, SC Tracie M. Jenkins, Southeastern Branch Representative, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA Andrine Shufran, Southwestern Branch Representative, Stillwater, OK Martha Victoria Rosett Lutz, Systematics, Evolution, & Biodiversity Representative, Lexington, KY Richard Levine, Headquarters Staff Liaison, Entomological Society of America, Lanham, MD Committee on Ethics and Rules Robert Puckett, Chair, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX Michael P. Parrella, Governing Board Representative, University of California Davis, Davis, CA Mark A. Boetel, Member At Large, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND Omaththage Perera, Member At Large, USDA-ARS, Stoneville, MS Robert Puckett, Member At Large, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX Jamesina J. Scott, Member At Large, Lake County Vector Control District, Lakeport, CA Daniel K. Young, Member At Large, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI C. David Gammel, CAE, Executive Director, Entomological Society of America, Lanham, MD Committee on Finance Ricardo T. Bessin, Chair, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY Susan McKnight, Eastern Branch Representative, Susan McKnight, LLC, West Hartford, CT Stephen L. Clement, International Branch Representative, Retired USDA ARS Research Entomologist, Pullman, WA John J. Obrycki, North Central Branch Representative, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY Lisa G. Neven, Pacific Branch Representative, USDA ARS, Wapato, WA Faith M. Oi, Southeastern Branch Representative, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL Phillip G. Mulder, Jr., Southwestern Branch Representative, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK C. David Gammel, CAE, Executive Director, Entomological Society of America, Lanham, MD Neil Willoughby, Headquarters Staff Liaison, Entomological Society of America, Lanham, MD Committee on International Affairs Lambert Kanga, Chair, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL Robert K. Peterson, Governing Board Representative, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT Jeffrey D. Bradshaw, Member, University of Nebraska, Scottsbluff, NE Mustapha Debboun, BCE, Member, US Army, Academy Health Sci: MCCS-HPM, Schertz, TX John E. Foster, Member, University of Nebraska Lincoln, Lincoln, NE Tiffany M. Heng-Moss, Member, University of Nebraska-Entomology, Lincoln, NE Reina Koganemaru, Member, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA John L. Petersen, Member, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ Patricia L. Prasifka, Member, Dow AgroSciences, West Fargo, ND 25

28 Program Information Program Information Livy H. Williams III, Ad Hoc, USDA ARS EIWRU, Montferrier sur Lez, France Shaohui Wu, Member, Blacksburg, VA Richard Levine, Headquarters Staff Liaison, Entomological Society of America, Lanham, MD Committee on Membership James D. Harwood, Chair, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY Douglas G. Pfeiffer, Governing Board Representative, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA Louela A. Castrillo, Eastern Branch Representative, Cornell University, Dept. of Entomology, Ithaca, NY David A. Jenkins, International Affairs Committee Liaison, USDA ARS, Mayaguez, PR Phyllis G. Weintraub, International Branch Representative, Gilat Research Center, D. N. Negev, Israel Kristina Friesen, Medical, Urban, & Veterinary Entomology Representative, USDA ARS, Lincoln, NE Robert J. Wright, North Central Branch Representative, University of Nebraska Lincoln, Lincoln, NE Helen Spafford, Pacific Branch Representative, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii Yoonseong Park, Physiology, Biochemistry, and Toxicology Representative, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS Sherilyn F. Smith, Plant-Insect Ecosystems Representative, Le Moyne College, Syracuse, NY John D. Hopkins, Southeastern Branch Representative, University of Arkansas CES, Little Rock, AR Jesus F. Esquivel, Southwestern Branch Representative, USDA ARS, Areawide Pest Mgmt. Res. Unit, College Station, TX Jessica L. Ware, Systematics, Evolution, & Biodiversity Representative, Newark, NJ Reina Koganemaru, Student Representative, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA Debi Sutton, Headquarters Staff Liaison, Entomological Society of America, Lanham, MD Committee on Student Affairs Joy Lynn Newton, Chair, University of Nevada Reno Cooperative Ext., Yerington, NV Carey R. Minteer, Vice Chair, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR Wendy A. Johnson, Student Representative to the Governing Board, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS Ligia Maria Marques Cota Vieira, Eastern Branch Representative, Blacksburg, VA Margaret Hardy, International Branch Representative, Institute for Molecular Bioscience/University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD, Australia Mitchell D. Stamm, North Central Branch Representative, University of Nebraska Lincoln, Lincoln, NE Kathleen Meyers, Pacific Branch Representative, Laramie, WY Lisa Marie Overall, Southwestern Branch Representative, Oklahoma State University Stillwater, OK Ralph Narain, BCE-Intern, Medical, Urban, & Veterinary Entomology Representative, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE Adam J. Bell, Systematics, Evolution, & Biodiversity Representative, Troy, NY Joyce E. Parker, Ad Hoc, Student Member, Rutgers University Marlton, NJ Debi Sutton, Headquarters Staff Liaison, Entomological Society of America, Lanham, MD Presidential Committee on Student and Young Professionals John M. Heraty, Chair, University of California-Riverside, Riverside, CA Susan J. Weller, Vice Chair, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN Lisa M. Knolhoff, Awards and Honors Committee Liaison, Pioneer Hi- Bred International, Johnston, IA Anne L. Nielsen, At Large, Rutgers University, Bridgeton, NJ Cheri M. Abraham, At Large, University of Georgia, Athens Natalie A. Hummel, At Large, Bayer CropScience, Research Triangle Park, NC Patricia L. Prasifka, At Large, Dow AgroSciences, West Fargo, ND W. Vanessa Aponte-Cordero, At Large, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA Wendy A. Johnson, At Large, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS Debi Sutton, Headquarters Staff Liaison, Entomological Society of America, Lanham, MD Publications Council Florence V. Dunkel, Chair, Physiology, Biochemistry, and Toxicology Representative, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT Timothy J. Lysyk, Governing Board Representative, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge, AB, Canada William O. Lamp, Plant-Insect Ecosystems Representative, University of Maryland, College Park, MD John M. Heraty, Systematics, Evolution, & Biodiversity Representative, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA Alec C. Gerry, Medical, Urban, & Veterinary Entomology Representative, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA E. Alan Cameron, Ex Officio, Penn State University (Emeritus), State College, PA Lawrence E. Hurd, Ex Officio, Washington and Lee University, Lexington, VA Gene R. Kritsky, Ex Officio, College of Mount St. Joseph, Cincinnati, OH Tom A. Royer, Ex Officio, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK John T. Trumble, Ex Officio, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA James B. Woolley, Ex Officio, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX Alan Kahan, Headquarters Staff Liaison, Entomological Society of America, Lanham, MD Certification Board Shripat T. Kamble, BCE, Director, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE Mustapha Debboun, BCE, Director-Elect, US Army, Academy Health Sci: MCCS-HPM, Schertz, TX Jerome J. Hatch, BCE, Past Director, Northwest Exterminating, Marietta, GA Bastiaan M. Drees, BCE, Governing Board Representative, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX Robin G. Todd, BCE, Eastern Branch Representative, ICR, Baltimore, MD Juan M. Rodriguez, BCE, International Branch Representative, Saudi Aramco, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia Stuart E. Mitchell, BCE, North Central Branch Representative, PestWest Environmental, Des Moines, IA Elizabeth Dykstra, BCE, Pacific Branch Representative, Washington Department of Health, Tumwater, WA James E. Cilek, BCE, Southeastern Branch Representative, Pinellas County Mosquito Control District, Clearwater, FL Brian L. Mount, BCE, Southwestern Branch Representative, FMC Professional Solutions, Bradenton, FL Naresh Duggal, BCE, Ad Hoc, Office of the Santa Clara County Executive, San Jose, CA Forrest E. St. Aubin, BCE-Retired, Ad Hoc, Leawood, KS Chris Stelzig, Headquarters Staff Liaison, Entomological Society of America, Lanham, MD Presidential Committee on ICE 206 Walt Leal, Co-Chair for ICE 206, University of California Davis, Davis, CA Alvin Simmons, Co-Chair for ICE 206, USDA ARS US Vegetable Lab, Charleston, SC Grayson Brown, Governing Board Representative, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY C. David Gammel, CAE, Executive Director, Entomological Society of America, Lanham, MD Rosina Romano, CMP, Headquarters Staff Liaison, Entomological Society of America, Lanham, MD Debi Sutton, Headquarters Staff Liaison, Entomological Society of America, Lanham, MD 26

29 Program Information Program Information Presidential Committee on the Insect Calendar Robert K. Peterson, Chair, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT Ricardo T. Bessin, Member, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY Jeffrey D. Bradshaw, Member, University of Nebraska, Scottsbluff, NE Fikru J. Haile Member, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN Thomas V. Myers, BCE Member, All-Rite Pest Control, Lexington, KY Marlin E. Rice, Member, Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Johnston, IA Richard Levine, Headquarters Staff Liaison, Entomological Society of America, Lanham, MD Linnaean Games Committee Deane Kathleen Zahn, Chair, Dow AgroSciences LLC, Lincoln, NE Phillip G. Mulder, Jr., Gamemaster, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK ESA Staff C. David Gammel, CAE, Executive Director Elizabeth Caesar, Desktop Publisher/Web Coordinator Adele Compton, Financial Assistant Alan Kahan, Director of Publications and Communications Richard Levine, Communications Program Manager Cindy Myers, Conferences & Exhibits Manager Pamela Reid, Marketing and Member Relations Manager Rosina Romano, CMP, Director of Meetings Chris Stelzig, Director of Certification and Data Management Debi Sutton, Director of Membership and Marketing Neil Willoughby, Director of Finance Remember Knoxville! Get the Knoxville ESA 202 Annual Meeting commemorative poster! Act fast! Purchase an original signed and numbered silk-screened print produced for ESA to commemorate the ESA s 60th Annual Meeting in Knoxville, Tennessee. The vintage-inspired, colorful print captures the spirit of Knoxville graphically with an insect surprise! Only 200 have been produced so it s soon to become a collector s item! The poster measures 2 wide by 8 high. It s sold in a sturdy cardboard envelope. Only $20.00 Available at the ESA Exhibit booth while supplies last. Please have exact change or credit card to purchase. ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA Sharing Insect Science Globally Begin your collection of commemorative Annual Meeting posters today! Limit two per person. Limited quantities available. 27

30 Daily Schedule of Meetings and Functions Daily Schedule of Meetings and Functions Daily Schedule of Meetings and Functions SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 0 Function Time Location Entomological Collections Network 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM Salon A, Hilton Knoxville ESA Governing Board Meeting: I 7:30 AM - 2:30 PM Rotunda, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Annual Review of Entomology 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM Mt. Laurel, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Microbial Control Working Group 8:00 AM - 8:00 PM Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville ESA Registration and Information Center 2:00 PM - 6:00 PM Clinch Concourse, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center ESA Certification Corporation Governing Board Meeting Council of Entomology Department Administrators Meeting 2:30 PM - 3:00 PM Rotunda, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 3:00 PM - 6:00 PM Salon B, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown P-IE Governing Council Meeting 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM Dogwood, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Entomological Collections Network 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM Salon C, Hilton Knoxville SUNDAY, NOVEMBER Function Time Location Moderator Training I 7:00 AM - 7:30 AM 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Entomological Collections Network 7:00 AM - 2:00 PM Salon A, Hilton Knoxville ESA Registration and Information Center 7:00 AM - 9:00 PM Clinch Concourse, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 202 Annual Meeting Program Committee 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM Board Room, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Environmental Entomology Editorial Board Meeting 8:00 AM - 0:00 AM Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville International Branch Meeting 8:00 AM - 0:55 AM 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Annals of the ESA Editorial Board Meeting 0:00 AM - 2:00 PM Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville Responsible Conduct of Research Training 0:00 AM - 2:30 PM Ballroom A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Moderator Training II 2:00 PM - 2:30 PM 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Lunch and Learn: How to Navigate the Annual Meeting & Get the Most Out of ESA 2:5 PM :5 PM Lecture Hall, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Certification Board Meeting 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM Board Room, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Journal of Economic Entomology Editorial Board :00 PM - 3:00 PM Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville IOBC-NRS Governing Board Meeting :00 PM - 5:00 PM The Boardroom, Hilton Knoxville Insect Photo Salon I 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM Cumberland, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Linnaean Games - Preliminary Rounds 2:00 PM - 5:00 PM Exhibit Hall B, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Journal of Medical Entomology Editorial Board Meeting 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville New Member Meet and Greet 4:30 PM - 5:5 PM Ballroom A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Judges Training I 4:45 PM - 5:5 PM 30 C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Acarology Society of America (ASA) Business Meeting 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM 30 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Opening Plenary Session 5:30 PM 7:30 PM Exhibit Hall B, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 28

31 Daily Schedule of Meetings and Functions Daily Schedule of Meetings and Functions Exhibit Hall 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Welcome Reception 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center MONDAY, NOVEMBER 2 Function Time Location Women in Entomology Breakfast 6:5 AM - 8:00 AM Windows on the Park, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Judges Training II 7:00 AM - 7:30 AM 30 C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Moderator Training III 7:00 AM - 7:30 AM 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center ESA Registration and Information Center 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM Clinch Concourse, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Entomological Foundation Board of Directors Meeting Arthropod Management Test Editorial Board Meeting 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM Salon D, Hilton Knoxville 8:00 AM - 0:00 AM Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville Coleopterists Society Executive Meeting 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Conference Room, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center IRAC-US Meeting 8:00 AM - :00 PM Salon A, Hilton Knoxville Exhibit Hall 9:00 AM 5:00 PM Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Entomological Foundation Development Committee Meeting Journal of Integrated Pest Management Editorial Board Meeting 9:45 AM - 0:45 AM Salon D, Hilton Knoxville 0:00 AM - 2:00 PM Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville Certification Business Meeting :00 AM - :00 PM Board Room, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Moderator Training IV 2:00 PM - 2:30 PM 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center CAMTech Reception 2:00 PM - 2:00 PM Rotunda, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Lunch and Learn: Interview Techniques 2:45 PM :45 PM Ballroom B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Thomas Say Editorial Board :00 PM - 2:00 PM Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville Books and Media Reviews Editorial Board Meeting 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville ICE Organizing Committee Meeting 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM The Boardroom, Hilton Knoxville PBT Section Networking Session 2:00 PM - 4:45 PM 30 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center All P-IE Section Networking Afternoon: Plant- Insect Ecosystems 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM Exhibit Hall B, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center SysEB Section Networking Session 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM Ballroom A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Highlights of Medical, Urban, and Veterinary Entomology in 202 2:00 PM - 6:00 PM Ballroom C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center American Entomologist Editorial Board Meeting 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville PBT Section Reception 4:45 PM - 6:00 PM 30 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center University of Illinois Reception 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM Salon B, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown University of California Alumni Reception 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM Salon A, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Entomological Foundation Awards Reception 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM Ballroom F, Knoxville Convention Center Iowa State University Alumni Mixer 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM Salon A, Hilton Knoxville University of Florida Alumni Mixer 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM Salon E, Hilton Knoxville 29

32 Daily Schedule of Meetings and Functions Daily Schedule of Meetings and Functions Kansas State University, Colorado State University, and University of Nebraska Mixer Northwest Mixer (Washington State University, University of Idaho, Oregon State University, Montana State University) 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM Ballroom E, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM LeConte, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Ohio State University Mixer 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM 30 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center University of Arkansas, Auburn University, Clemson University, University of Kentucky, and University of Tennessee Reception 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM Salon C, Hilton Knoxville University of Maryland Mixer 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM Salon B, Hilton Knoxville University of Missouri Reception 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville North Carolina State University Mixer 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM Hiwassee Room, Hilton Knoxville Southwestern Branch Mixer 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM Cumberland, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Black Entomologists Mixer/Business Meeting 7:00 PM - 0:00 PM Summit, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Rutgers University Mixer 7:00 PM - 0:00 PM Sequoyah I Room, Hilton Knoxville Cornell University Mixer 8:00 PM - 0:00 PM Sequoyah III Room, Hilton Knoxville University of Minnesota Reception 8:30 PM - 0:00 PM Salon C, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3 Function Time Location Moderator Training V 7:00 AM - 7:30 AM 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Past Presidents Breakfast 7:00 AM - 8:00 AM Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville USDA ARS All Hands Meeting 7:00 AM - 8:00 AM Ballroom B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Fire Ant extension Network Meeting 7:00 AM - 8:30 AM Sequoyah III Room, Hilton Knoxville ESA Registration and Information Center 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM Clinch Concourse, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Michigan State University Alumni and Friends Breakfast 7:30 AM - 9:00 AM Salon C, Hilton Knoxville Committee on Awards and Honors Meeting 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM Conference Room, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Committee on Education and Outreach Meeting 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM Board Room, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center New Governing Board Member Orientation 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM Hiwassee Room, Hilton Knoxville School and Urban IPM extension Network Meeting University of Tennesee Forensic Anthropology Center Tour 8:30 AM - 0:00 AM Sequoyah III Room, Hilton Knoxville 8:30 AM - 0:30 AM Clinch Concourse Exhibit Hall 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Committee on Membership Meeting 9:30 AM - 0:30 AM The Boardroom, Hilton Knoxville Ethics and Rules Committee Meeting 0:00 AM - 0:45 AM Conference Room, Knoxville Convention Center University of Tennesee Forensic Anthropology Center Tour 0:30 AM - 2:30 PM Clinch Concourse Committee on Common Names Meeting :00 AM - 2:00 PM Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville Section Leaders Meeting :00 AM - 2:00 PM Board Room, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Moderator Training VI 2:00 PM - 2:30 PM 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Journal of Insect Science Editorial Board Meeting 2:00 PM - :30 PM Rotunda, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 30

33 Daily Schedule of Meetings and Functions Daily Schedule of Meetings and Functions Lunch and Learn: Hands-On Photography Demonstration Lunch and Learn with Sonny Ramaswamy and Colleagues from NIFA Entomological Foundation Board of Counselors Meeting 2:5 PM - :5 PM Ballroom A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 2:5 PM - 2:5 PM Ballroom B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :00 PM - 3:00 PM Board Room, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Publications Council Meeting :00 PM - 5:00 PM Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville Student Debates :30 PM - 5:00 PM Lecture Hall, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Branch Leaders Meeting 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM Rotunda, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Committee on International Affairs Meeting 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM Hiwassee Room, Hilton Knoxville Informal Weevil Conference 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM Sequoyah III Room, Hilton Knoxville Student Session with Sonny Ramaswamy and Colleagues from NIFA 2:30 PM - 4:00 PM Ballroom B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Branch Treasurers Meeting 3:00 PM - 3:30 PM Conference Room, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Section Treasurers Meeting 3:30 PM - 4:00 PM Board Room, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Linnaean Games - Finals 5:00 PM - 7:30 PM Exhibit Hall B, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Purdue Entomology Centennial Reception 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM Ballroom A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Society for Regulatory Entomology 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM Cumberland, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Reception for RNAi Symposium 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM Sunsphere Climate Change Mixer 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM Ballroom B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center IOBC Workshop Symposium: Risk Assessment for Natural Enemies used for Classical Arthropod Biocontrol: From Regulatory Requirements to Science-Based Approaches 6:00 PM - 8:5 PM Ballroom F, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Korean Young Entomologists (KYE) 6:00 PM - 9:05 PM 200 D, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Overseas Chinese Entomologists Association (OCEA): Global Collaboration and Career Development in Entomology Annual Business Meeting of the International Union for the Study of Social Insects 6:00 PM - 0:00 PM 200 A, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM 30 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Heteroptera Conference 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM 200 B, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Student Awards Session 7:30 PM - 8:30 PM Exhibit Hall B, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center The Coleopterist s Society Business Meeting 7:30 PM - 0:00 PM Ballroom C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center North American Dipterists Society Meeting 7:30 PM - 0:5 PM 200 C, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Insect Photo Salon II 8:00 PM - 9:00 PM Cumberland, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown IOBC-NRS Symposium Mixer 8:5 PM - 0:00 PM Ballroom F, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Student Reception 8:30 PM - :30 PM Park Concourse, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center ESA Governing Board Reception 9:00 PM - 0:00 PM Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville Korean Young Entomologists (KYE) Reception 9:05 PM - :00 PM 200 D, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4 Function Time Location Student Affairs Committee Planning Meeting 6:30 AM - 7:45 AM Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville Moderator Training VII 7:00 AM - 7:30 AM 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 3

34 Daily Schedule of Meetings and Functions Daily Schedule of Meetings and Functions MUVE Final Business Meeting 7:00 AM - 8:5 AM 30 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center ESA Registration and Information Center 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM Clinch Concourse, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center PBT Final Business Meeting 7:30 AM - 7:55 AM Rotunda, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Under the Lens: The Science of Urban Pest Management 7:50 AM - 4:30 PM Salon C, Hilton Knoxville ESA Governing Board Meeting II 8:00 AM - :00 AM Rotunda, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Discover Life in America Field Trip 8:30 AM - 5:30 PM Clinch Concourse University of Tennesee Forensic Anthropology Center Tour 8:30 AM - 0:30 AM Clinch Concourse Exhibit Hall 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center University of Tennesee Forensic Anthropology Center Tour 203 Annual Meeting Program Committee Meeting Lunch and Learn: Politics and Science: How Congress and the President Impact Your Work (and what you can do about it) 0:30 AM - 2:30 PM Clinch Concourse :30 AM - :30 PM Board Room, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 2:5 PM - :5 PM Lecture Hall, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center SysEB Final Business Meeting 2:5 PM - :5 PM 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Passport Drawing in ESA Exhibit Booth Open P-IE Section Governing Council and Member Feedback Session :00 PM - :30 PM Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Booth 209 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM Rotunda, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Closing Session 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM Exhibit Hall B, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5 Function Time Location ACE Prep Course 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM Salon D, Hilton Knoxville ACE Exam I 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM Cumberland, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6 Function Time Location ACE Exam II 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM Cumberland, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Calling All New ESA Members! Join us for our Meet & Greet! If you are new to ESA this year, please stop by our New Members Meet & Greet Reception. Mingle with other new members, ESA leaders and staff, and learn about ESA benefits and the Entomology 202 Annual Meeting. The New Member Meet & Greet takes place on Sunday, November th from 4:30 5:5 PM in Ballroom A of the Knoxville Convention Center. Refreshments will be served. You should have received a special invitation to the reception in the mail bring it and exchange it for a special ESA welcome gift! 32

35 Daily Schedule by Date and Time Daily Schedule by Date and Time Daily Schedule by Date and Time SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 0 Time Session/Function Location 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM Entomological Collections Network Salon A, Hilton Knoxville 7:30 AM - 2:30 PM ESA Governing Board Meeting: I Rotunda, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM Annual Review of Entomology Mt. Laurel, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 8:00 AM - 8:00 PM Microbial Control Working Group Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville 2:00 PM - 6:00 PM ESA Registration and Information Center Clinch Concourse, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 2:30 PM - 3:00 PM ESA Certification Corporation Governing Board Meeting Rotunda, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 3:00 PM - 6:00 PM Council of Entomology Department Administrators Meeting Salon B, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM P-IE Governing Council Meeting Dogwood, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM Entomological Collections Network Salon C, Hilton Knoxville SUNDAY, NOVEMBER Time Session/Function Location 7:00 AM - 7:30 AM Moderator Training I 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 7:00 AM - 2:00 PM Entomological Collections Network Salon A, Hilton Knoxville 7:00 AM - 9:00 PM ESA Registration and Information Center Clinch Concourse, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM 202 Annual Meeting Program Committee Board Room, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 0:00 AM Environmental Entomology Editorial Board Meeting Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville 8:00 AM - 0:55 AM International Branch Meeting 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:20 PM 8:00 AM - :45 AM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM PBT Section Symposium: The i5k Initiative: A Global View of Arthropod Genomes SysEB Section Symposium: Social Insects and the Emergence of Novelty: From Local Rules to Global Behavior Symposium: Transgenic Engineering of Invertebrate Species Symposium: Aquatic Entomology as a Measure of Global Changes Symposium: Global Arthropod Repellent Research and Development Symposium: Persistence of Microbial Control Agents: Current Challenges, Recent Advancements and Future Needs 300 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 200 B, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 300 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ballroom F, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 30 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 30 C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 2:5 PM Symposium: Current Advances in Acarology Ballroom G, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 0:00 AM - 2:00 PM Annals of the ESA Editorial Board Meeting Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville 0:00 AM - 2:00 PM Symposium: Dealing with Delusional Parasitosis: Patients, Papers, and Psychologists 200 D, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 0:00 AM - 2:00 PM Symposium: Mentoring for a Global Profession 200 A, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 33

36 Daily Schedule by Date and Time 0:00 AM - 2:05 PM Symposium: An Introduction to RNA Interference (RNAi) or Post Transcriptional Gene Silencing (PTGS): Fourth Generation Pesticides: For All the Non-Molecular Entomologists (Part ) 300 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 0:00 AM - 2:30 PM Responsible Conduct of Research Training Ballroom A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 2:00 PM - 2:30 PM Moderator Training II 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 2:5 PM - :5 PM Lunch and Learn: How to Navigate the Annual Meeting & Get the Most Out of ESA Lecture Hall, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 2:30 PM - 4:30 PM Certification Board Meeting Board Room, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :00 PM - 3:00 PM Journal of Economic Entomology Editorial Board Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville :00 PM - 5:00 PM IOBC-NRS Governing Board Meeting The Boardroom, Hilton Knoxville Daily Schedule by Date and Time :00 PM - 4:45 PM :00 PM - 5:5 PM PBT Section Symposium: Remembering the Life and Work of Nancy Beckage Symposium: An Introduction to RNA Interference (RNAi) or Post Transcriptional Gene Silencing (PTGS): Fourth Generation Pesticides: For All the Non-Molecular Entomologists (Part 2). 200 A, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 300 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :00 PM - 5:5 PM Symposium: SOLA Scarab Workers 200 E, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center :5 PM - 5:5 PM :5 PM - 5:5 PM :5 PM - 5:5 PM :5 PM - 5:5 PM :5 PM - 5:5 PM :5 PM - 5:5 PM Program Symposium: Linking Global Agricultural Production with Pollination Services Program Symposium: Linkages Between Climate Change And Global Insect Pestilence: From Theory To Practice MUVE Section Symposium: A Celebration of the Life and Scientific Contributions of Carl Jones P-IE Section Symposium: IPM for Horticultural Crops in the Tropical World P-IE Section Symposium: Improving the Global Regulation of Transgenic Organisms Symposium: A Global View of Stored-Products Research: Emerging Concepts and Applications. Ballroom G, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ballroom C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 30 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ballroom B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ballroom F, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :5 PM - 5:5 PM Symposium: Americas Neuropterists Meeting Meeting Room 2, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown :5 PM - 5:5 PM Symposium: Facilitating a Global Society with Social Networking and Mobile Apps: Experiences and Lecture Hall, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Challenges :5 PM - 5:5 PM Symposium: Holistic Pest Management: Realistic Integration of Biological, Chemical, and Cultural Strategies in Horticultural Production Systems LeConte, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown :5 PM - 5:5 PM Symposium: International Society of Hymenopterists 200 B, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center :5 PM - 5:5 PM :5 PM - 5:5 PM :5 PM - 4:35 PM Symposium: New Pest vs Young Scientists: Advances Against Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Symposium: The Acarological Society of America Honors James H. Oliver, Jr. Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Crop Protection: Row Crops Ballroom E, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 30 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 30 C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :5 PM - 5:00 PM Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Biology and Ecology Salon C, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown :5 PM - 5:00 PM :5 PM - 5:00 PM Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Population Monitoring and Modeling Ten-Minute Papers, SysEB Section, Conservation, Biodiversity, and Gulf Coast Insects Summit, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 200 D, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 4:30 PM Symposium: Forest Entomology in an Era of Globalization 300 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 5:00 PM 34 Symposium: The Global Grass-Based Ecosystem: Connectivity, Diversity and Management Salon A, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown

37 Daily Schedule by Date and Time Daily Schedule by Date and Time :30 PM - 4:5 PM Ten-Minute Papers, PBT Section, Molecular Biology 300 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 4:5 PM Ten-Minute Papers, PBT Section, Physiology Rotunda, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 4:5 PM Ten-Minute Papers, PBT Section, Toxicology 300 C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM Insect Photo Salon I Cumberland, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 2:00 PM - 5:00 PM Linnaean Games Preliminary Rounds Exhibit Hall B, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM Journal of Medical Entomology Editorial Board Meeting Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville 4:30 PM - 5:5 PM New Member Meet and Greet Ballroom A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 4:45 PM - 5:5 PM Judges Training I 30 C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM Acarology Society of America (ASA) Business Meeting 30 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM Opening Plenary Session Exhibit Hall B, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM Exhibit Hall Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM Welcome Reception Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center MONDAY, NOVEMBER 2 Time Session/Function Location 6:5 AM - 8:00 AM Women in Entomology Breakfast Windows on the Park, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 7:00 AM - 7:30 AM Judges Training II 30 C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 7:00 AM - 7:30 AM Moderator Training III 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM ESA Registration and Information Center 7:50 AM - 2:0 PM Undergraduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, MUVE, PBT, SysEB, P-IE Clinch Concourse, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ballroom G, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM Entomological Foundation Board of Directors Meeting Salon D, Hilton Knoxville 8:00 AM - 0:00 AM Athropod Management Test Editorial Board Meeting Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville 8:00 AM - :00 PM IRAC-US Meeting Salon A, Hilton Knoxville 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Coleopterists Society Executive Meeting Conference Room, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Undergraduate Student Poster Display Competition, MUVE Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Undergraduate Student Poster Display Competition, PBT Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Undergraduate Student Poster Display Competition, P-IE Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Undergraduate Student Poster Display Competition, SysEB Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, MUVE- Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 8:00 PM Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, MUVE-2 Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, PBT- Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, PBT-2 Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, PBT-3 Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, P-IE- Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 35

38 Daily Schedule by Date and Time 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, P-IE-2 Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, P-IE-3 Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, P-IE-4 Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, P-IE-5 Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, P-IE-6 Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, P-IE-7 Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, SysEB- Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, SysEB-2 Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, SysEB-3 Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Daily Schedule by Date and Time 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, MUVE- Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, MUVE-2 Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, MUVE-3 Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, MUVE-4 Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, SysEB- Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, SysEB-2 Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, SysEB-3 Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, SysEB-4 Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, SysEB-5 30 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 30 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 30 C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 200 A, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 200 B, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 200 C, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 200 D, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 200 E, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 8:0 AM - 2:00 PM Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, P-IE- Lecture Hall, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 8:0 AM - 2:00 PM Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, P-IE-2 Ballroom A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:0 AM - 2:00 PM Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, P-IE-3 Ballroom B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:0 AM - 2:00 PM Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, P-IE-4 Ballroom C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:0 AM - 2:00 PM Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, P-IE-5 Ballroom E, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:0 AM - 2:00 PM Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, P-IE-6 Ballroom F, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:0 AM - 2:00 PM Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, P-IE-7 Cumberland, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 8:0 AM - 2:00 PM Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, P-IE-8 LeConte, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 8:0 AM - 2:00 PM Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, P-IE-9 Summit, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 8:0 AM - 2:00 PM Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, P-IE-0 Salon A, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 8:0 AM - 2:00 PM Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, P-IE- Salon B, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 8:0 AM - 2:00 PM Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, P-IE-2 Salon C, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 8:25 AM - 2:00 PM Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, PBT- 300 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:25 AM - 2:00 PM Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, PBT B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:25 AM - 2:00 PM Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, PBT C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 36

39 Daily Schedule by Date and Time Daily Schedule by Date and Time 8:25 AM - 2:00 PM Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, PBT-4: 300 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 9:45 AM - 0:45 AM 0:00 AM - 2:00 PM Entomological Foundation Development Committee Meeting Journal of Integrated Pest Management Editorial Board Meeting Salon D, Hilton Knoxville Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville :00 AM - :00 PM Certification Business Meeting Board Room, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 2:00 PM - 2:30 PM Moderator Training IV 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 2:00 PM - 2:00 PM CAMTech Reception Rotunda, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 2:45 PM - :45 PM Lunch and Learn: Interview Techniques Ballroom B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :00 PM - 2:00 PM Thomas Say Editorial Board Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM Books and Media Reviews Editorial Board Meeting Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM ICE Organizing Committee Meeting The Boardroom, Hilton Knoxville 2:00 PM - 4:45 PM PBT Section Networking Session 30 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM All P-IE Section Networking Afternoon: Plant-Insect Ecosystems Exhibit Hall B, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM SysEB Section Networking Session Ballroom A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 2:00 PM - 6:00 PM Highlights of Medical, Urban, and Veterinary Entomology in 202 Ballroom C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM American Entomologist Editorial Board Meeting Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville 4:45 PM - 6:00 PM PBT Reception 30 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM University of Illinois Reception Salon B, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM University of California Entomology Alumni Reception Salon A, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM Entomological Foundation Awards Reception Ballroom F, Knoxville Convention Center 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM Iowa State University Alumni Mixer Salon A, Hilton Knoxville 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM University of Florida Alumni Mixer Salon E, Hilton Knoxville 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM Kansas State University, Colorado State University, and University of Nebraska Mixer Northwest Mixer (Washington State University, University of Idaho, Oregon State University, Montana State University) Ballroom E, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center LeConte, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM Ohio State University Mixer 30 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM University of Arkansas, Auburn University, Clemson University, University of Kentucky, & University of Tennessee Reception Salon C, Hilton Knoxville 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM University of Maryland Mixer Salon B, Hilton Knoxville 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM University of Missouri Reception Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM North Carolina State University Mixer Hiwassee Room, Hilton Knoxville 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM Southwestern Branch Mixer Cumberland, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 7:00 PM - 0:00 PM Black Entomologists Mixer/Business Meeting Summit, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 7:00 PM - 0:00 PM Rutgers University Mixer Sequoyah I Room, Hilton Knoxville 8:00 PM - 0:00 PM Cornell University Mixer Sequoyah III Room, Hilton Knoxville 37

40 Daily Schedule by Date and Time 8:30 PM - 0:00 PM University of Minnesota Reception Salon C, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3 Time Session/Function Location 7:00 AM - 7:30 AM Moderator Training V 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 7:00 AM - 8:00 AM Past Presidents Breakfast Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville 7:00 AM - 8:00 AM USDA ARS All Hands Meeting Ballroom B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Daily Schedule by Date and Time 7:00 AM - 8:30 AM Fire Ant extension Network Meeting Sequoyah III Room, Hilton Knoxville 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM ESA Registration and Information Center Clinch Concourse, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 7:30 AM - 9:00 AM Michigan State University Alumni and Friends Breakfast Salon C, Hilton Knoxville 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM Committee on Awards and Honors Meeting Conference Room, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM Committee on Education and Outreach Meeting Board Room, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM New Governing Board Member Orientation Hiwassee Room, Hilton Knoxville 8:00 AM - 2:5 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:45 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Program Symposium: RNAi: From Basic Science Toward Global Application MUVE Section Symposium: Military Entomology: A Partner in Global Public Health P-IE Section Symposium: A Global Perspective of Bee Decline: Situation, Strategies and Successes P-IE Section Symposium: Do Crises Drive Innovation? Insect Resistance Management: Proactive or Reactive? IRAC US Symposium Series: No.8 SysEB Section Symposium: Entomologists Beyond Borders: Hands on Macrophotography to Help Think Globally Symposium: Asian Citrus Psyllid and Huanglonbing : Devastating Pest-Disease Complex and Threat to Citrus Production Worldwide Symposium: Biology and Management of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid in North America (Part ) Ballroom E, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 30 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Salon A, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Lecture Hall, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Ballroom A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Salon B, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Ballroom C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Symposium: Future of Amenity Trees Salon C, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:20 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Symposium: Microbe-Insect Interactions in Decomposition and Disease Ecology Symposium: Proceeding Along the IPM Continuum: Developing Multifaceted Approaches for Invasive Species Symposium: Red Palm Weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus. What s Next? Symposium: Social Networks: The Mechanistic Basis and Evolution of Social Traits Symposium: Advances in Pest Management for Turfgrass and Ornamentals Ten-Minute Papers, MUVE Section, Termites, Cockroaches, Stored Products 300 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center LeConte, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Ballroom G, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 200 C, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 200 E, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 200 D, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Biological Control Summit, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 8:00 AM - 2:5 PM Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Environmental Entomology 300 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Poster Presentations: MUVE Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Poster Presentations: PBT Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Poster Presentations: P-IE Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 38

41 Daily Schedule by Date and Time Daily Schedule by Date and Time 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Poster Presentations: SysEB Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 8:5 AM - 2:00 PM 8:5 AM - 2:00 PM SysEB Section Symposium: Bacterial Symbionts Mediating Arthropod Evolutionary Ecology: From Local Interactions to Global Diversity Ten-Minute Papers, SysEB Section, Beetle Systematics and Biogeography 200 A, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 30 C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:30 AM - 0:00 AM School and Urban IPM extension Network Meeting Sequoyah III Room, Hilton Knoxville 8:30 AM - :00 AM 8:30 AM - 2:00 PM 8:30 AM - :30 AM P-IE Section Symposium: USDA Global Science: 50 Years of Entomology P-IE Section Symposium: Biofuel Crop Entomology and Pest Management: Global, National and Local Developments SysEB Section Symposium: From Voucher Specimen to Climate Change: The Merging of Systematics and Ecology Ballroom B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ballroom F, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 200 B, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 8:30 AM - :30 AM Ten-Minute Papers, PBT Section, Biochemistry 300 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:30 AM - :45 AM Ten-Minute Papers, SysEB Section, Population Genetics, Biogeography, and Phylogeography 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:30 AM - 0:30 AM University of Tennesee Forensic Anthropology Center Tour Clinch Concourse 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM Symposium: Global Patterns in Insect Morphometrics 30 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Crop Protection: Fruit Trees & Vines Cumberland, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 9:30 AM - 0:30 AM Committee on Membership Meeting The Boardroom, Hilton Knoxville 0:00 AM - 0:45 AM Ethics and Rules Committee Meeting Conference Room, Knoxville Convention Center 0:00 AM - 2:30 PM University of Tennesee Forensic Anthropology Center Tour Clinch Concourse :00 AM - 2:00 PM Committee on Common Names Meeting Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville :00 AM - 2:00 PM Section Leaders Meeting Board Room, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 2:00 PM - 2:30 PM Moderator Training VI 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 2:00 PM - :30 PM Journal of Insect Science Editorial Board Meeting Rotunda, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 2:5 PM - :5 PM Lunch and Learn: Hands-On Photography Demonstration Ballroom A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 2:5 PM - 2:5 PM Lunch and Learn with Sonny Ramaswamy and Colleagues from NIFA Ballroom B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :00 PM - 3:00 PM Entomological Foundation Board of Counselors Meeting Board Room, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :00 PM - 5:00 PM Publications Council Meeting Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville :00 PM - 5:25 PM PBT Section Symposium: RNAi: The Power, the Promise and the Frustration Ballroom E, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :5 PM - 5:5 PM Symposium: 20 Years After Comstock the Wireworm Battle Continues Ballroom F, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 5:00 PM Student Debates Lecture Hall, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 5:30 PM :30 PM - 5:30 PM :30 PM - 5:30 PM :30 PM - 5:30 PM Program Symposium: Current Global Trends in Forensic Entomology MUVE Section Symposium: If the Epi Triad is Host, Pathogen and Environment, Where Are the Vectors? PBT Section Symposium: Transfer of Solutions from Nature to the Technical World: Latest Applications, Challenges and Future Trends in Insect Biotechnology P-IE Section Symposium: Insect Resistance Management, Ecological Genetics and Computer Modeling: Tools for Solving Local Problems With Global Implications Salon A, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 300 C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 300 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center LeConte, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 39

42 Daily Schedule by Date and Time Daily Schedule by Date and Time :30 PM - 5:30 PM P-IE Section Symposium: Researching Imminent or Newly Established Pests: Helping and Hurting at the Same Time Cumberland, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown :30 PM - 5:30 PM SysEB Section Symposium: Biodiversity in Mexico 200 A, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 5:30 PM :30 PM - 5:30 PM Symposium: Biology and Management of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid in North America (Part 2) Symposium: Tuta absoluta - The Global Threat of Tomatoes Ballroom C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ballroom G, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 5:30 PM Symposium: Chemical Ecology of Cerambycid Beetles 300 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 5:30 PM :30 PM - 5:30 PM :30 PM - 5:30 PM Symposium: Pest Control with Borates: The Science and the Art Symposium: Ecology and Conservation of Saproxylic Insects Symposium: Advances in the Management of Some Global Pests In Greenhouses 200 D, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 200 C, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 200 E, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 4:30 PM Ten-Minute Papers, MUVE Section, Mosquitoes, Part 30 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 5:00 PM Ten-Minute Papers, MUVE Section, Bed Bugs, Ants, Other Urban Pests Salon C, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown :30 PM - 5:00 PM Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Pollinators 300 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 5:5 PM Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Biological Control 2 Summit, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown :30 PM - 5:30 PM Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Invasive Species Salon B, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown :30 PM - 4:30 PM Ten-Minute Papers, SysEB Section, Ecology and Behavior 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 5:30 PM Ten-Minute Papers, SysEB Section, Phylogeny and Taxonomy 30 C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM Committee on International Affairs Meeting Hiwassee Room, Hilton Knoxville 2:00 PM - 5:00 PM Symposium: Purdue s Contribution to ESA and Entomology: 00 Year Perspective. Ballroom A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM Informal Weevil Conference Sequoyah III Room, Hilton Knoxville 2:00 PM - 4:30 PM Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Insect Resistance Management 30 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM Branch Leaders Meeting Rotunda, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 2:30 PM - 4:00 PM Student Session with Sonny Ramaswamy and Colleagues from NIFA 3:00 PM - 3:30 PM Branch Treasurers Meeting Ballroom B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Conference Room, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 3:30 PM - 4:00 PM Section Treasurers Meeting Board Room, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM Society for Regulatory Entomology Cumberland, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 5:00 PM - 7:30 PM Linnaean Games - Finals Exhibit Hall B, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM Purdue Entomology Centennial Reception Ballroom A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM Reception for RNAi Symposium Sunsphere 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM Climate Change Mixer Ballroom B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 6:00 PM - 8:5 PM Symposium: IOBC Workshop Symposium: Risk Assessment for Natural Enemies used for Classical Arthropod Biocontrol: From Regulatory Requirements to Science-Based Approaches Ballroom F, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 6:00 PM - 9:05 PM Symposium: Korean Young Entomologists (KYE) 200 D, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 6:00 PM - 0:00 PM Symposium: Overseas Chinese Entomologists Association (OCEA): Global Collaboration and Career Development in Entomology 200 A, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 40

43 Daily Schedule by Date and Time Daily Schedule by Date and Time 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM Symposium: Heteroptera Conference 200 B, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM Annual Business Meeting of the International Union for the Study of Social Insects 30 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 7:30 PM - 0:00 PM Symposium: The Coleopterist s Society Business Meeting Ballroom C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 7:30 PM - 0:5 PM Symposium: North American Dipterists Society Meeting 200 C, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 7:30 PM - 8:30 PM Student Awards Session Exhibit Hall B, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 PM - 9:00 PM Insect Photo Salon II Cumberland, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 8:5 PM - 0:00 PM IOBC-NRS Symposium Mixer Ballroom F, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:30 PM - :30 PM Student Reception Park Concourse, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 9:00 PM - 0:00 PM ESA Governing Board Reception Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville 9:05 PM - :00 PM Korean Young Entomologists (KYE) Reception 200 D, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4 Time Session/Function Location 6:30 AM - 7:45 AM Student Affairs Committee Planning Meeting Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville 7:00 AM - 7:30 AM Moderator Training VII 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 7:00 AM - 8:5 AM MUVE Final Business Meeting 30 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM ESA Registration and Information Center Clinch Concourse, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 7:30 AM - 7:55 AM PBT Final Business Meeting Rotunda, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - :00 AM ESA Governing Board Meeting II Rotunda, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Program Symposium: Ecological and Evolutionary Origins of Insect Pests in Agriculture: The Role of Crop Domestication and Global Crop Translocation MUVE Section Symposium: The Return of Insurmountable Opportunities: More Novel Statistics for Entomologists MUVE Section Symposium: Bed Bug Research: Catching Up With The Global Bed Bug Resurgence PBT Section Symposium: Novel Tools for Sustainable Pest Management P-IE Section Symposium: The Larry L. Larson Symposium: Global Challenges to Product Development and New Product Updates P-IE Section Symposium: Thinking Globally and Acting Locally: Educating the World with Sound Science on Tough Issues P-IE Section Symposium: Invasive Insects: A Global Regulatory Challenge P-IE Section Symposium: Ecological Considerations of the Rising Use of Systemic Insecticides SysEB Section Symposium: Discover Life in America s All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory in Great Smoky Mountains National Park SysEB Section Symposium: Foraging, Energetics and Life History - The Grand Connection Symposium: The Entomological Foundation and You: A Global Outlook on Entomology Education and Outreach Ballroom C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 30 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Salon A, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 300 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Cumberland, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Lecture Hall, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Salon B, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Salon C, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 200 C, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 200 A, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Ballroom A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 4

44 Daily Schedule by Date and Time 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Symposium: The Walnut Twig Beetle and Thousand Cankers Disease: A Global View from Ground Zero in Knoxville, Tennessee Ballroom E, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Symposium: GMOs for IPM - Implications for Field Crops Ballroom B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 2:05 PM 8:00 AM - 2:20 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Symposium: Vector-Virus Interactions: Implications for Transmission and Management of Emerging Diseases in Specialty Crops at Local and Global Scale Symposium: Update on Tuta absoluta, the Tomato Leafminer Symposium: More than Pests: Cockroach Behavior, Ecology, Systematics and Taxonomy Symposium: Nepal Overseas Entomologists Symposium: Global Collaboration for the Development of Next Generation IPM Program. Symposium: Anatomy of an Invasion: Requirements, Benefits and Possible Implications for Successful Invaders. 200 D, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Ballroom G, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 30 C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ballroom F, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 200 B, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Daily Schedule by Date and Time 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM Under the Lens: The Science of Urban Pest Management Salon C, Hilton Knoxville 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Poster Presentations: MUVE 2 Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Poster Presentations: PBT 2 Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Poster Presentations: P-IE 2 Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Poster Presentations: SysEB 2 Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Ten-Minute Papers, MUVE Section, Mosquitoes (Part 2) and Other Hematophagous Diptera 30 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - :5 AM Ten-Minute Papers, PBT Section, RNAi and Immunology 300 C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:5 AM - 2:00 PM 8:5 AM - 2:00 PM 8:30 AM - :5 AM 8:30 AM - 0:00 AM Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Forest and Arboreal Entomology Ten-Minute Papers, SysEB Section, Social Arthropod Ecology and Evolution Ten-Minute Papers, PBT Section, Chemical Communication Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Pheromones and Attractants Summit, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 300 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center LeConte, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 8:30 AM - 0:30 AM University of Tennesee Forensic Anthropology Center Tour Clinch Concourse 0:30 AM - 2:30 PM University of Tennesee Forensic Anthropology Center Tour Clinch Concourse :30 AM - :30 PM 203 Annual Meeting Program Committee Meeting Board Room, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 2:5 PM - :5 PM Lunch and Learn: Politics and Science: How Congress and the President Impact Your Work (and what you can do about it) Lecture Hall, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 2:5 PM - :5 PM SysEB Final Business Meeting 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :00 PM - :30 PM Passport Drawing in ESA Exhibit Booth :30 PM - 5:30 PM :30 PM - 5:30 PM :30 PM - 5:30 PM :30 PM - 5:30 PM :30 PM - 5:30 PM Program Symposium: Genetic Pest Management: Global Strategies, Hurdles, and Future Directions PBT Section Symposium: Function, Regulation and Evolution of Environmental Response Genes in Post- Genomic Era P-IE Section Symposium: Beyond Borders: Global Research in Pest Management P-IE Section Symposium: Remember IPM? Risks and Benefits of Global Expansion of Transgenes and Insecticide Seed Treatments in Field Crops P-IE Section Symposium: Variety is the Spice of Life: Biodiversity in Agricultural Systems Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Booth 209 Ballroom C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ballroom G, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ballroom F, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Salon C, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Summit, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 42

45 Daily Schedule by Date and Time Daily Schedule by Date and Time :30 PM - 5:30 PM :30 PM - 5:30 PM :30 PM - 5:30 PM :30 PM - 5:30 PM :30 PM - 5:30 PM :30 PM - 5:30 PM :30 PM - 5:30 PM :30 PM - 5:30 PM Symposium: Bugs, Bytes, and Basal Area How Forest Inventory & Analysis Programs Support Forest Entomology Research Symposium: Feeding Future Generations: Expanding a Global Science to Answer a Global Challenge Symposium: Forensic Expert Witness: Global Perspectives of Practice Symposium: How Entomologists Manage: The Global Skills We Often Overlook Symposium: Improving the Safety and Effectiveness of Biological Control Agents of Weeds in the USA Symposium: Peace Corps: Creating Global Entomologists for a Global Society Symposium: The Paris Lambdin Legacy: From Emergence to Convergence Symposium: Think Globally, Teach Locally: Designing Your Presentation to Reach Your Target Audience 30 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Salon A, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Ballroom B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center LeConte, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 200 D, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Cumberland, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 200 B, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 200 C, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 6:30 PM Symposium: The Insect Fat Body Symposium 300 C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 5:00 PM Ten-Minute Papers, MUVE Section, Ticks, Higher Diptera, and Fleas 30 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 4:30 PM Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Transgenic Host Plants Ballroom A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 5:30 PM Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Host Plant Resistance 300 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 5:00 PM 2:00 PM - 4:45 PM 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Crop Protection: Horticulture and Turf Ten-Minute Papers, SysEB Section, Morphology, Fossils, and Physiology Open P-IE Section Governing Council and Member Feedback Session Salon B, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Rotunda, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM Closing Session Exhibit Hall B, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5 Time Session/Function Location 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM ACE Prep Course Salon D, Hilton Knoxville 8:30 AM - 5:30 PM Discover Life in America Field Trip Clinch Concourse 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM ACE Exam I Cumberland, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6 Time Session/Function Location 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM ACE Exam II Cumberland, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown CONNECT to a WORLD of RESEARCH during Entomology 202 Visit ESA s Virtual Posters In addition to taking part in the hundreds of scientific sessions and physical posters in Knoxville, be sure to view the Virtual Posters authored by researchers from around the world. Further your own research and make new connections around the globe. Virtual Posters are available daily near room 30E at the Convention Center. For a list of Virtual Posters, please see the Virtual Poster listings on pages and 7 in this program book. 43

46 Daily Schedule by Scientific Program Daily Schedule by Scientific Program SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 0 Session Time Location Entomological Collections Network 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM Salon A, Hilton Knoxville Microbial Control Working Group 8:00 AM - 8:00 PM Smokey B/C, Hilton Knoxville Entomological Collections Network 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM Salon C, Hilton Knoxville SUNDAY, NOVEMBER Session Time Location Program Symposia Linkages Between Climate Change And Global Insect Pestilence: From Theory To Practice Linking Global Agricultural Production with Pollination Services :5 PM - 5:5 PM Ballroom C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :5 PM - 5:5 PM Ballroom G, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Section Symposia The i5k Initiative: A Global View of Arthropod Genomes (Section PBT) Social Insects and the Emergence of Novelty: From Local Rules to Global Behavior (Section SysEB) Remembering the Life and Work of Nancy Beckage (Section PBT) 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 300 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 2:20 PM 200 B, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center :00 PM - 4:45 PM 200 A, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Daily Schedule of Scientific Program A Celebration of the Life and Scientific Contributions of Carl Jones (Section MUVE) IPM for Horticultural Crops in the Tropical World (Section P-IE) Improving the Global Regulation of Transgenic Organisms (Section P-IE) Member Symposia :5 PM - 5:5 PM 30 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :5 PM - 5:5 PM 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :5 PM - 5:5 PM Ballroom B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Transgenic Engineering of Invertebrate Species 8:00 AM - :45 AM 300 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Aquatic Entomology as a Measure of Global Changes 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Ballroom F, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Global Arthropod Repellent Research and Development 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 30 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Persistence of Microbial Control Agents: Current 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 30 C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Challenges, Recent Advancements and Future Needs Current Advances in Acarology 8:00 AM - 2:5 PM Ballroom G, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Dealing with Delusional Parasitosis: Patients, Papers, and 0:00 AM - 2:00 PM 200 D, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Psychologists Mentoring for a Global Profession 0:00 AM - 2:00 PM 200 A, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center An Introduction to RNA Interference (RNAi) or Post Transcriptional Gene Silencing (PTGS): Fourth Generation Pesticides: For All the Non-Molecular Entomologists (Part ) An Introduction to RNA Interference (RNAi) or Post Transcriptional Gene Silencing (PTGS): Fourth Generation Pesticides: For All the Non-Molecular Entomologists (Part 2). 0:00 AM - 2:05 PM 300 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :00 PM - 5:5 PM 300 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center SOLA Scarab Workers :00 PM - 5:5 PM 200 E, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 44

47 Daily Schedule by Scientific Program A Global View of Stored-Products Research: Emerging Concepts and Applications. :5 PM - 5:5 PM Ballroom F, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Americas Neuropterists Meeting :5 PM - 5:5 PM Meeting Room 2, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Facilitating a Global Society with Social Networking and Mobile Apps: Experiences and Challenges Holistic Pest Management: Realistic Integration of Biological, Chemical, and Cultural Strategies in Horticultural Production Systems :5 PM - 5:5 PM Lecture Hall, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center :5 PM - 5:5 PM LeConte, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown International Society of Hymenopterists :5 PM - 5:5 PM 200 B, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center New Pest vs Young Scientists: Advances Against Brown Marmorated Stink Bug The Acarological Society of America Honors James H. Oliver, Jr. :5 PM - 5:5 PM Ballroom E, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :5 PM - 5:5 PM 30 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Forest Entomology in an Era of Globalization :30 PM - 4:30 PM 300 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center The Global Grass-Based Ecosystem: Connectivity, Diversity and Management :30 PM - 5:00 PM Salon A, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Ten Minute Paper (TMP) Oral Ten-Minute Papers, PBT Section, Molecular Biology :30 PM - 4:5 PM 300 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ten-Minute Papers, PBT Section, Physiology :30 PM - 4:5 PM Rotunda, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ten-Minute Papers, PBT Section, Toxicology :30 PM - 4:5 PM 300 C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Crop Protection: Row Crops :5 PM - 4:35 PM 30 C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Biology and Ecology :5 PM - 5:00 PM Salon C, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Population Monitoring and Modeling Ten-Minute Papers, SysEB Section, Conservation, Biodiversity, and Gulf Coast Insects Other Scientific Sessions :5 PM - 5:00 PM Summit, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown :5 PM - 5:00 PM 200 D, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Daily Schedule of Scientific Program Entomological Collections Network 7:00 AM - 2:00 PM Salon A, Hilton Knoxville Opening Plenary Session 5:30 PM 7:30 PM Exhibit Hall B, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center MONDAY, NOVEMBER 2 Student TMP Competition Session Time Location Undergraduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, MUVE, PBT, SysEB, P-IE 7:50 AM - 2:0 PM Ballroom G, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, MUVE- 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 30 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, MUVE-2 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 30 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, MUVE-3 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 30 C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, MUVE-4 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, PBT- 8:25 AM - 2:00 PM 300 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 45

48 Daily Schedule by Scientific Program Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, PBT-2 8:25 AM - 2:00 PM 300 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, PBT-3 8:25 AM - 2:00 PM 300 C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, PBT-4: 8:25 AM - 2:00 PM 300 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, P-IE- 8:0 AM - 2:00 PM Lecture Hall, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, P-IE-2 8:0 AM - 2:00 PM Ballroom A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, P-IE-3 8:0 AM - 2:00 PM Ballroom B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, P-IE-4 8:0 AM - 2:00 PM Ballroom C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, P-IE-5 8:0 AM - 2:00 PM Ballroom E, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, P-IE-6 8:0 AM - 2:00 PM Ballroom F, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, P-IE-7 8:0 AM - 2:00 PM Cumberland, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, P-IE-8 8:0 AM - 2:00 PM LeConte, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, P-IE-9 8:0 AM - 2:00 PM Summit, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, P-IE-0 8:0 AM - 2:00 PM Salon A, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, P-IE- 8:0 AM - 2:00 PM Salon B, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, P-IE-2 8:0 AM - 2:00 PM Salon C, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, SysEB- 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 200 A, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, SysEB-2 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 200 B, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Daily Schedule of Scientific Program Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, SysEB-3 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 200 C, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, SysEB-4 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 200 D, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition, SysEB-5 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 200 E, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Student Poster Competition Undergraduate Student Poster Display Competition, MUVE 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Undergraduate Student Poster Display Competition, PBT 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Undergraduate Student Poster Display Competition, P-IE 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Undergraduate Student Poster Display Competition, SysEB 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, MUVE- 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, MUVE-2 8:00 AM - 8:00 PM Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, PBT- 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, PBT-2 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, PBT-3 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, P-IE- 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, P-IE-2 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, P-IE-3 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, P-IE-4 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center 46

49 Daily Schedule by Scientific Program Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, P-IE-5 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, P-IE-6 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, P-IE-7 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, SysEB- 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, SysEB-2 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Graduate Student Poster Display Competition, SysEB-3 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Virtual Poster Display Competition Section Networking Sessions PBT Section Networking Session 2:00 PM - 4:45 PM 30 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center All P-IE Section Networking Afternoon: Plant-Insect Ecosystems 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM Exhibit Hall B, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center SysEB Section Networking Session 2:00 PM - 5:30 PM Ballroom A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Highlights of Medical, Urban, and Veterinary Entomology in 202 2:00 PM - 6:00 PM Ballroom C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3 Session Time Location Program Symposia RNAi: From Basic Science Toward Global Application 8:00 AM - 2:5 PM Ballroom E, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Current Global Trends in Forensic Entomology :30 PM - 5:30 PM Salon A, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Section Symposia Military Entomology: A Partner in Global Public Health (Section MUVE) A Global Perspective of Bee Decline: Situation, Strategies and Successes (Section P-IE) 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 30 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Salon A, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Daily Schedule of Scientific Program Do Crises Drive Innovation? Insect Resistance Management: Proactive or Reactive? IRAC US Symposium Series: No.8 (Section P-IE) Entomologists Beyond Borders: Hands on Macrophotography to Help Think Globally (Section SysEB) Bacterial Symbionts Mediating Arthropod Evolutionary Ecology: From Local Interactions to Global Diversity (Section SysEB) USDA Global Science: 50 Years of Entomology (Section P-IE) Biofuel Crop Entomology and Pest Management: Global, National and Local Developments (Section P-IE) From Voucher Specimen to Climate Change: The Merging of Systematics and Ecology (Section SysEB) If the Epi Triad is Host, Pathogen and Environment, Where Are the Vectors? (Section MUVE) RNAi: The Power, the Promise and the Frustration (Section PBT) 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Lecture Hall, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 2:45 PM Ballroom A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:5 AM - 2:00 PM 200 A, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 8:30 AM - :00 AM Ballroom B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:30 AM - 2:00 PM Ballroom F, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:30 AM - :30 AM 200 B, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 5:30 PM 300 C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :00 PM - 5:25 PM Ballroom E, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 47

50 Daily Schedule by Scientific Program Transfer of Solutions from Nature to the Technical World: Latest Applications, Challenges and Future Trends in Insect Biotechnology (Section PBT) Insect Resistance Management, Ecological Genetics and Computer Modeling: Tools for Solving Local Problems With Global Implications (Section P-IE) Researching Imminent or Newly Established Pests: Helping and Hurting at the Same Time (Section P-IE) :30 PM - 5:30 PM 300 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 5:30 PM LeConte, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown :30 PM - 5:30 PM Cumberland, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Biodiversity in Mexico (Section SysEB) :30 PM - 5:30 PM 200 A, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Member Symposia Asian Citrus Psyllid and Huanglonbing : Devastating Pest-Disease Complex and Threat to Citrus Production Worldwide Biology and Management of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid in North America (Part ) 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Salon B, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Ballroom C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Future of Amenity Trees 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Salon C, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Microbe-Insect Interactions in Decomposition and Disease Ecology Proceeding Along the IPM Continuum: Developing Multifaceted Approaches for Invasive Species Red Palm Weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus. What s Next? Social Networks: The Mechanistic Basis and Evolution of Social Traits Advances in Pest Management for Turfgrass and Ornamentals 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 300 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM LeConte, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Ballroom G, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 200 C, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 2:20 PM 200 E, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Daily Schedule of Scientific Program Global Patterns in Insect Morphometrics 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM 30 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 20 Years After Comstock the Wireworm Battle Continues :5 PM - 5:5 PM Ballroom F, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Tuta absoluta - The Global Threat of Tomatoes :30 PM - 5:30 PM Ballroom G, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Chemical Ecology of Cerambycid Beetles :30 PM - 5:30 PM 300 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Advances in the Management of Some Global Pests In Greenhouses Biology and Management of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid in North America (Part 2) :30 PM - 5:30 PM 200 E, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 5:30 PM Ballroom C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ecology and Conservation of Saproxylic Insects :30 PM - 5:30 PM 200 C, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Pest Control with Borates: The Science and the Art :30 PM - 5:30 PM 200 D, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Purdue s Contribution to ESA and Entomology: 00 Year Perspective. IOBC Workshop Symposium: Risk Assessment for Natural Enemies used for Classical Arthropod Biocontrol: From Regulatory Requirements to Science-Based Approaches 2:00 PM - 5:00 PM Ballroom A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 6:00 PM - 8:5 PM Ballroom F, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Korean Young Entomologists (KYE) 6:00 PM - 9:05 PM 200 D, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Overseas Chinese Entomologists Association (OCEA): Global Collaboration and Career Development in Entomology 6:00 PM - 0:00 PM 200 A, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Heteroptera Conference 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM 200 B, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center The Coleopterist s Society Business Meeting 7:30 PM - 0:00 PM Ballroom C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center North American Dipterists Society Meeting 7:30 PM - 0:5 PM 200 C, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 48

51 Daily Schedule by Scientific Program Ten Minute Paper (TMP) Oral Ten-Minute Papers, MUVE Section, Termites, Cockroaches, 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 200 D, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Stored Products Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Biological Control 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Summit, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Environmental Entomology 8:00 AM - 2:5 PM 300 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ten-Minute Papers, SysEB Section, Beetle Systematics and 8:5 AM - 2:00 PM 30 C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Biogeography Ten-Minute Papers, PBT Section, Biochemistry 8:30 AM - :30 AM 300 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ten-Minute Papers, SysEB Section, Population Genetics, Biogeography, and Phylogeography Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Crop Protection: Fruit Trees & Vines 8:30 AM - :45 AM 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM Cumberland, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Ten-Minute Papers, MUVE Section, Mosquitoes, Part :30 PM - 4:30 PM 30 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ten-Minute Papers, MUVE Section, Bed Bugs, Ants, Other Urban Pests :30 PM - 5:00 PM Salon C, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Pollinators :30 PM - 5:00 PM 300 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Biological Control 2 :30 PM - 5:5 PM Summit, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Invasive Species :30 PM - 5:30 PM Salon B, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Insect Resistance Management 2:00 PM - 4:30 PM 30 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ten-Minute Papers, SysEB Section, Phylogeny and Taxonomy :30 PM - 5:30 PM 30 C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ten-Minute Papers, SysEB Section, Ecology and Behavior :30 PM - 4:30 PM 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Poster Presentations MUVE 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center PBT 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center P-IE 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center SysEB 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Daily Schedule of Scientific Program Other Scientific Sessions Fire Ant extension Network Meeting 7:00 AM - 8:30 AM Sequoyah III Room, Hilton Knoxville School and Urban IPM extension Network Meeting 8:30 AM - 0:00 AM Sequoyah III Room, Hilton Knoxville Student Debates :30 PM - 5:00 PM Lecture Hall, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Informal Weevil Conference 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM Sequoyah III Room, Hilton Knoxville Annual Business Meeting of the International Union for the 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM 30 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Study of Social Insects 49

52 Daily Schedule by Scientific Program WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4 Program Symposia Session Time Location Ecological and Evolutionary Origins of Insect Pests in Agriculture: The Role of Crop Domestication and Global Crop Translocation Genetic Pest Management: Global Strategies, Hurdles, and Future Directions 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Ballroom C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 5:30 PM Ballroom C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Section Symposia Bed Bug Research: Catching Up With The Global Bed Bug Resurgence (Section MUVE) The Return of Insurmountable Opportunities: More Novel Statistics for Entomologists (Section MUVE) 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Salon A, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 30 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Novel Tools for Sustainable Pest Management (Section PBT) 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 300 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Daily Schedule of Scientific Program Invasive Insects: A Global Regulatory Challenge (Section P-IE) Ecological Considerations of the Rising Use of Systemic Insecticides (Section P-IE) The Larry L. Larson Symposium: Global Challenges to Product Development and New Product Updates (Section P-IE) Thinking Globally and Acting Locally: Educating the World with Sound Science on Tough Issues (Section P-IE) Discover Life in America s All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory in Great Smoky Mountains National Park (Section SysEB) Foraging, Energetics and Life History - The Grand Connection (Section SysEB) Function, Regulation and Evolution of Environmental Response Genes in Post-Genomic Era (Section PBT) Beyond Borders: Global Research in Pest Management (Section P-IE) Remember IPM? Risks and Benefits of Global Expansion of Transgenes and Insecticide Seed Treatments in Field Crops (Section P-IE) Variety is the Spice of Life: Biodiversity in Agricultural Systems (Section P-IE) 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Salon B, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Salon C, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Cumberland, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Lecture Hall, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 200 C, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 200 A, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 5:30 PM Ballroom G, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 5:30 PM Ballroom F, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 5:30 PM Salon C, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown :30 PM - 5:30 PM Summit, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Member Symposia Nepal Overseas Entomologists Symposium: Global Collaboration for the Development of Next Generation IPM Program. Anatomy of an Invasion: Requirements, Benefits and Possible Implications for Successful Invaders. 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Ballroom F, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 200 B, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center GMOs for IPM - Implications for Field Crops 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Ballroom B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center More than Pests: Cockroach Behavior, Ecology, Systematics and Taxonomy The Entomological Foundation and You: A Global Outlook on Entomology Education and Outreach The Walnut Twig Beetle and Thousand Cankers Disease: A Global View from Ground Zero in Knoxville, Tennessee Vector-Virus Interactions: Implications for Transmission and Management of Emerging Diseases in Specialty Crops at Local and Global Scale 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 30 C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Ballroom A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Ballroom E, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 8:00 AM - 2:05 PM 200 D, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center Update on Tuta absoluta, the Tomato Leafminer 8:00 AM - 2:20 PM Ballroom G, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center 50

53 Daily Schedule by Scientific Program Think Globally, Teach Locally: Designing Your Presentation to Reach Your Target Audience Bugs, Bytes, and Basal Area How Forest Inventory & Analysis Programs Support Forest Entomology Research Feeding Future Generations: Expanding a Global Science to Answer a Global Challenge :30 PM - 5:30 PM 200 C, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 5:30 PM 30 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 5:30 PM Salon A, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Forensic Expert Witness: Global Perspectives of Practice :30 PM - 5:30 PM Ballroom B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center How Entomologists Manage: The Global Skills We Often Overlook Improving the Safety and Effectiveness of Biological Control Agents of Weeds in the USA Peace Corps: Creating Global Entomologists for a Global Society :30 PM - 5:30 PM LeConte, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown :30 PM - 5:30 PM 200 D, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center :30 PM - 5:30 PM Cumberland, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown The Paris Lambdin Legacy: From Emergence to Convergence :30 PM - 5:30 PM 200 B, Floor Two, Knoxville Convention Center The Insect Fat Body Symposium :30 PM - 6:30 PM 300 C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ten Minute Paper (TMP) Oral Ten-Minute Papers, MUVE Section, Mosquitoes (Part 2) and Other Hematophagous Diptera 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM 30 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ten-Minute Papers, PBT Section, RNAi and Immunology 8:00 AM - :5 AM 300 C, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Forest and Arboreal Entomology Ten-Minute Papers, SysEB Section, Social Arthropod Ecology and Evolution 8:5 AM - 2:00 PM Summit, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown 8:5 AM - 2:00 PM 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ten-Minute Papers, PBT Section, Chemical Communication 8:30 AM - :5 AM 300 B, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Pheromones and Attractants 8:30 AM - 0:00 AM LeConte, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Ten-Minute Papers, MUVE Section, Ticks, Higher Diptera, and Fleas :30 PM - 5:00 PM 30 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Transgenic Host Plants :30 PM - 4:30 PM Ballroom A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Crop Protection: Horticulture and Turf :30 PM - 5:00 PM Salon B, Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section, Host Plant Resistance :30 PM - 5:30 PM 300 A, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Ten-Minute Papers, SysEB Section, Morphology, Fossils, and 2:00 PM - 4:45 PM 30 D, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center Physiology Daily Schedule of Scientific Program Poster Presentations MUVE 2 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center PBT 2 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center P-IE 2 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center SysEB 2 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM Exhibit Hall A, Floor One, Knoxville Convention Center Other Scientific Sessions Under the Lens: The Science of Urban Pest Management 7:50 AM 4:30 PM Salon C, Hilton Knoxville 5

54 Virtual Posters Listing Virtual Poster Listing Program Listing for Virtual Posters Virtual Poster Room (Near 30E, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center) Viewing: 9:00 AM 5:00 PM, Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, 9:00 AM 2:00 PM, Wednesday (Check Virtual Poster Room for schedule of times when authors will be available on-line) Organizers: Andrew P. Norton and Paul J. Ode, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO Virtual Posters: Medical, Urban, and Veterinary Entomology (MUVE) VP0 Correlation between sanitary factors and the German cockroach (Blattella germanica) infestation in residential buildings. Gholam Hossein Shahraki, and Kambiz Karimzadeh Shirazi, Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Iran VP02 First step of settlement of a new species of invasive mosquitoes (Aedes japonicus) in Belgium. David Damiens, Audrey Ayrinhac, Gauthier Martin, Thierry Hance, uclouvain.be, and Veerle Versteirt 2, Earth and Life Institute, Biodiversity Research Centre, UCL, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium, 2 Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerpen, Belgium VP03 Comparative toxicities of hydramethylnon, fipronyl and imidacloprid gel baits against field strain of German cockroaches. Gholam Hossein Shahraki, and Mohammad Mehdi Baneshi, Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Iran VP04 New species under genus Phlebotomus, Phlebotomus waragal sp. nov, and Sergentomyia, and Sergentomyia tara sp. nov. Prakash Rumu Salunke, National Institute of Virology, Pune, Maharashtra, India VP05 Subfossil beetles from a Neolithic well in central Europe. Ute Eulitz, and Klaus-Dieter Klass, Senckenberg Natural History Collections Dresden, Germany VP06 Does type of food matter in the foraging of household ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)? Abhinandini I. David, abhinandini. and Melally Giddegowda Venkatesha, Bangalore University, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India Virtual Posters: Physiology, Biochemistry, and Toxicology (PBT) VP07 The effect of gamma irradiation on the ovaries and testes of Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Phycitidae). Areej Kareem Al- Khalaf, Princess Nora Bint Abdulrahman University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Virtual Posters: Plant-Insect Ecosystems (P-IE) VP08 Threats and challenges of climate change effects on muga silk worm Antheraea assama Ww. (Lepidoptera) and strategies to overcome in muga silk production. C. J. Prabhakar, gmail.com, and Korada Mohan Rao, Central Silk Board, Bangalore, Karnataka, India VP09 Mass rearing and feeding potential of the apefly Spalgis epius (Westwood) (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae), a candidate biological control agent of mealybugs (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae). Melally Giddegowda Venkatesha, and Anegunda Shankar Dinesh, Bangalore University, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India VP0 Aploneura lentisci (Hemiptera: Aphididae) a new vector of potato virus Y (PVY) in Tunisia. Sonia Boukhris-Bouhachem, National Institute of Agricultural Research, Ariana, Tunisia VP Impact of climate change on voltinism and prospective diapause induction of a global pest insect - Cydia pomonella. Sibylle Stöckli, Research Station Agroscope Changins-Wädenswil ACW, Wädenswil, Switzerland VP2 A location aware system for integrated management of red palm weevil (Rhynchophorus ferrugineus). Costas Pontikakos, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens, Greece, and Dimitris Kontodimas, Benaki Phytopathological Institute, Athens, Greece VP3 Spontaneous weed strips associated with chili pepper agroecosystems impact the abundance and survival of aphid predators. Dany Silvio S. L. Amaral, Madelaine Venzon 2, Marcus Vinicius Alfenas Duarte, Helder Hugo dos Santos 2, and James D. Harwood 3, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil, 2 Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária, Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil, 3 University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY VP4 Multi-species comparisons for in vitro tolerance of quarantine tephritids to heat treatments. Emily A. Fontenot, gmail.com, Insect Pest Control Laboratory, Vienna, Austria, Scott W. Myers, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Buzzards Bay, MA, Guy J. Hallman, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Weslaco, TX, and Marc J. B. Vreysen, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, Austria VP5 Impact of insecticide use on the leafminer fly Liriomyza huidobrensis and their hymenopteran parasitoids and predators in potato crop on the central Peruvian coast. Norma Mujica, and Jürgen Kroschel, International Potato Center (CIP), Lima, Peru Virtual Posters: Systematics, Evolution, and Biodiversity (SysEB) VP6 Morphological studies on some species of Diptera in Saudi Arabia. Souad M. Alsaqabi, University of Dammam, Dammam, Saudi Arabia VP7 Diversity of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) in potato agroecosystems of the central highlands of Peru. Veronica Cañedo, and Jürgen Kroschel, International Potato Center (CIP), Lima, Peru VP8 Possible environmental pressures associated with eyespot evolution in Junonia and related genera (Nymphalidae: Junoniini). Eric Knutson, United States Army (deployed), Minneapolis, MN, and Eric M. Knutson, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND VP9 Biogeographic variation in the composition and social organization of litter-nesting Pheidole communities in the Amazon. Amy Mertl, Lesley University, Cambridge, MA, and Frank Azorsa Salazar, Centro de Ecología y Biodiversidad, Lima, Peru 52

55 Virtual Poster Listing Virtual Posters Listing Plant-Insect Ecosystems (P-IE) Section Symposium (Virtual Posters): Global Community-Driven Linked Data for Integrated Pest Management, Pest Risk Analysis and Biodiversity Conservation through the World Wide Web Moderator and Organizer: Petros T. Damos, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece Authors on-line 8:00 am :00 am, Tuesday VP20 Decision support for sustainable orchard pest management with the Swiss forecasting system SOPRA. Jörg Samietz, joerg. Heinrich Höhn, Elisabeth Razavi, Hans Ulrich Höpli, Lukas Schaub, and Benno Graf, Agroscope Changins, Wädenswil Research Station ACW, Changins-Wädenswil, Switzerland VP2 Supporting integrated pest management using open data networks and information technology through the World Wide Web. Sotiris Karampatakis, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Veria, Greece, and Petros T. Damos, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece VP23 Towards agro open data in the linked open data (LOD) cloud: The current issues in semantic knowledge representations. Charalampos Bratsas, Mathematics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece VP24 The use of WebGIS strategies for pest control in a Mediterranean area. Fransesco Manti, Elvira Castiglione, and Carmello Peter Bonsignore, Università degli Studi Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, Calabria, Italy VP25 A location aware system for integrated management of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus. Costas Pontikakos, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens, Greece, and Dimitris Kontodimas, Benaki Phytopathological Institute, Athens, Greece VP26 Control action threshold for Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) in tomato raised under greenhouse in Tunisia. Mohamed Braham, Amina Bensalem, Noura Djebali, and Chafik Eljemai, Centre Régional de Recherche en Horticulture et en Agriculture Biologique, Chott- Mariem, Tunisia VP22 Some current issues of integrated pest management in fruit orchards. Matilda Savopoulou-Soultani, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece Specialized Cannulation Chambers for Your Entomology Research from Living Systems Instrumentation The CH-LV- Large Vessel Chamber from Living Systems Instrumentation features: Unique size ideally suited for insect mid-gut cannulation and other entomology applications. Rigid stainless steel cannulae, available in a full range of sizes, are virtually unbreakable and feature grooves for thread ties to ensure secure attachment of your specimen. Optical viewing window for use in imaging studies. Both cannulae glide in and out on-axis for easy length adjustments. For questions, information, or pricing on this or any Living Systems Instrumentation product, including our full array of Sylgard coated dissection dishes, visit us at booth #504 or contact us at or via at today. CH-LV-: Large Vessel Chamber shown with a Scarlet Swallowtail. PO Box 00, St. Albans, VT

56 Sunday November Sunday November Sunday, November, 202, Morning Physiology, Biochemistry, and Toxicology (PBT) Section Symposium: The i5k Initiative: A Global View of Arthropod Genomes 300 A, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Susan Brown, Center for Genomic Studies on Arthropods Affecting Human Animal and Plant Health, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 8: Estimating genome size. Shawn Hanrahan, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 8: The i5k genome sequencing initiative at the HGCS, Baylor College of Medicine. Stephen Richards, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 8: New insights from the body louse genome. Barry R. Pittendrigh, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 9: Preliminary insights from the Megachile rotundata genome. Brielle J. Fischman, Hugh M. Robertson, and Gene E. Robinson, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 9: Progress on the bumble bee genome project. Seth M. Barribeau, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH) Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland 9: Progress on the genome of the primitively social wasp Polistes dominula. Amy L. Toth, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 0:00 Break 0: Extraordinary expansion and rapid diversification of effector genes for host adaptation in the Hessian fly genome. Jeff J. Stuart, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 0: The Manduca sexta genome project. Michael R. Kanost, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 0: Progress on sequencing and genome assembly for the western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera: Current status and potential use to model plant root-insect interactions. Brad S. Coates, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Ames, IA :5 000 The genome sequence of the most destructive insect pest of coffee crops, the coffee berry borer. Lucio Navarro, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN :35 00 The Exemplar Beetle Genomes Project: Building genomic resources to support studies in beetle phylogenomics and evolution. Duane D. McKenna, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN : Concluding remarks. Susan Brown, Center for Genomic Studies on Arthropods Affecting Human Animal and Plant Health, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS Systematics, Evolution, and Biodiversity (SysEB) Section Symposium: Social Insects and the Emergence of Novelty: From Local Rules to Global Behavior 200 B, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Zachary Shaffer, Juliana Rangel 2, Terrence P. McGlynn 3, Theresa L. Pitts-Singer 4, and Sandra M. Rehan 5, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, 2 North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, 3 California State University, Dominguez Hills, Carson, CA, 4 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Logan, UT, 5 University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 8:00 Welcoming Remarks 8: Swarm intelligence and swarm cognition in moundbuilding termites. Scott Turner, State University of New York, Syracuse, NY 8: Evolution of reproductive systems and pheromonal regulation in termites. Kenji Matsuura, ac.jp, Okayama University, Okayama, Japan 8: Behavioral correlates and markers of oxidative stress in honey bees. Michael Simone-Finstrom, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 9: Evolution of eusociality in zootermopsis. Kenneth J. Howard, Sage Colleges, Albany, NY 9:2 007 Are cockroaches rational decision-makers? Zachary Shaffer, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 9: Honey bee reproductive behavior: Implications for levels of selection in social insects. David R. Tarpy, ncsu.edu, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 9: Genomics of chemical communication in social insects. Christina M. Grozinger, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 0:5 Break 0: Optimal colony fissioning in social insects: Testing an inclusive fitness model with honey bees. Juliana Rangel, ncsu.edu, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 0: The costs and benefits of sociality in a facultatively social bee. Sandra M. Rehan, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA : Ant colony as superorganism: Metabolic scaling and synchronized respiration. James Waters, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ : Integrating genomics and chemical ecology to illuminate insect social behavior. Neil Tsutsui, edu, University of California, Berkeley, CA : Integrating social evolution and metabolic ecology. Jonathan Z. Shik, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 2: Collective decision-making in ants. Stephen C. Pratt, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 54

57 Sunday November Sunday November Member Symposium: Current Advances in Acarology Ballroom G, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Raul T. Villanueva, Jose Carlos V. Rodrigues 2, and C. W. Welbourn 3, Texas A&M University, Weslaco, TX, 2 University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR, 3 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 8:00 Welcoming Remarks 8: Mites that transmit Dutch elm disease. John C. Moser, USDA, Forest Service, Pineville, LA 8: How conventional and organic IPM programs affect the foliar Acarine populations in citrus. Raul T. Villanueva, and Gabriela Esparza-Diaz, Texas A&M University, Weslaco, TX 8: Are quarantine methods for Brevipalpus phoenicis removal from fruit effective? Jorge E. Peña, Ignacio Baez 2, Michael K. Hennessey 3, and Katia Santos, University of Florida, Homestead, FL, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Tallahassee, FL, 3 USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Raleigh, NC 9: Asian citrus psyllid control strategies and phytoseiid mite abundance, diversity, and consequences for secondary pest populations. Cesar Monzo, University of Florida, Southwest Florida Research and Education Center, Immokalee, FL, and Philip A. Stansly, University of Florida, Immokalee, FL 9: Morphological variation in a Bryobia species (Trombidiformes: Tetranychidae) from the Guassa Plateau, Menz Highlands, Ethiopia. Norman J. Fashing, Eddie A. Ueckermann 2, Peter J. Fashing 3, and Nga Nguyen 3, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, 2 Agricultural Research Council, Plant Protection Research Institute, Pretoria, South Africa, 3 California State University, Fullerton, CA 9: New observations on the systematics of the Leptinae (Acari: Parasitengonina: Erythraeidae). C. W. Welbourn, doacs.state.fl.us, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 9: Using monographs, cybertaxonomy, and phylogenetics to train a future generation of water mite systematists. Ashley P. G. Dowling, Andrea Radwell, and Ian Smith 2, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, 2 Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 0:00 Break 0: Next generation sequencing and transcriptome analysis: Exploring neuropeptides of the female deer tick (Ixodes scapularis) synganglion. N. Egekwu, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA 0: Improving biological control for a foliar spider mite pest of California grown avocados. Jesus R. Lara, and Mark S. Hoddle, University of California, Riverside, CA 0: Structure of soil mite communities in woodlands undergoing ecological restoration in the Chicago region. Monica A. Farfan, Kristen A. Ross, and David H. Wise, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL : Testing prey DNA fingerprinting on Amblyseius largoensis (Acari: Phytoseiidae) predation of Raoiella indica (Acari: Tenuipalpidae). Jose Carlos V. Rodrigues and Carlos Rivera-Rivera, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR : Ant-dependent mite diversity: A novel approach for studying the ecological development of constructed tallgrass prairies. Kaitlin Uppstrom Campbell, and Thomas O. Crist, Miami University, Oxford, OH : Population dynamics of citrus rust mites in Texas. Steven Michael Reyna, Mamoudou Setamou, and Jesse H. de Leon 2, Texas A&M University, Kingsville, TX, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Weslaco, TX : The impact of different agricultural management practices on mite assemblages in soil. Mariam Lekveishvili, and Cerruti Hooks, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 2:00 Concluding Remarks Member Symposium: Global Arthropod Repellent Research and Development 30 B, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Mustapha Debboun, United States Army, Fort Sam Houston, TX 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8: How repellents work? Neurophysiological and behavioral analysis. Zainulabeuddin Syed, nd.edu, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 8: New behavioral assays for spatial repellent testing. Sarah Moore, Ifakara Health Institute (Tanzania), London, United Kingdom 8: Personal protection provided by topical repellents and impregnated clothing used by the Australian Defence Force. Stephen P. Frances, Australian Army Malaria Institute, Enoggera, Queensland, Australia 8: Screening of natural products as biting deterrents/ repellents against Aedes aegypti. Abbas Ali, and Ikhlas Khan, University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS 9: Identification of the mosquito biting deterrent constituents from the Indian folk remedy plant, Jatropha curcas. Charles L. Cantrell, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, University, MS 9: Traditional plant-based insect repellents: Are they a powerful weapon to fight against malaria in rural Africa? Kaliyaperumal Karunammorthi, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia 9:35 Break 9: Area repellency studies with C890, a fatty acid based insect repellent. William Reifenrath, Stratacor, Inc., Richmond, CA 0: The use of repellents formulated in Specialized Pheromone and Lure Application Technology (SPLAT) for effective insect management. Agenor Mafra-Neto, ISCA Technologies, Inc., Riverside, CA 0: Evaluation of toxicity and repellency of essential oils 55

58 Sunday November Sunday November against biting flies and ticks. Andrew Y. Li, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kerrville, TX 0: Repelling insects and ticks with green chemistry. Joel R. Coats, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 0: Making pyrethroids more volatile for spatial repellent action. Kamlesh R. Chauhan, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD : Evaluation of the bite protection of U.S. military combat uniforms. Uli Bernier, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL East Lansing, MI, and Mollie D. McIntosh, Xavier University, Cincinatti, OH 0: Aquatic insects in a warming Arctic: Effects of temperature on interactions between Arctic mosquitoes (Aedes nigripes) and predaceous diving beetles (Colymbetes dolabratus) in West Greenland. Lauren E. Culler, edu, and Mathew P. Ayres, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH : The Trichoptera barcode of life database. Karl M. Kjer, Paul B. Frandsen, and Xin Zhou 2, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, 2 University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada : Regulatory perspectives on efficacy data development and performance standards for repellent impregnated materials and spatial repellents. Kevin Sweeney, epa.gov, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC Member Symposium: Aquatic Entomology as a Measure of Global Changes Ballroom F, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Jennifer M. Lang, M. Eric Benbow, and William O. Lamp 2, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH, 2 University of Maryland, College Park, MD 8:00 Welcoming Remarks 8: Bioassessment for water quality: Abilities and vulnerabilities in a changing climate. Michael J. Paul, michael. Tetra Tech, Research Triangle Park, NC 8: An integrative approach for fine scale taxonomic resolution of stream insect communites along gradients. Brian A. Gill, Boris Kondratieff, Andrea C. Encalada 2, N. LeRoy Poff, Kelly R. Zamudio 3, Alex S. Flecker 3, Cameron K. Ghalambor, and W. Chris Funk, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, 2 University of San Francisco of Quito, Quito, Ecuador, 3 Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 8: Macroinvertebrate responses to extreme drought conditions in a southeastern floodplain. Checo Colón-Gaud, Erica Johnson, and Damon Mullis, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA 9: Aquatic macroinvertebrate assemblages as indicators of land cover disturbance: A deep South perspective. Brian A. Helms, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 9: The effect of human land use on the movement of insects from streams to land. Ramsa Chaves-Ulloa, Ramsa.Chaves. and Brad W. Taylor, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 9:45 Break 0: Community responses of black flies (Diptera: Simuliidae) to climate change: Microscales and macroscales. Peter H. Adler, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, and John W. McCreadie, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL 0: Seasonal change in aquatic macroinvertebrate communities of Ghana, West Africa. M. Eric Benbow, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH, Richard Merritt, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, Ryan Kimbirauskas, Michigan State University, :20 Discussion Member Symposium: Persistence of Microbial Control Agents: Current Challenges, Recent Advancements and Future Needs 30 C, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Denny Bruck, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Corvallis, OR 8:00 Welcoming Remarks 8: Novel strategies for selection and improvement of mycoinsecticides: Directed evolution and genetic engineering. Nemat O. Keyhani, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 8: Biopesticide formulations: Making useful organisms usable. Robert W. Behle, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Peoria, IL 9: Using tracking methods to evaluate coverage and persistence of mycoinsecticides. Jarrod E. Leland, com, Novozymes Biologicals, Inc., Salem, VA 9: Conservation of soilborne entomopathogens in organic cropping systems. Mary Barbercheck, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, and Randa Jabbour, University of Maine, Orono, ME 0:05 Break 0: Entomopathogenic nematodes in for the long haul: Classical and conservation biological control. Albrecht Koppenhöfer, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 0: Enhanced persistence of entomopathogenic nematodes in inundative biocontrol applications. David Shapiro- Ilan, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Byron, GA :25 Concluding Remarks Member Symposium: Transgenic Engineering of Invertebrate Species 300 B, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Malcolm J. Fraser, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN 56

59 Sunday November Sunday November 8: Transposon-based genetic analysis in Anopheles stephensi. David O Brochta, University of Maryland, Biotechnology Institute, Rockville, MD 8: Lessons from transgenic beetles. Marce Lorenzen, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 9: Progress and prospects for the transgenic silkworm, Bombyx mori. Hanfu Xu, Southwest University, Chongqing, China 9: Homing endonucleases catalyze the efficient germline excision of a transgene in Aedes aegypti. Zach N. Adelman, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 0:00 Break 0: Characterization of blowfly gene promoters in transgenic Lucilia cuprina. Max Scott, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 0: Transgenic Aedes aegypti for arbovirus disease control and for the investigation of arbovirus-rnai pathway interaction. Alexander W. E. Franz, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO : Genetic engineering of chimeric spider silk proteins for production in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. Malcolm J. Fraser, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN Member Symposium: Dealing with Delusional Parasitosis: Patients, Papers, and Psychologists 200 D, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Matan Shelomi, University of California, Davis, CA 0:00 Introductory Remarks 0: Case studies and policies from the Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory. C. Roxanne Connelly and Cynthia C. Lord, University of Florida, Vero Beach, FL 0: Differentiating actual arthropod infestations from Ekbom Syndrome. Nancy C. Hinkle, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 0: Springtails: Unlikely kings of delusory parasitosis. Ernest C. Bernard, Kenneth A. Christiansen 2, and Karen M. Vail, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2 Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA : Extension challenges and procedures for dealing with mystery bug infestations. Michael E. Merchant, tamu.edu, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Dallas, TX : The human face of delusional parasitosis - possible underlying causes. Lynn S. Kimsey, University of California, Davis, CA Member Symposium: Mentoring for a Global Profession 200 A, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Kenneth A. Sorensen and Charles V. Covell 2, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, 2 Florida Museum of Natural History, Gainesville, FL 0:00 Introductory Remarks 0: Senior entomologist: Group, network, and mentoring. Kenneth A. Sorensen, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 0: The young entomologist: Some reflections on experiences and mentoring. Charles V. Covell, edu, Florida Museum of Natural History, Gainesville, FL 0: ESA student survey results on mentoring. Kenneth A. Sorensen, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 0: ESA mentoring and related resources and services available to students and senior entomologists. Richard Levine, Entomological Society of America, Lanham, MD :5 Panel Comments and Questions :35 Open Busines Session Member Symposium: An Introduction to RNA Interference (RNAi) or Post Transcriptional Gene Silencing (PTGS): Fourth Generation Pesticides: For All the Non-Molecular Entomologists (Part ) 300 D, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Reginald R. Coler and Jennifer L. Williams 2, ICR, Inc., Baltimore, MD, 2 McLaughlin Gormley King Company, Minneapolis, MN 0:00 Introductory Remarks 0: RNA interference the nuts and bolts. Jeffrey A. Fabrick, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Maricopa, AZ, and Jennifer L. Williams, McLaughlin Gormley King Company, Minneapolis, MN 0: Highly specific vector control through gene silencing. James J. Becnel, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL : Transcriptional silencing of a phosphotransferase kills mosquito larvae. Rajeev Vaidyanathan, com, SRI International, Harrisonburg, VA ESA Function: Responsible Conduct of Research Training Ballroom A, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Ernest S. Delfosse, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 0:00 2:30 57

60 Sunday November Sunday November Sunday, November, 202, Afternoon Lunch and Learn: How to Navigate the Annual Meeting and Get the Most Out of ESA Lecture Hall, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Jerome F. Grant, Joy L. Newton 2, and Debi Sutton 3, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2 University of Nevada, Reno, NV, 3 Entomological Society of America, Lanham, MD 2:5 - :5 Mock 2, and Michael Pfrender 4, USDA, Forest Service, Logan, UT, 2 Utah State University, Logan, UT, 3 University of Montana, Missoula, MT, 4 University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 3: Coevolution mediates the effects of climate change on interacting species. Tobin Northfield, and Anthony R. Ives, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI Future challenges to Insect Pest Management in agriculture and forestry 4: The impact of climate change on forest pests and their damage results of the BACCARA project. Maartje Klapwijk, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden Program Symposium: Linkages Between Climate Change And Global Insect Pestilence: From Theory To Practice Ballroom C, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Aaron S. Weed, Lauren E. Culler, Tobin Northfield 2, and Sanford D. Eigenbrode 3, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH, 2 University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 3 University of Idaho, Moscow, ID :5 Welcome and Opening Remarks. Aaron S. Weed, Lauren E. Culler, Tobin Northfield 2, and Sanford D. Eigenbrode 3, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH, 2 University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 3 University of Idaho, Moscow, ID Consequences of climatic variation on insect demography and population dynamics: General Principles : Climate and pestilence: A stable of theories or a stampede of contingencies. Mathew P. Ayres, Dartmouth.edu, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH : Using relationships between temperature, metabolism and consumption to predict the effects of climate change on pest pressure. Joshua J. Tewksbury, Curtis A. Deustch 2, David S. Battisti, Scott C. Merrill, 3, and Rosamond L. Naylor 4, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 2 University of California, Los Angeles, CA, 3 University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, 4 Stanford University, Stanford, CA 2: The influence of nitrogen deposition and ozone on plant-insect interactions in forest ecosystems. Mailea Miller-Pierce, Washington State University, Pullman, WA Effects of climate change on community interactions 2: Exploring the top-down effects of climate change on three species of aphids. Brandon Barton, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 2: Direct and indirect effects of climate change on the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines. Jason P. Harmon, ndsu.edu, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 3:08 Break Evolutionary adaptation to climate change 3: Potential effects of changing climate on Dendroctonus ponderosae, a widely distributed forest insect. Barbara J. Bentz, James Powell 2, Ryan Bracewell 3, Karen 58 4: Climate change and insect pest management in cereal production systems of the inland PNW. Sanford D. Eigenbrode, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 4: Effects of climate change on insect communities across variable crop landscapes. David W. Crowder, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 5:3 Concluding Remarks. Aaron S. Weed, dartmouth.edu, Lauren E. Culler, Tobin Northfield 2, and Sanford D. Eigenbrode 3, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH, 2 University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 3 University of Idaho, Moscow, ID Program Symposium: Linking Global Agricultural Production with Pollination Services Ballroom G, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Eleanor J. Blitzer, Mia G. Park, and Jessica D. Petersen 2, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 2 Cornell University, Geneva, NY :5 Introductory Remarks : Pollination, pollinators and agriculture production: Canadian international leadership then and now. Peter Kevan, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada : Global perspectives on crop pollination services. Alexandra-Maria Klein, Leuphana University, Lüneburg, Germany 2: Landscape perspectives on pollination dependence of crop yield. Teja Tscharntke, Georg-August- Universität, Göttingen, Germany 2:20 Break 2: Supporting pollination of perennial fruit crops using wildflower plantings: Progress and challenges. Brett R. Blaauw, and Rufus Isaacs, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 2:55 00 Pollination of a North American native crop, lowbush blueberry. Frank Drummond, University of Maine, Orono, ME 3:5 002 To what extent do native pollinators contribute to fruit production in Wisconsin? Claudio Gratton, Hannah R. Gaines, and Rachel E. Mallinger, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 3:35 Break #2

61 Sunday November Sunday November 3: Crossing boarders for crop production by managed solitary bees. Theresa L. Pitts-Singer, usda.gov, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Logan, UT 4:0 004 Connecting native and managed pollinators to apple production in New York orchards. Eleanor J. Blitzer, cornell.edu, Mia G. Park, and Bryan N. Danforth, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 4: Comparing fruit yield in pumpkin fields supplemented with honey bees (Apis mellifera) or bumble bees (Bombus impatiens). Jessica D. Petersen, and Brian A. Nault, Cornell University, Geneva, NY 4:50 Discussion Medical, Urban, and Veterinary Entomology (MUVE) Section Symposium: A Celebration of the Life and Scientific Contributions of Carl Jones 30 A, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: David B. Taylor and Jerome A. Hogsette 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Lincoln, NE, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL :5 006 Life and contributions of Carl Jones. Reid R. Gerhardt, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN : Graduate school at the University of Wyoming: A career begins in veterinary entomology. Gregory Johnson, edu, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT : Of mites and hens: Appreciating Carl Jones contributions to understanding host-ectoparasite relationships. Bradley A. Mullens, University of California, Riverside, CA 2:5 009 Invasion of the blood snatchers: Establishment of blacklegged ticks in Illinois and lone star ticks in Nebraska. M. Roberto Cortinas, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 2:35 00 Horn fly insecticide resistance: Diagnostic tools and resistance management strategies. Lane Foil, edu, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA, and Felix Guerrero, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kerrville, TX 2:55 0 Are the Muscidae important to the maintenance of mastitis among dairy cattle? D. Wes Watson, edu, Kevin Anderson, Roberta Lyman, and Christina Park, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 3:5 02 Why are stable fly bites so painful? Alberto Broce, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, and Jerome A. Hogsette, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL 3:35 03 Unknown 5. Jerome A. Hogsette, usda.gov, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL 3:55 04 Florida s stable flies and equine farms: A dynamic like no other. Phillip E. Kaufman, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, and Jimmy B. Pitzer, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 4:5 05 Spatial and temporal dynamics of stable fly populations in eastern Nebraska. David B. Taylor, and Kristina Friesen, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Lincoln, NE 4:35 06 Understanding the role of pteromalid parasitoids in biotic and biological control of house flies and stable flies in Illinois. Richard Weinzierl, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 4:55 07 A dud or not a dud: That is the question. Susan Ratcliffe, North Central IPM Center, Urbana, IL Physiology, Biochemistry, and Toxicology (PBT) Section Symposium: Remembering the Life and Work of Nancy Beckage 200 A, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Park Concourse, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Florence Dunkel and Karen M. Kester 2, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT, 2 Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA : Being and doing: The meaning of the life and work of Nancy Beckage. Florence Dunkel, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT :0 805 Nancy s early years: Host-parasite endocrine interactions. Lynn M. Riddiford, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, MD : Ecdysis control: Insights from hosts and parasites. James W. Truman, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Ashburn, VA : The role of neuropeptides in the physiology of insects: From Nancy Beckage s pioneering studies to the current burst of knowledge. Miriam Altstein, Volcani Institute, Bet Dagan, Israel : The Beckage story: How insects inspire knowledge creation and transfer to fields beyond entomology. Marianne Alleyne, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 2:0 809 Nancy Beckage: Leading insights into insect immunology. Diana Cox-Foster, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 2:25 80 Nancy the person: In the midst of molecular discoveries, her words and actions fostered young entomologists. Margaret L. Allen, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Stoneville, MS, Miriam F. Cooperband, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Buzzards Bay, MA, and Patricia V. Pietrantonio, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 2:40 8 Nancy and the beginning of polydnavirus genes characterization. Jean-Michel Drezen, Université François Rabelais, Parc de Grandmont, Tours, France 3:00 Break 3:5 82 Joint work on superparasitism- and the honorary doctorate to N. E. Beckage. Silvia Dorn, ethz.ch, Institute of Agricultural Sciences, ETH Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland 3:35 83 Nancy Beckage- teacher, mentor, champion for women in science. Genet M. Tulgetske, University of California, Riverside, CA 3:50 84 Exploring a new paradigm in teaching: Expansive collaboration, malaria, Mali. Ky-Phuong Luong, ucr.edu, University of California, Riverside, CA, Sidy Ba, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada, and Florence Dunkel, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59

62 Sunday November Sunday November 4:05 85 Virus-host, virus-virus interactions: Towards a new understanding of cypoviruses in host-parasitoid biology. Bruce Webb, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 4:20 86 How does the life and work of Nancy Beckage inform our future? Karen M. Kester, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 4:30 87 Photo and film memory. Florence Dunkel, montana.edu, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT, and Karen M. Kester, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 4:40 Reception, Park Concourse Session numbers appear out of order, but original numbering continues with the next symposium. 4:5 026 Addressing IRM issues. Blair D. Siegfried, unlnotes.unl.edu, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, and Clinton D. Pilcher, Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Johnston, IA 4: Ongoing efforts with crop plants in developing countries. Hector D. Quemada, Calvin College, Grand Rapids, MI 4: Science and society - the regulation of transgenic insects. Camilla Beech, Oxitec, Ltd., Oxfordshire, United Kingdom, and Luke Alphey, Oxitec, Ltd., Oxford, United Kingdom Plant-Insect Ecosystems (P-IE) Section Symposium: IPM for Horticultural Crops in the Tropical World Plant-Insect Ecosystems (P-IE) Section Symposium: Improving the Global Regulation of Transgenic Organisms Ballroom B, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Richard L. Hellmich, Jörg Romeis 2, Karen E. Hokanson 3, and Pamela M. Bachman 4, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Ames, IA, 2 Agroscope Reckenholz, Tänikon, Zürich, Switzerland, 3 University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, 4 Monsanto Company, Creve Coeur, MO :5 Introductory Remarks :20 08 Role of science in decision making. Raymond J. Layton, Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., Johnston, IA :40 09 Influence of bad science on GM crops acceptance. Jörg Romeis, Agroscope Reckenholz, Tänikon, Zürich, Switzerland 2: Approaches and challenges to tier-based nontarget organism assessments for insect control traits. Pamela M. Bachman, Monsanto Company, Creve Coeur, MO 2:20 02 Misinformation and politics: Bt eggplant. Anthony M. Shelton, Cornell University, Geneva, NY, and Karen E. Hokanson, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 2: Trade wreck? When ag policy meets reality. Jack A. Bobo, United States Department of State, Washington, DC 3:00 Break 3:5 023 Comparing apples and apples: Data transportability challenges. Andrew F. Roberts, Center for Environmental Risk Assessment, Washington, DC 3: Environmental risk assessment of GM crops: A European perspective. Yann Devos, European Food Safety Authority, Parma, Italy 3: Role of surrogate species in testing non-target effects of GM crops. Richard L. Hellmich, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Ames, IA, and Jörg Romeis, Agroscope Reckenholz, Tänikon Research Station ART, Zürich, Switzerland D, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Rangaswamy Muniappan, Short Heinrichs 2, Douglas G. Pfeiffer, and Naidu Rayapati 3, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, 2 Secretary General, IAPPS, Lincoln, NE, 3 Washington State University, Prosser, WA :5 029 An overview of the IPM CRSP. Rangaswamy Muniappan, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA : Use of Trichoderma spp., Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Bacillus spp. in seed and soil treatment. Barry Jacobsen, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT :55 03 Grafting vegetable seedlings for soil-borne disease resistance. Sally A. Miller, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH 2:5 032 Roguing for control of peanut bud necrosis virus disease in tomato. Naidu Rayapati, Washington State University, Prosser, WA 2: Host-free period for tomato yellow leaf curl virus control. Robert L. Gilbertson, University of California, Davis, CA 2: Impact assessment of IPM technology implementation. Jeff Alwang, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 3:5 Break 3: IPM packages for vegetable crops in India. S. Mohankumar, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India 3: IPM packages for vegetable crops in Indonesia. Aunu Rauf, Bogor Agricultural University, Bogor, Indonesia 4:0 037 IPM packages for vegetable crops in Bangladesh. Yousuf Mian, Integrated Pest Management Collaborative Research Support Program (IPM CRSP), Bangladesh Site, Joydebpur, Bangladesh 4: IPM packages for vegetable crops in West Africa. Douglas G. Pfeiffer, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 4:50 General Discussion

63 Sunday November Sunday November Member Symposium: The Global Grass- Based Ecosystem: Connectivity, Diversity and Management Salon A (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderators and Organizers: Matthew J. Petersen and David J. Shetlar 2, Cornell University, Geneva, NY, 2 Ohio State University, Columbus, OH :30 Introductory Remarks : The turfgrass environment, fragile or resilient? Studies on non-target effects of insecticides. David J. Shetlar, osu.edu, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH : Soil nematode diversity across an urban to rural gradient. Parwinder S. Grewal, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH 2:5 04 Influence of urban landscape on the distributions of Tipula paludosa and associated biological control agents. Matthew J. Petersen, Cornell University, Geneva, NY 2: Imported fire ants near the edge of their range: Disturbance and moisture determine prevalence and impact of an invasive social insect. Edward G. LeBrun, edu, Rob M. Plowes, and Lawrence E. Gilbert, University of Texas, Austin, TX 2:55 Break 3:0 043 Evaluating impacts of bioenergy grasslands on insects and ecosystem services: A proactive approach. Benjamin Werling, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 3: Influence of surrounding grassland habitats on stem feeding herbivores and associated parasitoids in wheat. Tatyana Rand, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Sidney, MT 3: Latitudinal variation in plant-herbivore interactions involving the invasive grass Phragmites australis. James T. Cronin, Ganesh Bhattarai, and Laura A. Meyerson 2, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, 2 University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 4:0 046 Impact of cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica) invasion on arthropod diversity and soil microfauna in Alabama. Sallie Martin, David W. Held, Charles H. Ray, Stephen Enloe, Nancy Lowenstein, and Lori Eckhardt, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 4:30 Concluding Remarks Member Symposium: A Global View of Stored- Products Research: Emerging Concepts and Applications. Ballroom F, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: David E. Bellamy and Rizana M. Mahroof 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Parlier, CA, 2 South Carolina State University, Orangeburg, SC :5 Welcoming Remarks :7 047 Heat treatment of mills in Greece. Vasilis Sotiroudas, Christos Athanassiou 2, and Bhadriraju Subramanyam, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 2 Agricultural University of Athens, Athens, Greece : Efficacy of fumigation for management of red flour beetle infesting rice mills. Karrie Buckman, usda.gov, and James F. Campbell, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Manhattan, KS : Mold mites, warehouse beetles, and cigarette beetle IPM. Stephen A. Kells, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 2: 050 Current status and future direction of ozone as a control strategy for insect pests. Linda J. Mason, edu, Yanlin Tian, Marissa McDonough, and Charles Woloshuk, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 2:29 05 Control of stored product pests in the post methyl bromide era. Jeffrey A. Weier, Sprague Pest Solutions, Tacoma, WA 2:47 Break 3: Effectiveness of Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin combined with diatomaceous earth against Rhyzopertha dominica F. (Coleoptera: Bostrychidae): Influence of grain types and insect populations. Waqas Wakil, com, Tahira Riasat 2, and Muhammad Yasin, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan, 2 Government College University, Faisalabad, Pakistan 3: Fumigation alternatives for stored products after methyl bromide is gone. Thomas W. Phillips, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 3: Mating disruption for stored products moths: Factors affecting efficacy. Charles S. Burks, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Parlier, CA 3: Sex pheromone-mediated mating disruption of Lasioderma serricorne, a serious beetle pest of stored products. Rizana M. Mahroof, South Carolina State University, Orangeburg, SC 4:4 056 Population dynamics of the confused flour beetle in a German flour mill treated with the larval parasitoid Holepyris sylvanidis (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae). Cornel Adler, jki.bund.de, Matthias Schöller, and Sandra Beier, Federal Research Centre for Cultivated Plants, The Julius Kühn Institut, Berlin, Germany 4:32 Concluding Remarks Member Symposium: Americas Neuropterists Meeting Meeting Room 2 (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderators and Organizers: David E. Bowles and Atilano Contreras-Ramos 2, United States National Park Service, Republic, MO, 2 Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México, México City, México :5 Welcoming Remarks :7 057 Taxonomic status of New World Chrysopid larvae (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae). Catherine A. Tauber, edu, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 6

64 Sunday November Sunday November : Methods for rearing Chrysoperla externa on a large scale production. Brígida de Souza, Federal University of Lavras, Lavras, Brazil : Mantispids (Neuroptera: Mantispidae) of the interior highlands of the United States. Daniel Reynoso-Velasco, mail.missouri.edu, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, and David E. Bowles, United States National Park Service, Republic, MO 2:7 060 Developments in the systematics of owlflies (Ascalaphidae). Joshua R. Jones, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 2:37 06 Fossil Neuropterida: A short look at a long history. John D. Oswald, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 3:02 Break 3:7 062 A plan for a phylogenetic analyses for antlions (Neuroptera: Myrmeleontidae). Renato Machado, neo.tamu.edu, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 3: Revision of the antlion genus Paranthaclisis, including a morphological and molecular based phylogeny of the group. Ben Diehl, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX monsanto.com, Renata Bolognesi, Parthasarathy Ramaseshadri, Ronald D. Flannagan, S. Zhao, Barbara Elizabeth Wiggins, G. Heck, Monsanto Company, Chesterfield, MO 3:05 Break 3: Ecological effects testing for an in planta RNA-based insect control trait. Pamela M. Bachman, monsanto.com, Bonnie Ayden, Renata Bolognesi 2, David Carson, Samuel Dubelman, Joshua Fischer, Geoffrey Mueller, Mark S. Paradise, Parthasarathy Ramaseshadri 2, Jianguo Tan, Joshua Uffman, Barbara Elizabeth Wiggins 2, and Steven L. Levine, Monsanto Company, Creve Coeur, MO, 2 Monsanto Company, Chesterfield, MO 4:00 07 Risk assessment and regulation of RNAi pesticides in the context of genetically engineered plants. Andrew F. Roberts, Center for Environmental Risk Assessment, Washington, DC 4:40 Panel Discussion Member Symposium: Facilitating a Global Society with Social Networking and Mobile Apps: Experiences and Challenges 3: Studying Coniopterygidae (Neuroptera) using lessons from the Sternorrhyncha (Hemiptera). Gary L. Miller, ars.usda.gov, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Belstville, MD 4:7 065 Coniopterygidae of dry forests of the Mexican Pacific. Mariza A. Sarmiento-Cordero, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México, México, DF, México, and Atilano Contreras-Ramos, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México, México City, México 4: Ectosymbiontic Chironomidae on larval Megaloptera from Thailand. David E. Bowles, United States National Park Service, Republic, MO 4:57 Discussion 5:2 Concluding Remarks Member Symposium: An Introduction to RNA Interference (RNAi) or Post Transcriptional Gene Silencing (PTGS): Fourth Generation Pesticides: For All the Non-Molecular Entomologists (Part 2). 300 D, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Reginald R. Coler and Jennifer L. Williams 2, ICR, Inc., Baltimore, MD, 2 McLaughlin Gormley King Company (MGK), Minneapolis, MN :00 Introductory Remarks : RNA interference: A functional genomics tool with pest control implications. Xuguo Joe Zhou, edu, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, and Blair D. Siegfried, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE : RNA interference in ticks: A functional genomics tool for the study of tick-host interactions. Shahid Karim, usm.edu, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS 2: Analyses of RNA interference gene targets for the control of western corn rootworm. Gerrit Segers, 62 Lecture Hall, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Godshen Robert Pallipparambil and Joe Louis 2, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, 2 Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA :5 Introductory Remarks : You are what you tweet - communicating entomology 40 characters at a time. May R. Berenbaum, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL : A gnat in the Cloud: How to wing it online. Kristie Reddick, and Jessica Honaker, Texas A&M University, Portland, OR 2: Online resources for managing scientific content: Rethinking the way we collaborate. Brian P. McCornack, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 2: Pecan ipmpipe facilitates communication among diverse pecan stakeholders to serve overlapping interests: Experiences and challenges. Andrew Birt, Alejandro A. Calixto, Luis Calixto, Neal Lee, and Marvin Harris, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 2: Lessons from lady beetles: Accuracy of monitoring data from U.S. and U.K. citizen science programs. Mary M. Gardiner, John E. Losey 2, Helen Roy 3, Peter Brown 4, Rebecca Smyth 2, and Leslie L. Allee 2, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, 2 Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 3 Natural Environment Research Council, Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom, 4 Animal and Environmental Research Group, East Rd., Cambridge, United Kingdom 3:0 Break 3: Making the leap from in-field to mobile extension outreach via social media and app development. Natalie A. Hummel, and Anna Meszaros, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA 3: Invasive species and forest pests: How we have built

65 Sunday November Sunday November apps for that. C. T. Bargeron, J. LaForest, D. J. Moorhead 2, and G. Keith Douce, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, 2 University of Georgia, Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health, Tifton, GA 4: Let s make an app: Design, development and implementation in research. Godshen Robert Pallipparambil, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, Ann Smittu Joseph, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, Thomas Antony, TechData Service Company, King of Prussia, PA, and Shihabudin Ibrahim, Whitlock, Irving, TX 4: Hey, that s my [photo][app][post]!: Intellectual property issues in disseminating science in a social-media world. Gary Pulsinelli, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 4:48 08 Entomology and social media: From blogs to apps. Cheri M. Abraham, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA 5:0 Concluding Remarks Member Symposium: Forest Entomology in an Era of Globalization 300 A, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Nathan Havill, Richard W. Hofstetter 2, and Kimberly F. Wallin 3, USDA, Forest Service, Hamden, CT, 2 Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, 3 University of Vermont, Burlington, VT :30 Welcoming Remarks : Climate, adaptation, and range expansion in invasive forest insects. Dylan Parry, State University of New York, Syracuse, NY 2: The diverse and indispensable role of insects in changing urban ecosystems. Vincent D Amico, USDA, Forest Service, Newark, DE 2: International trade in live plants: The most damaging pathway for invasion of forest pests. Andrew M. Liebhold, USDA, Forest Service, Morgantown, WV 3:05 Break 3: The real cost of invasives: Who s going to pay? Darrell W. Ross, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 3: Who let the bugs out? When forest management causes insect problems. B. Staffan Lindgren, University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, British Columbia, Canada 4:20 Concluding Remarks Member Symposium: Holistic Pest Management: Realistic Integration of Biological, Chemical, and Cultural Strategies in Horticultural Production Systems LeConte (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderators and Organizers: Randy Martin and Raymond A. Cloyd 2, Bioworks, Inc., Victor, NY, 2 Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS :5 Introductory Remarks : What does IPM mean to horticulture producers? Graham Tucker, Green Circle Growers, Oberlin, OH : Sanitation: The first line of defense in IPM. Randall H. Zondag, Ohio State University, Painesville, OH 2: How is spray technology an IPM tactic? Heping Zhu, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Wooster, OH 2:20 Break 2: How does extension have to change to deliver IPM and meet the needs of the grower? Frank A. Hale, University of Tennessee, Nashville, TN 3:00 09 Extension on the front-lines. James A. Bethke, University of California, Cooperative Extension, San Marcos, CA 3: What do growers need from university research and extension? Tammy Ingersoll, Village Farms, Monahans, TX 3: What does industry need from university research and extension? Randy Martin, Bioworks, Inc., Victor, NY 4:00 Break 4: Integrating beneficial arthropods and pesticides: A grower s perspective. Jeff Mast, Banner Greenhouses, Nebo, NC 4: Integrating beneficial arthropods and pesticides: An academic perspective. Raymond A. Cloyd, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 5:00 Concluding Remarks Member Symposium: International Society of Hymenopterists 200 B, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Andrew R. Deans and John M. Heraty 2, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, 2 University of California, Riverside, CA :5 Welcoming Remarks : New insight into an old genus: Revising Disholcaspis Dalle Torre & Kieffer, 90 (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae). Crystal McEwen, University of Maryland, College Park, MD : Phylogenetics and taxonomy of the enigmatic genus Coccobius (Aphelinidae: Coccophaginae). Jason Mottern, and John M. Heraty, University of California, Riverside, CA : Cremnops (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) of the World: A phylogenetic analysis. Erika Tucker, and Michael J. Sharkey, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 2: Employing polydnavirus genes to uncover cryptic 63

66 Sunday November Sunday November species in Ichneumonoidea. Victoria G. Pook, edu, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 2: Higher-level molecular phylogeny of Ophioniformes (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae). Andrés Herrera, gmail.com, and Barbara J. Sharanowski, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada 2:35 Break 2: The origin and diversification of spider wasps (Hymenoptera: Pompilidae). Juanita Rodriguez, Cecilia Waichert, Carol D. von Dohlen, and James P. Pitts, Utah State University, Logan, UT 3: The shape of things to come: A morphometric analysis of the Dryinidae chela in relation to host choice. Carly M. Tribull, University of California, Berkeley, CA 3: Systematics of the well-known family Chyphotidae (Hymenoptera). Emily A. Sadler, and James P. Pitts, Utah State University, Logan, UT 3: Gustatory and odorant receptor genes in Trissolcus basalis (Platygastridae: Telenominae). Elijah Talamas, osu.edu, and Norman F. Johnson, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 3:50 Business Meeting 4:20 Foraging and Pollination John P. Cullum 2, Sean A. Wiles 3, Starker E. Wright, and Tracy C. Leskey, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kearneysville, WV, 2 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, 3 Pennsylvania State University, Biglerville, PA 3:5 Break 3: Understanding the seasonality of the brown marmorated stink bug in Virginia. Katherine L. Kamminga, and Thomas P. Kuhar, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 3:50 02 Injury to peaches and apples from brown marmorated stink bug following discrete exposure periods during the growing season. Shimat V. Joseph, Brent D. Short 2, Tracy C. Leskey 2, and J. Christopher Bergh, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Winchester, VA, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kearneysville, WV 4:0 022 Feeding damage on hazelnuts by Halyomorpha halys, brown marmorated stink bug (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae). Christopher S. Hedstrom, Vaughn M. Walton, Jeffrey C. Miller, Peter W. Shearer 2, and Jeff Olsen 3, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, 2 Oregon State University, Hood River, OR, 3 Oregon State University, McMinnville, OR 4: Spatial patterns of brown marmorated stink bug host use in nurseries: A multi-scale analysis. Holly M. Martinson, and Michael J. Raupp, University of Maryland, College Park, MD Member Symposium: New Pest vs Young Scientists: Advances Against Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Ballroom E, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Doo-Hyung Lee, Christina Harris 2, and Shimat V. Joseph 3, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kearneysville, WV, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD, 3 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Winchester, VA :5 Welcoming Remarks : Occurrence of brown marmorated stink bug, an outbreak pest, in Japan. Ken Funayama, lg.jp, Akita Prefectural Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Research Center, Yokote, Akita, Japan : Incorporating the reproductive biology of brown marmorated stink bug into phenological models. Anne L. Nielsen, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 2: Patterns of release of a Halyomorpha halys maleproduced pheromone and attraction of conspecifics. Christina Harris, and Aijun Zhang, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD 2: Classical biological control of the brown marmorated stink bug: Behavioral observations of Trissolcus spp., potential biological control agents. Christine Dieckhoff, ars.usda.gov, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Newark, DE, and Kim A. Hoelmer, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Montferrier, DE, France 2: Defining risk posed by Halyomorpha halys populations overwintering in natural landscapes. Doo-Hyung Lee, DooHyung. 64 4: Examining landscape factors that are facilitating the distribution of the brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys) in New Jersey. Adam M. Wallner, Noel Hahn, Cesar Rodriguez-Saona 2, Anne L. Nielsen, and George C. Hamilton, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, 2 Rutgers University, Chatsworth, NJ 5:0 Concluding Remarks Member Symposium: SOLA Scarab Workers 200 E, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Andrew B. T. Smith, Canadian Museum of Nature, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada :00 Introduction. Andrew B. T. Smith, Canadian Museum of Nature, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada : A passion for rhinoceros and stag beetles in Japan. Kentaro Miwa, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE : Beetle survey of the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas: Scarabs cross three forest types. Edward G. Riley, tamu.edu, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX : Results of a preliminary survey of the Scarabaeidae of Valles Caldera National Preserve. Reese J. Worthington, go.olemiss.edu, University of Mississippi, University, MS 2: Scarabaeoid beetles of the West Indies. Mary Liz Jameson, Wichita State University, Wichita, KS, Brett C. Ratcliffe, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, Michael A. Ivie, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT, Ronald D. Cave, University of Florida, Ft. Pierce, FL, Andrew B. T. Smith, Canadian Museum of Nature, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, and Paul Skelley, Florida State Collection of Arthropods, Gainesville, FL

67 Sunday November Sunday November 2: Studies on the biology of Lichnanthe Burmeister (Glaphyridae): Color morph frequencies, mate selection, and sex ratios. David C. Carlson, Retired, Fair Oaks, CA 2:45 Break 3: Scarab Identification Workshop in Peru: An innovative method for outreach and collaboration. Brett C. Ratcliffe, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 3: Testing the Great American Biotic Interchange hypothesis using Hercules beetles (genus Dynastes). Jen-Pan Huang, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 3: Phylogenetic analysis resolves basal relationships in dung beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae). Sergei Tarasov, University of Oslo, Norway 4: Patterns of abundance and colonization power of invasive scarab beetles in southern Mexico. Jorge L. León-Cortés, El Colegio de la Frontera Sur, San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas, México 4: Cloud forest passalids: An evolutionary study of the genus Petrejoides. Cristian Fernando Beza-Beza, wichita.edu, Wichita State University, Wichita, KS 4:45 Discussion and Concluding Remarks Member Symposium: The Acarological Society of America Honors James H. Oliver, Jr. 30 B, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: H. Joel Hutcheson, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Ames, IA :5 Welcoming Remarks : The genomes of the Phytoseiid Metaseiulus occidentalis. Marjorie A. Hoy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL : Technologies to reduce the incidence of tick-borne disease transmission in livestock and humans by controlling ticks feeding on white-tailed deer. J. Mat Pound, gov, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kerrville, TX 2: Parahaploidy and other stories. Ellen Dotson, cdc.gov, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 2: A life of ticks, mites, and parasites. H. Joel Hutcheson, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Ames, IA 2:40 Break 2: So what use are larvae in systematics of Amblyomma? Hans Klompen, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 3: Host-tick coextinction: Are some tick species threatened? Lance Durden, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA 3: The U.S. National Tick Collection: Past, present, and future. Lorenza Beati, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA 3: Systematics of closely related tick species (Acari: Ixodidae). Dmitry Apanaskevich, edu, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA 4:5 Acarological Society of America Business Meeting Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section: Biology and Ecology Salon C (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderators: Anthony J. Lentz and Sebe Brown 2, Bellarmine University, Louisville, KY, 2 Louisiana State University AgCenter, Winnsboro, LA :5 Introductory Remarks : Butterfly beauties and dragonfly damsels. Linda A. Smyth, ESA Emeritus Member, Macon, GA : Caterpillars in the classroom: Using in-class research projects to engage introductory science students. Evan Lampert, Gainesville State College, Oakwood, GA : Diversity of insect species infesting maize under traditional storage systems in Somanya and Mim. Danny Nii Akwei Obuamah, University of Ghana, Legon, Accra, Ghana : Performance of specialist and generalist insect herbivores on native and novel host plants. Rodrigo Diaz, ufl.edu, Veronica Manrique, Jose Castillo, and William A. Overholt, University of Florida, Fort Pierce, FL 2: Montane environments as a source of biotypic diversity in Russian wheat aphid, Diuraphis noxia, in Colorado. Mariana Chapela, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 2: Insect compassion, evidence of altruism, reciprocity and midwifery behavior in aphids. J. Kent Morgan, ars.usda.gov, Abigail Walter 2, Robert G. Shatters, Stephen L. Lapointe, Wayne B. Hunter, and David G. Hall, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Fort Pierce, FL, 2 Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp, Sweden, 2: Bioecology of the spittlebug Aeneolamia varia and perspectives of its microbiological control in sugarcane in the Andean region of Colombia. German Vargas, org, Johanna Obando, Myriam Rosero, Jesus Matabanchoy, Carlos A. Moreno, Gerson Ramirez, Carlos Sendoya, Anamaria Garcia, Yolima Arenas, Alex Bustillo, Ulises Castro, and Luis A. Gomez, Colombian Sugarcane Research Center - Cenicaña, Cali, Colombia 2: Seasonal occurrence and life history of Paratelenomus saccharalis, an egg parasitoid of kudzu bug in Japan. Keiji Takasu, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan 2: Feeding behavior of Bactericera cockerelli on various host plants, using electrical penetration graph. Cole Pearson, cole. Washington State University, Pullman, WA, Elaine Backus, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Parlier, CA, and Joseph E. Munyaneza, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Wapato, WA 3:06 Break 3: Learning with an aversive stimulus in Helicoverpa zea. Anthony J. Lentz, and Christopher M. 65

68 Sunday November Sunday November Sims, Bellarmine University, Louisville, KY 3: Dispersal and host finding by the host-specific weevil Rhinoncomimus latipes. Scott H. Berg, and Judith A. Hough-Goldstein, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 3: Influence of dung quality on dung beetle attraction in Nebraska. Sean D. Whipple, Jeanna D. Jenkins, Karla H. Jenkins, and Jeffrey D. Bradshaw, University of Nebraska, Scottsbluff, NE 3: Determination of seasonal cold tolerance for adult and larval Pityophthorus juglandis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). R. Fithian, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 4: Temperature and food quality alter tritrophic interactions in a plant-grasshopper-spider food chain. Angela N. Laws, and Anthony Joern, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 4: Trophic control of the ranchman s tiger moth (Platyprepia virginalis) across a moisture gradient. Patrick Grof- Tisza, University of California, Davis, CA Dave Ruen, Dow AgroSciences, Lanesboro, MN, and Eric Scherder, Dow AgroSciences, Huxley, IA 2: Bio-efficacy of lambda-cythalothrin dimethoate on insect pests of cowpea Vigna. Philomina Gyamfi, aol.com, University of Ghana, Legon, Acca-North, Ghana 2: Bio-efficacy of three insecticides in the management of cowpea insect pests. Philomina Gyamfi, University of Ghana, Legon, Oda, Ghana 2: Managing a complex of sucking pests in vegetables with Dow AgroSciences Closer insecticide. Boris A. Castro, dow.com, Dow AgroSciences, Fresno, CA, Jesse M. Richardson, Dow AgroSciences, Hesperia, CA, James D. Thomas, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN, and John C. Palumbo, University of Arizona, Yuma, AZ 2:42 Break 2: A multiple quarantine treatment using bale compression and a 3-d hydrogen phosphide fumigation to control Hessian fly in hay exported to Japan. Victoria Y. Yokoyama, ars.usda.gov, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Parlier, CA 4: Australian insectary industry and its current status. Mahmuda Begum, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia 4:45 Concluding Remarks Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section: Crop Protection: Row Crops 30 C, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Paul W. Borth and Jessica L. Parker 2, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN, 2 Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA :5 Introductory Remarks : Pest status of threecornered alfalfa hopper (Spissistilus festinus) in reproductive stage soybeans. Fred R. Musser, msstate.edu, Ishakh Pulakkatu-Thodi 2, Angus L. Catchot 3, Jeffrey Gore 4, and Donald Cook 4, Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, 2 University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, 3 Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, 4 Mississippi State University, Stoneville, MS : Feeding behavior of four aphid species on thiamethoxam seed-treated soybean. Jeffrey A. Davis, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA : Sucking insect management in alfalfa with Transform TM (sulfoxaflor). Jesse M. Richardson, Dow AgroSciences, Hesperia, CA, Boris A. Castro, Dow AgroSciences, Fresno, CA, Harvey A. Yoshida, Dow AgroSciences, Richland, WA, James D. Thomas, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN, C. Scott Bundy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, Eric T. Natwick, University of California, Cooperative Extension, Holtville, CA, James D. Barbour, University of Idaho, Parma, ID, Douglas B. Walsh, Washington State University, Prosser, WA, and Vonny Barlow, University of California, Blythe, CA : Field trial performance of sulfoxaflor for control of aphids in corn and soybeans. Neil Spomer, com, Dow AgroSciences, Brookings, SD, James D. Thomas, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN, Kevin Johnson, Dow AgroSciences, Danville, IL, Patricia Prasifka, Dow AgroSciences, West Fargo, ND, 66 3: Influence of banded pre-emergent herbicide applications on arthropod diversity in corn. Daniel L. Frank, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 3: Role of DuPont Cyazypyr insect control in the management of coleopteran pests in multiple crops. Rachel Cameron, I. Billy Annan, Juan M. Alvarez, and Hector Portillo, DuPont Crop Protection, Newark, DE 3: Utilization of sulfoxaflor in management programs for tarnished plant bug (Lygus lineolaris) in cotton. Melissa Willrich Siebert, Larry Walton 2, Ralph B. Lassiter, Andrew T. Ellis, Robert Haygood 3, and James D. Thomas 4, Dow AgroSciences, Greenville, MS, 2 Dow AgroSciences, Tupelo, MS, 3 Dow AgroSciences, Collierville, TN, 4 Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN 3: Transform TM field performance on cotton pests in Texas. Jackie A. Lee, Dow AgroSciences, Lubbock, TX, Vernon B. Langston, Dow AgroSciences, The Woodlands, TX, Roy Parker, Texas Cooperative Extension, Corpus Christi, TX, David L. Kerns, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, Lubbock, TX, and James D. Thomas, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN 3: Field performance of Nealta miticide in the U.S. crop protection market. Paul Neese and Joe Stout, BASF Corporation, Research Triangle Park, NC 4: Using the pesticide risk mitigation engine to assess and reduce pesticide risks. Thomas A. Green, org, Chuck Benbrook 2, Karen Benbrook 3, Michael Guzy 4, Paul Jepson 4, Jonathan Kaplan 5, Susan Kegley 6, Pierre Mineau 7, and Wade Pronschinske, IPM Institute of North America, Inc., Madison, WI, 2 Organic Center, Enterprise, OR, 3 BCS Ecologic, Inc., Enterprise, OR, 4 Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, 5 Natural Resources Defense Council, San Francisco, CA, 6 Pesticide Research Institute, Berkeley, CA, 7 Pierre Mineau Consulting, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 4: Farmers-scientist, role in crop protection science in India. Harvir Singh, Directorate of Oil Seed Research, Hyderabad, India 4:33 Concluding Remarks

69 Sunday November Sunday November Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section: Population Monitoring, and Modeling Summit (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderators: Donald C. Henne and John C. Wise 2, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Weslaco, TX, 2 Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI :5 Introductory Remarks : Use of solar-powered nighttime illumination to reduce defoliation by Chinese rose beetle (Adoretus sinicus Burmeister) (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) in cacao. Grant T. McQuate, Grant. USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Hilo, HI, and Mary Liz Jameson, Wichita State University, Wichita, KS : Association of stink bug injury and remotely sensed data in cotton. Dominic R. Reisig, Francis P. F. Reay-Jones 2, and Alan Meijer, North Carolina State University, Plymouth, NC, 2 Clemson University, Florence, SC : How far do insects move? Understanding predator movement throughout agricultural fields using immunomarking. Beth A. Choate, and Jonathan Lundgren, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Brookings, SD : Co-clustering spatial data using a generalized linear mixed model with application to integrated pest management. Zhanpan Zhang, Daniel R. Jeske, 2, Xinping Cui 2, and Mark S. Hoddle 2, GE Global Research, Niskayuna, NY, 2 University of California, Riverside, CA 2: Population model for Ascotis selenaria (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) in citrus orchard. Kyung San Choi, kr, Rural Development Administration, Jeju, South Korea 2: Evaluation of baits for improved trapping of spotted wing drosophila. Steven Van Timmeren, Rufus Isaacs, Keith S. Mason, Craig R. Roubos and Katie O Donnell, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 2: Evaluation of traps for monitoring blueberry gall midge (Dasineura oxycoccana Johnson) and using SADIE analysis to model midge and parasitoid distribution in rabbiteye blueberries. Elena M. Rhodes, Oscar E. Liburd, and Nicole B. Benda, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 2: Enumerative and binomial sampling of Tetranychus urticae (Koch) (Acari: Tetranychidae) on peppermint in California. Kris Tollerup, Daniel Marcum, Rob Wilson, and Larry Godfrey, University of California, Davis, CA 2:54 Break 3: Monitoring the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Sulc) (Hemiptera: Triozidae): Trends and challenges. Donald C. Henne, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Weslaco, TX, and John Goolsby, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Edinburg, TX 3: Integrated trap crop and pheromone trap cystem for organic management of brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys). Clarissa Mathews, edu, Shepherd University, Shepherdstown, WV, and M. Haroun Hallack, Redbud Farm, Inwood, WV 3: Simulating trapping experiments for random-walkers on a large air-table. Christopher Adams, Peter S. McGhee, Larry J. Gut, and James R. Miller, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 3: Calculating trap interception radius from the singletrap multiple release configuration: Part - Data from air-table and literature. James R. Miller, Christopher Adams, Larry J. Gut, and McGhee Peter, Michigan State University, E. Lansing, MI 3: Calculating trap interception radii from the single-trap multiple release configuration: Part 2 - tortricid moths. Peter S. McGhee, Christopher Adams, Larry J. Gut, and James R. Miller, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 4: Sequential sampling for headworm in grain sorghum. Norman Elliott, Kristopher L. Giles 2, Tom A. Royer 2, Michael J. Brewer 3, Bonnie B. Pendleton 4, Brian P. McCornack 5, and Georges Backoulou 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Stillwater, OK, 2 Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, 3 Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Corpus Christi, TX, 4 West Texas A&M University, Canyon, TX, 5 Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 4: Survey of pest management practices of stored rough rice in California. Luis Espino, University of California, Cooperative Extension, Colusa, CA, Chris Greer, University of California, Cooperative Extension, Yuba City, CA, Randall Mutters, University of California, Cooperative Extension, Oroville, CA, and James F. Thompson, University of California, Davis, CA 4: Mass trapping Amyelois transitella: A case for areawide application. Justin E. Nay, Integral Ag., Inc., Durham, CA, and Elizabeth A. Boyd, California State University, Chico, CA 4: Evaluation of trapping methods for walnut twig beetle (Pityophthorus juglandis) in east Tennessee. Alicia M. Bray, tnstate.edu, William Klingeman 2, Jennifer Juzwik 3, Sharon E. Reed 4, Jason B. Oliver, Nadeer Youssef, Paris L. Lambdin 2, and Katheryne Nix 2, Tennessee State University, McMinnville, TN, 2 University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 3 USDA, Forest Service, St. Paul, MN, 4 University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 4: WeevilTrak by DuPont: Degree-days, plant phenology and local knowledge deliver timely solutions to a troublesome turf pest. Daniel C. Peck, EntomoTech Fundamentals, Geneva, NY, Victor B. Steward, DuPont Crop Protection, Overland Park, KS, and Mark A. Coffelt, DuPont Crop Protection, Wilmington, DE 5:09 Concluding Remarks Ten-Minute Papers, SysEB Section: Conservation, Biodiversity, and Gulf Coast Insects 200 D, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Janice L. Bossart and John T. Longino 2, Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, LA, 2 University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT :5 Introductory Remarks : Litter ants from Chiapas to Nicaragua: Highlights from the LLAMA project. John T. Longino, com, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, Michael G. Branstetter, University of California, Davis, CA, and Laura Sáenz, Universidad de San Carlos, Ciudad de Guatemala, Guatemala 67

70 Sunday November Sunday November : Life in the clouds: Biodiversity and vertical stratification sampling in the Ecuadorian cloud forest. Guinevere Z. Jones, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY : Arthropod biodiversity inventory and monitoring in the alpine environment for natural resource management on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Jesse A. Eiben, University of Hawaii, Manoa, Honolulu, HI : Limited erosion of biodiversity from small relic forest patches. Janice L Bossart, Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, LA 2: Armored scale insect pests in quarantine and in a tropical rainforest canopy: Molecular identification, species delimitation, and systematics. Benjamin B. Normark, ent.umass.edu, Akiko Okusu, John W. Dooley 2, and Geoffrey Morse 3, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, 2 USDA, South San Francisco, CA, 3 University of San Diego, San Diego, CA 2: Rearing port interceptions for identification. Sian Mary O Sullivan Bailey, Hannah Nadel, Scott W. Myers, and Victor C. Mastro, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Buzzards Bay, MA, 2: Comparison of functional traits to determine land use effects on macroinvertebrates of northern Mongolian streams. Oyunchuluun Yadamsuren, Saara DeWalt, John Morse, Peter H. Adler, Jon K. Gelhaus 2, and Bryan L. Brown 3, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, 2 Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia, PA, 3 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 2: Nosema survey in the Middle East and neighboring countries. Irfan Kandemir, Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey, and Walter S. Sheppard, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 2:54 Break 3: Response of Parnassius apollo elevational distribution to climate warming. J. I. Rong, Xinjiang Normal University, Urumqi, China 3:2 029 Warm ants: Ant responses to warming in low and high latitude eastern U.S. forests. Shannon L. Pelini, com, Sarah E. Diamond 2, Lauren M. Nichols 2, Aaron M. Ellison 3, Nicholas J. Gotelli 4, Nathan J. Sanders 5, and Rob R. Dunn 2, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH, 2 North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, 3 Harvard University, Petersham, MA, 4 University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, 5 University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 3: Species mapping for the 2 st Century: The case of periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.). John Cooley, magicicada.org, David C. Marshall, and Chris Simon, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 3: Ant diversity and community structure on coastal dunes of the northern Gulf of Mexico. Xuan Chen, gmail.com, Benjamin Adams, Cody Bergeron, and Linda M. Hooper- Bui, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 3: Silent spring revisited: Insects and spiders in Louisiana s saltwater marshes after the Macondo blowout. Gerald Soderstrum, Linda M. Hooper-Bùi, O. Osisioma, R. Strecker, Xuan Chen, Benjamin Adams, E. Overton, and R. E. Turner, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 4: Acrobat ant antics: The secret life of ants in Louisiana s salt marshes. Theresa Crupi, Linda M. Hooper- Bui, B. Hesson, M. Accardo, Gerald Soderstrum, R. Strecker, and Xuan Chen, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 4: Hula hoops, high wire acts and acrobats: Ant density and distribution in saltwater marshes. B. Hesson, lsu.edu, Linda M. Hooper-Bui, Gerald Soderstrum, M. Accardo, R. Strecker, and Xuan Chen, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 4: Oil pollution mediated mortality and behavior modification in coastal insects. Benjamin Adams, lsu.edu, Xuan Chen, and Linda M. Hooper-Bui, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 4: Putting the canary back in the coal mine: Crickets and ants in the saltmarshes post-macondo blowout. Linda M. Hooper- Bui, R. Strecker, B. Hesson, Gerald Soderstrum, M. Accardo, D. Aguillard, E. Thompson, and Xuan Chen, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 4:57 Concluding Remarks Ten-Minute Papers, PBT Section: Molecular Biology 300 B, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Jay D. Evans, and Christina M. Grozinger 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD, 2 Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA :30 Introductory Remarks : Resistance of Sitka spruce against white pine weevil: A genomic and histological approach to decipher stone cell development. Justin G. A. Whitehill, Timothy R. Sexton, Alvin D. Yanchuk 2, and Joerg Bohlmann, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, 2 British Columbia Ministry of Forests, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada : Trans and cis factors regulating tissue and lactation specific gene expression in the tsetse fly (Glossina morsitans morsitans). Geoffrey M. Attardo, Joshua B. Benoit, Veronika Michalkova, Kevin R. Patrick, Tyler Krause, and Serap Aksoy 2, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, 2 Yale University, New Haven, CT : Transcriptional markers of aging and dietary protein stress in developing Apis mellifera nurses. Vanessa Corby-Harris, Beryl M. Jones, Alexander R. Walton, and Kirk E. Anderson, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Tucson, AZ 2: Molecular characterization and functional analysis of chitin synthase genes from Locusta migratoria. Jianzhen Zhang, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, China 2: Colorimetric DNA chip technology makes the simultaneous quantification of gene expression of hundreds of genes more accessible. Dirk C. de Graaf, Jorgen Ravoet, and Lina De Smet, Ghent University, Ghent, Oost- Vlaanderen, Belgium 2: Transcriptome of the tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris, with emphasis on digestion related genes. Omaththage P. Perera, Gordon Snodgrass, Ryan Jackson, Clint Allen, and Patricia F. O Leary 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Stoneville, MS, 2 Cotton Incorporated, Cary, NC 68

71 Sunday November Sunday November 2:45 Break 3: Lignin-associated metagene expression in a lignocellulose-digesting termite. Amit Sethi, edu, Jeffrey Slack 2, Elena S. Kovaleva 2, George W. Buchman 2, and Michael E. Scharf, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, 2 Chesapeake-PERL, Inc., Savage, MD 3: Aquaporin identification and analysis in the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) and the potato psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli). Joseph Hancock, Jared Fradette, and Cecilia Tamborindeguy, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 3: A genome-to-lead approach for insecticide discovery: Chemical library screening reveals antagonists of vector arthropod dopamine receptors with in vivo toxicity. Jason M. Meyer, Karin F. K. Ejendal, Larisa V. Avramova, Jason Conley, Gloria I. Giraldo-Calderón, Elisabeth E. Garland- Kuntz, Tarsis Brust, Diego Echeverri, Emma Lang, Shilpa Parakh, Neha Rana, Markus Lill, Val J. Watts, and Catherine HIll, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 3: Studies exploring honey bee (Apis melllifera) queen mating and reproduction. Elina L. Niño, and Christina M. Grozinger, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 3: Evolution of the βgrps/gnbp/β-,3-glucanase family of insects. Austin L. Hughes, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 4: Insights into the virulence of soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) biotypes using RNA-Seq. Raman Bansal, osu.edu, M. Rouf Mian 2, Omprakash Mittapalli, and Andrew P. Michel, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Wooster, OH 4:2 Concluding Remarks Ten-Minute Papers, PBT Section: Physiology Rotunda, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Dan A. Hahn, and Coby Schal 2, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2 North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC :30 Introductory Remarks :33 03 Glucose aversion in the German cockroach is mediated by changes in gustatory sensillum function. Ayako Wada- Katsumata, Jules Silverman, and Coby Schal, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC : Insect responses to climate change: What are we testing for? Nigel R. Andrew, Sarah Hill, Matt Binns, M. Habibullah Bahar 2, Emma Ridley 3, Myung- Pyo Jung 4, Chris Fyfe, Michelle Yates 4, and Mohammad Khusro, University of New England, Armidale, New South Wales, Australia, 2 Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Saskatoon, SK, Canada, 3 University of York, York, United Kingdom, 4 National Academy of Agricultural Science, Suwon, South Korea : Nutrient regulation and post-ingestive utilization in glucose averse German cockroaches. Jules Silverman, jules_ Jonathan Shik, and Coby Schal, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 2: Larval starvation affects metabolic physiology and behaviors of adult honey bees. Ying Wang, Osman Kaftanoglu, Nicholas Baker, Gro V. Amdam, and Robert E. Page, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 2:2 035 Emergence of coordination in collective food transport by the ant Aphaenogaster cockerelli. Aurélie Buffin, edu, and Stephen C. Pratt, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 2: Involvement of fatty acids and oxylipins in soybean defense against the southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula. Zhaorigetu Chen, Jonathan Smith, and Burton Bluhm, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, 2:45 Break 3: Effects of age and lifetime flight behavior on reproduction in Drosophila melanogaster. Georgina E. Mancinelli, and Stephen P. Roberts, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI 3:2 038 Using adult emergence to diagnose immature life stage distributions of internally feeding pests developing on fresh fruit and its application in postharvest treatment scenarios. David E. Bellamy and Spencer Walse, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Parlier, CA 3: Results of larval Apis melifera inter-laboratory validation tests for development of a standardized test procedure. Michael Patnaude, Leonardo Fernandes, and James Hoberg, Smithers Viscient, Wareham, MA 3: Multiple flights in the dispersal of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius). Jesse A. Hardin, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, and David N. Byrne, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 3: Improving the sterile insect technique using simple atmospheric treatments. Dan A. Hahn and Giancarlo Lopez- Martinez, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 4:00 Concluding Remarks Ten-Minute Papers, PBT Section: Toxicology 300 C, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Michael E. Scharf and Ralf Nauen 2, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, 2 Bayer CropScience, Monheim, Germany :30 Introductory Remarks : Insecticide resistance: The global problem of insect management. Abdallah Albeltagy, Plant Protection Research Institute, Alexandria, Egypt : Monitoring of carbamate and organophosphate resistance levels in Nilaparvata lugens based on bioassay and quantitative sequencing. Deok Ho Kwon, Siwoo Lee 2, Ji Hyun Park, and Si Hyeock Lee, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea, 2 National Academy of Agricultural Science, Suwon, Gyeonggido, South Korea : The association of differentially-expressed midgut genes with Bacillus thuringiensis toxin resistance in European corn borer. Brad S. Coates, Haichuan Wang 2, Richard L. Hellmich, and Blair D. Siegfried 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Ames, IA, 2 University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 69

72 Sunday November Sunday November 2: Detoxification genes and their expression levels in different life stages of bumble bee (Bombus huntii). Junhuan Xu, Utah State University, North Logan, UT, and Rosalind James, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Logan, UT 2: Initial profile of a mutation on gamma-aminobutyric associated with cyclodiene insecticide resistance in western corn rootworm populations. Haichuan Wang, Brad S. Coates 2, Hong Chen, and Blair D. Siegfried, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Ames, IA 2: Resistance of the western flower thrips to insecticides. David Mota-Sanchez, Gabriela Romero- Verdin 2, David Smitley, and Mark E. Whalon, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 2 Universidad Autónoma Agraria Antonio Narro, Saltillo, Coahuila, México Sunday, November, 202, Evening Opening Plenary Session Exhibit Hall B, Floor One (Knoxville Convention Center) 5:30 Call to Order, Introductions, and Remembrances - Grayson C. Brown, ESA President, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 5:35 Presidental Address: State of the Society - Grayson C. Brown, ESA President 5:50 ESA Headquarters Report - C. David Gammel, CAE, Entomological Society of America, Executive Director, Lanham, MD 2:45 Break 3: Characterization and functional analysis of glutathione S-transferase genes of the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria. Enbo Ma, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, China 3: Uptake, translocation and fate of sulfoxaflor in three plants: Cabbage (Brassica oleracea), pepper (Capsicum annuum) and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). Gerrit J. DeBoer, dow.com, Andrew E. Robinson, and Yelena A. Adelfinskaya, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN 3: Insecticidal properties of stem extracts of Tinospora crispa (Family: Menispermaceae) towards Macrotermes gilvus (Isoptera: Termitidae). Fauziah Abdullah, Alimah Ahmad, Mohd Shukri Mohd Sabri, and Ibnu Sina Ismail, University Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Federal Territory, Malaysia 3: Indoxacarb biotransformation in the German cockroach (Blattella germanica L.). Ameya D. Gondhalekar, edu, Isabel Silva, and Michael E. Scharf, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 3: Effect of flonicamid on Asian citrus psyllid mortality and transmission of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. Gaurav Goyal, Lukasz, L. Stelinski, and Kirsten S. Pelz- Stelinski, University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL 4:00 Concluding Remarks Insect Photo Salon I Cumberland (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderator and Organizer: James E. Appleby, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 2:00 3:00 PM Linnaean Games Preliminary Rounds Exhibit Hall B, Floor One (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Deane K. Zahn, Dow AgroSciences, LLC, Lincoln, NE, and Phillip G. Mulder, Jr., Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 2:00 5:00 PM 70 5:58 Entomological Foundation Report - Thomas A. Green, Chair, Entomological Foundation Board of Directors, IPM Institute of North America, Inc., Madison, WI 6:06 ESA Professional Awards - Grayson C. Brown, ESA President, and Robert N. Wiedenmann, ESA Vice President, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 6:36 Insect Photo Salon Winners - James Appleby, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 6:4 Introduction of Founder s Speaker - Grayson C. Brown, ESA President 6: Founders Memorial Lecture: Charles Darwin, the evolutionary entomologist. Gene Kritsky, College of Mount St. Joseph, Cincinnati, OH 7:4 International Congress of Entomology 206 Report - Grayson C. Brown, ESA President 7:29 Concluding Remarks and Adjourn to Welcome Reception - Grayson C. Brown, ESA President Welcome Reception Exhibit Hall A, Floor One (Knoxville Convention Center) 7:30 9:30 Purchase copies of the 203 World of Insect Calendar at the ESA Booth in the Exhibit Hall Additional copies can also be ordered through the ESA Online bookstore. For more information, check the website at:

73 Monday, November 2 Poster Display Monday, November 2 Monday, November 2, 202, Morning Student Competition for the President s Prize: Virtual Poster Display Presentations Virtual Poster Room (Near 30 E, Floor Three, Knoxville Convention Center) Organizers: Luis A. Cañas and Marianne Alleyne 2, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, 2 University of Illinois, Urbana, IL. Viewing: 9:00 am 5:00 pm VP27 The effect of feeder location on pollen collection by bumble bees in a tomato greenhouse in Ontario, Canada. L. L. Orbán, C. M. S. Plowright, and R. C. Plowright 2, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, 2 University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada VP28 Soil drainage class, host tree species and thinning influence host tree resistance to the eastern spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana [Clem.]). Alvaro Fuentealba, and Eric Bauce, Universite Laval, Québec City, Québec, Canada VP29 Understanding the biology and ecology of an exotic mosquito, Culex molestus Forskal (Diptera: Culicidae), to assess public health risks in urban areas of Australia. Nur Faeza Abu Kassim, msn.com, Cameron E. Webb, and Richard C. Russell, University of Sydney, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, New South Wales, Australia VP30 A metabolomics resistance test. S. P. Kos, leidenuniv.nl, Young Hae Choi, Peter G. L. Klinkhamer, C. M. Hermans, and Kristen A. Leiss, Leiden University, Leiden, Zuid Holland, Netherlands VP3 Differential tissue distribution of defense compounds in Jacobaea vulgaris, Jacobaea aquatica and their crosses. Tri Rini Nuringtyas, Young Hae Choi, Rob Verpoorte, Peter G. L. Klinkhamer, and Kristen A. Leiss, Leiden University, Leiden, Zuid Holland, Netherlands VP32 The mantodean egg case: Evolutionary hypotheses on their functional diversity and its significance for praying mantid and systematics and phylogenetics (Insecta: Mantodea). Julio Rivera, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and Gavin J. Svenson, Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Cleveland, OH VP33 Dietary costs of genetic resistance to the microbial insecticide Bacillus thuringiensis. Ikkei Shikano, and Jennifer Cory, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada VP34 Cool caterpillars: Low temperature biological control of a climbing cutworm. T. Scott Johnson, D. T. Lowery 2, Joan Cossentine 2, and Jennifer Cory, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada, 2 Agriculture and Agri- Food Canada, Summerland, British Columbia, Canada Student Competition for the President s Prize: Poster Display Presentations Exhibit Hall A, Floor One (Knoxville Convention Center) Viewing: 8:00 am 6:00 pm Organizers: Luis A. Cañas and Marianne Alleyne 2, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, 2 University of Illinois, Urbana, IL. Undergraduate Student Poster Display Competition: MUVE D000 The emergence of the entomophagy food industry in the U.S. and abroad. Marianne Shockley Cruz, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, and Harman Johar, University of Georgia, Athens, GA D0002 Prohibitin protein characterization in dengue virus vector and non-vector mosquito species. Kimberly Filcek, edu, and Justin R. Anderson, Radford University, Radford, VA D0003 The effectiveness of Pseudomonas pigments as mosquito larvicidal and anti-arbovirus compounds. Andrew Cheeseman, and Justin R. Anderson, Radford University, Radford, VA D0004 Metagenomic survey of Solenopsis invicta Buren (red imported fire ant) colonies in the presence and absence of Solenopsis invicta virus (SINV). Chris M. Powell, uttyler.edu, and Blake R. Bextine, University of Texas, Tyler, TX D0005 Statewide survey documenting established colonies of the Formosan subterranean termite (Coptotermes formosanus) within Louisiana parishes. Eric Guidry, Timmy Madere, Barry P. Yokum, Ed D. Freytag, Kenneth S. Brown, Alan R. Lax 2, and Claudia Riegel, City of New Orleans Mosquito and Termite Control Board, New Orleans, LA, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, New Orleans, LA D0006 Mobile maggots: Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae) larval growth and mortality rates associated with movement between food substrates. Carmen Mostek, com, Amanda Fujikawa, and Leon G. Higley, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE D0007 Anoxia tolerance of Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae) maggots. Melissa Lein, Amanda Fujikawa, and Leon G. Higley, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE D0008 Comparative morphology of antennal sensillae of three disjunct populations of Wyeomyia smithii (Diptera: Culicidae). Casey Wesselman, and William Irby, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA D0009 A multiplex quantitative polymerase chain reaction-based assay for the identification of three container dwelling mosquito species. Matt Warndorf, Clark University, Worcester, MA Undergraduate Student Poster Display Competition: PBT D000 Fighting female flesh flies: A study of behavioral ontogeny in the flesh fly, Sarcophaga crassipalpis. Anthony Lundy, goldmail.etsu.edu, Veronica Fregoso, Darrell Moore, Mark Phillips, Edith Seier, and Karl H. Joplin, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN D00 Determining the LC 50 of toluene for Drosophila melanogaster. Ryan Reynolds, Heather 7

74 Monday, November 2 Monday, November 2 Poster Display Skeen-Esterheld, Zoe Knippa, Peter Karagozian, Gina Duong, Debra Bramblett 2, Elmer Ledesma, and Rosemarie Rosell, University of St. Thomas, Houston, TX, 2 Paul L. Foster School of Medicine, El Paso, TX D002 The effects of density on behavior in the flesh fly, Sarcophaga crassipalpis. Mark Phillips, edu, Veronica Fregoso, Xinguo Lu, Anthony Lundy, Karl H. Joplin, and Darrell Moore, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN D003 Influences of age and density on spatial distribution in male flesh flies, Sarcophaga crassipalpis. Allyn M. Heath, goldmail.etsu.edu, Karl H. Joplin, Darrell Moore, and Edith Seier, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN D004 The impacts of climate change on the overwintering energetics and microenvironmental conditions of the goldenrod gall fly, Eurosta solidaginis. Drew Spacht, edu, Seth Pezar, and Michael A. Elnitsky, Mercyhurst University, Erie, PA D005 Investigating Solanum tuberosum induced response to Bactericera cockerelli feeding and Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum infection. Elida Yesenia Martinez, student.alamo.edu, Ordom Brian Huot, and Cecilia Tamborindeguy, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX D006 Is nuclease activity limiting succesful RNAi gene silencing in Heliothis virescens larvae? Victoria R. Knight, edu, Jerreme J. Jackson, and Juan L. Jurat-Fuentes, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN D007 Gene knockdown in Homalodisca vitripennis cell cultures. Justin R. Hazlerig, Daymon Hail, Chris M. Powell, and Blake R. Bextine, University of Texas, Tyler, TX D008 Delivery of dsrna to plant vascular tissues as a pest management approach for phloem feeding insects. MacKenzie F. Patton, University of Texas, Tyler, TX Undergraduate Student Poster Display Competition: P-IE D009 Evaluating pesticide sensitivity of the honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) microbiome. Ann C. Bernert, com, Ramesh R. Sagili, and Ken B. Johnson, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR D0024 Increasing educational outreach efforts in entomology. John Taylor Diller, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN D0025 Sublethal effects of Bacillus thuringiensis on Plutella xylostella populations. Valéria Lucas de Laurentis, hotmail.com, Ana Carolina Pires Veiga, Haroldo Xavier Linhares Volpe, Alessandra Marieli Vacari, Ricardo Antonio Polanczyk, and Sergio Antonio De Bortoli, Faculdade de Ciências Agrárias e Veterinárias, Jaboticabal, São Paulo, Brazil D0026 Phenology of blueberry gall wasp and the effect of insecticides on infestation and biological control. Patricia Samota, Keith S. Mason, and Rufus Isaacs, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI D0027 Use of acoustic technology to control wood infesting insects. Nicholas C. Aflitto, and Richard W. Hofstetter, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ D0028 Molecular tracking of life-stage dependent intraguild predation. Rebecca L. Wente, Jason M. Schmidt, and James D. Harwood, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY D0029 Explaining spatio-temporal patterns of impact to Dalmatian toadflax by the stem-mining weevil, Mecinus janthiniformis: Effects of host quality and attack intensity on weevil population growth. Jess R. Inskeep, Aaron S. Weed 2, Mark Schwarzländer, Bradley L. Harmon, and Tessa M. Scott, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, 2 Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH D0030 Interactive effects of (Mecinus janthiniformis) herbivory and varying soil resource conditions on the performance of Dalmatian toadflax (Linaria dalmatica). Tessa M. Scott, uidaho.edu, Aaron S. Weed 2, Mark Schwarzländer, Bradley L. Harmon, and Jess R. Inskeep, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, 2 Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH D003 Host effects on the cold hardiness strategies of Epiphyas postvittana. Laurel A. Mosca, Amy C. Morey, Robert C. Venette 2, and William D. Hutchison, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, 2 USDA, Forest Service, St. Paul, MN D0032 Flight response of the walnut twig beetle, Pityophthorus juglandis, to aggregation pheromones produced by low densities of males. Kristina J. Tatiossian, Stacy M. Hishinuma, Yigen Chen, Mary Louise Flint, and Steven J. Seybold 2, University of California, Davis, CA, 2 USDA, Forest Service, Davis, CA D0020 Comparing the effect of native and introduced grasses on the development of least skippers (Lepidoptera: Hesperiinae: Anycloxypha numitor). Calla Olson, and Kirk J. Larsen, Luther College, Decorah, IA D002 The role of honey hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) as a natural defense mechanism and colony stress indicator. Lydia L. McCormick, Berry J. Brosi, and Keith Delaplane 2, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, 2 University of Georgia, Athens, GA D0022 Biocalendar foreshows winter moth hatch in Massachusetts, U.S.A. Jarrod University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA D0023 Oviposition preference of Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) on kale and rocket. Caroline Placidi De Bortoli, Rafael Ferreira Santos 2, Maíra Trevisan, com.br 2, Sergio Leandro De Bortoli 2, Alessandra Marieli Vacari, and Sergio Antonio De Bortoli, Faculdade de Ciências Agrárias e Veterinárias, Jaboticabal, São Paulo, Brazil, 2 Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho, Jaboticabal, São Paulo, Brazil D0033 The effects of management practices on functional diversity in cucurbit production systems. Sarah K. Barney, gmail.com, Jason M. Schmidt, Mark Williams, and James D. Harwood, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY D0034 Surveying pollinator communities in production soybean fields: A Kansas perspective. Ryan Hackett, and Brian P. McCornack, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS Undergraduate Student Poster Display Competition: SysEB D0035 Genetic variation of the striped bark scorpion, Centruroides vittatus. Clint E. Trammel, Amber D. Tripodi, and Allen L. Szalanski, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR D0036 Using primary endosymbionts as a tool for constructing potato psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli) phylogenies. Jessica Woodruff, Daymon Hail 2, and Blake R. Bextine 2, University of Texas, Kilgore, TX, 2 University of Texas, Tyler, TX 72

75 Monday, November 2 Poster Display Monday, November 2 D0037 Male ant genitalia: Musculature, functional morphology and homology. Brendon E. Boudinot, Evergreen State College, Olympia, WA D0038 Construction of an electronic, multiple-entry identification key to two species groups of Signiphora (Hymenoptera: Signiphoridae). Alyssa N. Mann, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX D0039 Patterns of dung beetle diversity in a biodiversity hotspot in eastern Kenya. Amanda Lee Edwards, edu, and David N. M. Mbora, Whittier College, Whittier, CA D0040 The giant water scavenger beetles: A review of the New World Hydrophilus (Coleoptera: Hydrophilidae). Clay E. McIntosh, and Andrew Short, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS D004 A revision of the genus Heteranassa Smith (Lepidoptera: Erebidae: Erebinae). Nicholas T. Homziak, and Kelly B. Miller, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM D0042 The natural history of a previously unidentified species of Dohrniphora (Diptera: Phoridae) with notes on development and life history. James R. Willett, Chelsea Hernandez, Melissa S. Sisson, Natalie K. Lindgren, and Sibyl R. Bucheli, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX D0043 Observations on sex ratio and phenology in Danae testacea (Ziegler), a cantharidin-orienting handsome fungus beetle (Coleoptera: Endomychidae). Stuart Rupp, and Michele B. Price, Lewis-Clark State College, Lewiston, ID Graduate Student Poster Display Competition: MUVE- D0044 Spatial distribution and density of Nylanderia pubens (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) on urban lots. Stephanie Hill, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL D0045 Role of the bed bug (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) cuticle in attachment and germination of entomopathogenic fungi. Kevin R. Ulrich, Raymond J. St. Leger, Mark F. Feldlaufer 2, and Barbara L. Thorne, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD D0046 Could behavioral responses by bed bugs to insecticide residues influence their efficacy? Kyle Michael Loughlin, kyle. Michael F. Potter, and Kenneth F. Haynes, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY D0047 Diversity of microbial communities identified in exotic ticks imported in U.S.A. by migrating songbirds. Nabanita Mukherjee, Michael Sellers, Laquita Burton 2, Steven W. Adamson, Lorenza Beati 2, Frank Moore, and Shahid Karim, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS, 2 Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA D0048 Ascogregarina infection reduces per capita growth rate in native and non-native hosts. John Soghigian, edu, and Todd P. Livdahl, Clark University, Worcester, MA D0049 Container habitat characteristics: Aedes larval abundances and adult quality. Katie May Westby, Jake Williams, and Steven A. Juliano, Illinois State University, Normal, IL D0050 The effects of an urban heat island on the population performance and larval development of the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus). Tyler Benjamin Ward, Michael H. Reiskind, and Justin L. Talley, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK D005 Evaluating radioprotectors to improve x-ray sterilization techniques for Aedes aegypti males. Stacy D. Rodriguez, nmsu.edu, Ramaninder Kaur Brar, Jacob Urquidi, and Immo A. Hansen, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM D0052 Mortality of larval Aedes triseriatus and Aedes japonicus associated with fungal strains in laboratory and natural environments. Rebecca J. Morningstar, Michael G. Kaufman, and Edward D. Walker, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI D0053 Ecology of mosquitoes vectors associated with eastern equine encephalitis in Georgia. Kelly Elizabeth Dabney, georgiasouthern.edu, and William Irby, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA D0054 Wolbachia-mediated improved population replacement in Aedes aegypti. Shawna Ryan, Deepak Joshi, and Zhiyong Xi, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI D0055 Abundance and diversity of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) associated with irrigation of south central Nebraska. A. K. Bryson, and M. Roberto Cortinas, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE Graduate Student Poster Display Competition: MUVE-2 D0056 Dispersal of house flies (Musca domestica) from livestock facilities and the significance of habitat corridors. Trisha Dubie, Justin L. Talley, and Astri Wayadande, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK D0057 Distribution and biodiversity of blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) throughout New Jersey. Lauren M. Weidner, George C. Hamilton, and Jeffery K. Tomberlin 2, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, 2 Texas A&M University, College Station, TX D0058 Relative frequency of two entomopathogenic fungi, Beauveria and Metarhizium (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae), from soils of forested and urban habitats. Tamra Reall, and Richard M. Houseman, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO D0059 Comparison of the immune response in alimentary tract tissues from body versus head lice following Escherichia coli oral infection. Ju Hyeon Kim, Kyong Sup Yoon 2, Domenic J. Previte 2, Barry R. Pittendrigh 3, John M. Clark 2, and Si Hyeock Lee, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea, 2 University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, 3 University of Illinois, Urbana, IL D0060 Homing endonucleases catalyze double-stranded DNA break formation and transgene excision in the Aedes aegypti germline. Azadeh A. Aryan, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA D006 Contribution of the gut bacterial community to the nutritional ecology of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Kerri L. Coon, and M. R. Strand, University of Georgia, Athens, GA D0062 Preliminary analysis of genetic structure of synanthropic populations of Rhodnius ecuadoriensis from coastal Ecuador. Sofia I. Muñoz, Fernando Abad-Franch 2, and Mario J. Grijalva, Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Ecuador, Quito, Ecuador, 2 Instituto Leônidas e Maria Deane, Manaus, Brazil 73

76 Monday, November 2 Monday, November 2 Poster Display D0063 Metagenomic profile of the microbial populations associated with the spotted fever group rickettsia infected Gulf Coast ticks (Amblyomma maculatum). Khem Raj BC, eagles.usm.edu, Rebecca Browning, and Shahid Karim, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS D0064 Different physiological roles of two dopamine receptors in isolated salivary glands of the blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis. Donghun Kim, Ladislav Simo, and Yoonseong Park, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS D0065 Gregarine infection in Aedes triseriatus: Impact on behavior and vulnerability to predation. Linda Valsdottir, clarku.edu, John Soghigian, and Todd P. Livdahl, Clark University, Worcester, MA D0066 Evidence of group size dependent suppression of entomopathogenic bacteria, Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies thuringiensis and israelensis, by Formosan subterranean termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae). Cai Wang, and Gregg Henderson Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA D0067 Time lapse between two molts of workers of Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki and its implication for ingestion of lethal dose of a chitin synthesis inhibitor. Garima Kakkar, and Nan-Yao Su, University of Florida, Davie, FL Graduate Student Poster Display Competition: PBT- D0068 Changes in biogenic amines correlate with time of day, light cycle, age, and aggressive state in the flesh fly, Sarcopaga crassipalpis. Veronica Fregoso, Mark Phillips, Xinguo Lu, Anthony Lundy, Edith Seier, Karl H. Joplin, Thomas C. Jones, and Darrell Moore, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN D0069 Evaluating the dynamics of anti-fungal compounds in Lepidoptera larvae. Chen Zha, and Allen C. Cohen, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC and Yang Cao 2, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO, 2 South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China D0076 Monitoring termite alate flight phenology with citizen scientists on Oahu, Hawaii. Reina L. Tong, and Makena Mason, University of Hawaii, Manoa, Honolulu, HI Graduate Student Poster Display Competition: PBT-2 D0077 Olfactory response of the antennal trichoid sensilla to chemical repellents in mosquitoes, Culex quinquefaciatus. Feng Liu, and Nannan Liu, Auburn University, Auburn, AL D0078 Antennal sensillae of Ibalia leucopoides ensiger, a parasitoid of siricid wasps. Derek J. Robertson, Brian T. Sullivan 2, William P. Shepherd 2, James R. Meeker 2, Crawford W. Johnson 2, and Kamal J. Gandhi, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 2 USDA, Forest Service, Pineville, LA D0079 Testing for cross-resistance in Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) with field-evolved resistance to Bt maize. Siva R. K. Jakka, Victoria R. Knight, and Juan L. Jurat-Fuentes, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN D0080 Evidence for P-glycoprotein modification of insecticide toxicity in vector mosquitoes. Ngoc N. Pham, com, Tiffany L. Carpenetti, Sara S. Scates, Philene D. Vu, and Troy D. Anderson, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA D008 The elytron as a model system for the study of the mode of action of the chitin inhibitor, diflubenzuron. Meera Kumari, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS D0082 Selection for resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry2Aa in Ostrinia nubilalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae). Karen F. da Silva, Terence A. Spencer, and Blair D. Siegfried, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE D0070 Microplitis demolitor bracovirus blocks plasmatocyte response to PSP. Joe Ballenger, Kevin Clark, and M. R. Strand, University of Georgia, Athens, GA D007 A Toll-ML-LPS pathway in insects. Xue Zhong, umkc.edu, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO D0072 MicroRNA regulation of bursicon and its receptors. Xi Chen, Hongwei Zhang, Shengzhang Dong, Honglian Shao, and Qisheng Song, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO D0073 Transposon-based germ-line transformation of the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei: Opportunities for functional genomics. Flor E. Acevedo, Carlos Barrera 2, Channa Aluvihare 3, Robert A. Harrell 3, Pablo Benavides 2, and David O Brochta 3, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 2 Cenicafe, Chinchina, Caldas, Colombia, 3 University of Maryland, Biotechnology Institute, Rockville, MD D0074 The role of chemical, visual, and tactile cues in the host selection behavior of Ceutorhynchus cardariae, a potential biological control agent for Lepidium draba. Jessica K. Rendon, Mark Schwarzländer, and Sanford D. Eigenbrode, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID D0075 Binding property and activity of gloverins from the silkworm, Bombyx mori. Huiyu Yi, Xiao-Qiang Yu, 74 D0083 Molecular characterization of Spodoptera frugiperda resistance to Bt corn. Liang Gong, Siva R. K. Jakka 2, Carlos A. Blanco 3, and Juan L. Jurat-Fuentes 2, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China, 2 University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 3 USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Riverdale, MD D0084 Testing the role of arylphorin during midgut healing in response to CryAc intoxication. Jerreme J. Jackson, edu, Omaththage P. Perera 2, and Juan L. Jurat-Fuentes, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Stoneville, MS D0085 Microbial modification of mosquitocide toxicity. Sara S. Scates, and Troy D. Anderson, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA D0086 Association between behavior and detoxification in honey bee. Ling-Hsiu Liao, and May R. Berenbaum, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL Graduate Student Poster Display Competition: PBT-3 D0087 Modulation of Drosophila sodium channel gating by four TipE-homologous proteins. Lingxin Wang, edu, Yoshiko Nomura, Yuzhe Du, and Ke Dong, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI

77 Monday, November 2 Poster Display Monday, November 2 D0088 Insecticide resistant management studies in diamondback moth, Plutella xyllostella, in Georgia. Krishna Bahadur Bhandari, and David G. Riley, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA D0089 Cytochrome P450s: Their expression and function in insecticide resistant mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus. Ting Yang, and Nannan Liu, Auburn University, Auburn, AL D0090 Honey bee acetylcholinesterase inhibition: Insights into coumaphos tolerance. Lizette Dahlgren, com, Reed Johnson 2, Blair D. Siegfried, and Marion D. Ellis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 2 Ohio State University, Columbus, OH D009. Insights into the evolution of beetle Cytochrome P450 s from the genomes of Harmonia axyridis (Coccinellidae) and Tribolium castaneum (Tenebrionidae). Supriya Pati, memphis.edu, David R. Nelson 2, and Duane D. McKenna, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, 2 University of Tennessee, Health Science Center, Memphis, TN D0092 Autosomal linkage of differential gene expression in an insecticide resistant strain of Musca domestica. Ming Li, auburn.edu, William R. Reid, and Nannan Liu, Auburn University, Auburn, AL D0093 Development of a Tier- assay for effects of plantincorporated protectant (PIPs) in aquatic systems on leafconsuming shredders. Ryan C. Gott, and William O. Lamp, University of Maryland, College Park, MD D0094 Analysis of amylase and glucosidase as receptors for Bacillus thuringiensis CryBa in mosquito Anopheles gambiae. Qi Zhang, Gang Hua, and Michael Adang, University of Georgia, Athens, GA D0095 Screening of lethal genes for feeding RNAi by leaf discmediated systematic delivery in Tetranychus urticae. Ji Hyun Park, Deok Ho Kwon, and Si Hyeock Lee, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea D0096 Acaricide resistance of the twospotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae) in Washington hops and mint. Tara Piraneo, Douglas B. Walsh 2, and Deborah Brooks 2, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, 2 Washington State University, Prosser, WA D0097 In vivo assessment of xenobiotic transporter function in Apis mellifera. Grace Kunkel, and David J. Hawthorne, University of Maryland, College Park, MD Graduate Student Poster Display Competition: P-IE- D0098 Impacts of landscape heterogeneity on ant community composition in soybean fields. Hannah J. Penn, gmail.com, and James D. Harwood, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY D0099 Survey of the Curculionidae in White Rock Nature Preserve, Monroe County, Illinois, with notes on plant associations. Korey A. P. Byers, Southeast Missouri State University, Cape Girardeau, MO D000 Ants associated with Diaphorina citri and their role in its biological control in South Florida. Jose Bernardo Navarrete, and Jorge E. Peña, University of Florida, Homestead, FL D00 Community composition and niche partitioning behaviors of ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in arid grasslands of western Oklahoma. Allison Giguere, and Carmen M. Greenwood, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK D002 Nest density of Bombus impatiens in heterogeneous landscape surrounding vegetable farms. C. Sheena Sidhu, psu.edu, James Strange 2, and Shelby J. Fleischer, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Logan, UT D003 Wildflower plantings for conservation biological control: Floral resources support natural enemies and their control of pests in adjacent crop fields. Brett R. Blaauw, and Rufus Isaacs, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI D004 Pollination services in changing landscapes: New tools for understanding the distribution of native bees in Costa Rica. Sara M. Galbraith, Nilsa A. Bosque- Pérez, Sven Günter 2, and Sanford D. Eigenbrode, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, 2 Tropical Agricultural Research and Higher Education Center, Turrialba, Costa Rica D005 Native pollinators in Iowa cornfields: Community identification and trapping methods analysis. Michael Joseph Wheelock, and Matthew E. O Neal, Iowa State University, Ames, IA D006 Effects of landscape context on native bee communities in Palouse prairie fragments. Paul Raymond Rhoades, vandals.uidaho.edu, Sanford D. Eigenbrode, Nilsa A. Bosque- Pérez, Walter S. Sheppard 2, and Lisette Waits, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, 2 Washington State University, Pullman, WA D007 Can conserving insect pollinators increase seed production for soybean? Trief K. Henze, Iowa State University, Ames, IA D008 Optimizing sampling for bee communities using bee bowls. Matthew I. McKinney, and Yong-Lak Park, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV D009 A comparison of old-field and brownfield plant-pollinator communities in north-central New Jersey. Caroline M. DeVan, and Daniel E. Bunker, New Jersey Institute of Technology and Rutgers Universiy, Newark, NJ Graduate Student Poster Display Competition: P-IE-2 D00 Consumable climate data for season-long monitoring of grape berry moth in Virginia. Timothy A. Jordan, and Douglas G. Pfeiffer, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA D0 Differences in oviposition preferences of spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, on grape varieties: Recommendations for control. Auriel-Robert Vilaire, .wsu.edu, Laura Corley Lavine, and Douglas B. Walsh 2, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, 2 Washington State University, Prosser, WA D02 Spatial distributions of grape root borer (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) in Virginia vineyards and the development of a quantitative sampling scheme. Jhalendra P. Rijal, Carlyle C. Brewster 2, and J. Christopher Bergh, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Winchester, VA, 2 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 75

78 Monday, November 2 Monday, November 2 Poster Display D03 A survey of Xylella fastidiosa-carrying glassy-winged sharpshooters (Homalodisca vitripennis) across Texas grape vineyards and variations between their internal microbial communities. Elwyn Wayne Welch, University of Texas, Health Science Center, Tyler, TX D04 Relative susceptibility of selected potato cultivars to two wireworm species. Kevin W. Langdon, and Mark R. Abney, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC D05 Wireworm survey of small grain and potato fields in Montana. Anuar Morales-Rodriguez, montana.edu, Ruth O Neill, and Kevin W. Wanner, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT D06 Landscape effects on spatial distribution of brown marmorated stink bug (Halymorpha halys) in peach orchards. Noel Hahn, George C. Hamilton, Cesar Rodriguez- Saona 2, and Alex Kaufman, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, 2 Rutgers University, Chatsworth, NJ D07 The impact of landscape diversity on the seasonal abundance of Japanese beetles and stink bugs in soybean. Cody D. Kuntz, and Matthew E. O Neal, Iowa State University, Ames, IA D08 Feeding habits of the brown marmorated stink bug (Pentatomidae: Halyomorpha halys). Theresa M. Cira, umn.edu, Robert L. Koch 2, Eric C. Burkness, and William D. Hutchison, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, 2 Minnesota Department of Agriculture, St. Paul, MN D09 Host preference of the brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stål) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), using economically important crops of Florida. Ashley V. Poplin, and Amanda C. Hodges, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL D020 Managing stink bugs in cotton using strip spray applications. Ishakh Pulakkatu-Thodi, Francis P. F. Reay- Jones 2, Jeremy K. Greene 3, Dominic R. Reisig 4, and Michael D. Toews, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, 2 Clemson University, Florence, SC, 3 Clemson University, Blackville, SC, 4 North Carolina State University, Plymouth, NC D02 The role of host plants on the population dynamics of the rice stink bug, Oebalus pugnax (F.). George Awuni, edu, Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS Graduate Student Poster Display Competition: P-IE-3 D022 The role of host volatiles combined with pheromones in the chemical ecology of cerambycid beetles. R. Maxwell Collignon, Ian Swift 2, and Jocelyn G. Millar, University of California, Riverside, CA, 2 California State Collection of Arthropods, Sacramento, CA D023 Maternal and dietary source influence bacteria associated with gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar). Charles Mason, edu, and Kenneth F. Raffa, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI Nathan Havill 2, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, 2 USDA, Forest Service, Hamden, CT D026 Parasitoids and associated insects emerging from trees colonized by native Agrilus in Wisconsin. Todd D. Johnson, Steven J. Krauth, Jonathan Lelito 2, and Kenneth F. Raffa, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 2 USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Brighton, MI D027 Effects of methyl jasmonate trunk injection on phloem phenolics of Fraxinus Americana and F. pennsylvanica and associated emergence of the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis). David Showalter, Vanessa L. Muilenburg 2, Daniel A. Herms 2, and Pierluigi Bonello, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 2 Ohio State University, Wooster, OH D028 Towards developing ash varieties resistant to emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). Lindsay A. Kolich, and Matthew D. Ginzel, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN D029 Stacking the deck: Should tree growth regulators be added to the treatment arsenal for Fraxinus spp. trees infested with emerald ash borer? Sara R. Tanis, Deborah G. McCullough, and Bert M. Cregg, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI D030 Modeling within-tree distributions of Agrilus planipennis. Christopher J. Foelker, and Melissa K. Fierke, State University of New York, Syracuse, NY D03 Loblolly pine tree resin flow defense and mortality during an induced Ips beetle infestation. Sander Olivia Denham, gmail.com, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC D032 Evaluation and monitoring of ash trees that have survived long-term exposure to Agrilus planipennis in southeast Michigan. Katie G. Hietala, Jordan M. Marshall, and Andrew J. Storer, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI D033 Distribution and phenology of barrens buck moth (Hemileuca maia Drury) in the Albany Pine Bush Preserve. Georgia R. Keene, Dylan Parry, H. Brian Underwood, and Neil Gifford 2, State University of New York, Syracuse, NY, 2 Albany Pine Bush Preserve, Albany, NY Graduate Student Poster Display Competition: P-IE-4 D034 The biology of a little known weevil: Polydrusus impressifrons. Jack C. Niedbala, Washington State University, Pullman, WA D035 How habitat structure affects predation of codling moth (Cydia pomonella). Nathaniel J. Walton, and Matthew Grieshop, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI D036 What a beech: Impacts of beech bark disease in Michigan from 2002 to 202. James Bryan Wieferich, edu, and Deborah G. McCullough, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI D024 Walnut aphid (Chromaphis juglandicola) population growth tied to foliar nitrogen in walnuts. Kevi C. Mace-Hill, berkeley.edu, University of California, Berkeley, CA D025 Phenology of pine bark adelgid, Pineus strobi, and its predator, Laricobius rubidus, in southwest Virginia. Jacqueline S. Brown, Scott M. Salom, Loke T. Kok, and D037 Biotic and abiotic factors affecting establishment of introduced predators of hemlock woolly adelgid in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Abdul Hakeem, Jerome F. Grant, Paris L. Lambdin, Gregory J. Wiggins, Frank A. Hale 2, J. Rusty Rhea 3, Robert Webster 4, and Thomas Colson 5, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2 University of Tennessee, Nashville, TN, 3 USDA, Forest Service, Asheville, NC, 4 National Park 76

79 Monday, November 2 Poster Display Monday, November 2 Service, Gatlinburg, TN, 5 Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Gatlinburg, TN D038 Dealing with variable spring conditions: The strategy of eastern tent caterpillars (Malacosoma americanum). Mariana Abarca, John T. Lill, Pablo Frank-Bolton, and Roxana Leontie, George Washington University, Washington, DC D039 Phenology of plum curculio in North Carolina tree fruits. Amanda J. Bakken, Mark R. Abney, and James F. Walgenbach 2, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, 2 North Carolina State University, Fletcher, NC D040 Density-dependent survival: Hemlock woolly adelgid life stages. Elizabeth M. Sussky, and Joseph S. Elkinton, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA D04 Defense chemistry of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) putatively resistant to hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae). E. A. McKenzie, and Joseph S. Elkinton, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA D042 Effects of woodland management history and leaf litter characteristics on the diversity and composition of terrestrial Isopod. José-Cristian Martínez, and Francis Anthony, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL D043 Effects of selected pesticides on calico scale populations and their natural enemies in urban honeylocust trees. Carlos Quesada, Adam Witte, and Clifford S. Sadof, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN D044 Spatial distribution of hemlock woolly adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) ovisacs within eastern hemlock tree: Implications for sampling. Sunghoon Baek, and Yong-Lak Park, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV Graduate Student Poster Display Competition: P-IE-5 D045 Biology of the kudzu bug Mecacopta cribraria (Hemiptera: Plataspidae), on soybean and kudzu in relation to soybean maturity group, planting date. Joni L. Blount, University of Georgia, Athens, GA D046 Inheritance and fitness costs of Bt resistance for a fieldderived strain of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte). David A. Ingber, Graham P. Head 2, and Aaron J. Gassmann, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, 2 Monsanto Company, St. Louis, MO D047 In silico identification of mirnas from the Asian rice gall midge (Orseolia oryzae) - a major pest of rice. Isha Atray, icgeb.res.in, Deepak Kumar Sinha, J. S. Bentur 2, and Suresh Nair, International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, New Delhi, India, 2 Directorate of Rice Research, Hyderabad, India D048 Random mating within field populations of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) subjected to Bt corn hybrids and refuge strategies: Fact or fiction? Steven Joel Smith, Purdue University, Bluffton, IN, and Christian H. Krupke, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN D049 F 2 screening for resistance to pyramided Bacillus thuringiensis maize in Louisiana and Florida populations of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Fei Yang, agcenter.lsu.edu, Ying Niu, Jawwad A. Qureshi 2, Liping Zhang, B. Rogers Leonard, Robert L. Meagher 3, Graham P. Head 4, S. David Wangila, and Fangneng Huang, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA, 2 University of Florida, Immokalee, FL, 3 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL, 4 Monsanto Company, St. Louis, MO D050 Invertebrate biodiversity and distribution on the invasive plant garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) and native plants in Vermont campgrounds. Chenin K. Limback, Anna L. Carragee, Megan L. Yanney, and Kimberly F. Wallin, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT D05 To eat or not to eat: Preference and performance of corn earworm on soybean tissues. Rachel Suits, Dominic R. Reisig 2, and Hannah J. Burrack, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, 2 North Carolina State University, Plymouth, NC D052 Frequency of extended diapause in Nebraska populations of the northern corn rootworm, Diabrotica barberi Smith and Lawrence (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). Ryan Winslow Geisert, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, and Lance J. Meinke, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE D053 Effect of soybean resistance on soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) biotypes. Predeesh Chandran, ksu.edu, John C. Reese, Brian Diers 2, and William T. Schapaugh, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 2 University of Illinois, Urbana, IL D054 Development and reproduction of the two-spotted ladybeetle (Adalia bipunctata) on diets of Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) and corn leaf aphid (Rhopalosiphum maidis). Azhar A. Khan, Jawwad A. Qureshi, Muhammad Afzal 2, and Philip A. Stansly, University of Florida, Immokalee, FL, 2 University of Sargodha, Sargodha, Pakistan D055 Post-release assessment of the efficacy of Urophora cardui and Hadroplontus litura, biological control agents of Canada thistle. Joel R. Price, Mark Schwarzländer, and Bradley L. Harmon, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID D056 Wisconsin soybean aphids (Aphis glycines): Molecular characterization and comparison with known biotypes. Michael Scott Crossley, and David B. Hogg, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI Graduate Student Poster Display Competition: P-IE-6 D057 Behavioral and neurophysiological responses of experienced vs. naive generalist predators to induced plant volatiles. Ulianova Vidal Gómez, Michael E. Scharf, and Ian Kaplan, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN D058 Feeding preference of Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) on kale and rocket. Caroline Placidi De Bortoli, Rafael Ferreira Santos, 2, Claudio Antonio Salas Figueroa 2, Sergio Leandro De Bortoli 2, Alessandra Marieli Vacari, and Sergio Antonio De Bortoli, Faculdade de Ciências Agrárias e Veterinárias, Jaboticabal, São Paulo, Brazil, 2 Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho, Jaboticabal, São Paulo, Brazil D059 Behavioral responses of a specialist parasitoid, Microplitis croceipes and a generalist parasitoid, Cotesia marginiventris to host related volatiles. Tolulope O. Morawo, and Henry Y. Fadamiro, Auburn University, Auburn, AL D060 Effect of host plant on defense elicitors. Loren Rivera Vega, and Gary W. Felton, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 77

80 Monday, November 2 D06 Culture independant microbial community analysis of economically important psyllid pests. Alex Arp, and Blake R. Bextine, University of Texas, Tyler, TX D062 Impact of fatty acid desaturases in Arabidopsis on the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae. Jiamei Li, Carlos A. Avila, and Fiona L. Goggin, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR D063 Behavioral responses of Laricobius nigrinus (Coleoptera: Derodontidae) and Laricobius nigrinus x Laricobius rubidus hybrids to Adelges tsugae (Hemiptera: Adelgidae) and host tree odors in a 4-way olfactometer. Arielle L. Arsenault, gmail.com, Nathan Havill 2, Albert E. Mayfield 3, Daniel S. Ott, and Kimberly F. Wallin, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, 2 USDA, Forest Service, Hamden, CT, 3 USDA, Forest Service, Asheville, NC Jason Osborne, and Mark R. Abney, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC D074 Friends or frienemies? The community ecology of greenhouse biocontrol. Emily Pochubay, Joseph Samuel Riddle, and Matthew Grieshop, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI D075 A study of aedeagal and genetic variation among hostspecific forms of Melanoplus bowditchi (Orthoptera: Acrididae). Muhammad Irfan Ullah, Mathew L. Brust 2, Fatima Mustafa, Kathleen M. Kneeland, W. Wyatt Hoback 3, Shripat T. Kamble, and John E. Foster, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 2 Chadron State College, Chadron, NE, 3 University of Nebraska, Kearney, NE Monday, November 2 Poster Display D064 Thousand cankers disease: Potential use of host kairomones for detection and monitoring of the insect vector, Pityophthorus juglandis. Matthew A. Paschen, William Klingeman 2, Jennifer Juzwik 3, and Matthew D. Ginzel, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, 2 University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 3 USDA, Forest Service, St. Paul, MN D065 Comparison of different diets for development of the ashy-gray ladybird beetle (Olla v-nigrum) and the green lacewing (Ceraeochrysa cubana) in the laboratory. Joel A. Mendez, Jawwad A. Qureshi, and Philip A. Stansly, University of Florida, Immokalee, FL D066 Feeding preferences of the Asiatic garden beetle. Laura E. Eckman, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT D067 Studies on the genetic differentiation of the legume pod borer, Maruca vitrata F. (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), populations in West Africa. Tolulope A. Agunbiade, Brad S. Coates 2, Barry R. Pittendrigh, and Sun Weilin, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Ames, IA Graduate Student Poster Display Competition: P-IE-7 D068 Toxicity and residual activity of insecticides to predatory mites (Acari: Phytoseiidae). Raja Zalinda Raja Jamil, edu, and John C. Wise, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI D069 Management of thrips in tomatoes and peppers using cultural methods. Kara A. Tyler-Julian, Joseph E. Funderburk, Steve Olson, Galen Frantz 2, and Charles Mellinger 2, University of Florida, Quincy, FL, 2 Glades Crop Care, Inc., Jupiter, FL D076 Preliminary results of infestation of twospotted spider mites (Tetranychus urticae) in cotton prior to squaring. Luis Ricardo Orellana, Ashley P. G. Dowling, and Gus Lorenz 2, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, 2 University of Arkansas, Lonoke, AR D077 Immunomarking field perimeters to determine Drosophila suzukii movement into red raspberries. Jimmy Klick, oregonstate.edu, Wei Q. Yang 2, James R. Hagler 3, Amy J. Dreves, and Denny Bruck 4, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, 2 North Willamette Research and Extension Center, Aurora, OR, 3 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Maricopa, AZ, 4 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Corvallis, OR D078 Population model of Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in pepper fields in Korea. Sun Kyung Lee, Marana Park, Chang-Gyu Park 2, and Joon- Ho Lee, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea, 2 National Academy of Agricultural Science, Su-won, South Korea Graduate Student Poster Display Competition: SysEB- D079 Measuring the effects of reduced winter snowpack on ground dwelling insect populations in the northeastern U.S. Bart Gengler, Daniel P. Comerford, Daniel S. Ott, Paul G. Schaberg 2, Scott Sillett 3, Pamela H. Templar 4, Helen Yurchenco, and Kimberly F. Wallin, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, 2 USDA, South Burlington, VT, 3 Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, Washington, DC, 4 Boston University, Boston, MA D080 Seasonal abundance of carrion beetles (Coleoptera) as a potential forensic tool. Araceli Rosillo, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX D070 Habitat manipulation to promote sustainable management of viruliferous aphids. Katelyn A. Kowles, edu, Douglas W. Johnson 2, and James D. Harwood, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 2 University of Kentucky, Princeton, KY D07 Spatial and temporal genetic analyses of Lycorma delicatula (Hemiptera: Fulgoridae) in South Korea. Marana Park, snu.ac.kr, Kyung Seok Kim, Hwa Yeun Nam, and Joon-Ho Lee, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea D072 Testing the host range of the pestiferous leafminer, Liriomyza langei, and non-pestiferous leafminer species. Sara Elizabeth Emery, University of California, Berkeley, CA D073 A spatial ecology study of the effects of field conditions on the incidence of Plectris aliena Chapman (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) grub damage to sweetpotato roots. Nancy Brill, 78 D08 Change in age structure over an annual cycle for riffle beetles found in submerged rootmats in the Whitewater River, Missouri. Nicholas G. Wehner, Southeast Missouri State University, Cape Girardeau, MO D082 A comprehensive revision of the New World genus Metaparia (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). Clayton A. Sublett, and Jerry L. Cook, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX D083 Molecular phylogeny of the New Zealand genus Sagola Sharp (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae: Pselaphinae). Jong-Seok Park, and Christopher E. Carlton, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA D084 Preliminary review of the taxonomy of the Oiceoptoma (Coleoptera: Silphidae) of North America. Natalie K. Lindgren, Christopher M. Wilson, Brent C. Rahlwes, Alan

81 Monday, November 2 Poster Display Monday, November 2 D. Archambeault, Melissa S. Sisson, Michelle L. Lewis, and Sibyl R. Bucheli, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX D085 Distribution of sensory hairs on the head horn of the Asian rhinoceros beetle, Trypoxylus dichotomus Kono. (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae). Robert A. Zinna, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, and Erin L. McCullough, University of Montana, Missoula, MT D086 Using novel loci to form a preliminary phylogeny of fireflies (Coleoptera: Lampyridae). Gavin J. Martin, Seth M. Bybee, Michael F. Whiting, and Marc A. Branham 2, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, 2 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL D087 Revision of the neotropical burrowing water beetle genus Liocanthydrus (Coleoptera: Noteridae) with the description of new species. Stephen M. Baca, Grey Gustafson, and Kelly B. Miller, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM Graduate Student Poster Display Competition: SysEB-2 D088 A phylogeny of Hetaerina Hagen (Odonata: Calopterygidae) based on morphological data with an examination of potential correlated evolution between sexually selected characters. Jessica E. Louton, Marc A. Branham, and Seth M. Bybee 2, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2 Brigham Young University, Provo, UT D089 Madagascar s millipede assassin bugs (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Ectrichodiinae): Taxonomy, phylogenetics, and sexual dimorphism. Michael Forthman, and Christiane Weirauch, University of California, Riverside, CA D090 Testing relationships of the termite-assassins: A molecular phylogeny of Salyavatinae and Sphaeridopinae (Hemiptera: Reduviidae). Eric R. L. Gordon, and Christiane Weirauch, University of California, Riverside, CA D09 The assessment of genetic variability among spined soldier bug (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) populations. Fatima Mustafa, Muhammad Irfan Ullah, Kathleen M. Kneeland, Thomas A. Courdon 2, David W. Stanley 2, W. Wyatt Hoback 3, and John E. Foster, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Columbia, MO, 3 University of Nebraska, Kearney, NE D092 Using DNA to better understand cryptic species complexes in the dung breeding Ravinia (Diptera: Sarcophagidae). Evan S. Wong, Gregory A. Dahlem 2, and Ronald W. DeBry, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, 2 Northern Kentucky University, Highland Heights, KY D093 Systematics of the millipede-attacking flies Myriophora (Diptera: Phoridae). John M. Hash, John M. Heraty, and Brian V. Brown 2, University of California, Riverside, CA, 2 Natural History Museum, Los Angeles County, CA D094 Phylogenetic systematics of the family Signiphoridae (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea). Ana Dal Molin, edu, and James B. Woolley, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX D095 Molecular techniques elucidate cryptic relationships within the Sirex noctilio North American parasitoid guild. Joelle N. Chille, Christopher M. Whipps, Dylan Parry, and Melissa K. Fierke, State University of New York, Syracuse, NY D096 Advances in the revision of the South American wasp Alophophion Cushman 947 (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae: Ophioninae). Mabel Alvarado, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS D097 Preliminary phylogenetic analysis of North American Agonopterix Hübner 825 (Gelechioidea: Elachistidae: Depressariinae). Robert Samuel de Moya, and Sibyl R. Bucheli, Sam Houston State University, Hunstville, TX Graduate Student Poster Display Competition: SysEB-3 D098 Spatial distribution of two potyvirus in Puerto Rico. Isis J. López Quintero, Linda Wessel-Beaver 2, James Ackerman, and Jose Carlos V. Rodrigues, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras, San Juan, PR, 2 University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, PR D099 Comparing the accuracy and effectiveness of three sampling methods of grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) in a western Oklahoma grassland. Kenneth E. Masloski, okstate.edu, Michael H. Reiskind, and Carmen M. Greenwood, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK D0200 Character analysis of spiniform setae in subfamilies of Gelechioidea. Melissa S. Sisson, and Sibyl R. Bucheli, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX D020 A survey of invertebrate fauna in tall grass prairie restorations in South Dakota: Using ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) as indicators of restoration success. Laura B. Winkler, laura. South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD D0202 Host selection and partitioning of midges (Diptera: Chironomidae, Ceratopogonidae) by Hydrachnidiae. Travis Edwards, and Ashley P. G. Dowling, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR D0203 Structural and functional differences in the antennae of worker honey bees of Apis mellifera and Apis cerana. Jewon Jung, Kun woong Park, and Hyung wook Kwon, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea D0204 Comparison of the Silphidae in various habitats at Hawn State Park, Ste. Genevieve County, Missouri. Benjamin J. Kist, Southeast Missouri State University, Cape Girardeau, MO D0205 Morphometric analysis of Scaphinotus petersi populations in the Arizona Sky Islands. Craig Connolly, and Karen Ann Ober, College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA D0206 Vertical sampling in tree canopies: Implications for documenting and estimating arthropod diversity and abundance. Carla I. Coots, Paris L. Lambdin, Jerome F. Grant, and J. Rusty Rhea 2, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2 USDA, Forest Service, Asheville, NC D0207 Effects of gravel augmentation on invertebrate assemblage and biomass in the American River, CA. Nicholas A. Macias, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA D0208 Climate impacts on Lepidoptera and Odonata communities at California natural reserves. Jessica E. Rothery, gmail.com, University of California, Berkeley, CA, and Joan E. Ball, University of California, Oakland, CA 79

82 Monday November 2 Monday November 2 Student Competition for the President s Prize: Ten-Minute Papers Organizers: Luis A. Cañas and Marianne Alleyne 2, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, 2 University of Illinois, Urbana, IL. Undergraduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition: MUVE, PBT, SysEB, & P-IE Ballroom G, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Susan J. Weller, Phillip A. Glogoza 2, and Justin R. Anderson 3, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, 2 University of Minnesota, Moorhead, MN, 3 Radford University, Radford, VA 7:50 Introductory Remarks 7: The effects of pokeweed antiviral protein on mosquito larvae and arboviruses. Nikki Holland, and Justin R. Anderson, Radford University, Radford, VA 8: Triethylamine as a potential anesthetic agent for the study of mosquito heart physiology. Weihan Chen, vanderbilt.edu, and Julian F. Hillyer, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 9:5 Break 0: Phototaxis, host cues, and host-plant finding in a monophagous weevil, Rhinoncomimus latipes. Jeffrey R. Smith, and Judith A. Hough-Goldstein, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 0: Evidence of a novel oviposition preference in Oecanthus forbesi. William Licht, University of Minnesota, Duluth, MN 0: Evaluation of captured navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), by a novel kairomonebaited trap. Joanna B. Bloese, and Elizabeth A. Boyd, California State University, Chico, CA 0: Abundance and diversity in insect visitors to extrafloral nectaries in elderberries (Sambucus nigra). Tanjim Taswar Hossain, University of South Florida, St. Petersburg, FL, and Jaime C. Pinero, Lincoln University of Missouri, Jefferson City, MO 0: Sublethal effects of Bacillus thuringiensis on the reproductive performance of Plutella xylostella populations. Valéria Lucas de Laurentis, Ana Carolina Pires Veiga, Haroldo Xavier Linhares Volpe, Caroline Placidi De Bortoli, com.br, Alessandra Marieli Vacari, Ricardo Antonio Polanczyk, and Sergio Antonio De Bortoli, Faculdade de Ciências Agrárias e Veterinárias, Jaboticabal, São Paulo, Brazil 8: Computational prediction of mirna targets in three different Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) life stages. Juan F. Macias Velasco, Wayne B. Hunter 2, Daymon Hail, and Blake R. Bextine, University of Texas, Tyler, TX, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Ft. Pierce, FL 8: Does Interstate 40 facilitate or impede tick dispersal? A. Daniel Greene, Brian M. Hendricks 2, Taylor Lewis 2, Hannah Peace 2, David Paulsen 2, and Rebecca T. Trout Fryxell 2, Lincoln Memorial University, Harrogate, TN, 2 University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 8: Social immunity in ants: The role of trophallaxis and cathepsin D in colony-wide immunocompetence of Camponotus pennsylvanicus. Brian Lejeune, Erin J. Cram, and Rebeca B. Rosengaus, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 8: Biodiversity complexity in the Australian tick tock cicadas. Patrick D. Gero, Katherine B. R. Hill, David C. Marshall, Christopher L. Owen, and Chris Simon, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 9: A new flightless genus of rove beetle (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae: Omaliinae) from Tasmania. Anthony Deczynski, and Margaret K. Thayer, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL 9:5 034 Eyeing the evolution of odonate color vision. Kelsy K. Johnson, Michael F. Whiting, and Seth M. Bybee, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 9: Trophic diversity among the Blattodea. Megan M. Wilson, Dominic Evangelista, and Jessica L. Ware, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ 9: Fleas, lice, and earwigs too? Evolution of ectoparasitic earwigs (Dermaptera). Michael A. Naegle, com, and Michael F. Whiting, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 80 : Understanding the influence of inflorescence position on plant-pollinator communities. Amanda Skidmore, amanda. Logan M. Minter, and Ric Bessin, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY : Distinguishing feral and managed honey bees (Apis mellifera) using stable carbon isotope ratios. Lucy Anderson, and Berry J. Brosi, Emory University, Atlanta, GA : Azteca ants connect aboveground and belowground processes in a wet tropical forest. Jane Lucas, edu, Natalie A. Clay 2, Michael Kaspari 2, and Adam Davidson Kay, University of St. Thomas, St. Paul, MN, 2 University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK : Can fungal endophytes be used to control ornamental insect pests? Conor Fair, Greg Sword, Maria Julissa Ek-Ramos, and Kevin Heinz, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX : Laos: An emerging frontier for entomological research. David A. Pick, Florida Atlantic University, Jupiter, FL 2:03 Concluding Remarks Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition: MUVE- 30 A, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Bradley A. Mullens and Lee W. Cohnstaedt 2, University of California, Riverside, CA, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Manhattan, KS 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8: The cost of control: The financial dynamics of sanitation and other pest management programs in food-processing facilities.

83 Monday November 2 Monday November 2 Scott Williams, and Linda J. Mason, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 8: Improving the health of nestling birds by controlling bees and hematophagous arthropods with permethrin. Caroline Efstathion, Bill Kern, and Paul Bardunias, University of Florida, Davie, FL 8: The role of mosquito-derived nutrients from tree holes in supporting terrestrial predator communities. William C. Glasgow, Stephen David Flanagan, Alisa A. Abuzeineh, and Donald A. Yee, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS 8: The role of protists in the diet of larval container mosquitoes. Jeffrey Skiff, and Donald A. Yee, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS 8: A comparison between two surveillance methods for container-breeding mosquitoes in a La Crosse endemic area. Jake E. Bova, Sally Paulson, Carlyle C. Brewster, and Dana Hawley, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 9: Evaluating a native fish species as an alternative to the western mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis, for the biological control of mosquitoes in southern California. Adena M. Why, ucr.edu, and William Walton, University of California, Riverside, CA 9: Using simulation models to understand mosquito- Wolbachia interactions. Philip Ray Crain, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 9:27 Break 9: An attractive self-marking ovitrap (ASMO) to measure dispersal and determine skip oviposition in Aedes albopictus field populations. Timothy Davis, Dan Kline 2, Phillip E. Kaufman, Jerome A. Hogsette 2, and Andrew Tatem, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL 9: Carry-over effects of temperature on different life stages of Aedes albopictus: Linking larval environments to adult survival and fitness. Francis N. Ezeakacha, and Donald A. Yee, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS 0: The effect of La Crosse virus infection on the production of serotonin in Aedes triseriatus and Aedes albopictus. Fan Yang, Jianyong Li, Carlyle C. Brewster, and Sally Paulson, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 0: Suppression of dengue virus propagation by sterol carrier protein 2 inhibitor in Aedes Aag2 cell. Qiang Fu, edu, and Que Lan, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 0: Plasmodium parasites manipulate mosquitoes olfaction behavior to increase their malaria transmission potential. Justin George, and Thomas Baker, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 0: Is there local transmission of avian malaria parasites in Alaska? Jenny S. Carlson, Anthony Cornel, Laura Wilson 2, Erika Walther 2, Claire Loiseau 2, and Ravinder N. M. Sehgal 2, University of California, Davis, CA, 2 San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA 0: Susceptibility of potential mosquito vectors to bovine ephemeral fever virus. Hsuan-Jen Pan, and Chi-Wei Tsai, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan :03 Concluding Remarks Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition: MUVE-2 30 B, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Emma N. I. Weeks and Sandra A. Allan 2, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8: Population genetics and ecological studies of the newly invasive Asian cockroach (Blattella asahinai) in central North Carolina. Yvonne Matos, W. Booth, Edward L. Vargo, and Coby Schal, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 8: Determination of acaricide resistance in Rhipicephalus sanguineus and evaluation of resistance mechanisms. Amanda L. Eiden, Phillip E. Kaufman, Faith M. Oi, Michael J. Dark, and Robert J. Miller 2, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Edinburg, TX 8: Effect of environmental humidity on red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst), developmental rate when fed dried distillers grains with solubles. Mahsa Fardisi, edu, Linda J. Mason, and Klein Ileleji, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 8: Susceptibility of field strains of three stored product insect species to spinosad and chlorpyrifos-methyl + deltamethrin. Blossom Sehgal, and Bhadriraju Subramanyam, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 8: Amblyomma americanum distribution, seasonality, and pathogen prevalence at Ames Plantation. Brian M. Hendricks, A. Daniel Greene 2, Hannah Peace, Taylor Thompson, David Paulsen, Graham J. Hickling, and Rebecca T. Trout Fryxell, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2 Lincoln Memorial University, Harrogate, TN 9: Species composition and prevalence of Borrelia infections in Ixodes spp. ticks from the southeastern coastal United States. Lauren Paul Maestas, Graham J. Hickling, Rick Gerhold, Deb Miller, and Rebecca T. Trout Fryxell, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 9: Genetic and phenotypic variation in host-seeking behavior of nymphal Ixodes scapularis ticks: Implications for Lyme disease risk in the eastern United States. Isis M. Kuczaj, gmail.com, Graham J. Hickling 2, and Jean I. Tsao, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 2 University of Tennessee, Institute of Agriculture, Knoxville, TN 9: Responses of the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, to semiochemicals in a Y-tube olfactometer. Lucas P. Carnohan, Emma N. I. Weeks, Phillip E. Kaufman, and Sandra A. Allan 2, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL 9:39 Break 9: Prevalence and molecular characterization of Wolbachia infection in lone star ticks (Amblyomma americanum) from central Georgia. Amanda Jo Williams-Newkirk, 8

84 Monday November 2 Monday November 2 emory.edu, Ian Fried, Thomas Gillespie, and Gregory A. Dasch, Emory University, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 0: Functional characterization of a putative octopamine/ tyramine receptor from the southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus. Aaron D. Gross, Michael J. Kimber, Kevin B. Temeyer 2, Andrew Y. Li 2, Felix Guerrero 2, Adalberto A. Pérez de León 2, and Joel R. Coats, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kerrville, TX 0: Factors influencing the composition of bed bug (Cimex lectularius) aggregations. Margie P. Lehnert, edu, Peter H. Adler, Eric P. Benson, Patricia A. Zungoli, and Patrick D. Gerard, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 0: Exploring components of subsocial behavior in the bed bug. Sydney Crawley, and Kenneth F. Haynes, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 0: Egg surface morphology and morphometrics of bed bug (Cimex lectularius) eggs. Brittany Elise Delong, vt.edu, and Dini M. Miller, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 0:5 038 Evolution of resistance to combination insecticide products in the bed bug. Jennifer Gordon, uky.edu, Michael F. Potter, and Kenneth F. Haynes, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY : The cost of bed bug anxiety: Travelers willingness to pay to avoid them. Jerrod M. Penn, Leigh J. Maynard, and Desmond O. Brown, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 8: Mechanical vector potential and microbiota assemblages of Nylanderia sp. nr. pubens (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Danny L. McDonald, Jeff Brady 2, and Roger E. Gold, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 2 Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Stephenville, TX 9: Biology and management of Brachymyrmex patagonicus Mayr (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Chris Keefer, and Roger E. Gold, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 9: Using odor absorbed filter papers and canines to detect off-site fire ants. Wei-Lien Chi, Hui- Min Lin 2, Chung-Chi Lin 3, Yi-Lun Tsai, Wang-Ting Chen 2, Yi-Chen Chen 2, Yang-Yuan Chen 2, and Yi-Yang Lien, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pintung, Taiwan, 2 Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, 3 National Changhua University of Education, Changhua, Taiwan 9: Red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta) forager sizes and granular ant bait grit size selection in the presence of Pseudacteon spp. phorid flies. Janis Reed, Roger E. Gold, and Robert T. Puckett, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 9:39 Break 9:5 039 Using a sandwich ELISA test to determine optimal bait station placement for Argentine ant control in natural park habitats. Jinbo Song, Eric P. Benson, Patricia A. Zungoli, and Brittany Ellis, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 0: Effects of diet on queen development in the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile. Richard Neff, University of California, Riverside, CA :5 Concluding Remarks Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition: MUVE-3 30 C, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Eileen A. Buss and Matt Aubuchon 2, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8: Standard metabolic rate of Lepisma saccharina and Thermobia domestica: Effects of temperature and mass. Zachary C. DeVries, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 8: Food preferences of Ctenolepisma longicaudata. Edward James Cayia, and Rebecca W. Baldwin, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 8: Effect of different mulches on Nylanderia pubens (Forel) foraging and nesting behavior. Shweta Sharma, ufl.edu, Eileen A. Buss, and David Oi 2, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL 8: Selecting ant baits for an IPM strategy for Caribbean crazy ants, Nylanderia pubens (Forel), based on macronutrient preferences and nest demographics. Dawn Calibeo, and Faith M. Oi, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 0: Alteration of molting process caused by noviflumuron in Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae). Lin Xing, and Nan-Yao Su, University of Florida, Davie, FL 0: A preadaptation for fungal gardening in Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki as a result of tunnel excavation. Paul Bardunias, and Nan-Yao Su, University of Florida, Davie, FL 0: Effects of intercepting tunnel treatment with Altriset on Reticulitermes flavipes populations at group source and satellite feeding sites. Znar Barwary, and Xing Ping Hu, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 0: Eastern subterranean termite (Reticulitermes flavipes) chitinase activity in response to two chitinase inhibitor treated diets. Timothy J. Husen, Shripat T. Kamble, and Julie M. Stone, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE : Landscape interactions with subterranean termite (Isoptera: Reticulitermes) communities in Missouri: Patterns of invasion as subdivisions are developed and age. Paul S. Botch, and Richard M. Houseman, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO : Habitat fragmentation and bee abundance in Little Rock, Arkansas. Nicole D. Freeman, and Janet Lanza, University of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR :27 Concluding Remarks 82

85 Monday November 2 Monday November 2 Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition: MUVE-4 30 D, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Jonathan A. Cammack and Astri Wayadande 2, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, 2 Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8: The effect of diet and sex on the gustatory behavioral response of the blow fly, Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae), to amino acids associated with decomposition. Allissa M. Blystone, and Karolyn M. Hansen, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH 8: Microbial and insect communities associated with cadaver decomposition islands in Louisiana. Danielle C. Levron, and Erin J. Watson-Horzelski, Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, LA 8: Insect faunal succession on white-tailed deer carcasses and comparison to past succession studies on pigs in southwest Virginia. James McKee Wilson, Nelson W. Lafon 2, Kimberly L. Kreitlow 3, Carlyle C. Brewster, and Richard D. Fell, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, 2 Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries, Roanoke, VA, 3 North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 8: Necrophilous insect succession and sampling on fetal pig. Angela Bucci, D. Wes Watson, and Coby Schal, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 8: Elucidation of the genetic basis of monogeny in Chrysomya rufifacies (Diptera: Calliphoridae). Meaghan L. Pimsler, Sing-Hoi Sze, Corbin D. Jones 2, Jeffery K. Tomberlin, and Aaron M. Tarone, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 2 University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 9: Non-consumptive effects on an ephemeral resource between an intraguild predator, Chrysomya rufifacies (Diptera: Calliphoridae), and its prey, Cochliomyia macellaria (Diptera: Calliphoridae). Micah Flores, and Jeffery K. Tomberlin, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 9: Developmental plasticity of the secondary screwworm, Cochliomyia macellaria Fabricius (Diptera: Calliphoridae), in Texas. Charity G. Owings, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 9: The effect of seston on the susceptibility of Simulium vittatum larvae (Diptera: Simuliidae) to insecticidal proteins produced by Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis. Joseph P. Iburg, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 9:39 Break 9: Attraction and oviposition response of gravid female black flies (Simulium vittatum) to S. vittatum eggs. Tommy W. McGaha, Raymond Noblet, and Thomas R. Unnasch 2, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 2 University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 0: The role of midgut immunity and homeostasis in Leishmania survival, development, and transmission by the sand fly, Lutzomyia longipalpis. Matthew C. Heerman, edu, Marcelo Ramalho-Ortigao, and Ludek Zurek, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 0: The fate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Musca domestica: Concurrent spatial and temporal examination of bacteria along with expression of house fly antimicrobial responses. Chet Joyner, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, Mary Mills, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, and Dana Nayduch, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Manhattan, KS 0: Comparison of the movement of Escherichia coli O57:H7 and Salmonella enterica, to lettuce by the blow fly, Phormia regina (Meigen), and house fly, Musca domestica. Rebecca C. Pace, Justin L. Talley, and Astri Wayadande, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 0:39 04 Determination of resistance mechanisms within field populations of Haematobia irritans through toxicological and biochemical techniques. Chris J. Holderman, Phillip E. Kaufman, and Jeffrey R. Bloomquist, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 0:5 042 House fly (Musca domestica) responses to insect honeydew. Kim Hung, and Alec Gerry, University of California, Riverside, CA : The effect of laboratory colonization on parasitization rate and fitness of Spalangia cameroni (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), a pupal parasitoid of filth flies on livestock facilities. E. T. Machtinger, Christopher J. Geden 2, and N. C. Leppla, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL :5 Concluding Remarks Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition: PBT- 300 A, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Julian F. Hillyer and Mark R. Brown 2, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, 2 University of Georgia, Athens, GA 8:25 Introductory Remarks 8: Expression and functional role for the RYamide-2 neuropeptide in the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. David Arthur McKinney, and Mark R. Brown, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 8: Patterns of gene expression during Apis mellifera worker development with varying degrees of infestation by Varroa. Ryan D. Kuster, Olav Rueppell, and Humberto F. Boncristiani, University of North Carolina, Greensboro, NC 8:5 046 Transcriptome of the plant virus vector Graminella nigrifrons, and the molecular interactions of maize fine streak rhabdovirus transmission. Yuting Chen, osu.edu, and Andrew P. Michel, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH 9: Apprehending the mechanisms of plant defense subsequent to Bactericera cockerelli feeding and Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum infection. Ordom Brian Huot, tamu.edu, and Cecilia Tamborindeguy, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 9:5 048 In vitro Nosema ceranae infection on honey bee larvae results in infection as adults and higher mortality rate. Daren M. Eiri, Guntima Suwannapong 2, and James C Nieh, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 2 Burapha University, Chon Buri, Thailand 83

86 Monday November 2 Monday November 2 9: The effects of the fungal pathogen, Nosema ceranae, on honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) physiology and behavioral development. Mike Goblirsch, and Marla Spivak, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 9: Nutrition and immune responses of honey bees exposed to pesticides. Alison M. Reeves, Jennifer R. Williams, Brenna E. Traver, Carlyle C. Brewster, Richard D. Fell, and Troy D. Anderson, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 9:5 042 Targeting juvenile hormone metabolic genes in the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) as a strategy to reduce the spread of citrus greening disease. Evelien Van Ekert, edu, Dov Borovsky 2, Charles A. Powell, Ronald D. Cave, Rocco T. Alessandro 3, and Robert G. Shatters 3, University of Florida, Fort Pierce, FL, 2 Borovsky Consulting, Vero Beach, FL, 3 3 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Fort Pierce, FL 0:03 Break 0: Termite ß (,3)-glucanases; mining antimicrobial compounds for the treatment of human diseases? William S. Du Comb, Cameron Habib, Veronica Godoy, Marinia Hincapie, and Rebeca B. Rosengaus, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 0: Immune response of Lymantria dispar to naturally occurring intracellular pathogens. Gwyn L. Puckett, illinois.edu, Leellen Solter 2, and Marianne Alleyne, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, 2 University of Illinois, llinois Natural History Survey, Champaign, IL 0: Transgenerational immunity in Manduca sexta. Alex Chancellor, Wendy Smith, and Rebeca B. Rosengaus, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 0: Evolution of juvenile hormone esterase in insects. Sandeep Kumar, and Hojun Song, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL : Hormonal regulation of reproduction in bed bug, Cimex lectularius. Hemant Gujar, and Subba R. Palli, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY : Ovary ecdysteroidogenic hormone has roles in blood digestion, egg maturation and metabolism in the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Animesh Dhara, Jai H. Eum, M. R. Strand, and Mark R. Brown, University of Georgia, Athens, GA : Influence of parasitism on metabolites of the light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana. Julie V. Hopper, and Nicholas J. Mills, University of California, Berkeley, CA :39 Concluding Remarks Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition: PBT B, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Nannan Liu and R. Michael Roe 2, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, 2 North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 8:25 Introductory Remarks 8: Effect of neonicotinoid seed treatments on preypredator interactions of soybean aphid and Orius insidiosus (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae). Carolina Camargo, yahoo.es, Thomas E. Hunt 2, and Blair D. Siegfried, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 2 University of Nebraska, Concord, NE 8: Sublethal effects of reduced risk pesticides on the biological control agent, Hippodamia convergens. Lisa Fernandez, and Nicholas J. Mills, University of California, Berkeley, CA 8:5 043 Video-tracking of behavioral effects following sublethal exposure to pyrethroids in the honey bee, Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae). E. M. Ingram, gmail.com, J. Augustin 2, Marion D. Ellis, and Blair D. Siegfried, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 2 University d Avignon et des pays du Vaucluse, Avignon, Provence Alpes Côtes d Azur, France 9: Sub-lethal effects of neonicotinyl insecticide (imidacloprid) colony exposure on honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) queen fecundity. Judy Y. Wu, and Marla Spivak, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 9: Toxicological effects of in-hive pesticides to honey bees. Jennifer R. Williams, Richard D. Fell, and Troy D. Anderson, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 9: Mode of action of N,N-Diethyl-meta-Toluamide (DEET) on the insect nervous system. Daniel R. Swale, and Jeffrey R. Bloomquist, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 9: The regulatory pathway of a rhodopsin-like G-proteincoupled receptor-mediated insecticide resistance in the mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus. Ting Li, com, and Nannan Liu, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 9: Management of Drosophila suzukii through systemic activity of neonicotinoids on highbush blueberry. Charles Clark Coslor, Lynell K. Tanigoshi, Beverly S. Gerdeman, and Hollis G. Spitler, Washington State University, Mt. Vernon, WA 0:03 Break 0: Histopathological effects of the cyanobacterial toxin, Microcystin-LR on the exposed epithelial tissues of the amberwing spreadwing damselfly, Lestes eurinus, and the bloodworm, Chironomus riparius. Nathan Baker, Ohio State University, Fredericktown, OH 0: Sublethal effects of hydroxamic acids on larvae of western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera. Zixiao Zhao, and Nicholas J. Miller, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 0: The effect of delay of adult emergence in Bt corn on resistance evolution of western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera Leconte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). Jung Koo Kang, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 0: The effects of methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide on mortality and egg maturation in adult female Aedes aegypti. Daniel J. Usry, Mark R. Brown, and M. R. Strand, University of Georgia, Athens, GA : Biotransformation and sequestration of arsenic in aquatic Diptera. Christina Loraine Mogren, .ucr.edu, Samuel M. Webb 2, and John T. Trumble, University of California, Riverside, CA, 2 Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Menlo Park, CA 84

87 Monday November 2 Monday November 2 : Sanitation increases effectiveness of aerosol insecticides in milling facilities. Kabita Kharel, Frank H. Arthur 2, Kun-Yan Zhu, and James F. Campbell 2, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Manhattan, KS : Detecting the presence of insecticide target sites expressed in non-engineered insect cell lines: A high throughput screening approach. Lacey J. Jenson, and Jeffrey R. Bloomquist, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL :39 Concluding Remarks Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition: PBT C, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Kate Aronstein and Kelli Hoover 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Weslaco, TX, 2 Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 8:25 Introductory Remarks 8: Exploration of feedstock-associated lignocellulases within the digestive tract of the lower termite Reticulitermes flavipes. Zachary Karl, and Michael E. Scharf, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 8: Development of arthropod resistance to xenobiotics. Rebeca Gutierrez, Mark E. Whalon, and David Mota-Sanchez, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 8: Differences in larval midgut protease activity between CryAc-resistant and susceptible strains of Helicoverpa zea. Min Zhang, Jeffrey A. Fabrick 2, Yves Carriere, Bruce Tabashnik, and Xianchun Li, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Maricopa, AZ 9: Larval survival and plant injury of CryF-susceptible, -resistant, and -heterozygous genotypes of the fall armyworm on transgenic corn containing single or pyramided Bt genes. Ying Niu, Fei Yang, Liping Zhang, S. David Wangila, Robert L. Meagher 2, B. Rogers Leonard 3, and Fangneng Huang, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL, 3 Louisiana State University AgCenter, Winnsboro, LA 9: Fitness costs of CryF resistance in fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda. Ana Maria Velez, gmail.com, Terence A. Spencer, Analiza P. Alves 2, and Blair D. Siegfried, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 2 Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., Johnston, IA 9: RNA interference as a tool for the analysis of gene function in the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say). Ashley D. Yates, and Nicholas J. Miller, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 9: What the midgut transcriptome tells us about the stored product pest, Callosobruchus maculatus, the cowpea weevil. Alice M. Vossbrinck, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 9:5 Break 0: A tripartite termite-protozoa-bacteria symbiosis: Impact of different endosymbiotic groups on Reticulitermes flavipes lignocellulose digestion. Brittany F. Peterson, edu, Amit Sethi, Huizhe Zhou, and Michael E. Scharf, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 0: Midgut-specific profiles of the emerald ash borer larvae (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire). Swapna Priya Rajarapu, Vanessa L. Muilenburg, Daniel A. Herms, Pierluigi Bonello 2, and Omprakash Mittapalli, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, 2 Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 0: Overexpression of an insect cellulase in switchgrass for improved sugar release. Jonathan D. Willis, A. Grace Collins, Juan L. Jurat-Fuentes, and C. Neal Stewart, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 0: Salivary gland transcriptome reveals bacterial symbionts of the potato leafhopper, Empoasca fabae. Bridget D. DeLay, and William O. Lamp, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 0: Expression of a prostaglandin E 2 synthase in the salivary glands of the blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis. Joshua R. Urban, and Yoonseong Park, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS : RNAi mediated depletion of NSF in Amblyomma maculatum infected with Rickettsia parkeri. Rebecca Browning, Steven W. Adamson, and Shahid Karim, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS :5 Concluding Remarks Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition: PBT-4: 300 D, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Qisheng Song and Catherine Loudon 2, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, 2 University of California, Irvine, CA 8:25 Introductory Remarks 8: Parasitoid mediated effects on host behavior: Impacts on infection risk by other pathogens. S. E. Johnson, edu, and M. R. Strand, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 8: Differences in egg morphology between coleopteran and lepidopteran stored-product insect pests in relation to tolerance to fumigants. Sandipa G. Gautam, edu, George P. Opit, Spencer Walse 2, and Dennis Margosan 2, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Parlier, CA 8: Evaluation of food-grade additives as methyl bromide alternatives to control the ham mite, Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Schrank). Salehe Abbar, and Thomas W. Phillips, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 9: Effects of resource availability on energy allocation patterns and fitness in bumble bee (Bombus impatiens) colonies. Nhi Duong, and Goggy Davidowitz, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 9:5 046 Fitness and fecundity of hemlock woolly adelgid in relation to the health of the eastern hemlock. A. C. Jones, vt.edu, Scott M. Salom, and Donald E. Mullins, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 9: Transgenic citrus strategies for control of the citrus root 85

88 Monday November 2 weevil, Diaprepes abbreviatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Sulley Ben-Mahmoud, Dov Borovsky 2, J. Ramos 3, Charles A. Powell, Ronald D. Cave, David G. Hall 3, Stephen L. Lapointe 3, and Robert G. Shatters 3, University of Florida, Fort Pierce, FL, 2 Borovsky Consulting, Vero Beach, FL, 3 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Fort Pierce, FL 9: Oxidative responses of resistant and susceptible soybeans to soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura). Lia S. Marchi, Tiffany M. Heng-Moss, Thomas E. Hunt 2, Edson L. L. Baldin, and John C. Reese 3, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 2 University of Nebraska, Concord, NE, 3 Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 8:5 047 The development of best use practices of commercialized colonies of Bombus impatiens on strawberry, watermelon, and pickling cucumber crops in Delaware. J. Marchese, and Deborah A. Delaney, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 8: Assessing the health of commercial honey bees (Apis mellifera) across varying agricultural landscapes. Matthew Smart, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, Jeff Pettis, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD, Ned Euliss, United States Geological Survey, Northern Prairie Widlife Research Center, Jamestown, ND, and Marla Spivak, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN Monday November 2 9:5 Break 0: Courtship song mechanism of Cotesia congregata (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). Justin P. Bredlau, Yasha J. Mohajer, Timothy M. Cameron 2, Michael L. Fine, and Karen M. Kester, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, 2 Miami University, Oxford, OH 0: Investigations of candidate genes involved in production of the aggregation pheromone 4,8-dimethyldecenal in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae). Michael Jamison Aikins, Hongbo Jiang, Yoonseong Park, and Thomas W. Phillips, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 8: Influence of urbanization on the survival and productivity of honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies in an agricultural region. Douglas B. Sponsler, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH 8: Insect pollinators in soybean fields: Community identification and sampling method analysis. Kelly Ann Gill, and Matthew E. O Neal, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 9: Non-symmetric effect of exotic plant and insect species on floral visitation networks in simplified Hawaiian ecological communities. Jennifer L. Imamura, and George K. Roderick, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 0: Effects of age and lifetime flight behavior on flight capacity in Drosophila melanogaster. Steven J. Lane, cmich.edu, and Stephen P. Roberts, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 0: Gripping or slipping: How the claw retractor muscle behaves in different walking situations in the beetle Pachnoda marginata (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae). Philipp Bußhardt, and Stanislav N. Gorb, University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany 0: Structural and biochemical characterization of chemosensory proteins from the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. Arun Wanchoo, Almudena Ortiz- Urquiza, John Boswell, and Nemat O. Keyhani, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL : Cold hardiness and supercooling point of the female redbay ambrosia beetle (Xyleborus glabratus) - implications for invasion potential in the northern latitudes of North America. John P. Formby, Natraj Krishnan, Will Underwood 2, and John J. Riggins, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, 2 Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, Moss Point, MS : Effects of nutrition on worker body size variation in the red imported fire ant. Bill D. Wills, Shawn M. Wilder 2, Andrew V. Suarez, David Holway 3, and Micky D. Eubanks 2, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, 2 Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 3 University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA :27 Concluding Remarks Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition: P-IE- Lecture Hall, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator: Brian Bret, Dow AgroSciences, Roseville, CA 8:0 Introductory Remarks 86 9: Assessing the pollination requirements of a perennial crop. Hannah R. Gaines, and Claudio Gratton, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 9: Spatial distribution of Varroa destructor and bee brood within colonies of Apis mellifera. Jackson C. Means, vt.edu, Carlyle C. Brewster, Richard D. Fell, and Loke T. Kok, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 9: The effects of pesticide exposure on gene expression, chemical communication, and hormone production in honey bees. Daniel R. Schmehl, Christina M. Grozinger, Peter E. A. Teal 2, and James H. Tumlinson, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL 9:5 Break 0: Quantifying the influence of landscape composition on the pollination service supplied to pumpkins (Cucurbita pepo) in Ohio. Ben W. Phillips, and Mary M. Gardiner, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH 0: Assessing the importance of flowers and their scents in the host selection of the seed-feeding weevil (Mogulones borraginis). Ikju Park, Mark Schwarzländer, and Sanford D. Eigenbrode, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 0: Does floral farmscaping differentially affect a pest (Pieris rapae) and its parasitoids in broccoli? Obinna Lebechukwu Aduba, John R. Ruberson, and Peter G. Hartel 2, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, 2 University of Georgia, Athens, GA 0: Pollinator preferences and their potential effects on floral trait diversity. Margaret W. Thairu, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, and Johanne Brunet, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Madison, WI 0: What s the attraction? Early season native bee

89 Monday November 2 Monday November 2 visitation to a non-flowering shrub, Adenostoma fasciculatum, at Pinnacles national monument, California. Joan M. Meiners, joan. Terry L. Griswold 2, and Edward W. Evans, Utah State University, Logan, UT, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Logan, UT : Effects of landscape and farm management on wild pollinators of eastern apple orchards. Mia G. Park, cornell.edu, and Bryan N. Danforth, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY : A preference for local foods: Bumble bee foraging decisions in a Rocky Mountain meadow. Jane E. Ogilvie, jane. Takashi T. Makino 2, and James D. Thomson, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 2 Yamagata University, Yamagata, Japan :27 Concluding Remarks Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition: P-IE-2 Ballroom A, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator: G. David Buntin, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA 8:0 Introductory Remarks 8: Evaluating the effects of native nematode species of the genus Deladenus (Thorne 94) on the woodwasp Sirex nigricornis F. (Hymenoptera: Siricidae) from Illinois and Louisiana. Elliott A. Zieman, John D. Reeve, and F. Agustin Jiménez, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 8: Evolutionary relationships between Deladenus nematodes parasitizing northeastern North American Sirex species. E. Erin Morris, Ryan Kepler, Stefan Long, David W. Williams 2, and Ann Hajek, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 2 USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Buzzards Bay, MA 8: Temporal shifts in spider foraging within a forest food web. Thomas D. Whitney, and James D. Harwood, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 8: Woodland management history and its effect on the abundance and diversity of forest leaf-litter arthropods. José- Cristian Martínez, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL 9: Forest stand type preference of Sirex nigricornis (Hymenoptera: Siricidae) in Mississippi. Kevin D. Chase, msstate.edu, Kamal JK. Gandhi 2, and John J. Riggins, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, 2 University of Georgia, Athens, GA 9:5 049 Oviposition preferences of female Sirex nigricornis F. (Hymenoptera:Siricidae) in relation to differing moisture contents of Pinus echinata. Jessica Hartshorn, and Fred M. Stephen, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 9: Using molecular techniques to guide the management of the invasive goldspotted oak borer, Agrilus auroguttatus Schaeffer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). Vanessa Lopez, ucr.edu, Paul F. Rugman-Jones, Richard Stouthamer, Tom W. Coleman 2, and Mark S. Hoddle, University of California, Riverside, CA, 2 USDA, Forest Service, San Bernardino, CA 9: Temperature affects gloomy scale (Melanaspis tenebricosa) abundance on urban trees. Adam Dale, ncsu.edu, and Steven D. Frank, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 9: Priority effects in the establishment of the oak leaf tie community. Elisha Sigmon, and John T. Lill, George Washington University, Washington, DC 0:03 Break 0: Mountain pine beetle fungal associates change in abundance through the beetle life cycle. Lily Khadempour, Valerie LeMay 2, David Jack 2, Joerg Bohlmann 2, and Colette Breuil 2, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 2 University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada 0: Ecological and anthropogenic factors influencing goldspotted oak borer (Agrilus auroguttatus) populations. Lauren A. Singleton, and Dessie L. A. Underwood, California State University, Long Beach, CA 0: Effects of cold tolerance on potential distributions of introduced emerald ash borer parasitoids. Anthony A. Hanson, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, and Robert C. Venette, USDA, Forest Service, St. Paul, MN 0: Catching the right flight: Cues eliciting attachment and detachment behaviors by mites phoretic on the pine engraver, Ips pini (Say). Jesse A. Pfammatter, and Kenneth F. Raffa, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI : Differential selection behavior of southern pine beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis) and primary predator, Thanasimus dubius to α-pinene enantiomers. J. C. Staeben, com, Brian T. Sullivan 2, William P. Shepherd 2, John T. Nowak 3, and Kamal J. Gandhi, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 2 USDA, Forest Service, Pineville, LA, 3 USDA, Forest Service, Asheville, NC : Cold hardiness of emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) from green and black ash. Lindsey D. E. Christianson, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, and Robert C. Venette, USDA, Forest Service, St. Paul, MN : An assessment scheme for identifying sentinel trees to detect invasive borers in urban forests. Gabriel P. Hughes, Clifford S. Sadof, and Matthew D. Ginzel, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN : Identifying and evaluating pine mortality associated with Ips spp. in Arkansas, Texas, and Louisiana. Chandler S. Barton, Larry D. Galligan, Fred M. Stephen, Stephen R. Clarke 2, and James D. Smith 3, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, 2 USDA, Forest Service, Lufkin, TX, 3 USDA, Forest Service, Pineville, LA :5 Concluding Remarks Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition: P-IE-3 Ballroom B, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator: Matthew Caroll, St. Loius, MO 8:0 Introductory Remarks 8: Gene flow and genetic structure of European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) e- and z-pheromone races in the northeastern U.S.: Greater isolation of e-race populations. Jing Sun, 87

90 Monday November 2 Monday November 2 Brad S. Coates 2, Nicholas J. Miller 3, Shelby J. Fleischer 4, and Thomas W. Sappington 2, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Ames, IA, 3 University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 4 Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 8: Examining the spatial distribution pattern of corn planthopper, Peregrinus maidis, in corn-sunn hemp intercropping system and corn monoculture. Roshan Manandhar, hawaii.edu, and Mark G. Wright, University of Hawaii, Manoa, Honolulu, HI 8: Impact of corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea) on field corn grain quality. Jenny Bibb, Angus L. Catchot, Donald Cook 2, Fred R. Musser 3, Scott D. Stewart 4, B. Rogers Leonard 5, Tom Allen, and G. David Buntin 6, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, 2 Mississippi State University, Stoneville, MS, 3 Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, 4 University of Tennessee, Jackson, TN, 5 Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA, 6 University of Georgia, Griffin, GA 8: Diurnal activity patterns of Colaspis brunnea (F.) and Colaspis crinicornis Schaeffer (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). Kentaro Miwa, and Lance J. Meinke, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 9: Inter-plant compensation for southwestern corn borer (Diatraea grandiosella) injury. Sandy Steckel, and Scott D. Stewart, University of Tennessee, Jackson, TN 9: Management of sugarcane beetles (Eutheola humilis rugiceps) in field corn. Kevin Lanford, Angus L. Catchot, Fred R. Musser 2, Donald Cook 3, and Erick Larson, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, 2 Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, 3 Mississippi State University, Stoneville, MS 9: Characterizing the epigeal and foliar food webs on poison hemlock. Christine D. Allen, edu, Kenneth F. Haynes, John J. Obrycki, and James D. Harwood, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 9: Evaluating root injury and maize yield for a seed-blend targetting corn rootworm larvae. Nicholas A. Tinsley, illinois.edu, Ronald E. Estes, Preston M. Schrader, and Michael E. Gray, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 9:5 Break 0:03 05 Innovative corn-legume intercropping scheme: A strategy to suppress insect pest occurrence. Myleen Raymundo Corpuz, Isabela State University, Philippines 0:5 052 Visible/NIR reflectance spectroscopy for twospotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae Koch) detection and prediction on strawberry leaves. Teresia Nyoike, and Oscar E. Liburd, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 0: The use of time-series analyses to understand the ecology of a foliar spider mite pest of Hass avocados. Jesus R. Lara, and Mark S. Hoddle, University of California, Riverside, CA 0: Window of risk for volunteer wheat establishment and wheat curl mite (Aceria tosichella K.) infestation. Anthony J. McMechan, and Gary L. Hein, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 0:5 055 Host preference of the brown wheat mite (Petrobia 88 latens [Muller]) in eastern Colorado. Sheri N. Hessler, sheri. Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO : Orientation and oviposition preference of the storedproduct mite, Tyrophagus putrescentiae (Shrank), for HAM with various treatments. Barbara A. Amoah, and Thomas W. Phillips, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS :5 057 How to compose an attractive agroecosystem for natural enemies. Itai Opatovsky, Iris Musli, Phyllis G. Weintraub 2, and Yael Lubin, Ben-Gurion University, Midreshet Ben-Gurion, Israel, 2 Agricultural Research Organization, Gilat Research Center, Israel :27 Concluding Remarks Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition: P-IE-4 Ballroom C, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator: Timothy J. Dennehy, Bayer CropScience, Research Triangle Park, NC 8:0 Introductory Remarks 8:5 058 Characterization of the bacterial community structure in Cecropia-obligate Azteca ants using 454 pyrosequencing. Alissa Hanshew, and Cameron Currie, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 8: The influence of the endosymbiont, Arsenophonus, on soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) performance on resistant and susceptible plants. Jason A. Wulff, and Jennifer A. White, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 8: The frequency and diversity of maternally inherited endosymbionts in solitary bees of North America. Abiya Saeed, and Jennifer A. White, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 8:5 052 Endosymbiont effects on host plant usage in Aphis craccivora. Steven M. Wagner, Jennifer A. White, and Joshua McCord, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 9: Effect of the gut symbiont Enterococcus faecalis on seed consumption by Harpalus pensylvanicus. Ryan B. Schmid, Jonathan Lundgren 2, and Michael R. Lehman 2, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Brookings, SD, 9: Which aphids are important vectors of soybean mosaic virus? Adam J. Varenhorst, and Matthew E. O Neal, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 9: Cucumber mosaic virus infection in squash influences interactions with non-vector herbivores and predators. Kerry Mauck, Consuelo M. De Moraes, and Mark C. Mescher, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 9: Assessing yield impacts of bean leaf roll virus and pea enation mosaic virus in lentils inoculated at different growth stages by pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum). Sunil Paudel, vandals.uidaho.edu, and Sanford D. Eigenbrode, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 9:5 Break 0: Transmission biology of two tomato begomoviruses by Bemisia tabaci. Sung-Hsia Weng, Wen-

91 Monday November 2 Monday November 2 Shi Tsai 2, and Chi-Wei Tsai, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, 2 AVRDC, The World Vegetable Center, Tainan, Taiwan 0: Evaluation of tomato spotted wilt virus-resistant and susceptible peanut genotypes by thrips-mediated TSWV transmission experiments. Anita Shrestha, Rajagopalbabu Srinivasan, Albert K. Culbreath, and David G. Riley, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA 0: The effects of host plant resistance genes and vector transmission on the evolution of resistance-breaking in tomato spotted wilt virus. Jessica L. Houle, and George G. Kennedy, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 0: Effect of multiple red raspberry viruses on the behavior and life history of Amphorophora agathonica. Danielle Lightle, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, and Jana C. Lee, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Corvallis, OR 0: Response of aphid vectors of potato leaf roll virus to different potato varieties in southern Idaho. Shaonpius Mondal, Erik J. Wenninger 2, Pamela J. S. Hutchinson 3, Sanford D. Eigenbrode, Nilsa A. Bosque-Pérez, Deepak Shrestha, Jonathan L. Whitworth 4, and William E. Snyder 5, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, 2 University of Idaho, Kimberly, ID, 3 University of Idaho, Aberdeen, ID, 4 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Aberdeen, ID, 5 Washington State University, Pullman, WA : Interactions among potato genotypes, virus strains, inoculation timing and method in the potato virus Y and green peach aphid pathosystem. Deepak Shrestha, uidaho.edu, Erik J. Wenninger 2, Pamela J. S. Hutchinson 3, Jonathan L. Whitworth 4, Shaonpius Mondal, and Nilsa A. Bosque-Pérez, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, 2 University of Idaho, Kimberly, ID, 3 University of Idaho, Aberdeen, ID, 4 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Aberdeen, ID : Molecular characterization and pathogenicity of fungal isolates against the small hive beetle (Aethina tumida) a destructive pest of honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies. Saundra A. Wheeler, and Lambert H. B. Kanga, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL : Impact of conventional versus organic agriculture on entomopathogenic fungi. Eric H. Clifton, Erin W. Hodgson, Stefan T. Jaronski 2, and Aaron J. Gassmann, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Sidney, MT :39 Concluding Remarks Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition: P-IE-5 Ballroom E, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator: John Fitt, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN 8:0 Introductory Remarks 8: Does the red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta) effect weed seed predation? Aaron F. Fox, David Orr, S. Chris Reberg-Horton, Steven D. Frank, and Chris Moorman, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 8: Efficacy of the red imported fire ant in reducing Mexican rice borer severity in sugarcane and non-crop hosts. M. T. VanWeelden, B. E. Wilson, J. M. Beuzelin 2, and T. E. Reagan, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA, 2 Louisiana State University AgCenter, Alexandria, LA 8: Effects of red imported fire ants (Solenopsis invicta) and habitat on the survival of lone star ticks (Amblyomma americanum) and gulf coast ticks (Amblyomma maculatum). Elizabeth R. Gleim, Michael J. Yabsley, and L. Mike Conner 2, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 2 Joseph W. Jones Ecological Research Center, Ichauway, Newton, GA 8: Impact of selenium in the ant diet on the argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Deborah De La Riva, Greg Kund, and John T. Trumble, University of California, Riverside, CA 9: Investigation into the cumulative stress hypothesis: A case study with spotted knapweed (Centaurea stoebe ssp. micranthos) and Larinus minutus. Carey R. Minteer, uark.edu, Timothy J. Kring, Jun Shen, and Robert N. Wiedenmann, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 9: Overcompensatory plant responses to insect herbivory: A meta-analysis. Loriann C. Garcia, and Micky D. Eubanks, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 9: Testing for priming effects in the native weed horsenettle. Thomas Bentley, Consuelo M. De Moraes, and Mark C. Mescher, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 9:39 Break 0:5 054 The biology and the biomass impact of Blastobasis repartella (Dietz) (Lepidoptera: Coleophoridae) on switchgrass. Veronica Calles Torrez, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 0: Effects of simulated climate warming and population source on synchrony of forest tent caterpillar (Malacosoma disstria Hübner) egg hatch and host leaf phenology. Johnny A. Uelmen, Ezra G. Schwartzberg, Richard L. Lindroth, and Kenneth F. Raffa, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 0: The benefits within: Can increased crop genotypic diversity help manage insect pests? Ian M. Grettenberger, and John F. Tooker, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 0: Metalized polyethylene mulch to reduce incidence of huanglongbing and improve growth of new citrus plantings. Scott D. Croxton, and Philip A. Stansly, University of Florida, Immokalee, FL 0: European earwig Forficula auricularia L. (Dermaptera: Forficulidae) responses to understory treatments in organic and conventional peach orchards of northern Utah. Andrew S. Tebeau, Diane G. Alston, Jennifer R. Reeve, Brent L. Black, and Corey V. Ransom, Utah State University, Logan, UT 0: Metriocnemus knabi provides guardianship resulting in an exclusive habitat for Wyeomyia smithii within the pitchers of Sarracenia purpurea. Gary J. Torrisi, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE : Early-season patterns of onion thrips, Thrips tabaci (Lindeman), population densities in onion fields in New York. Erik A. Smith, Elson J. Shields 2, Marc F. Fuchs, and Brian A. Nault, Cornell University, Geneva, NY, 2 Cornell University, Ithaca, NY :5 Concluding Remarks 89

92 Monday November 2 Monday November 2 Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition: P-IE-6 Ballroom F, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator: J. Lindsey Flexner, DuPont Agricultural Biotechnology, Wilmington, DE 8:0 Introductory Remarks 8: Fine-scale spatial distribution of captured indigenous and marked wild-type navel orangeworm in a kairomone-baited mass trapping system. Devin A. Clarke, edu, Justin E. Nay 2, and Elizabeth A. Boyd, California State University, Chico, CA, 2 Integral Ag., Inc., Durham, CA 8: Traps as a detection tool for low density Asian longhorned beetle populations in Worcester, Massachusetts using pheromone and kairomone blends. Peter S. Meng, psu.edu, Maya Nehme, Melody A. Keena 2, R. Talbot Trotter 2, Angela M. Hoover, Dana C. Roberts, Kelsey A. Benkoski, Clint McFarland 3, Alan J. Sawyer 4, and Kelli Hoover, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 2 USDA, Forest Service, Hamden, CT, 3 USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Worcester, MA, 4 USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Otis ANGB, MA 8: Monitoring, trapping, and behavioral studies of the spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura), a new pest threatening Florida blueberries. Lindsy E. Iglesias, ufl.edu, and Oscar E. Liburd, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 8:5 055 Oviposition preferences of pickleworm (Diaphania nitidalis) with implications for management through trap crops and companion planting. Rosalie Leiner, and Helen Spafford, University of Hawaii, Manoa, Honolulu, HI 9: Employing immunomarkers to track dispersal and trophic relationships of a piercing-sucking predator, Podisus maculiventris (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae). Jessica L. Kelly, purdue.edu, James R. Hagler 2, and Ian Kaplan, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Maricopa, AZ 9: Monitoring alkali bee (Nomia melanderi) flight height with a vehicular bee sweeper in Washington state. Amber C. Vinchesi, and Douglas B. Walsh, Washington State University, Prosser, WA VanWeelden, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA, 2 Louisiana State University AgCenter, Alexandria, LA 0: The phenology of fourth instar plum curculio (Conotrachelus nenuphar) emergence in Michigan tart cherry and apple orchards with implications for managing the pest in soil. Roger Duncan Selby, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 0: Characterizing adult emergence phenology of emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) across a latitudinal gradient. Samuel Discua Duarte, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH 0: Simulating the location of Bemisia tabaci biotype B (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) nymphs on tomato plants. Diego F. Rincon, Luis A. Cañas, and Casey W. Hoy, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH : Predictive habitat selection modeling for an endangered insect species across a Wisconsin landscape. Anna N. Hess, Andrew J. Storer, Robert J. Hess 2, and Michael J. Falkowski, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI, 2 Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison, WI : Modeling realized niches for invasive consumers: A geographic model of resource quality for the South American cactus moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg). Tyler E. Schartel, and Christopher P. Brooks, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS : Seasonal flight dynamics of aphid species in occurrence with potato virus Y infection in commercial potato fields of Wisconsin. Natalie Hernandez, and Russell L. Groves, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI :39 Concluding Remarks Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition: P-IE-7 Cumberland (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderator: Scott Hutchins, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN 8:0 Introductory Remarks 9: Mapping dispersal of an invasive gallmaker using GIS and remote sensing: Localized proliferation of the Asian chestnut gall wasp. Ignazio Graziosi, and Lynne Rieske Kinney, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 9: Evaluation of monitoring methods for the redbay ambrosia beetle (Xyleborus glabratus), a new invasive species from southeast Asia. Latasha D. Tanner, and Lambert H. B. Kanga, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL 9: Developing a bait for asparagus miner (Diptera: Agromyzidae) monitoring in commercial asparagus fields. William R. Morrison, and Zsofia Szendrei, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 0:03 Break 0: The effect of intertrap distance and chlorantraniliprole seed treatments on Mexican rice borer (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) pheromone trap capture in rice fields. B. E. Wilson, edu, Jeremy D. Allison, T. E. Reagan, J. M. Beuzelin 2, and M. T. 90 8: Role of ethylene in the defense response of buffalograss to chinch bug feeding. Crystal M. Ramm, crystal. Lisa Baird 2, Tiffany M. Heng-Moss, Fred Baxendale, Paul Twigg 3, and Keenan L. Amundsen, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 2 University of San Diego, San Diego, CA, 3 University of Nebraska, Kearney, NE 8: St. Augustine grass resistance against the southern chinch bug, Blissus insularis Barber. Kate Youngs, ncsu.edu, and Yasmin J. Cardoza, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 8: Harmonic radar tagging for tracking movement of stink bugs. Grant L. Pilkay, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, Francis P. F. Reay-Jones, Clemson University, Florence, SC, and Jeremy K. Greene, Clemson University, Blackville, SC 8: Aquatic insects have positive indirect effects on terrestrial prey. Jamin Dreyer, David Hoekman, and Claudio Gratton, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

93 Monday November 2 Monday November 2 9: Seasonal abundance and biology of brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Stål) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), in Virginia vineyards. Sanjay Basnet, Douglas G. Pfeiffer, Thomas P. Kuhar, and Curt A. Laub, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 9: Relative suitability of selected fruit trees and wild hosts for development of brown marmorated stinkbug, Halyomorpha halys Stål (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae). Angelita Acebes, vt.edu, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, Tracy C. Leskey, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kearneysville, WV, and J. Christopher Bergh, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Winchester, VA 9: Land use change affects spider community structure in the urban ecosystem of Cleveland, Ohio. Caitlin E. Burkman, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, and Mary M. Gardiner, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH 9: Impacts of the establishment of two exotic coccinellid species on the historical native lady beetle community in Missouri. Lauren M. Diepenbrock, and Deborah L. Finke, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 9:5 Break 0: Inbreeding in horsenettle (Solanum carolinense) alters nocturnal plant volatile emissions that guide oviposition by specialist herbivores. Rupesh Ram Kariyat, Kerry Mauck, Chris Balogh, Andrew G. Stephenson, Mark C. Mescher, and Consuelo M. De Moraes, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 0: Host plant (Solanum carolinense L.) inbreeding affects larval growth, adult flight metabolism, and gene expression of a specialist herbivore (Manduca sexta L.). Scott L. Portman, psu.edu, Rupesh Ram Kariyat, Michelle Johnston, Andrew G. Stephenson, and James H. Marden, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 0: Does plant domestication change the dynamics of belowground herbivore-natural enemy interactions? Monique J. Rivera, Cesar Rodriguez-Saona 2, and Albrecht Koppenhöfer, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, 2 Rutgers University, Chatsworth, NJ 0: The nutrient availability hypothesis: A test of a unifying plant-herbivore hypothesis. Warren B. Sconiers, and Micky D. Eubanks, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 0: More than just the sweet stuff: Parasitic dodder vines imbibe host plant secondary metabolites that are toxic to insect herbivores. Jason D. Smith, Consuelo M. De Moraes, and Mark C. Mescher, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA : The roles of plant-trapped carrion and enemy-free space in indirect defense against two herbivores on a sticky plant (Madia elegans). Billy Krimmel, and Ian S. Pearse, University of California, Davis, CA : Diet breadth and macronutrient regulation reveal how generalist herbivores coexist. Paul A. Lenhart, tamu.edu, Micky D. Eubanks, and Spencer T. Behmer, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX : Evolution in wild parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) chemistry after escape and reassociation with a specialist herbivore (Depressaria pastinacella). Tania Jogesh, edu, Arthur Zangerl, Margaret Stanley 2, and May R. Berenbaum, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, 2 University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand :39 Concluding Remarks Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition: P-IE-8 LeConte (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderator: David L. Kerns, Macon Ridge Research Station, Winnsboro, LA 8:0 Introductory Remarks 8: Determination of growth stage-specific response of soybeans to varying densities of redbanded stink bug, Piezodorus guildinii Westwood (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae). S. Vyavhare, M. O. Way 2, and Raul F. Medina, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 2 Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Beaumont, TX 8: The influence of the developmental host plant complex on future foraging behavior in Lysiphlebus testaceipes (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). Allison Dehnel, and David B. Hogg, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 8: Rotten to the cob: Western bean cutworm larval feeding damage and gibberella ear rot impact growers in Indiana. Nicole S. Parker, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 8: Within field spatial distribution of Dectes texanus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in Kansas soybean (Glycine max). Alice L. Harris, and Brian P. McCornack, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 9: Impact and management of the invasive kudzu bug, Megacopta cribraria (Hemiptera: Plataspidae), in soybeans. Nicholas J. Seiter, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, Jeremy K. Greene, Clemson University, Blackville, SC, Francis P. F. Reay-Jones, Clemson University, Florence, SC, and Phillip M. Roberts, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA 9: Effects of neonicotinoid seed treatments on soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) feeding behavior and soybean physiology. Mitchell Stamm, Fred Baxendale, Tiffany M. Heng-Moss, Blair D. Siegfried, Thomas E. Hunt 2, John C. Reese 3, and Predeesh Chandran 3, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 2 University of Nebraska, Concord, NE, 3 Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 9: Origins of virulence: A molecular investigation of the genetic relationship among avirulent and virulent soybean aphid biotypes. Jacob A. Wenger, and Andrew P. Michel, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH 9: Is pyramiding resistance the answer for soybean aphid management? Michael T. McCarville, Matthew E. O Neal, Bruce D. Potter 2, Kelley J. Tilmon 3, Eileen M. Cullen 4, Brian P. McCornack 5, John F. Tooker 6, Andrew P. Michel 7, and Deirdre A. Prischmann-Voldseth 8, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, 2 University of Minnesota, Lamberton, MN, 3 South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, 4 University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 5 Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 6 Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 7 Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, 8 North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 9

94 Monday November 2 9: Evidence for a domed functional response in the soybean aphid parasitoid Binodoxys communis. Megan E. Carter, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 0:03 Break 8: Intercepting insect pests of cucurbit crops with lethal seedling traps as a pollinator friendly management method. Logan M. Minter, Camron T. Clark 2, and Ric Bessin, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 2 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA Monday November 2 0: Effect of canopy height and prey location on lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) captures in soybean. Ximena Cibils-Stewart, and Brian P. McCornack, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 0: Predator guilds attacking coccinellid eggs vary among egg mass species and across foraging habitats. Chelsea Smith, and Mary M. Gardiner, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH 0: Local weed communities vs. landscape composition as drivers of aphid alightment in crops. Gina M. Angelella, purdue.edu, Jeffrey D. Holland, and Ian Kaplan, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 0: Sibling rivalry gone mad! Can a parasitoid alter competition between aphid embryos? Matthew C. Kaiser, and George E. Heimpel, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN : Manipulation of Myzus persicae, green peach aphid, and Leptinotarsa decemlineata, Colorado potato beetle, to determine predator distribution in potatoes. Christine Ann Lynch, Eric G. Chapman 2, William E. Snyder, and James D. Harwood 2, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, 2 University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY : The role of oxidative enyzmes and ROS in the defense response of switchgrass to aphid feeding. Travis J. Prochaska, Kyle G. Koch, Tiffany M. Heng- Moss, Gautam Sarath 2, and Lisa Baird 3, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Lincoln, NE, 3 University of San Diego, San Diego, CA : The presence of multiple predator life stages enhances pea aphid suppression. Erica P. Stephens, usu.edu, and Ricardo A. Ramirez, Utah State University, Logan, UT : Categories of resistance (antibiosis, antixenosis, and tolerance) in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) to aphids. Kyle G. Koch, Jeffrey D. Bradshaw 2, and Tiffany M. Heng-Moss, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 2 University of Nebraska, Scottsbluff, NE :5 Concluding Remarks Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition: P-IE-9 Summit (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderator: Anthony J. Lentz, Bellarmine University, Louisville, KY 8:0 Introductory Remarks 8: Why do carabids love cover crops? Isolating mechanisms of generalist predator recruitment in agricultural systems. Carmen K. Blubaugh, Ian Kaplan, and Clifford S. Sadof, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 8: Effects of rye cover crop on arthropod communities. Mike W. Dunbar, Aaron J. Gassmann, and Matthew E. O Neal, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 8: Development time and consumption rate of Chrysoperla rufilabris Burmeister (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) feeding on Microtheca ochroloma Stål (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). Angie A. Niño, and Ronald D. Cave, University of Florida, Ft. Pierce, FL 9: Interactions between Lygus bugs and Erigeron annuus: Applications toward a trap crop system for the tarnished plant bug. Sean T. Halloran, and James H. Tumlinson, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 9: Exploring alternative management options for rice water weevil (Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel) in California. Mohammad-Amir Aghaee, University of California, Davis, CA 9: Integrating chlorantraniliprole seed treatment with flooding depth and varietal resistance for the management of rice water weevil (Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus) in rice. Srinivas K. Lanka, and Michael J. Stout, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 9: A comparrison of tarnished plant bug, Lygus lineolaris, biotypes from the hills and delta regions of Mississippi. Brian P. Adams, Jeffrey Gore 2, Angus L. Catchot, and Fred R. Musser 3, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, 2 Mississippi State University, Stoneville, MS, 3 Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS 9: The impact of tillage in sugar beet fields on the seasonal abundance of carabids (Coleoptera: Carabidae) in western Nebraska. Rudolph Johannes Pretorius, Jeffrey D. Bradshaw 2, and Gary L. Hein, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 2 University of Nebraska, Scottsbluff, NE 0:03 Break 0: The effect of overwintering cold exposure on the spring emergence behavior and reproductive success of the eastern larch beetle, Dendroctonus simplex (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Fraser R. McKee, and Brian H. Aukema, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 0: Effects of local landscape composition on Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata) colonization of commercial potato in Wisconsin. Anders S. Huseth, wisc.edu, Kenneth E. Frost, and Russell L. Groves, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 0: Potential lethal effects of two commonly applied turf fungicides on larvae of the Japanese beetle, Popillia japonica (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae). Glen R. Obear, R. Chris Williamson, and Patrick J. Liesch, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 0: Incorporating buckwheat as a living mulch with zucchini squash to reduce pest and disease pressure, increase natural enemy populations, and increase yield. Janine Razze, and Oscar E. Liburd, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL : Western bean cutworm (Striacosta albicosta) in Michigan dry beans. Megan M. Chludzinski, and Christina DiFonzo, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 92

95 Monday November 2 Monday November 2 :5 06 Is natural enemy distribution compatible with sitespecific management of Helicoverpa zea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in sorghum? Alysha M. Soper, Brian P. McCornack, and R. Jeff Whitworth, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS : Efficacy of Storcide II and liquid formulation of spinosad (Sensat ) against phosphine-resistant Rhyzopertha dominica and Tribolium castaneum on wheat. Nisha Shakya, nisha. George P. Opit, Justin L. Talley, and Carol L. Jones, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK : Wild host utilization of Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) and implications for its establishment in the southern United States. Matthew W. Bickerton, ncsu.edu, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC :5 Concluding Remarks Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition: P-IE-0 Salon A (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderator: Ann M. Ray, Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH 8:0 Introductory Remarks 8:5 064 Direct effect of high temperatures on Adelges tsugae mortality. Angela M. Mech, Robert O. Teskey, J. Rusty Rhea 2, and Kamal J. K. Gandhi, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 2 USDA, Forest Service, Asheville, NC 8: Daily activity patterns of Laricobius osakensis and Laricobius nigrinus, two specialist predators of Adelges tsugae, and potential interactions. Lígia C. Vieira, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 8: Bromeliad insect communities and the biology of bromeliad dwelling cockroaches (Blattodea). Dominic Evangelista, and Jessica L. Ware, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ 8:5 067 Identification of resistance in Malus against codling moth and leafroller. Joseph Jeffrey Schwarz, .wsu.edu, Jay Brunner, Katherine Evans, and Cameron Peace 2, Washington State University, Wenatchee, WA, 2 Washington State University, Pullman, WA 9: The effects of overhead irrigation and leaf structure on foliar microarthropods including Neoseiulus cucumeris. Joseph Samuel Riddle, and Matthew Grieshop, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 9:5 069 Efficacy of Isaria fumosorosea (= Paecilomyces fumosorosea) and horticultural oils on ornamentals infested with the Madeira mealybug, Phenacoccus madeirensis Green. Sarahlynne Guerrero, Amanda C. Hodges, Lance S. Osborne 2, and Pasco B. Avery 3, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2 University of Florida, Apopka, FL, 3 University of Florida, Fort Pierce, FL 9: Large-scale propagation of Homalodisca coagulata virus- via glassy-winged sharpshooter (Homalodisca vitripennis) tissue cell culture. Anna Biesbrock, edu, Wayne B. Hunter 2, and Blake R. Bextine, University of Texas, Tyler, TX, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Ft. Pierce, FL 9: The grape mealybug (Pseudococcus maritimus) as a vector of GLRAV-3 in Concord vineyards in Washington state. Brian W. Bahder, and Douglas B. Walsh, Washington State University, Prosser, WA 9:5 Break 0: Heritability of insect resistance in balsam fir (Abies balsamea). Sara L. Fraser, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada 0: Overview of current research on Ovavesicula popilliae, a microsporidian pathogen of the Japanese beetle. Bryan Petty, Donn T. Johnson, and Donald C. Steinkraus, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 0: Temperature-dependent development of redbay ambrosia beetle (Xyleborus glabratus Eichoff) and its symbiotic fungi Raffaelea lauricola. Gurpreet. S. Brar, John. L. Capinera, Jason. A. Smith, and Jorge E. Peña 2, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2 University of Florida, Homestead, FL 0: Potential oviposition repellent for the navel orangeworm (Amyelois transitella) in almond orchards of central California. Kevin Rayne Cloonan, University of California, Davis, CA 0: Identification of plant reservoir hosts of Xylella fastidiosa and natural infectivity of Oklahoma insect vectors. Lisa M. Overall, and Eric J. Rebek, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK : Residual activity of imidacloprid and its metabolites in eastern hemlock multiple years after treatment. Elizabeth P. Benton, R. Jesse Webster 2, Carla I. Coots, Richard Cowles 3, and Jerome F. Grant, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2 National Park Service, Gatlinburg, TN, 3 Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, Windsor, CT : RNAi-based strategy for Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) control: A method to reduce the spread of citrus greening disease. Chloë Hawkings, J. Kent Morgan 2, Lindsay Shaffer, Charles A. Powell, Dov Borovsky 3, Ronald D. Cave, William Dawson 4, Siddarame Gowda 4, and Robert G. Shatters 2, University of Florida, Fort Pierce, FL, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Fort Pierce, FL, 3 Borovsky Consulting, Vero Beach, FL, 4 University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL : Non-target impacts of rotational hog grazing in Michigan apple orchards. Krista Buehrer, and Matthew Grieshop, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI :39 Concluding Remarks Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition: P-IE- Salon B (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderator: Kenneth Ostlie, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 8:0 Introductory Remarks 8: Impact of pollen-induced Bt toxicity by a multi-toxin corn variety on survivorship and growth of corn earworm and its implications on current IRM practices. Arun Babu, gmail.com, Fred R. Musser, Michael A. Caprio 2, Donald Cook 3, and Clint Allen 4, Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, 2 Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, 3 Mississippi State University, Stoneville, MS, 4 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Stoneville, MS 93

96 Monday November 2 8: Effect of nitrogen on Bt gene expression in corn roots and resulting trait performance against corn rootworms (Diabrotica spp.). Trisha M. Franz, and Kenneth Ostlie, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 8: Response of Spodoptera frugiperda and Agrotis ipsilon to exposure to Bt event 507 corn. Rachel R. Binning, rachel. DuPont Pioneer, Johnston, IA, Richard L. Hellmich, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Ames, IA, and Joel R. Coats, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 8: Corn earworm populations in Pennsylvania field corn and the value of Bt for controlling ear damage. Eric Bohnenblust, Jim Breining, Shelby J. Fleischer, Greg Roth, and John F. Tooker, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA : Effects of elicitor-mediated induction of plant defense on the growth of fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda Smith). John Gordy, Michael J. Stout, and B. Rogers Leonard, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA : Herbivore secretes gut bacteria to suppress plant defenses. Seung H. Chung, Cristina Rosa, Erin D. Scully, Michelle Peiffer, Kelli Hoover, Dawn S. Luthe, and Gary W. Felton, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, : Perception of an insect semiochemical primes hostplant defenses. Anjel M. Helms, John F. Tooker, and Mark C. Mescher, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA Monday November 2 9: Effects of entomopathogens on fitness costs of Bt resistance in western corn rootworm. Amanda M. Hoffmann, B. Wade French 2, and Aaron J. Gassmann, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Brookings, SD 9: Investigation of potential resistance to Cry3Bb in populations of western corn rootworms in northwestern Illinois. Preston M. Schrader, Ronald E. Estes, Nicholas A. Tinsley, and Michael E. Gray, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 9: Assessment of movement behavior of third instar European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, on Bt corn. Holly Lynn Johnson, and Charles E. Mason, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 9: Impact of Bt corn on bollworm, Helicoverpa zea, survivorship in Bollgard II cotton. Ben Von Kanel, entomology.msstate.edu, Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS 9:5 Break 0: Assumptions about western corn rootworm behavior in Bt corn are not met in block refuges. Sarah A. Hughson, and Joseph L. Spencer, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 0: Effect of selection on insect cold hardiness: Implications for Epiphyas postvittana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) and pest risk mapping. Amy C. Morey, Robert C. Venette 2, and William D. Hutchison, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, 2 USDA, Forest Service, St. Paul, MN 0: Subterranean termite feeding preference for wood containing various sap-stain fungi. Nathan S. Little, nathanlittle. Tor P. Schultz, Susan V. Diehl, Andrew J. Londo, and John J. Riggins, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 0: Evaluating microbial seed treatments in combination with transgenic corn as a defense against western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera). Stephanie L. Gorski, ncsu.edu, and Yasmin J. Cardoza, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 0: The effect of JA-mediated defenses on the survival and growth of western corn rootworm larvae, Diabotrica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). Jelfina Alouw, jelfine_ Yuanxin Yan 2, Michael V. Kolomiets 2, and Nicholas J. Miller, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 2 Texas A&M University, College Station, TX :39 Concluding Remarks Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition: P-IE-2 Salon C (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderator: Jesse M. Richardson, Dow AgroSciences, Hesperia, CA 8:0 Introductory Remarks 8: Do alternative prey disrupt or enhance pest consumption? A case study with a flexibly-foraging, sit-and-wait predator. Kelton D. Welch, Kenneth F. Haynes, and James D. Harwood, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 8: Indirect effects of predator diversity on a vector-borne plant pathogen. Elizabeth Y. Long, and Deborah L. Finke, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 8: Integrating conservation biological control and chemical control in cole crops through habitat manipulation. Emily K. Linkous, and Celeste Welty, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 8: Flight capacity of Tetrastichus planipennisi (Eulophidae), an introduced parasitoid of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis. Samuel J. Fahrner, Jonathan Lelito 2, and Brian H. Aukema, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, 2 USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Brighton, MI 9: Cover crop mulch and strip-tillage influence biological control in cabbage (Brassica oleracea). Alexandria N. Bryant, Daniel Brainard, and Zsofia Szendrei, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 9:5 065 Parasitism of light brown apple moth, Epiphyas postvittana, in California. Linda P. Buergi, and Nicholas J. Mills, University of California, Berkeley, CA 9: Effect of vineyard proximity to riparian habitat on biological control of the western grape leafhopper (Erythroneura elegantula) in northern California wine grape vineyards. Houston Wilson, Albie Miles, Kent M. Daane, and Miguel Altieri, University of California, Berkeley, CA 9: Solid-set canopy delivery: A novel biological pesticide delivery system for tree fruit production. Peter Nelson, msu.edu, and Mark E. Whalon, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 9:5 Break 94

97 Monday November 2 Monday November 2 0: The stink bug assassins: Exploring biological control options using molecular techniques. Kacie J. Athey, uky.edu, James D. Harwood, and John R. Ruberson 2, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 2 University of Georgia, Tifton, GA 0: Indigenous natural enemies of the brown marmorated stink bug. Ashley L. Jones, Paula M. Shrewsbury, and Cerruti Hooks, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 0: Aphelinus certus: Minnesota s latest invasive species or biocontrol agent? Joe M. Kaser, and George E. Heimpel, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 0: Natural enemies of onion thrips (Thrips tabaci Lindeman) in New York onion agroecosystems. Elaine J. Fok, cornell.edu, and Brian A. Nault, Cornell University, Geneva, NY 0: Life history of Larinus minutus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a biological control agent of spotted knapweed. Adam M. Alford, Carey R. Minteer, Jun Shen, and Timothy J. Kring, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR : Effects of Lysiphlebus testaceipes parasitism levels on cannibalism and intraguild predation among the native ladybeetle Hippodamia convergens and the exotic Coccinella septempunctata. Kody Mullins, and Kristopher L. Giles, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK : Natural allies: Independent and interactive effects of two specialist natural enemies on woolly apple aphid colonies. Sean D. M. Gresham, and J. Christopher Bergh, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Winchester, VA : Life history and potential control of Pityophthorus juglandis in east Tennessee. Katheryne Nix, Paris L. Lambdin, Jerome F. Grant, Mark T. Windham, Albert E. Mayfield 2, Paul Merten 2, and Joseph Doccola 3, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2 USDA, Forest Service, Asheville, NC, 3 Arborjet, Inc., Woburn, MA :39 Concluding Remarks Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition: SysEB- 200 A, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Julie M. Urban and John M. Heraty 2, New York State Museum, Albany, NY, 2 University of California, Riverside, CA 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8: Systematics of Parasitengona, with an emphasis on water mites (Acari: Hydrachnidiae). Ray Fisher, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 8: Amblydromella caudiglans: A newcomer to the integrated pest management of spider mites? Rebecca Schmidt, Washington State University, Wenatchee, WA 8: Manipulate or facilitate: How endosymbiotic bacteria thrive in Linyphiid spiders. Meghan M. Curry, com, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 8: Global populations of Aphis craccivora show a high diversity of facultative endosymbionts. Cristina M. Brady, and Jennifer A. White, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 8: Dynamics of a bacteriophage required in a heritable defensive symbiosis. Stephanie Weldon, and Kerry M. Oliver, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 9: Intraspecific behavioral variation and the red imported fire ant foraging gene. Alison A. Bockoven, edu, Craig J. Coates, and Micky D. Eubanks, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 9: Quantifying the rainforest ant gut microbiome. Jon G. Sanders, and Naomi E. Pierce, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 9: Variation of symbiotic gut communities across diets and colonies of the ant Cephalotes varians. Yi Hu, edu, Piotr Lukasik, Yemin Lan, Corrie S. Moreau 2, Gail Rosen, and Jacob A. Russell, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, 2 Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL 9:39 Break 9: Family ties and fluroescent dyes: Searching for nepotism in Solenopsis invicta. Collin Cutrone McMichael, and Micky D. Eubanks, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 0: Does endopolyploidy affect caste, body size, and societal role in ants? Daniel R. Scholes, Andrew V. Suarez, and Ken N. Paige, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 0: Cuticular hydrocarbon evolution in parabiotic nestsharing ants. Virginia Emery, and Neil Tsutsui, University of California, Berkeley, CA 0: Trap-jaw ants (Odontomachus sp.) use ballistic jaw propulsion for predator avoidance during interactions with antlions. Fredrick Larabee, and Andrew V. Suarez, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 0: The impact of long-term pan trapping on native bee abundance, richness and diversity. Zachariah J. Gezon, and Rebecca E. Irwin, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 0: Population genetics of bumble bees in the central United States. Amber D. Tripodi, and Allen L. Szalanski, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR : Automated identification of bees. Nidhi Dharithreesan, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ : Trees, leaves, and lobes: Katydid (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) phylogenetics, leaf-like wings, and external ear morphology. Joseph D. Mugleston, Hojun Song 2, and Michael F. Whiting, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, 2 University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL :27 Concluding Remarks Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition: SysEB B, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Randall T. Schuh and Katrina L. Menard 2, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY, 2 Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, Norman, OK 95

98 Monday November 2 Monday November 2 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8: Monotomid ID: A multi-access Lucid TM key to the New World genera of Monotomidae. Thomas C. McElrath, uga.edu, Olivia Boyd, and Joseph V. McHugh, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 8: Not so ironclad (beetles): The first large-scale phylogeny of the family Zopheridae (Coleoptera: Tenebrionoidea). Nathan P. Lord and Kelly B. Miller, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 8: Molecular phylogenetics and evolution of Lamiinae, the flat-faced longhorn beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). Stephanie Haddad, and Duane D. McKenna, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 8: A hairy mess: Evaluation of metafemoral hairs of the Aderidae (Coleoptera: Tenebrionoidea) and their phylogenetic utility. Traci L. Grzymala, University of California, Berkeley, CA 8: Using high-throughput sequencing of partial transcriptomes to understand the phylogeny of Tenebrionidae (Coleoptera). Kojun Kanda, and David Maddison, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 9: A taxonomic problem: Is Mnesarete the most famous Hetearina? Insights using a molecular phylogenetic analysis (Odonata: Calopterygidae). Melissa Sanchez-Herrera, gmail.com, Mayra Saenz 2, Emilio Realpe 2, and Jessica L. Ware, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, 2 Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia 9: Phylogeny and biology of Ischrysonychini, Chapuis 875. Chulwoo Shin, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 9: Phylogeny of North American Aphaenogaster species (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) reconstructed with morphological and DNA data. Bernice Bacon DeMarco, and Anthony Cognato, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 9:39 Break 9: More data, more problems? Toward a total evidence phylogeny of the ants. Phillip M. Barden, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 0: Phylogenetics and diversification of eucharitid ant parasitoids in the New World (Hymenoptera: Eucharitidae). Elizabeth Murray, and John M. Heraty, University of California, Riverside, CA 0: A phylogeny of Nearctic Virbia Walker (Lepidoptera: Erebidae: Arctiinae) based on molecular data. Kendra Casanova, Jennifer Zaspel, and Chris Schmidt 2, University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh, WI, 2 Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids and Nematodes, Ottawa, Canada 0: A preliminary phylogeny of Pyrgomorphidae (Orthoptera: Caelifera) based on morphological characters. Ricardo Mariño-Pérez, and Hojun Song, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 0: From the root to the tips: Building the Trichoptera tree of life. Paul B. Frandsen, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 0:5 069 The phylogeny and revised classification of 96 Machaerotidae, the tube-making spittlebugs (Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha: Cercopoidea). Adam J. Bell, edu, State University of New York, Albany, NY, Gavin J. Svenson, Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Cleveland, OH, and Jason R. Cryan, New York State Museum, Albany, NY : Phylogenetics of Thysanoptera: Timing and tempo of thrips evolution. Rebecca S. Buckman, com, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, Laurence Mound, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Canberra, Australia, and Michael F. Whiting, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT : Systematics of Physoderinae (Reduviidae: Heteroptera): Origins of the Madagascar fauna and taxonomic revision of the Indo-Pacific Physoderes Westwood. Wei Song Hwang, and Christiane Weirauch, University of California, Riverside, CA : Delimiting host-plant specific genetic lineages embedded within morphological species using molecular phylogenetics. Alex R. Van Dam, and Bernie P. May, University of California, Davis, CA :39 Concluding Remarks Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition: SysEB C, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: David Wagner and Alejandro A. Valerio 2, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, 2 Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8: Do aphid soldiers elicit an immune response in victims? Sarah P. Lawson, Andrew W. Legan, and Patrick Abbot, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 8: Population and functional transcriptomics of host use evolution in the aphid Uroleucon ambrosiae. Aman Gill, life.bio.sunysb.edu, Douglas J Futuyma, and Joshua Rest, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 8: A morphological perspective of North American Mordellini (Mordellidae: Mordellinae). Brent C. Rahlwes, Sibyl R. Bucheli, and Jerry L. Cook, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 8: Lineage discovery in the mega-diverse tribe Staphylinini continues: Alesiella gen. nov. and other relicts (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae). A. J. Brunke, and Alexey Solodovnikov, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark 8: Triaging the Phyllobaenus from Phyllobaenus : A preliminary assessment of the New World Hydnocerini (Coleoptera: Cleridae: Hydnocerinae). John Moeller Leavengood, Michael J. Sharkey, and Eric G. Chapman, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 9: Ash mortality caused by emerald ash borer alters the forest floor environment and invertebrate community. Kayla I. Perry, and Daniel A. Herms, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH 9:5 070 The structure of epigeic beetle (Coleoptera) assemblages in Arctic Canada. Crystal M. Ernst, mcgill.ca, and Christopher M. Buddle, McGill University, Ste-Annede-Bellevue, Québec, Canada

99 Monday November 2 Monday November 2 9: Ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) communities of an Illinois sand savanna and sand prairie mosaic. Alan David Yanahan, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, and Steven J. Taylor, University of Illinois, Champaign, IL 9:39 Break 9: Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) induced tree mortality alters forest bird communities. Lawrence C. Long, and Daniel A. Herms, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH 0: Body size and dispersal ability of carabid beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) on an elevation gradient in a Neotropical cloud forest. Sarah A. Maveety, and Robert A. Browne, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC 0: Elucidating rostrum development in the weevils (Curculionoidea) through morphology, transcriptomics, and differential gene expression. Steven Ray Davis, P. Cartwright, and M. S. Engel, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 0: Ancient eyes and scorpionflies: Evolution of panorpid visual systems (Mecoptera: Panorpidae). Katherine F. Manwaring, and Michael F. Whiting, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 0: A molecular phylogeny of the lichen moth tribe Lithosiini (Lepidoptera: Erebidae: Arctiinae) with a preliminary assessment of lichen phenolic sequestration. Clare H. Scott, Jennifer Zaspel 2, Susan J. Weller 3, and Marc A. Branham, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2 University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh, WI, 3 University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 0: Acoustic structures and signals in the larger Mexican pine beetle, Dendroctonus approximatus. Kasey Maria Yturralde, and Richard W. Hofstetter, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ : The use of chemical and visual cues in Greta morgane, a mimetic neotropical butterfly. Adrea Susan Gonzalez-Karlsson, University of California, Los Angeles, CA :5 070 Rethinking species: Species delimitation in a radiation of island endemic plant bugs (Pseudoloxops) in French Polynesia. Brad Balukjian, University of California, Berkeley, CA :27 Concluding Remarks Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition: SysEB D, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Jessica L. Ware and Torsten Dikow 2, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, 2 Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8:03 07 Differing rates of character evolution in Schistocerca lineata Scudder, 899 (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Cyrtacanthacridinae). Tyler Raszick, and Hojun Song, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 8:5 072 Density-dependent phenotypic plasticity in birdwing grasshoppers, Schistocerca americana (Drury) and S. serialis cubense (Saussure) (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Cyrtacanthacridinae). Steve Gotham, and Hojun Song, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 8: Global biogeographic patterns of grassland Auchenorrhyncha. Therese Anne Catanach, edu, University of Illinois, Champaign, IL, and Christopher H. Dietrich, University of Illinois, llinois Natural History Survey, Champaign, IL 8: The Neotropical cicada genus Zammara (Hemiptera: Cicadidae), untangling the taxonomic knot, using DNA, morphology and song. Geert Goemans, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 8:5 075 The black-headed conundrum: Species boundaries in Chyphotes (Hymenoptera: Chyphotidae). Emily A. Sadler, gmail.com, and James P. Pitts, Utah State University, Logan, UT 9: Elucidating the species and species limits in the tiger moth genus Euchaetes Harris (Lepidoptera: Erebidae). Heather M. Cummins, and Susan J. Weller, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 9: Microclimate and vegetation structure significantly affect the composition and phenology of butterfly assemblages in an Ecuadorian dry forest. Maria F. Checa, and Keith R. Willmott, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 9: Analysis of morphology of neotropical Geometrinae (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) using exo- and endoskeletal characters. David M. Plotkin, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 9:5 Break 0: Urban biodiversity of crambine sod webworms and their host preferences. Devon A. Rogers, David J. Shetlar, and Steven Passoa 2, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 2 USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Columbus, OH 0: Testing for genetic differentiation among populations of the North American native cranberry fruitworm, Acrobasis vaccinii (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), from blueberries and cranberries. Kyle Harrison, Zsofia Szendrei 2, Cesar Rodriguez-Saona 3, and Raul F. Medina, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 2 Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 3 Rutgers University, Chatsworth, NJ 0: What an ancient ecosystem can tell us: Scrub islands of the southeastern U.S. and their endemic grasshoppers within the Melanoplus Puer Group (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Melanoplinae). Derek A. Woller, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 0: Unraveling the mysteries of Cremnops (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) biogeography. Erika Tucker, and Michael J. Sharkey, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 0: Diversification and biogeography of the Australian cicada genus Pauropsalta. Christopher L. Owen, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT : Large-scale rearing and field sampling programs find many new species of Creagrura Townes (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) from Central and South America. Shelby E. Stedenfeld, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, and Ilari E. Sääksjärvi, University of Turku, Turku, Finland 97

100 Monday November 2 : Environmental controls on biofilm succession drive invertebrate grazing pressure. Jennifer M. Lang, com, and M. Eric Benbow, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH : Host dynamics determine strength of fungal pathogen control of an insect pest. Erica J. Kistner, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN :39 Concluding Remarks 8:5 073 Statistical biodiversity: Analyses of carrion-feeding insects as a function of local climate and stage of decomposition. Michelle L. Lewis, Natalie K. Lindgren, and Sibyl R. Bucheli, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 9: Response of invertebrate diversity to habitat degradation in a wastewater effluent release site in southeast Louisiana. Marc O. Weller, and Janice L Bossart, Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, LA Monday November 2 Graduate Student Ten-Minute Paper Competition: SysEB E, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Stephen P. Yanoviak and Floyd Shockley 2, University of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR, 2 Smithsonian Institution, Woodbridge, VA 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8: Bee community seasonality and composition in anthropogenic landscapes. Misha Leong, edu, and George K. Roderick, University of California, Berkeley, CA 8: Geographic variation in diapause in Nezara viridula (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae). Alexander Ko, com, and Paula Levin Mitchell, Winthrop University, Rock Hill, SC 8: Litter source determines macroinvertebrate colonization in Appalachian headwater streams. Christopher J. Strohm, and Lynne K. Rieske-Kinney, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 8: Influence of unusual heat stress on resistance of wheat plants to Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor) infestation. Yaleaka B. Currie, Lieceng Zhu, and Ming- Shun Chen 2, Fayetteville State University, Fayetteville, NC, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Manhattan, KS 9: Community and population patterns of mosquito larvae in tire habitats across spatial and temporal axes in Mississippi, U.S.A. Stephen David Flanagan, edu, Francis N. Ezeakacha, Alisa A. Abuzeineh, Jeffrey Skiff, William C. Glasgow, Kevin Kuehn, and Donald A. Yee, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS 9: Patterns of burrowing invertebrate communities in small and large agricultural drainage ditches. Alan Leslie, umd.edu, and William O. Lamp, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 9:39 Break 9: Profile of the effects of a distinct precipitation gradient and land use practices on community composition of indigenous entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN) in Oklahoma. Kyle Risser, Xandra Robideau, Mackenzie Jochim, and Carmen M. Greenwood, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 0: Is nesting behavior evolving in a stepwise evolution of increasing behavioral complexity in spider wasps? The case of the subfamily Pompilinae (Hymenoptera: Pompilidae). Juanita Rodriguez, Carol D. von Dohlen, and James P. Pitts, Utah State University, Logan, UT 0: A coat of many colors: Quantification and analysis of bumble bee color patterns. Michelle A. Duennes, illinois.edu, Sydney A. Cameron, and Zoi Rapti, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL Thank You! For being a part of Entomology 202 in Knoxville, TN Next year s theme is: Science Impacting a Connected World We look forward to seeing you next year! 0: Component wise variance in community profiles of Apis mellifera hives. Kirk J. Grubbs, Jarrod J. Scott, Kevin J. Budsberg, Harry Read, Teri C. Balser, and Cameron Currie, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 0: Relationship between reproductive mode and mitochondrial diversification inferred by cytonuclear disequilibria in the bark louse Echmepteryx hageni. Scott M. Shreve, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, and Kevin P. Johnson, University of Illinois, llinois Natural History Survey, Champaign, IL 0: Multiscale patterns of ground-dwelling spider (Araneae) diversity in Northern Canada. Sarah Loboda, sarah. and Christopher M. Buddle, McGill University, l Ile Perrot, Québec, Canada : Changes in California Odonata communities since 94. Joan E. Ball, University of California, Oakland, CA, and Vincent H. Resh, University of California, Berkeley, CA : Where are we now? Bergmann s rule sensu lato in insects. Matan Shelomi, University of California, Davis, CA :27 Concluding Remarks 98

101 Monday November 2 Monday November 2 Monday, November 2, 202, Afternoon Lunch and Learn: Interview Techniques Ballroom B, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Scott Hutchins, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN 2:45 - :45 Section Networking Session: All P-IE Section Networking Afternoon: Plant-Insect Ecosystems Exhibit Hall B, Floor One (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Bonnie B. Pendleton and Gary D. Thompson 2, West Texas A&M University, Canyon, TX, 2 Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN 2:00 All P-IE Section Afternoon, Welcome by Bonnie B. Pendleton, P-IE President, West Texas A&M University, Canyon, TX 2: Learning Session: Public vs. private funding and the future of IPM. Bonnie B. Pendleton, West Texas A&M University, Canyon, TX 2: Present and future funding for tree fruit research and extension efforts, Larry J. Gut, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 2: Trends in IPM in southern states: Private and public IPM-related resources and implications for the future, Charles T. Allen, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 2: The future of IPM Funding - IPM centers and other non-afri NIFA programs, Thomas O. Holtzer, ColoState.edu, Colorado State University, Fort Collins 3: Competitive grant funding - a USDA perspective, Mary Purcell-Miramontes, National Institute of Food and Agriculture, USDA, Washington, DC 3:5 Panel Discussion 3:30 Networking and Refreshments: Pie, Drinks, and More! 4:5 Year 5, P-IE Business and Awards, Bonnie Pendleton and Gary Thompson 5:5 Prize drawings for volunteers and members - Must Be Present to Win! 5:25 Concluding Remarks Section Networking Session: Highlights of Medical, Urban, and Veterinary Entomology in 202 Ballroom C, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Christopher J. Geden and Edward D. Walker 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL, 2 Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 2:00 Introductory Remarks 2: Highlights of urban entomology. Roberto M. Pereira, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 2: Highlights of medical entomology. Barry W. Alto, University of Florida, Vero Beach, FL 3: Highlights of veterinary entomology. Pia Untalan Olafson, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kerrville, TX 3:50 Concluding Remarks 3:55 Reception 4:55 MUVE Preliminary Business Meeting Section Networking Session: PBT Section Networking Session 30 A, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Subba R. Palli, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 2:00 Welcoming Remarks 2: PBT Plenary (Nam-Yao Su Award winner): The molecular making of a robust insect s olfactory system. Walter S. Leal, University of California, Davis, CA 2:50 Break 3:0 Business meeting. Subba R. Palli, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 3: PBT Plenary 2 (PBT Recognition Award winner): Antiimmunity: Pathogen strategies for evasion of the insect immune system. M. R. Strand, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 4:40 Concluding Remarks. Subba R. Palli, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY Section Networking Session: SysEB Section Networking Session Ballroom A, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Kelly B. Miller and Christiane Weirauch 2, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 2 University of California, Riverside, CA 2:00 Reception 2:30 Introductory Remarks 2: Report from the National Science Foundation. Michael F. Whiting, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 3: Travel and Snodgrass Award Recipients. Kelly B. Miller, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 3:45 SysEB Business Meeting. Kelly B. Miller, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 4:45 Break 4: Featured Speaker. Darryl Gwynne, utoronto.ca, University of Toronto, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada 5:40 Concluding Remarks 99

102 Tuesday, November 3 Tuesday, November 3, 202, Morning Poster Presentations Exhibit Hall A, Floor One (Knoxville Convention Center) Viewing: 8:00 am 6:00 pm Organizers: Andrew P. Norton and Paul J. Ode, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO Poster Presentatons: Section MUVE D0209 Using scientific inquiry to teach students about water quality based on aquatic insects. Helena Puche, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL, and Jame Holt, Riverside Brookfield High School, Riverside, IL D020 Cloning and expression of tick Ixodes muris ferritin gene. Quentin Q. Fang, Daniel C. McGovern, georgiasouthern.edu, and Jack St. Sean, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA D0220 Regulation of oxidative stress responses in the malaria vector, Anopheles stephensi. James Andrew Brennan, .arizona.edu, Xianchun Li, and Michael A. Riehle, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ D022 Spectral sensitivity of a nocturnal mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus. Emma N. I. Weeks, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, and Sandra A. Allan, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL D0222 Larval habitat distribution and mosquito movement effects on barrier trapping strategies. Cynthia C. Lord, Joseph J. Pohedra, and C. Roxanne Connelly, University of Florida, Vero Beach, FL D0223 Phylogenetic relationships among Anopheles (Diptera: Culicidae) based on mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase II gene. Arunaditya Deshmukh, Monika Miglani, Richa Sharma, Manvender Singh, and Surendra Kumar Gakhar, Maharshi Dayanand University, Rohtak, Haryana, India D0224 Incomplete unidirectional cytoplasmic incompatibility and Wolbachia pipientis diversity in two populations of Culex pipiens from metropolitan Chicago, IL. Megan L. Fritz, msu.edu, Stephanie LeValley, Edward D. Walker, and Ian Dworkin, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI Tuesday, November 3 Poster Display D02 Population density of adult Dermacentor andersoni in Alberta. Tim Lysyk, Shaun Dergousoff, and Kateryn Rochon 2, Lethbridge Research Centre, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada, 2 University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada D022 Surveying for the western black-legged tick and Lyme disease in Utah. Ryan S. Davis, Scott A. Bernhardt, and Ricardo A. Ramirez, Utah State University, Logan, UT D023 Evidence of two genetic lineages of Aedes aegypti in Cameroon (Central Africa). David Basile Kamgang Mbouhom, Institut Pasteur of Bangui, Bangui, Central African Republic D024 Evaluation of the effectiveness of two different methods for ovitrap surveillance of Aedes albobictus. Marco Selmi, Osservatorio Permanente per Patologie a Trasmissione Vettoriale, Capannori, Italy D0225 Cell proliferation in the midgut during the post-embryonic development of Aedes aegypti. Kenner Morais Fernandes, Clóvis Andrade Neves, and Gustavo Ferreira Martins, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil D0226 Interactions among three La Crosse encephalitis competent vectors (Aedes triseriatus, Aedes albopictus, Aedes japonicus) in a La Crosse encephalitis endemic state. Eric J. Dotseth, wv.gov, West Virginia Department of Health & Human Resources, Charleston, WV, Emily E. Beckelhimer, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, Laura G. Hunt, Marshall University, Huntington, WV, Mickey Z. King-Fowler, Charleston, WV, and Daniel D. Payne, West Virginia University Institute of Technology, Montgomery, WV D0227 Using cattle to autodisseminate insect growth regulator, pyriproxyfen, to mosquito-breeding habitats by Anopheles arabiensis. Dickson Wilson Lwetoijera, Ifakara Health Institute, Ifakara, Tanzania D025 Vertical distribution of container-inhabiting mosquitoes in a La Crosse virus endemic area of North Carolina. Michael Riles, Hope Mason, Bruce Harrison, and Brian D. Byrd, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC D026 Matching larval and adult thermal environments: Is there evidence for adaptive plasticity in the mosquito Aedes albopictus Skuse? Michael H. Reiskind, and Ali A. Zarrabi, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK D027 Behavioral responses of mosquitoes (Culex sp.) to the presence of pyrethroid-treated nets. Adeolu Taiwo Ande, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Kwara, Nigeria D028 mirna-based RNAi as a tool for loss of function phenotypes in Aedes aegypti. Sanjay P. Basu, Michelle A. Anderson, Azadeh A. Aryan, Kevin M. Myles, and Zach N. Adelman, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA D029 Geographic diversity in bacterial flora from the midguts and diverticula of Aedes albopictus mosquitoes. Justin R. Anderson, Amanda M. Robinson, and Kimberly Filcek, Radford University, Radford, VA D0228 Effectiveness of some plant extracts on the pupal stage of Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae). Roqaya Mohammad A. Almehmadi, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia D0229 Effectiveness of Olyset ceiling nets in reducing malaria vectors and transmission: A randomized field trial in western Kenya. Noboru Minakawa, Gabriel O. Dida 2, Hitoshi Kawada, James O. Kongere 2, George O. Sonye 3, Jinping Hu, and Kyoko Futami, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, Japan, 2 Kenya Medical Research Institute, Nairobi, Kenya, 3 ASK Project, Mbita, Nyanza, Kenya D0230 Control of larval western treehole mosquito (Aedes sierrensis) by low-volume application of VectoBac WDG: Development of techniques. Mary A. Sorensen, placermosquito.org, Placer Mosquito & Vector Control District, Roseville, CA, and Valkyrie Piper Kimball, Marin-Sonoma Mosquito and Vector Control District, Cotati, CA D023 Mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) species composition and seasonal abundance in representative habitats of three Wisconsin ecoregions. Jamee Lee Hubbard, and Ashley M. Schroeder, University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point, WI 00

103 Tuesday, November 3 Poster Display Tuesday, November 3 D0232 The contribution of reproductive interference in population displacement of invasive Aedes species. Irka E. Bargielowski, ufl.edu, Maria Cristina Carrasquilla, and Philip Lounibos, University of Florida, Vero Beach, FL D0233 Identification of canine heartworm and avian malaria vectors in Tennessee. Rebecca T. Trout Fryxell, edu, Hannah Peace, Taylor Lewis, Brian M. Hendricks, A. Daniel Greene 2, and David Paulsen, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2 Lincoln Memorial University, Harrogate, TN D0234 Comparative biology of disjunct populations of the pitcher plant mosquito, Wyeomyia smithii (Diptera: Culicidae), in the southeastern United States. William Irby, edu, Rachel Morreale, and J. Phillip Bloodworth, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA Poster Presentations: Section PBT D0235 Azinphosmethyl resistance and flight phenology differences in codling moth adults in commercial and abandoned apple orchards in Pennsylvania. Neelendra K. Joshi, Larry A. Hull 2, Greg Krawczyk 2, and Edwin G. Rajotte, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 2 Pennsylvania State University, Biglerville, PA D0236 Gut microbes of generalist and specialist herbivores. Sarah Bell, Alyssa Kelly, Dewalf Puerta, Brenda Starcher, Obadi Obadi, Jeanelle M. Morgan, and Evan Lampert, Gainesville State College, Oakwood, GA D0237 Monitoring of chlorantraniliprole resistance in populations of Plutella xylostella. Herbert Alvaro Abreu Siqueira, depa.ufrpe.br, Lilian M. S. Ribeiro, Hugo N. Ferreira, Jefferson E. Silva, and Wellington M. Silva, Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil D0238 Fluorescing potential feeding deterrents found in hemlock woolly adelgids, Adelges tsugae, and their biological control agents. A. C. Jones, Donald E. Mullins, T. H. Jones 2, and Scott M. Salom, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, 2 Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, VA D0239 The role of diet moisture content in the development and subsequent fecundity of Amyelois transitella. Devin A. Clarke, Justin E. Nay 2, and Elizabeth A. Boyd, California State University, Chico, CA, 2 Integral Ag., Inc., Durham, CA D0240 Waveform morphology of auditory evoked brain potentials in Acheta domesticus. Catherine Chaffin, com, Bailee Guisti, Al Yonovitz, and Rita Quigley, University of Montana, Missoula, MT D024 Identification of a novel pyrethroid receptor site on a mosquito sodium channel. Yuzhe Du, Yoshiko Nomura, Gul Satar, Zhaonong Hu, Boris S. Zhorov 2, and Ke Dong, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 2 McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada D0242 Interactions between Vernonia galamensis Gilbert capitate glandular trichomes and adult sweetpotato whiteflies (Bemisia tabaci). Francoise Djibode Favi, Charles L. Cantrell 2, and Mark E. Kraemer, Virginia State University, Petersburg, VA, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, University, MS D0243 Can temperate insects take the heat? The risks of high temperature exposure to meat ants caused by climate change. Nigel R. Andrew, Robert Hart, Myung- Pyo Jung 2, and John Terblanche 3, University of New England, Armidale, New South Wales, Australia, 2 National Academy of Agricultural Science, Suwon, South Korea, 3 Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, Matieland, South Africa D0244 Developing statistical process control systems in insect mass-rearing programs. Allen C. Cohen, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC D0245 Cadherin Bt resistance alleles in the pink bollworm, Pectinophora gossypiella. Jeffrey A. Fabrick, gov, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Maricopa, AZ D0246 Effect of RNA interference of western corn rootworm cadherin expression on Cry34/35Ab and Cry3Aa toxicity. Hong Chen, Sek Yee Tan 2, Huarong Li 2, Kenneth Nava 2, and Blair D. Siegfried, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 2 Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN D0247 MON 8770 Soybean expresses near-high dose of CryAc against two important lepidopteran pests. Ted C. MacRae, Thomas L. Clark, Tederson Galvan 2, Samuel Martinelli 2, Duska Stojsin 3, and Xianghai Ye 4, Monsanto Company, Chesterfield, MO, 2 Monsanto Company, São Paulo, Brazil, 3 Monsanto Company, St. Louis, MO, 4 Monsanto Company, Huxley, IA D0248 Identification of Bt toxin receptor(s) from western corn rootworm midugt using ligand blots. Haichuan Wang, edu, Sek Yee Tan 2, Huarong Li 2, David McCaskill 2, Kenneth Narva 2, and Blair D. Siegfried, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 2 Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN D0249 Sigificantly elevated expression of the CYP9 genes in a permethrin resistant strain of Aedes aegypti. Cheng Chang, Xin-Yi Huang, Wen-Kai Shen, and Shu-Mei Dai, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan D0250 Expression and purification of an insect endoglucanase using an E. coli-based cell-free system. Arnubio Valencia J., arnubio. Haichuan Wang 2, and Blair D. Siegfried 2, Universidad de Caldas, Manizales, Caldas, Colombia, 2 University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE D025 Differential susceptibility to insecticides among various color morphs of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri. Siddharth Tiwari, Nabil Killiny, Rajinder Mann, Erik J. Wenninger 2, and Lukasz, L. Stelinski, University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, 2 University of Idaho, Kimberly, ID D0252 Adaptive melanism and immunity to fungal infection in the migratory grasshopper, Melanoplus sanguinipes. Robert B. Srygley, and Stefan T. Jaronski, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Sidney, MT D0253 Transcriptome profiling of diapause and post-diapause quiescent alfalfa leafcutting bees. George D. Yocum, george. Joseph Rinehart, David P. Horvath, and William P. Kemp, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Fargo, ND D0254 Thermoperiodism in the cavity nesting alfalfa leafcutting bee, Megachile rotundata. Joseph Rinehart, usda.gov, George D. Yocum, and William P. Kemp, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Fargo, ND D0255 Interactions of a novel cypovirus in the Heliothis virescens and Campoletis sonorensis host parasitoid system. Juliane Deacutis, Philip L. Houtz, and Bruce Webb, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY D0256 Coleopteran cadherin fragments synergize toxicity of Bacillus thurigiensis toxins, Cry3Aa, Cry3Bb, and Cry8Ca, against Alphitobius diaperinus (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) larvae. Youngjin 0

104 Tuesday, November 3 Park, Gang Hua, and Michael Adang, University of Georgia, Athens, GA D0257 Antioxidant capacity and oxidative stress in the freezetolerant woolly bear caterpillar, Pyrrharctia isabella. Michael A. Elnitsky, Larae Tymochko, Courtney Legters, and Jacklyn Papa, Mercyhurst University, Erie, PA D0258 Toxicity of clothianidin and thiamethoxam on larval stages of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus Olivier in laboratory assays. Vincenzo Di Ilio, Nabawy Metwaly 2, Silvia Catarci, Massimo Cristofaro 3, and Emilio Caprio 4, Biotechnology and Biological Control Agency, Sacrofano, Roma, Italy, 2 Green World s.r.l., Lanuvio, Roma, Italy, 3 Agenzia nazionale per le nuove tecnologie, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Labor, Rome, Italy, 4 University of Napoli, Portici, Napoli, Italy 4 Virginia Department of Forestry, Charlottesville, VA, 5 USDA, Forest Service, Athens, GA D0268 Dietary choices and their implication for survival and development of mole crickets (Scapteriscus spp.). Yao Xu, David W. Held, Xing Ping Hu, and Kathy Flanders, Auburn University, Auburn, AL D0269 Effect of some medicinal plant extracts on life table parameters of silverleaf whitefly (Bemisia tabaci, Biotype B) in control conditions. Mehdi Zarabi, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran D0270 Enhancing native pollinators in Maine s lowbush blueberry fields: What to plant and how to plant it. Eric Matthew Venturini, University of Maine, Orono, ME Tuesday, November 3 Poster Display D0259 Effects of polyphenolic olive tree extracts on the life cycle of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata. Vincenzo Di Ilio, Massimo Cristofaro 2, and Massimo Pizzichini 2, Biotechnology and Biological Control Agency (BBCA), Sacrofano, Roma, Italy, 2 Agenzia nazionale per le nuove tecnologie, l energia e lo sviluppo economico sostenibile (ENEA), Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Labor, Rome, Italy D0260 mirna mediates locust s phase transition by regulation of neural signaling passway. Meiling Yang, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, China D026 Molecular cloning and expression of heat shock protein genes in Oxya chinensis. Yaping Guo, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, China D0262 Effects of the serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor paroxetine on locomotion by the larva of the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Thomas M. Clark, and Michael Kinney, Indiana University, South Bend, IN D0263 The brain plasticity of the adult worker of the stingless bee Melipona quadrifasciata anthidioides depends on interactions with conspecifics. Hudson Vaner Ventura Tomé, com.br, Conrado Augusto Rosi Denadai, Jéssica Fernanda Pimenta, Raul Narciso C. Guedes, and Gustavo Ferreira Martins, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil D0264 Life-history traits and mating preference of a melanic strain of Spodoptera exigua. Sisi Liu, Mo Wang 2, and Xianchun Li, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 2 Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, Hubei, China D027 Nesting and pollen preference of a native bee (Osmia lignaria) within an apple orchard in Virginia. Mark E. Kraemer, Melanie Cutter, and Françoise Favi, Virginia State University, Petersburg, VA D0272 The diversity of insects visiting flowers of saw palmetto (Arecaceae). Mark A. Deyrup, Archbold Biological Station, Lake Placid, FL, and Leif D. Deyrup, University of the Cumberlands, Williamsburg, KY D0273 Operation Pollinator: Evaluation of flowering plant mixes for attracting insect pollinators in agricultural systems. Jaret C. Daniels, Jeff Peters 2, Neal Williams 3, Katharina Ullmann 3, Kimiora Ward 3, Rufus Isaacs 4, Julianna Tuell 4, Emily May 4, Keith S. Mason 4, James D. Ellis, J. Akers Pence, and Don Wagge 5, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2 Syngenta Crop Protection, Greensboro, NC, 3 University of California, Davis, CA, 4 Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 5 National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Fort Snelling, MN D0274 Does landscape context influence pollination services in biofuel crops? Ashley Bennett, Heidi Liere 2, Claudio Gratton 2, and Rufus Isaacs, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 2 University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI D0275 A protein-based marker method to quantify foraging patterns of Osmia cornifrons (Radoszkowski) in tree fruit ecosystem. Neelendra K. Joshi, David J. Biddinger, Edwin G. Rajotte 2, Noemi O. Halbrendt, Cassandra Pulig, Kusum J. Naithani 2, and Mace Vaughan 3, Pennsylvania State University, Biglerville, PA, 2 Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 3 The Xerces Society, Portland, OR D0265 A34S substitution in acetylcholinesterase resulting in changes of its catalytic efficiency contributes to carbofuran resistance in Chilo suppressalis. Shu-Mei Dai, nchu.edu.tw, Hsuan-Jen Chien 2, Xin-Yi Huang, and Cheng Chang, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan, 2 Council of Agriculture, Executive Yuan, Taipei, Taiwan Poster Presentations: Section P-IE D0266 Non-additive consumptive and non-consumptive effects of the parasitoids Aphidius colemani and Aphidius ervi on aphid host populations. Kathryn Suzanne Ingerslew, edu, and Deborah L. Finke, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO D0267 Phenology and community structure of woodwasps in southeastern pine forests. Kamal JK. Gandhi, uga.edu, Brittany Barnes, James R. Meeker 2, Wood Johnson 3, Christopher Asaro 4, and Daniel R. Miller 5, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 2 USDA, Forest Service, Forest Health Protection, Pineville, LA, 3 Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA, 02 D0276 Interactions between aphid feeding and phloem sealing responses. Karla J. Medina-Ortega, and Gregory P. Walker, University of California, Riverside, CA D0277 Behavioral responses of lesser mealworm beetles to pheromone components using a walking wind tunnel bioassay. Allard Cossé, and Bruce W. Zilkowski, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Peoria, IL D0278 Behavioral response of the pepper weevil (Anthonomus eugenii Cano) to synthetic volatile compounds. Manolo Muñiz- Merino, and Juan Cibrián-Tovar, Colegio de Postgraduados, Texcoco, Estado de México, México D0279 Tunneling by mole crickets (Scapteriscus spp.) enhances hydraulic conductivity of soils. David Bailey, auburn.edu, David W. Held, Navin Twarakavi 2, Francisco J. Arriaga 3, and Prabahakar Clement, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, 2 Desert Research Institute, Las Vegas, NV, 3 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Auburn, AL

105 Tuesday, November 3 Poster Display Tuesday, November 3 D0280 Male lifetime mating capacity in northern corn rootworm in relation to body size. B. Wade French, gov, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Brookings, SD, and Leslie Hammack, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Keystone, SD D028 Effects of wind speed, wind direction, and temperature on flight patterns of the bog buck moth (Saturniidae: Hemileuca maia). John M. Wallace, Mariah A. Wallace, and Karen R. Sime, State University of New York, Oswego, NY D0282 Reproductive performance of Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) on kale and rocket. Caroline Placidi De Bortoli, Rafael Ferreira Santos 2, Haroldo Xavier Linhares Volpe, Sergio Leandro De Bortoli 2, Alessandra Marieli Vacari, and Sergio Antonio De Bortoli, Faculdade de Ciências Agrárias e Veterinárias, Jaboticabal, São Paulo, Brazil, 2 Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho, Jaboticabal, São Paulo, Brazil D0283 Tarnished plant bug dynamics in Québec vineyards. Noubar J. Bostanian, Charles Vincent, Gaetan Bourgeois, and Dominique Plouffe, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, St. Jean-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada D0284 False ring formation in eastern hemlock branches: Impacts of hemlock woolly adelgid and elongate hemlock scale. Liahna Gonda-King, Laura Radville 2, and Evan L. Preisser, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, 2 Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA D0285 Biology and trapping of spotted wing drosophila. Jana C. Lee, and Denny Bruck, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Corvallis, OR D0286 Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) invasion along riparian corridors in southern California. Lauren Fah, and Dessie L. A. Underwood, California State University, Long Beach, CA D0287 Species distribution modeling of the South American cactus moth: The importance of treating SDMs as hypotheses in predicting invasions. Christian Carter, and Christopher P. Brooks, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS D0288 Effects of Russian olive leaf litter on aquatic invertebrate communities. Heidi Meador, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY D0289 Comparison of invasive potential between two cryptic species of the coconut beetle, Brontispa longissima (Gestro). Shunichiro Takano, Yokohama Plant Protection Station, Yokohama, Japan, Keiji Takasu, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan, Atsushi Mochizuki, National Institute for Agro- Environmental Sciences, Tsukuba, Japan, Kazuhiko Konishi, National Agricultural Research Center for the Hokkaido Region, Hokkaido, Japan, and Satoshi Nakamura, Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan D0290 Impact of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) treatment of cotton on ovipostion behavior and larval development of Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Simon Atsbaha Zebelo, YuanYuan Song, Joseph Kloepper, and Henry Y. Fadamiro, Auburn University, Auburn, AL D029 Little fire ant, Wasmannia auropunctata, on Guam. Ross H. Miller, and Maia Raymundo, University of Guam, Mangilao, Guam D0292 Bacterial symbionts associated with the gut of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys. Bridget D. DeLay, Jian Wang, and William O. Lamp, University of Maryland, College Park, MD D0293 Evaluation of artificial diets for Coleomegilla maculata (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). M. Guadalupe Rojas, ars.usda.gov, Juan A. Morales-Ramos, and Eric W. Riddick, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Stoneville, MS D0294 Feeding deterrence in the brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys). Robert Bedoukian, Bedoukian Research Incoproration, Danbury, CT, and Genoveva M. Collins, ICR, Inc., Baltimore, MD D0295 Host preference among edible beans and peas by the kudzu bug, Megacopta cribraria. Alton N. Sparks, edu, Joni L. Blount 2, John All 2, and G. David Buntin 3, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, 2 University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 3 University of Georgia, Griffin, GA D0296 Movement of insect predators among an oilseed crop (winter canola), winter wheat, and uncultivated pasture in the Southern Plains. Kristopher L. Giles, Brian P. McCornack 2, James R. Hagler 3, Timothy J. Kring 4, S. L. Donelson, Kody Mullins, Casi N. Jessie, W. Jessie, N. Bradford, and Ximena Cibils-Stewart 2, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, 2 Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 3 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Maricopa, AZ, 4 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR D0297 Reproductive status of dissected spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura), representing multiple locations in the Pacific Northwest. Beverly S. Gerdeman, hotmail.com, and Lynell K. Tanigoshi, Washington State University, Mt. Vernon, WA D0298 Effects of winter cover crops on ground beetle abundances in corn. Laura A. Campbell, and Bryan G. Young, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL D0299 Infestation by elongate hemlock scale makes eastern hemlock less attractive to the hemlock woolly adelgid. Sara Gomez, Liahna Gonda-King, and Evan L. Preisser, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI D0300 The relationship between temperature and Xylosandrus germanus flight and attack activity. Michael E. Reding, mike. Christopher M. Ranger, Peter B. Schultz 2, and Jason B. Oliver 3, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Wooster, OH, 2 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia Beach, VA, 3 Tennessee State University, McMinnville, TN D030 Host-microbiota interactions and dietary adaptation of the rotation-resistant western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera). Chia-Ching Chu, Matias J. Curzi, Jorge A. Zavala 2, Joseph L. Spencer, and Manfredo J. Seufferheld, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, 2 Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina D0302 Scale insect and pathogen complex affecting eastern white pine health. Angela M. Mech, David R. Coyle, Christopher Asaro 2, Michelle Cram 3, and Kamal JK. Gandhi, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 2 Virginia Department of Forestry, Charlottesville, VA, 3 USDA, Forest Service, Athens, GA D0303 Volatiles released by Oryza sativa L. and its implications for the chemotaxic behavior of Tibraca limbativentris Stal. (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) and egg parasitoids. Rita de Cássia de Melo Machado, Josué Sant Ana, Maria C. B. Moraes 2, Miguel Borges 2, and R. A. Laumann 2, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, 2 Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária, Brasília, Brazil 03

106 Tuesday, November 3 D0304 Feeding and reproduction of the brown lacewings (Sympherobius barberi) on diets of Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) and flour moth (Ephestia kuehniella). Azhar A. Khan, Jawwad A. Qureshi, Muhammad Afzal 2, Joe Barcinas 3, and Philip A. Stansly, University of Florida, Immokalee FL, 2 University of Sargodha, Sargodha, Pakistan, 3 Foothill Agricultural Research, Corona, CA D0305 Wherever the chips may fall: Does host material increase attraction of cerambycid beetles to traps baited with generic pheromones? Megan M. Montalvo, Alysha DeWees, Patrick Martin, and Ann M. Ray, Xavier University, CIncinnati, OH D0306 Influence of temperature on the development of Encarsia sp. (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae), parasitizing whitefly Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) on tomatoes. Barno Tashpulatova, Uzbek Research Institute of Plant Rrotection, Tashkent, Uzbekistan D0307 Interaction of ketols, diols and ethanol on attraction of hardwood borers (Cerambycidae) in the southeastern U.S.A. Daniel R. Miller, Christopher M. Crowe, Jon Sweeney 2, and Peter J. Silk 2, USDA, Forest Service, Athens, GA, 2 Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Atlantic Forestry Centre, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada D035 Preliminary data on the physiological and behavioral doseresponses of the lesser chestnut weevil (Curculio sayi) to volatile organic compounds from its host plant. Andrew Fill, missouri.edu, Bruce A. Barrett, and Ian W. Keesey, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO D036 EAG responses to host-based attractants and temporal patterns in host-seeking flight of Xyleborus glabratus, X. affinis, and X. ferrugineus. Paul E. Kendra, Wayne S. Montgomery, Jerome Niogret, Mark A. Deyrup 2, and Nancy D. Epsky, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Miami, FL, 2 Archbold Biological Station, Lake Placid, FL D037 Survey of stink bug (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) egg parasitoids in soybean and corn in eastern Nebraska. Wan Zaki Wan Mamat, Robert J. Wright, and Thomas E. Hunt 2, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 2 University of Nebraska, Concord, NE D038 Developing a multifaceted natural enemies application. James Jasinski, Mary M. Gardiner 2, Celeste Welty 3, Daniel Fischer 3, Chelsea Smith 2, Caitlin E. Burkman 2, Ben W. Phillips 2, Scott P. Prajzner 2, Sarah Rose 2, Daniel Saunders 3, Brett Robison 3, Rajni Gora 3, Chethan Rudramuni 3, and Aishwarya Varadarajan 3, Ohio State University, Urbana, OH, 2 Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, 3 Ohio State University, Columbus, OH Tuesday, November 3 Poster Display D0308 Classical biological control of the Asian chestnut gall wasp (Dryocosmus kuriphilus) by the introduction of torymid parasitoid (Torymus sinensis) in Japan and Italy. Seiichi Moriya, go.jp, Ishizue Adachi 2, Kaori Yara, Ambra Quacchia 3, Giovanni Bosio 4, and Alberto Alma 3, National Agricultural Research Center, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan, 2 National Institute of Fruit Tree Science, Morioka, Iwate, Japan, 3 University of Turin, Turin, Piemonte, Italy, 4 Phytosanitary Service-Piemonte Region, Turin, Piemonte, Italy D0309 Feeding preference and olfactory response of black walnut curculio, Conotrachelus retentus, to black walnut plant tissues. William Terrell Stamps, and Michele Warmund, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO D030 Phylogenetic distribution of phenotypic traits in Bacillus thuringiensis. Phyllis A. W. Martin, Michael B. Blackburn, Robert Farrar, Daniel Kuhar, and Dawn E. Gundersen-Rindal, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD D03 Red oak tannins alter gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) feeding preference, weight gain and behavior. Brian Rehill, United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD D032 Comparison of rearing systems for the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) parasitoid, Spathius agrili (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). Jason Hansen, Hannah Nadel 2, and Allen C. Cohen, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, 2 USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Buzzards Bay, MA D033 Honeydew sugar composition of the phloem sap feeder, the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Homoptera: Psyllidae), on citrus host plants. Nabil Killiny, and Faraj Hijaz, University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL D034 Classical biological control of the European apple sawfly with the ichneumonid Lathrolestes ensator: A case of longterm commitment. Charles Vincent, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, St. Jean-sur-Richelieu, Québec, Canada, Margaret Appleby, Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Brighton, Ontario, Canada, Alan Eaton, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH, and Jacques Lasnier, Ag-Cord, Inc., Granby, Québec, Canada D039 Plant volatiles attractive to the granulate ambrosia beetle, Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky). Karla Addesso, Tennessee State University, McMinnville, TN D0320 Costs and benefits of Ceratomia catalpae chemical defense. Audreylee Barrett, Bryce Diettrich, Natalie Shepherd, and Evan Lampert, Gainesville State College, Oakwood, GA D032 Visual identification of Trissolcus species parasitizing the brown marmorated stinkbug, Halyomorpha halys. Matthew Buffington, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Washington, DC, Steve Valley, Oregon Department of Agriculture, Salem, OR, Christine Dieckhoff, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Newark, DE, and Kim A. Hoelmer, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Montferrier, France D0322 Attraction and electroantennography responses of the male Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata, to natural essential oils and synthetic blends. Jerome Niogret, gov, Paul E. Kendra, Hernán Roberto Espinoza 2, and Nancy D. Epsky, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Miami, FL, 2 Fundación Hondureña de Investigación Agrícola, Cortés, Honduras D0323 Comparison of Anisopteromalus calandrae and Theocolax elegans in supressing Rhyzopertha dominica in stored rice. Paul W. Flinn, and Frank H. Arthur, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Manhattan, KS D0324 Beneficial insects associated with newly established native perennial plant and pasture border rows in central Kentucky. John D. Sedlacek, Karen L. Friley, and Jermaine Dunigan, Kentucky State University, Frankfort, KY D0325 Comparative flight responses of the walnut twig beetle, Pityophthorus juglandis, and associated insects to varying release rates of aggregation pheromone and host volatiles in California and Tennessee. Paul L. Dallara, Alicia M. Bray 2, Lori J. Nelson 3, William Klingeman 4, Jason B. Oliver 2, and Steven J. Seybold 3, University of California, Davis, CA, 2 Tennessee State University, McMinnville, TN, 3 USDA, Forest Service, Davis, CA, 4 University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 04

107 Tuesday, November 3 Poster Display Tuesday, November 3 D0326 Ground-dwelling insects associated with newly established native perennial plant border rows in central Kentucky: Preliminary results. Karen L. Friley, John D. Sedlacek, and Kyle Kratzer, Kentucky State University, Frankfort, KY D0327 Phenology of the spotted-wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii, in the lower San Joaquin Valley of California. David R. Haviland, and Stephanie M. Rill, University of California, Cooperative Extension, Bakersfield, CA D0328 The Dundee Biological Control Laboratory and mass rearing the parasitoid Tamarixia radiata for control of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, in Florida citrus groves. Robin J. Stuart, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Dundee, FL D0329 Leaf consumption by Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) on kale and rocket. Caroline Placidi De Bortoli, Rafael Ferreira Santos 2, Dagmara Gomes Ramalho, Sergio Leandro De Bortoli 2, Alessandra Marieli Vacari, and Sergio Antonio De Bortoli, Faculdade de Ciências Agrárias e Veterinárias, Jaboticabal, São Paulo, Brazil, 2 Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho, Jaboticabal, São Paulo, Brazil D0330 Biological control of the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) in California. Anna L. Soper, Mark S. Hoddle, and Richard Stouthamer, University of California, Riverside, CA D033 Quantification of the costs of insect collection curation. Luciana Musetti, Sara Hemly, and Norman F. Johnson, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH D0332 Molecular detection of Nosema from feral honey bees. Allen L. Szalanski, and Amber D. Tripodi, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR D0333 Survey of Tiphia parasitoids of the Japanese and Oriental beetles in Massachusetts and New Hampshire. Ana Legrand, ana. University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT D0334 Evaluation of native natural enemies as biological control agents of Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis). Michael T. Smith, Ellen Aparicio, Daria Tatman, and Jinquan Wu, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Newark, DE D0335 Host plant resistance in sunflower, Helianthus annuus L. Jarrad Prasifka, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Fargo, ND D0336 Comparing location and clustering patterns of persistent and reticent foragers at the dance floor in the honey bee, Apis mellifera. Ashley E. Wagner, Byron N. Van Nest 2, Adam White, Ross Yost, Chelsea Corrigan, Edith Seier, Michele L. Joyner, and Darrell Moore, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN, 2 Wake Forest University, Winston- Salem, NC D0337 Natural enemies of Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) in natural areas of their indigenous geographic range: Approaches and prospects. Michael T. Smith, usda.gov, Franck Herard 2, and Jinquan Wu, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Newark, DE, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Montpellier, France D0338 Disease and pest occurrence of honey bees (Apis mellifera) in Ohio based upon USDA honey bee survey results in Barbara Bloetscher, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH D0339 Phenology of the gall midge, Jaapiella ivannikovi, as a biological control agent on Russian knapweed, Acroptilon repens, in Wyoming. Kathleen Meyers, and Timothy Collier, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY D0340 Collecting, rearing, and shipping a potential classical biological control agent to New Zealand. Sean D. M. Gresham, and J. Christopher Bergh, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Winchester, VA D034 Determining the foraging range of the alfalfa leafcutting bee (Megachile rotundata) in alfalfa seed crops. Natalie K. Boyle, and Douglas B. Walsh, Washington State University, Prosser, WA D0342 A myrmecophilic orb-weaver spider avoids plant-defending acacia ants behaviorally by sitting very still. John D. Styrsky, Lynchburg College, Lynchburg, VA, and Loriann C. Garcia, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX D0343 Field border and crop vegetation effects on weed seed predation. Aaron F. Fox, David Orr, S. Chris Reberg- Horton, Chris Moorman, and Geoff Balme, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC D0344 A fungus-fungus gnat (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) symbiosis for biocontrol of the giant reed (Arundo donax). Donald B. Thomas, Patrick J. Moran, and John Goolsby, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Weslaco, TX D0345 Colony structure and spatial partitioning of cavity dwelling ant species in nuts of eastern U.S. forest floors. Doug Booher, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, Joe A. MacGown, Mississippi Entomological Museum, Mississippi State, MS, and Richard M. Duffield, Howard University, Washington, DC D0346 Aerial delivery of biological control agents using unmanned aerial vehicles. Yong-Lak Park, and Srikanth Gururajan, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV D0347 Potato leafhopper affects nitrogen subsidies in a tall fescue/ alfalfa forage mixture. William O. Lamp, and Elizabeth J. Sancomb, University of Maryland, College Park, MD D0348 Modeling insect populations with the effect of climate change using CLIMEX and DYMEX in Korea. Jung-Joon Park, and Kijong Cho, Korea University, Seoul, South Korea D0349 Retrospective analysis of the successful establishment of a biological control agent, Peristenus digoneutis, based upon microsatellite data. Veronica Marcari, Marie-Claude Bon, Kim A. Hoelmer, Dominique Coutinot, Kathy Tatman 2, Phil Taylor 2, and Alessio De Biase 3, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Montferrier, France, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Newark, DE, 3 University of Rome, Rome, Italy D0350 Spatial distribution of Cotesia flavipes (Cameron): Sampling performed using sugarcane stems. Haroldo Xavier Linhares Volpe, Alessandra Marieli Vacari, Ana Carolina Pires Veiga, Rogério Teixeira Duarte, Valéria Lucas de Laurentis, Gustavo Oliveira de Magalhães, Antonio Sergio Ferraudo, and Sergio Antonio De Bortoli, Faculdade de Ciências Agrárias e Veterinárias, Jaboticabal, São Paulo, Brazil D035 The interactive effects of herbivory and rising temperatures on Quercus alba seedling demography: An experimental and observational test. Melissa A. Burt, Rob R. Dunn 2, Lauren M. Nichols 2, and Nathan J. Sanders, University of 05

108 Tuesday, November 3 Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2 North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC D0352 As good as it gets: Predator response to hemlock woolly adelgid does not change among hemlock species with varying levels of host resistance. Lori Nelson, and Lynne Rieske Kinney, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY D0353 Foraging behavior and seed dispersal mutualisms in a warmed world: The effects of experimental warming on ant assemblages and the processes they mediate. Katharine L. Stuble, Courtney Patterson, Rob R. Dunn 2, and Nathan J. Sanders, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2 North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC D0354 A review of fortuitous and intentional biological control releases on Guam. Christy J. Leppanen, University of Guam, Mangilao, Guam D0355 Buggy buffet: It s tarsal-licking good! Renee Follum, Jerome F. Grant, and Gregory J. Wiggins, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN D0365 Life history traits of Spodoptera frugiperda populations previously exposed to Bacillus thuringiensis CryAb corn. Fernanda Freitas Sousa, Simone Martins Mendes 2, Thaís Patrícia M. Teixeira, and Eliseu Jose G. Pereira, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Vicosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil, 2 Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária, Sete Lagoas, Minas Gerais, Brazil D0366 An omnivore s dilemma: Implications of diet mixing and switching in the lady beetle Coleomegilla maculata. Donald C. Weber, Michael M. Athanas, and Kanisha Ferguson, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD D0367 Aphids capable of fine resolution landing. David Alan Jenkins, and Ricardo Goenaga, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Tropical Agriculture Research Station, Mayaguez, PR D0368 Aestival survival of Laricobius nigrinus Fender (Coleoptera: Derodontidae) in the field in Tennessee. Ashley B. Lamb, utk.edu, Albert E. Mayfield 2, J. Patrick Parkman, and Jerome F. Grant, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2 USDA, Forest Service, Asheville, NC Tuesday, November 3 Poster Display D0356 Measuring mosquitoes and ground beetles at a continental scale. David Hoekman, National Ecological Observatory Network, Boulder, CO D0357 Seasonal abundance of Scirtothrips dorsalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in citrus orchards related with surrounding host plants in Jeju, South Korea. Jeong Heub Song, Young Taek Yang, Soon Yeong Hong, Shin Chan Lee, and Seong Geun Kang, Jeju Agricultural Research and Extension Services, Seogwipo, Jeju, South Korea D0358 Development of a long-lasting pheromone lure for the major pest of almonds and pistachios, navel orangeworm, Amyelois transitella. Bradley S. Higbee, Paramount Farming Co, Bakersfield, CA D0359 Effect of photoperiod on severity of leaf chlorosis elicited by the black pecan aphid (Melanocallis caryaefoliae). Ted E. Cottrell, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Byron, GA D0360 Distribution of the related weevil species Sitophilus oryzae and S. zeamais in Brazil. Alberto S. Correa, gmail.com, Luiz Orlando Oliveira, and Raul Narciso C. Guedes, Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil D036 Understanding ecological role of a predatory mite (Balaustium sp., Acari: Erythraeidae) in northern California. Joanna B. Bloese, and Elizabeth A. Boyd, California State University, Chico, CA D0362 Overwintering potential of the potato/tomato psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli) in Nebraska. Sean D. Whipple, hotmail.com, and Jeffrey D. Bradshaw, University of Nebraska, Scottsbluff, NE D0363 Role of volatiles in host recognition and preference by Listronotus maculicollis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Olga Kostromytska, Cesar Rodriguez-Saona 2, and Albrecht Koppenhöfer, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, 2 Rutgers University, Chatsworth, NJ D0369 Comparisons of morphometric traits associated with flight performance in two species of longhorn beetles, Monochamus alternatus and M. saltuarius (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). Kwang Pum Lee, Chan Sik Jung 2, Yil Sung Moon 2, Sang Hyun Koh 2, and Chul Su Kim 2, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea, 2 Korea Forest Research Institute, Seoul, South Korea D0370 Changes in aquatic insect communities of coldwater steams following major stream and riparian habitat improvements. Kirk J. Larsen, Luther College, Decorah, IA D037 Compositional and biosynthetic studies of the stylet sheath from the Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri, Hemiptera: Psyllidae). J. Kent Morgan, Robert G. Shatters, Gary A. Luzio, El-Desouky Ammar, Rocco T. Alessandro, and Wayne B. Hunter, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Fort Pierce, FL D0372 Seasonal patterns in the proportion of Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) carrying Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. Timothy Ebert, Ronald H. Brlansky, and Michael E. Rogers, ufl.edu, University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL D0373 The effects of outdoor recreation on soil macrofauna communities in coast live oak forests (Quercus agrifolia) in southern California. Emily Ferrill, and Dessie L. A. Underwood, California State University, Long Beach, CA D0374 Effect of temperature on reproduction parameters of potato tuberworm, Phthorimaea operculella (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae). Ali Golizadeh, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil, Iran D0375 Multi-species outbreak of oak defoliating caterpillars (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in the southeastern U.S. David R. Coyle, Kelly A. Dyer, John Pickering, and Kamal JK. Gandhi, University of Georgia, Athens, GA D0376 Incidence of Eucosma giganteana on wild and agronomic populations of Silphium perfoliatum in eastern South Dakota. Paul J. Johnson, and Arvid Boe, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD D0364 Emerald ash borer populations and ash regeneration at three stages of the invasion wave. Stephen Burr, edu, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 06 D0377 Effects of naturalized roughs on parasitism rates of black cutworm (Agrotis ipsilon) and fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) on Kentucky golf courses. S. N. Marksbury, samantha_ Emily K. Dobbs, and Jonathan L. Larson, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

109 Tuesday, November 3 Poster Display Tuesday, November 3 D0378 Tracking stink bug populations using pheromone traps. John J. Herbert, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA, and Michael D. Toews, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA D0379 Flight activity of the eastern larch beetle, Dentroctonus simplex, measured with a flight mill. Erica C. Nystrom Santacruz, Samuel J. Fahrner, Fraser R. McKee, and Brian H. Aukema, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN Poster Presentations: Section SysEB D0380 Microbes associated with wood-boring Coleoptera. Nathan M. Schiff, Ellen S. Green, 2, Tanya K. McKinney 2, Daniel Walker 2, and D. Rashad Warren 2, USDA, Forest Service, Stoneville, MS, 2 Delta State University, Cleveland, MS D038 Teaching undergraduates how to conduct research: From concepts to publication. R. Strecker, and Linda M. Hooper-Bui, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA D0382 The butterflies (Rhopalocera: Papilionoidea) from the Cuatro Cienegas Basin, Coahuila, México. Jessica Hernández-Jerónimo, Marysol Trujano-Ortega, Uri Omar García-Vázquez, and Arturo Contreras-Arquieta 2, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México, México, 2 Acuario y Herpetario W. L. Minckley, Cuatro Ciénegas de Carranza, Coahuila, México D0383 The butterflies (Rhopalocera: Papilionoidea) of Misantla, Veracruz, Mexico. Arturo Arellano-Covarrubias, hotmail.com, Eric Centenero-Alcalá, Marysol Trujano-Ortega, and Arturo Sánchez y Gándara 2, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México, México, 2 Asociación para el Desarrollo Integral de la Región de Misantla, Veracruz, México D0384 Trichoptera of the Buffalo National River, Arkansas, and Ozark National Scenic Riverways, Missouri. David E. Bowles, david_ United States National Park Service, Republic, MO D0385 Biodiversity and community structure of arthropods associated with Salvinia minima. Katherine A. Parys, gmail.com, and Seth J. Johnson, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA D0386 The genus Stichopogon (Diptera: Asilidae) in America north of Mexico. Jeffrey K. Barnes, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR D0387 The moths of Congaree National Park. Joseph Culin, clemson.edu, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, Brian G. Scholtens, College of Charleston, Charleston, SC, John Snyder, Furman University, Greenville, SC, and Tom Smith, Woodbridge, VA D0388 Inventory of the lepidopteran fauna of the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, Cuba. Deborah L. Matthews, edu, Jacqueline Miller, Terry A. Lott, Roger W. Portell, and James K. Toomey, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL D0389 The rove beetle fossils of the Green River Formation. Stylianos Chatzimanolis, University of Tennessee, Chattanooga, TN D0390 Moss-inhabiting flea beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Galerucinae: Alticini): Classification, diversity, and biology. Alexander S. Konstantinov, USDA, Washington, DC D039 Longhorned beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) and bark beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) species diversity and community structure in a fragmented temperate forest landscape. Daniel M. Pavuk, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH D0392 So many beetles, so little space: Speciation of Mecyclothorax beetles on Haleakala volcano, Maui. James Liebherr, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY D0393 Host specificity, alpha- and beta-diversity of wood-boring weevils in genera from the Brazil nut family (Lecythidaceae) in French Guiana and Peru. Joyce Fassbender, City University of New York, NY, Pedro Centeno, Asociación para la Conservación de la Cuenca Amazónica, Puerto Maldonado, Madre de Dios, Peru, Alec Baxt, Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Brooklyn, NY, and Amy Berkov, City College of New York, NY D0394 An inventory of native bees (Hymenoptera: Apiformes) of the Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming. David J. Drons, and Paul J. Johnson, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD D0395 Monomorium collingwoodi (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), a new ant species of the Monomorium hildebrandti group from Saudi Arabia with a key to the Arabian species. Abdulrahman Saad Aldawood, and Mostafa R. Sharaf, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia D0396 Diversity and distribution of ants in New England: Linking museum records and ecological surveys in biogeographic analyses of a regional ant fauna. Aaron M. Ellison, edu, Harvard University, Petersham, MA, and Nicholas J. Gotelli, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT D0397 Ant (Hymenoptera, Formicidae) assemblages of the Cross Timbers ecoregion in the Fort Worth Nature Center, Fort Worth, Texas. Ann B. Mayo, University of Texas, Arlington, TX D0398 Washington State Department of Agriculture Digital Image Pest Identification System. Jenni Cena, Washington State Department of Agriculture, Olympia, WA D0399 Revitalization of the recent invertebrates collection of the Sam Noble Museum. Laura Sohl-Smith, Katrina L. Menard, Tamaki Yuri, Janet Braun, and Roxie Hites, Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, Norman, OK D0400 A revision of the Hylaeus episcopalism species-group. David A. Tanner, University of North Texas, Dallas, TX, and Terry L. Griswold, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Logan, UT D040 The fauna of Ambrysus (Heteroptera: Naucoridae) of southern Mexico. Daniel Reynoso-Velasco, edu, and Robert W. Sites, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO D0402 Genetic diversity in populations of the blue orchard bee (Osmia lignaria). Richard L. Roehrdanz, usda.gov, and Sheila G. Sears, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Fargo, ND D0403 Responses of upland forest invertebrates to climatic warming: Understanding the past to predict and manage for the future. Ryan C. Garrick, University of Mississippi, University, MS D0404 The genome of the arboreal ant, Pseudomyrmex gracilis. Benjamin E. R. Rubin, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL 07

110 Tuesday, November 3 D0405 Evolution and homoplasy at the bem6 microsatellite locus in three Bemisia tabaci cryptic species. Aaron M. Dickey, Lance S. Osborne 2, Paula M. Hall 2, Robert G. Shatters, and Cindy L. McKenzie, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Fort Pierce, FL, 2 University of Florida, Apopka, FL D0406 Increasing performance in spider orb webs (Larinioides cornutus) intercepting high speed prey. Andrew Sensenig, Tabor College, Hillsboro, KS, and Todd Blackledge, University of Akron, Akron, OH D0407 Molecular analysis of early successional insect communities on Kasatochi Island. Derek S. Sikes and Sayde Ridling, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK D0408 Acoustic behavior of the rare cicada Cornuplura nigroalbata (Davis) (Hemiptera: Cicadidae). Allen Sanborn, barry.edu, Barry University, Miami Shores, FL, and Polly K. Phillips, Miramar, FL D0409 Apparent asynchronous emergences of Brood II of periodical cicadas, Magicicada spp. (Hemiptera: Cicadidae), in Connecticut and eastern New York. Chris T. Maier, Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven, CT D040 A novel form of feeding in a new genus of mite. Samuel J. Bolton, Hans Klompen, Gary R. Bauchan 2, and Ronald Ochoa 2, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD D04 Trace metals in the ovipositors of wood-boring Hymenoptera. Karen R. Sime, and Paul Tomascak, State University of New York, Oswego, NY D042 Community interactions among stream channels: Influence of dominant water sources on invertebrate movement. Rachel L. S. Heth, and Robert W. Sites, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO Tuesday, November 3 Poster Display Available in December! The Cicadas of North America North of Mexico Allen F. Sanborn Maxine S. Heath The newest Thomas Say Monograph presents a comprehensive review of the North American cicada fauna that provides information on synonymies, type localities, and type material. There are 70 species and 2 subspecies found in continental North America north of Mexico. The book has 2 figures with each species photographed in color. Published by the Entomological Society of America Hardcover, 227 pages, 202. ISBN: ESA Members: $79.95 Nonmembers: $99.95 Stop by the ESA Booth and order now at the special ESA Meeting Price of $74.95! 08

111 Tuesday November 3 Tuesday November 3 Tuesday, November 3, 202, Morning Oral Presentations Program Symposium: RNAi: From Basic Science Toward Global Application Ballroom E, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Qisheng Song, Subba R. Palli 2, Yongping Huang 3, and David L. Denlinger 4, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, 2 University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 3 Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China, 4 Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 8:00 Opening Remarks. Subba R. Palli, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 8: RNAi in Drosophila: Genome wide RNAi screens in tissue culture and in vivo. Norbert Perrimon, med.harvard.edu, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 8: Inherent environmentally-mediated horizontal RNAi transfer among honey bees (Apis mellifera). Eyal Maori, cam.ac.uk, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom 8: Progress of silkworm mirnas and their function. Yongping Huang, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China 9: Baculoviral-encoded micrornas target host immune genes and small RNA transport machinery in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. Javaregowda Nagaraju, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India 9: Discovery of replicating RNA pathogen by deep sequencing. Qingfa Wu, Chinese Science and Technology University, Hefei, Anhui, China 9:50 Break 0: Synthetic mirna for target-specific knockdown of closely related genes. Jingjing Xu, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 0: mirnas play a role in silkworm metamorphosis. Xie Ge, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China 0: Delivery of dsrna through Nano particles. Kun-Yan Zhu, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 0: Pushing RNAi in systemic interference defective (SID) organisms and tissues with cell penetrating peptides (CPP). Dmitri Boudko, Rosalind Franklin University, North Chicago, IL : RNAi as a tool for probing mosquito diapause. David L. Denlinger, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH : RNA-based technologies to control plant pests. William Moar, Monsanto Company, St. Louis, MO Medical, Urban, and Veterinary Entomology (MUVE) Section Symposium: Military Entomology: A Partner in Global Public Health 30 A, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Scott Gordon, Armed Forces Pest Management Board, Silver Spring, MD 8:00 Welcoming Remarks 8: DOD entomology: Improving global public health, strengthening national and global security. Mark Beavers, mark. Armed Forces Pest Management Board, Silver Spring, MD 8: Operation Pacific Angel : USAF entomology outreach in Cambodia. Wesley Walker, United States Air Force, Apo, Japan 8: Joint dengue outbreak response in the Republic of Marshall Islands. Ian Sutherland, United States Navy, Honolulu, HI 8: Radiological air sampling and volunteer evacuations in Japan: Two extremes but an entomologist did it! Jaree Johnson, United States Army, Public Health Command, Pacific, Apo, Japan 9:0 077 U.S. military entomologists and the President s malaria initiative. C. A. Stoops, United States Navy, Gainesville, FL 9:25 Break 9: Central public health reference laboratory: Evolution of the Georgian and U.S. Governments partnership in global public health. Jamie Blow, United States Army, Silver Spring, MD 0: The Deployed War-Fighter Protection (DWFP) Program, nine years of integrated vector management research for the U.S. Military and the world. Douglas Burkett, osd.mil, Chief, Research Division, Silver Spring, MD 0: Collaborative efforts in vector surveillance within the Caucasus Region (Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia): A perspective from an Army entomologist. Lewis S. Long, mil, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, MD 0: DoD and Interagency public health response to the 20 dengue fever outbreak in Kenya and Somalia. Joshua Bast, United States Army, Medical Research Unit, Dpo, Kenya 0:45 Concluding Remarks Plant-Insect Ecosystems (P-IE) Section Symposium: A Global Perspective of Bee Decline: Situation, Strategies and Successes Salon A (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderators and Organizers: John A. Skinner and Christina M. Grozinger 2, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2 Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 8: Introduction: Coordinated responses to honey bee 09

112 Tuesday November 3 (Apis mellifera) decline. Keith Delaplane, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 8: Colony losses, four years in seven U.S. apiaries, some results of the CAP Stationary Hive Project. Frank Drummond, frank. University of Maine, Orono, ME, Kate Aronstein, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Weslaco, TX, Yanping (Judy) Chen, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD, Brian D. Eitzer, Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven, CT, James D. Ellis, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, Jay D. Evans, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD, Nancy Ostiguy, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, Walter S. Sheppard, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, Marla Spivak, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, and Kirk Visscher, University of California, Riverside, CA 8: Formulation makes the poison: Inerts and pollinators. Chris Mullin, Timothy J. Ciarlo, Jing Chen, Wanyi Zhu, Maryann Frazier, and James Frazier, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 8: Draw me a map: Quantifying spatial intersections between honey bees and neonicotinoids. Christian H. Krupke, Brian D. Eitzer 2, and Jeffrey D. Holland, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, 2 Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, New Haven, CT : Reflections from across the pond: European colony losses in perspective. Giles Budge, Food and Environment Research Agency, York, United Kingdom 2: Future challenges to manage bee decline. Mary Purcell-Miramontes, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Washington, DC Plant-Insect Ecosystems (P-IE) Section Symposium: Do Crises Drive Innovation? Insect Resistance Management: Proactive or Reactive? (IRAC U.S. Symposium Series: No. 8) Lecture Hall, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Caydee Savinelli and Graham P. Head 2, Syngenta Crop Protection, Greensboro, NC, 2 Monsanto Company, St. Louis, MO 8:00 Welcoming Remarks 8:0 079 Interaction of insecticide resistance and delayed emergence in the Colorado potato beetle - new challenges for an old pest. Russell L. Groves, and Anders S. Huseth, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI Tuesday November 3 9: The Microsporidia, ubiquitous.. and enigmatic. Leellen Solter, University of Illinois, llinois Natural History Survey, Champaign, IL 9:5 078 Molecular, physiological and behavioral responses of honey bees (Apis mellifera) to Nosema infection. Holly Holt, Kate Aronstein 2, and Christina M. Grozinger, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Weslaco, TX 9:30 Break 9: Using molecular tools for development of field-based tests for bee health. Kate Aronstein, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Weslaco, TX 9: The possible role of viruses in honey bee colony losses. Yanping (Judy) Chen, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bee Research Laboratory, Beltsville, MD, Gennaro DI Prisco, Napoli, Italy, Xuan Zhang, Yunnan Agricultural University, Yunnan, China, and Jay D. Evans, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD 8: Western corn rootworm and Bt maize: A case study illustrating the need for IPM and IRM. Aaron J. Gassmann, Jennifer L. Petzold-Maxwell, Eric H. Clifton, Mike W. Dunbar, Amanda M. Hoffmann, David A. Ingber, and Ryan S. Keweshan, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 8: Deployment of Bt cotton and Bt corn in the agricultural landscape of the southern U.S., opportunities and challenges for strategic resistance management. Randall G. Luttrell, randy. K. C. Allen, Ryan Jackson, and Omaththage P. Perera, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Stoneville, MS 9: Inevitable emergence of insecticide resistance in populations of Asian citrus psyllid, vector of the greening disease pathogen: Current status, mechanisms, and efforts for proactive management. Lukasz, L. Stelinski, Siddharth Tiwari, and Michael E. Rogers, University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL 9: Managing resistance in the complex world of tree fruit IPM. John C. Wise, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 0: Genetic diversity of U.S. honey bee populations and importation of novel germplasm from the Old World. Walter S. Sheppard, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 0: Breeding programs to improve honey bee health. Marla Spivak, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 0: Using extension to understand bee health. John A. Skinner, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 0:55 Break : Honey bee health in East Africa. Harland M. Patch, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA : Native pollinator health in agroecosystems. Anne Averill, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 0 9:50 Break 0: Long-term insecticide resistance management for diamondback moth: Dreaming the impossible dream? Anthony M. Shelton, Cornell University, Geneva, NY 0: Proactive IRM for thrips a case study of onion thrips in onion. Brian A. Nault, and Anthony M. Shelton, Cornell University, Geneva, NY 0: A reactive approach to manage pollen beetle in European winter oilseed rape: Good news, bad news and challenges ahead. Ralf Nauen, and C. T. Zimmer, Bayer CropScience, Monheim, Germany : Are resistant pests more of a threat than new invasive species in ornamentals? Lance S. Osborne, University of Florida, Apopka, FL : Results of a proactive global IRM strategy for

113 Tuesday November 3 Tuesday November 3 diamides. Caydee Savinelli, Syngenta Crop Protection, Greensboro, NC, James C. Adams, Nichino America, Inc., Wilmington, DE, John T. Andaloro, DuPont Crop Protection, Newark, DE, Ralph Bagwell, Bayer CropScience, Research Triangle Park, NC, Robert Senn, Syngenta Crop Protection AG, Basel, Switzerland, Daniel W. Sherrod, DuPont Crop Protection, Memphis, TN, and Russell Slater, Syngenta Crop Protection AG, Basel, Switzerland :45 Concluding Remarks Systematics, Evolution, and Biodiversity (SysEB) Section Symposium: Entomologists Beyond Borders: Hands on Macrophotography to Help Think Globally Ballroom A, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Cheri M. Abraham and Ric Bessin 2, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA, 2 University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 8:00 Welcoming Remarks 8: Introduction to insect macrophotography. Robert K. D. Peterson, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 8: This is not that difficult: Techniques for shooting digital macro-photography images of insects. Marlin E. Rice, pioneer.com, Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., Johnston, IA 9: Approaching the unapproachable: Tips and tricks for photographing live insects in their native habitats. Ted C. MacRae, Monsanto Company, Chesterfield, MO 9: Digital Imagery: Tips, tricks and tools to make impressive insect images. Jocelyn Gill, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 9: Methods of magnification. Thomas Shahan, Norman, OK 0: Photographing insects on a budget. Alexander L. Wild, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 0: Digital image processing: One perspective on organization, correction and retrieval of images. Eugene D. White, Rose Pest Solutions, Troy, MI :5 Concluding Remarks :20 Hands on Workshop Plant-Insect Ecosystems (P-IE) Section Symposium: Bacterial Symbionts Mediating Arthropod Evolutionary Ecology: From Local Interactions to Global Diversity 200 A, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Jennifer A. White, Raul F. Medina 2, and Mariana Mateos 2, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 2 Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 8:5 Introductory Remarks 8: Vertical transmission of the bacterial symbionts conferring ecologically important traits to pea aphids. Ryuichi Koga,2, Xian-Ying Meng, Tsutomu Tsuchida,3, and Takema Fukatsu, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Japan, 2 Yale University, New Haven, CT, 3 University of Toyama, Toyama, Japan 8: Variation in the bacterial gut communities of ants across diets and geographic locations. Jacob A. Russell, Yi Hu, Piotr Lukasik, and Corrie S. Moreau 2, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, 2 Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL 9: Tracking dynamic Rickettsia-whitefly interactions: How a rapidly spreading symbiont influences host biology and plantinsect interactions. Anna G. Himler, Suzanne E. Kelly, Jacqueline E. Bergen, Bree A. Rodriguez, Ling Zhong, David N. Byrne, and Martha S. Hunter, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 9:20 Break 9:40 08 Differential presence of bacteria in insects associated with two plant species. Raul F. Medina, Aaron M. Dickey 2, Punya Nachappa, and Cecilia Tamborindeguy, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Fort Pierce, FL 0: Distribution of spiroplasma-mediated protection against parasitoids in Drosophila. Mariana Mateos, tamu.edu, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 0: Factors influencing the maintenance of a defensive symbiosis in aphids. Kerry M. Oliver, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 0:40 Break 0: Geographic variation in symbiotic bacteria associated with the cotton fleahopper. Josephine Antwi, edu, Mariana Mateos, Greg Sword, and Raul F. Medina, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX :5 085 Evolutionary and ecological consequences of a rapid endosymbiont spread. Tamara Haselkorn, Tom Brekke, Robert Unckless, Lisa Boelio, Finn Hamilton 2, Sarah Cockburn 2, Steve Perlman 2, and John Jaenike, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, 2 University of Victoria, Victoria, B.C, Canada : Global variation and local host plant associations of bacterial symbionts of an invasive aphid. Jennifer A. White, and Cristina M. Brady, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY :55 Concluding Remarks Plant-Insect Ecosystems (P-IE) Section Symposium: Biofuel Crop Entomology and Pest Management: Global, National and Local Developments Ballroom F, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Gregg S. Nuessly and G. David Buntin 2, University of Florida, Belle Glade, FL, 2 University of Georgia, Griffin, GA 8:30 Introductory Remarks

114 Tuesday November 3 8: Insects in bioenergy feedstocks: Back to the basics. Jeffrey D. Bradshaw, Jarrad Prasifka 2, Michael E. Gray 3, Kyle G. Koch 4, and Tiffany M. Heng-Moss 4, University of Nebraska, Scottsbluff, NE, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Fargo, ND, 3 University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, 4 University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 9: A case for entomology as a copartner with agronomy in the evaulation of biofuel crops: Sweet sorghum in Florida. Gregg S. Nuessly, Ronald H. Cherry, Hardev Sandhu, Nicholas Larsen, and Yueguang Wang 2, University of Florida, Belle Glade, FL, 2 University of Idaho, Aberdeen, ID 9: Field screening of sweet sorghum inbred lines and experimental hybrids for insect resistance. Xinzhi Ni, ars.usda.gov, William F. Anderson, and Joseph E. Knoll 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Tifton, GA, 2 University of Georgia, Tifton, GA Moderator and Organizer: Kevin Hackett, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD 8: Controlling insects with pathogens: It s harder than you think. Phyllis A. W. Martin, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD 8: Insect neuropeptides and pest management. Ronald J. Nachman, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, College Station, TX 9: USDA ARS accomplishments in weed biocontrol. John Goolsby, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Weslaco, TX 9: ARS accomplishments in insect biocontrol. Walker Jones, and Edgar G. King, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Stoneville, MS Tuesday November 3 9: Insect and disease pests affecting conventional and bio-energy sugarcane and sorghum cultivars in the multi-use landscapes of the Gulf Coast. T. E. Reagan, B. E. Wilson, lsu.edu, J. M. Beuzelin 2, M. T. VanWeelden, and M. O. Way 3, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA, 2 Louisiana State University AgCenter, Alexandria, LA, 3 Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Beaumont, TX 0:00 Break 0:5 082 Insects associated with winter legume cover crops in a sorghum for bio-fuel and cotton rotation system. Dawn M. Olson, Ted Webster, Brian Scully, Tim Strickland, Richard Davis, and William F. Anderson, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Tifton, GA 0: Challenges of evaluating and integrating natural enemy impacts on pests of bioenergy crops at a landscape level. Brian P. McCornack, Ximena Cibils- Stewart, Kristopher L. Giles 2, James R. Hagler 3, Timothy J. Kring 4, S. L. Donelson 2, Kody Mullins 2, Casi N. Jessie 2, W. Jessie 2, and N. Bradford 2, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 2 Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, 3 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Maricopa, AZ, 4 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 0: Hybrid poplars: A multiple use woody plant. John J. Brown, R. Andrew Rodstrom 2, A. Del Pozo 3, Jack C. Niedbala, Eugene R. Hannon 4, Neal T. Kittelson 5, Douglas B. Walsh 6, John D. Stark 7, and Richard S. Zack, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, 2 GreenWood Resources, Inc., Boardman, OR, 3 North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, 4 Fresno County, Fresno, CA, 5 Idaho Department of Lands, Coeur d Alene, ID, 6 Washington State University, Prosser, WA, 7 Washington State University, Puyallup, WA 9: National prosperity and the U.S. Cattle Fever Tick Eradication Program: A historical perspective. Adalberto Perez de Leon, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kerrville, TX 0: The Screwworm Eradication Program: From an unlikely dream to an outstanding reality. S. R. Skoda, ars.usda.gov, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kerrville, TX 0: Too many D s: USDA and pesticides. Daniel A. Strickman, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD Systematics, Evolution, and Biodiversity (SysEB) Section Symposium: From Voucher Specimen to Climate Change: The Merging of Systematics and Ecology 200 B, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Christiane Weirauch and John M. Heraty, University of California, Riverside, CA 8: Introduction and Tri-Trophic Database (TTD) ADBC project. Christiane Weirauch, University of California, Riverside, CA 8: Herbarium specimen digitization and workflows. Melissa Tulig, New York Botanical Garden, New York, NY 9: Update from the idigbio HUB. Deborah Paul, fsu.edu, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL : Insect biodiversity and ecosystem services in bioenergy landscapes: Lessons from a five-year study. Doug A. Landis, Benjamin Werling, Rufus Isaacs, Julianna Tuell, Ashley Bennett, Claudio Gratton 2, Timmothy D. Meehan 2, and Heidi Liere 2, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 2 University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI :35 Concluding Remarks Plant-Insect Ecosystems (P-IE) Section Symposium: USDA Global Science: 50 Years of Entomology Ballroom B, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) 9: Range-wide, species-specific, ecological and historical biogeography: Getting the concepts right in ecological niche modeling and species distribution modeling. A. Townsend Peterson, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 9:50 Break 0: Light brown apple moth: Species distribution models and climate change. Nicholas J. Mills, University of California, Berkeley, CA 0: From museum trays to niche modeling: Predicting habitat shifts in an endangered species. R. A. Redak, richard. Kristine Preston, and John Rotenberry, University of California, Riverside, CA 2

115 Tuesday November 3 Tuesday November 3 0: Climate change and the risk of vector-borne diseases in North America. Sahotra Sarkar, Teresa Feria 2, Blake Sissel, Chissa-Louise Rivaldi, and Victor Sanchez-Cordero 3, University of Texas, Austin, TX, 2 University of Texas, Pan American, Edinburg, TX, 3 Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México, México City, México : Discussion. John M. Heraty, University of California, Riverside, CA Member Symposium: Advances in Pest Management for Turfgrass and Ornamentals 200 E, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: David W. Held and Clifford S. Sadof 2, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, 2 Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8: Effects of intraguild predation and leaf domatia on spider mite outbreaks on cultivated maples in nurseries. Julia Prado, Steven D. Frank 2, and Clifford S. Sadof, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, 2 North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 8:8 084 Acoustic, visual, and volatile cues can improve performance of traps for ambrosia beetles (Xylosandrus spp.) in nurseries. Austin Gorzlancyk, David W. Held, Jaeyoung Jeong, Dong-Joo Kim, Christopher M. Ranger 2, and Michael E. Reding 2, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Wooster, OH 8: Effects of nursery production practices on resource allocation patterns, insect herbivory, and carbon sequestration trajectories of hybrid elm and river birch in urban environments. Alejandro Chiriboga, and Daniel A. Herms, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH 8: Diversity of wood-boring beetles at three diverse habitats. Juang-Horng Chong, Clemson University, Florence, SC 9: The importance of soil moisture and the treatment of surrounding trees in protecting individual trees from emerald ash borer. David Smitley, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 9: Hot in the city: Urban heat affects scale insect abundance and ecology. Emily K. Meineke, com, and Steven D. Frank, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 9: Two tropical invasive ortheziid scales: The citrus orthezia, Praelongorthezia praelonga (Douglas), and the lantana bug, Insignorthezia insignis (Browne) (Hemiptera: Ortheziidae), a threat to ornamental plants. Demian Takumasa Kondo, Corporacion Colombiana de Investig Agropecuaria, Palmira, Colombia 9: Effects of calico scale management programs on spider mite outbreaks on urban honeylocust trees. Adam Witte, Carlos Quesada, and Clifford S. Sadof, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 0: Royal palm bug control. A. D. Ali, Davey Tree Expert Co., Alva, FL, and Doug Caldwell, University of Florida, Naples, FL 0:8 Break 0: Potential of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) for growth promotion and pest management in bermudagrass. R. Murphey Coy, David W. Held, and Joseph Kloepper, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 0: Development of an IPM program for the tropical sod webworm, Herpetogramma phaeopteralis Guenée (Lepidoptera: Crambidae: Spilomelinae). Nastaran Tofangsazi, Eileen A. Buss 2, Robert L. Meagher 3, Laurie E. Trenholm 2, and Steven Arthurs, University of Florida, Apopka, FL, 2 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 3 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL 0: The cryptic behavior of the hunting billbug (Sphenophorus venatus vestitus) in warm season turfgrass. Diane E. Silcox, and Rick Brandenburg, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC : Ecology and chemical control of the sugarcane beetle, Euetheola humilis (Burmeister). Terri Hoctor, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, and Rick Brandenburg, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC : Evaluation of bentgrasses species and cultivars for resistance/tolerance to annual bluegrass weevil, Listronotus maculicollis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Olga Kostromytska, Cesar Saona-Rodriguez, and Albrecht Koppenhöfer, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ : Comparative ecotoxicology of turf insecticides: Impacts on pollinators, natural enemies, and ecosystem services. Jonathan L. Larson, Carl T. Redmond, and Daniel A. Potter, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY : Naturalized areas, insect biodiversity, and ecosystem services for biocontrol on golf courses. Emily K. Dobbs, and Daniel A. Potter, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 2:3 Concluding Remarks Member Symposium: Asian Citrus Psyllid and Huanglonbing : Devastating Pest-Disease Complex and Threat to Citrus Production Worldwide Salon B (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderators and Organizers: Jawwad A. Qureshi and Philip A. Stansly, University of Florida, Immokalee, FL 8:00 Welcoming Remarks 8: Key aspects of the interaction between Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, the causal agent of huanglongbing, and its insect vector. Kirsten S. Pelz-Stelinski, University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL 8: Biological control to reduce Asian citrus psyllid and huanglongbing in Florida. Jawwad A. Qureshi, University of Florida, Immokalee, FL 8: Classical biocontrol of Asian citrus psyllid in California with parasitoids from Pakistan. Mark S. Hoddle, edu, University of California, Riverside, CA 9: Integrated management of Asian citrus psyllid to 3

116 Tuesday November 3 Tuesday November 3 reduce huanglongbing in Florida. Philip A. Stansly, edu, University of Florida, Immokalee, FL 9: Citrus Health Management Areas: Area-wide approach to managing the Asian citrus psyllid in Florida. Michael E. Rogers, University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL 9:45 Break 0: Factors affecting population fluctuations of Asian citrus psyllid in commercial citrus groves in Texas. Mamoudou Setamou, Texas A&M University, Weslaco, TX 0: Research advances for management of Asian citrus psyllid and huanglongbing in Mexico. J. Isabel López-Arroyo, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, General Terán, México 0: Huanglongbing and Asian citrus psyllid management in Brazil: Current situation and prospects. Pedro Takao Yamamoto, Universidade of São Paulo, Piracicaba, Brazil : Asian citrus psyllid occurrence and management in China history and current status. Yulu Xia, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC : A national collaboration to achieve a practical outcome: Interfering with psyllid transmission of huanglongbing. Robert G. Shatters, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Fort Pierce, FL :40 Discussion Member Symposium: Biology and Management of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid in North America (Part ) Ballroom C, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Albert E. Mayfield and Shimat V. Joseph 2, USDA, Forest Service, Asheville, NC, 2 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Winchester, VA 8:00 Welcoming Remarks 8: The evolutionary history of hemlock woolly adelgids and their hemlock hosts. Nathan Havill, USDA, Forest Service, Hamden, CT 8: Population genetic structure and diversity in eastern hemlock: Implications for gene conservation. Robert M. Jetton, Kevin M. Potter 2, Bill Dvorak, Valerie Hipkins 3, and J. Rusty Rhea 4, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, 2 North Carolina State University, Research Triangle Park, NC, 3 USDA, Forest Service, Placerville, CA, 4 USDA, Forest Service, Asheville, NC 8: Population dynamics of hemlock woolly adelgid. Joseph S. Elkinton, R. Talbot Trotter 2, and Anne Paradis, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, 2 USDA, Forest Service, Hamden, CT 9: When one is not a lonely number: Initial colonization dynamics of the hemlock woolly adelgid. Patrick C. Tobin, and Richard M. Turcotte, USDA, Forest Service, Morgantown, WV 4 9: Quantifying the biodiversity impacts of the invasive hemlock woolly adelgid: Options for eastern forests. R. Talbot Trotter, Nathan Havill, and Alexander Evans 2, USDA, Forest Service, Hamden, CT, 2 Forest Guild, Santa Fe, NM 9:43 Break 9: Hemlock woolly adelgid herbivory in southern Appalachian forest landscapes: Effects on invasive species introduction and establishment. Robert N. Coulson, tamu.edu, Andrew Birt, and Maria D. Tchakerian, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 0: Why is adelgid lethal to hemlocks? Effects of hemlock woolly adelgid and elongate hemlock scale on hemlock physiology. Evan L. Preisser, Sara Gomez, Liahna Gonda- King, and Laura Radville 2, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI, 2 Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 0: Identifying mechanisms of resistance of hemlock to the hemlock woolly adelgid. Kelly F. Oten, Ben C. Smith 2, Laura N. Rivera, J. C. Domec, Mary Talley, John Frampton, and Fred P. Hain, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, 2 North Carolina State University, Waynesville, NC 0: Hemlock woolly adelgid suppression with neonicotinoid insecticides in the southeastern U.S. S. Kristine Braman, and Jim Quick, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA : Managing hemlock woolly adelgid using imidacloprid: An eight-year study on the translocation, persistence, metabolite production, and factors that influence chemical movement. Carla I. Coots, Paris L. Lambdin, Jerome F. Grant, and J. Rusty Rhea 2, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2 USDA, Forest Service, Asheville, NC : Management of hemlock woolly adelgid in the Great Smoky Mountains. R. Jesse Webster, National Park Service, Gatlinburg, TN :58 Concluding Remarks Member Symposium: Future of Amenity Trees Salon C (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderators and Organizers: David L. Cox, Deborah G. McCullough 2, and Don Grosman 3, Syngenta Crop Protection, Madera, CA, 2 Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 3 Texas Forest Service, Lufkin, TX 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8: Amenity trees, their benefit and value in urban landscapes. Thomas J. Brandeis, Christopher Oswalt, and Francisco J. Escobedo 2, USDA, Forest Service, Knoxville, TN, 2 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 8: Invasive forest pests: Historical patterns and future trends. Andrew M. Liebhold, USDA, Forest Service, Morgantown, WV 8: Economics of dealing with protecting and removing infested amenity trees. Robert G. Haight, USDA, Forest Service, St. Paul, MN 9: Thousand cankers disease Geosmithia morbida, an example of lethal collaboration between insects and pathogens of amenity trees. Whitney Cranshaw,

117 Tuesday November 3 Tuesday November 3 edu, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 9: Larvae or life - what choices do we have when lepidopteran larvae threaten lives of vertebrates? Peter Wyss, peter. Syngenta Crop Protection, Basel, Switzerland, and David L. Cox, Syngenta Crop Protection, Madera, CA 0:0 Break 0: They re here, they re bad, now what? New options for dealing with invasive forest pests. Deborah G. McCullough, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, and Therese M. Poland, USDA, Forest Service, East Lansing, MI 0: Exploiting an arms race: Genetic selection of ash (Fraxinus) and birch (Betula) to minimize tree mortality due to insects. Daniel A. Herms, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH : Saving amenity trees among the forest - when bark beetles don t know their boundaries. Don Grosman, tfs.tamu.edu, Texas Forest Service, Lufkin, TX, Christopher J. Fettig, USDA, Forest Service, Davis, CA, Stephen R. Clarke, USDA, Forest Service, Lufkin, TX, and David L. Cox, Syngenta Crop Protection, Madera, CA :45 Concluding Remarks Member Symposium: Global Patterns in Insect Morphometrics 30 B, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Matan Shelomi, University of California, Davis, CA 9:00 Welcoming Remarks 9: Development time, seasonality, and body size clines in insects: A general explanation? Michael E. Dillon, uwyo.edu, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, and Melanie Frazier, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Newport, OR 9: Physiological synergism and antagonism in the evolution of insect body size. Goggy Davidowitz, arizona.edu, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 9: Machine vision in anatomy-based insect identification and geolocation. Colin Favret, University de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada 0: Body size and insect invasions: Ladybugs as a case study. Edward W. Evans, Utah State University, Logan, UT 0: Oxygen availability as a factor in determining insect body and tracheal system size. Jon F. Harrison, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ Member Symposium: Microbe-Insect Interactions in Decomposition and Disease Ecology 300 B, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Tawni L. Crippen and Jeffery K. Tomberlin 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, College Station, TX, 2 Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 8:00 Welcoming Remarks 8: Beetles, bacteria and broilers: An arena for pathogen dispersal. Tawni L. Crippen, Cynthia L. Sheffield, Longyu Zheng 2, Jesus F. Esquivel, Toni L. Poole, and Jeffery K. Tomberlin 3, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, College Station, TX, 2 Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, China, 3 Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 8:7 089 Plant-insect-microbe infection paradigm: Cotton, stink bugs and opportunistic pathogens. Jesus F. Esquivel, jesus. Enrique Medrano, and Lori Hinze, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, College Station, TX 8: Insect symbiosis in psyllids: A new tool for understanding pathogen transmission. Blake R. Bextine, Blake_ University of Texas, Tyler, TX 8: Ecology of food-borne pathogens: Do insects matter? Ludek Zurek, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 9: Bacterial deposition by hemipterans: One size does not fit all. Astri Wayadande, and Jacqueline Fletcher, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 9: Host-microbe interactions in honey bee colonies. Jay D. Evans, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD 9: Soil invertebrate-microbe interactions during plant litter decomposition. Kyle Wickings, and Stuart Grandy, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 9:47 Break 0:02 Introductory Remarks 0: Microbes, maggots and multiplicity: Biotic and abiotic complexities of carrion decomposition. M. Eric Benbow, Jeffery K. Tomberlin 2, Tawni L. Crippen 3, Aaron M. Tarone 2, Thomas Wood 4, Helene N. LeBlanc 5, and Jennifer L. Pechal, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH, 2 Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 3 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, College Station, TX, 4 Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 5 University of Ontario, Institute of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario, Canada 0: Induced release of a plant-defense volatile deceptively attracts insect vectors to plants infected with a bacterial pathogen. Lukasz, L. Stelinski, edu, Rajinder Mann, Jared G. Ali, Sara Lynn Hermann, Siddharth Tiwari, Kirsten S. Pelz-Stelinski, and Hans T. Alborn 2, Center, University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, 2 Insect Chemistry Unit, Gainesville, FL 0: Fear of predation alters the decomposition of leaf litter via inputs of grasshopper carcasses. Michael Strickland, Dror Hawlena 2, Mark Bradford, and Oswald Schmitz, Yale University, New Haven, CT, 2 Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel 0: Bacterial diversity associated with flies of forensic importance. Baneshwar Singh, Tawni L. Crippen 2, Aaron M. Tarone, M. Eric Benbow 3, Longyu Zheng 4, Ziniu Yu 4, Adrienne L. Brundage, Andrew Fields 5, Micah Flores, Scot E. Dowd 6, Thomas Wood 7, and Jeffery K. Tomberlin, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, College Station, TX, 3 University of Dayton, Dayton, OH, 4 Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, China, 5 Harvard 5

118 Tuesday November 3 Tuesday November 3 University, Cambridge, MA, 6 Research and Testing Laboratories, Lubbock, TX, 7 Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA : Bacteria and blow fly interactions throughout vertebrate decomposition. Jennifer L. Pechal, com, M. Eric Benbow, Tawni L. Crippen 2, Aaron M. Tarone 3, and Jeffery K. Tomberlin 3, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, College Station, TX, 3 Texas A&M University, College Station, TX : Olfactory stimuli associated with decomposing vertebrates and their role in the attraction of the blowfly, Calliphora vomitoria. Helene N. LeBlanc, University of Ontario, Oshawa, Ontario, Canada : Behavioral and community analyses of bacteria associated with Lucilia species. Aaron M. Tarone, ag.tamu.edu, Baneshwar Singh, Tawni L. Crippen 2, Longyu Zheng 3, Andrew Fields 4, Qun Ma, Thomas Wood 5, Scot E. Dowd 6, Micah Flores, and Jeffery K. Tomberlin, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, College Station, TX, 3 Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, China, 4 Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 5 Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 6 Research and Testing Laboratories, Lubbock, TX :50 Discussion Member Symposium: Proceeding Along the IPM Continuum: Developing Multifaceted Approaches for Invasive Species LeConte (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderators and Organizers: Jimmy Klick and Tracy C. Leskey 2, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kearneysville, WV 8:00 Welcoming Remarks 8: Optimizing a bait for Drosophila suzukii to aid in monitoring, decision making and management. Joe Kleiber, Jana C. Lee 2, Michael Qian, D. Max Suckling 3, C. Rikard Unelius 3, and Denny Bruck 2, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Corvallis, OR, 3 New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Limited, Auckland, New Zealand 8: Preventative management and landscape ecology of Drosophila suzukii. Amy J. Dreves, Amanda Ohrn, Denny Bruck 2, and Jana C. Lee 2, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Corvallis, OR 8: Reducing Drosophila suzukii management challenges: Alternatives to insecticide cover sprays. Jimmy Klick, oregonstate.edu, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, Wei Q. Yang, North Willamette Research and Extension Center, Aurora, OR, and Denny Bruck, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Corvallis, OR 8: Quantifying the effect of pesticide resistance management: A multifaceted approach. Kelly A. Hamby, J. C. Chiu, Denny Bruck 2, Peter W. Shearer 3, Lynell K. Tanigoshi 4, and Frank G. Zalom, University of California, Davis, CA, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Corvallis, OR, 3 Oregon State University, Hood River, OR, 4 Washington State University, Mt. Vernon, WA Preston H. Brown, Peter W. Shearer, Howard M. A. Thistlewood 2, and Jeffrey C. Miller 3, Oregon State University, Hood River, OR, 2 Agriculture and Agri- Food Canada, North Summerland, British Columbia, Canada, 3 Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 9: Management of spotted wing drosophila in west coast sweet cherries: A short ride on the IPM continuum. Elizabeth H. Beers, Washington State University, Wenatchee, WA, Peter W. Shearer, Oregon State University, Hood River, OR, and Robert A. Van Steenwyk, University of California, Berkeley, CA 9:53 Break 0: Distribution, impact, and management of invasive pests of fruit in the southeastern U.S. Hannah J. Burrack, hannah_ North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, Dan L. Horton, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, James F. Price, University of Florida, Wimauma, FL, J. Powell Smith, Clemson University, Lexington, SC, Douglas G. Pfeiffer, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, and Donn T. Johnson, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 0:26 09 Distribution of brown marmorated stink bug injury within mid-atlantic apple orchards. J. Christopher Bergh, Shimat V. Joseph, Tracy C. Leskey 2, Dean Polk 3, Greg Krawczyk 4, Bryan Butler 5, and Starker E. Wright 2, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Winchester, VA, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kearneysville, WV, 3 Rutgers University, Chatsworth, NJ, 4 Pennsylvania State University, Biglerville, PA, 5 University of Maryland, Westminster, MD 0: Season-long patterns of attraction of brown marmorated stink bug to pheromone lures in orchard agroecosystems. Tracy C. Leskey, Starker E. Wright, Ashot Khrimian 2, Aijun Zhang 2, and Donald C. Weber 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kearneysville, WV, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD : Influence of winter cover crops and flowering borders on brown marmorated stink bug mortality. Cerruti Hooks, Armando Rosario-Lebron, Jermaine Hinds, and Emily Zobel, University of Maryland, College Park, MD : Alternative management options for the brown marmorated stink bug in fruit orchards. Greg Krawczyk, psu.edu, Larry A. Hull, and David J. Biddinger, Pennsylvania State University, Biglerville, PA : Evaluation of fruit damage in different pepper varieties due to feeding by the brown marmorated stink bug. George C. Hamilton, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, Galen P. Dively, University of Maryland, College Park Maryland, MD, Thomas P. Kuhar, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, and Joanne Whalen, University of Delaware, Newark, DE :56 Concluding Remarks Member Symposium: Red Palm Weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus: What s Next? Ballroom G, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Aziz M. Ajlan and Khalid Alhudaib, King Faisal University, Hofuf, Al-Hassa, Saudi Arabia 9: Pachycrepoideus vindemmiae: A potential biological control agent of spotted wing drosophilia, Drosophila suzukii. 6 8: Artificial rearing of red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus. Annie Thomas, St.

119 Tuesday November 3 Tuesday November 3 Joseph College for Women, Kerala, India, and C. R. M. Nair, PG and Research, Kerala, India 8: Is the dipping method with effective insecticides a suitable way to control the red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, in date palm offshoots? M. M. Abo-El-Saad, King Faisal University, Al-Hassa, Saudi Arabia 8: Analysis of sounds produced by first-instar red palm weevil in date palm fronds. Richard W. Mankin, ars.usda.gov, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL, and Nathan J. Herrick, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL 9: Palm weevils of the genus Rhynchophorus (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae): Emerging threats to cultivated palms in the United States and abroad. Muhammad Haseeb, Muhammad. and Moses T. K. Kairo, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL 9: Functional role of neuropeptide Leucokinin II in growth inhibition of red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus. Mona Al-Dawsary, Salman Bin Abdul Aziz University, Al-Kharj, Saudi Arabia 9: Genetic diversity of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus population from Saudi Arabia and India. Khalid Alhudaib, Aziz M. Ajlan, and J. R. Faleiro, King Faisal University, Al-Hassa, Saudi Arabia 0:00 Break 0: Dispersal characteristics of red palm weevil: Flight studies in the field and lab. Mark S. Hoddle, University of California, Riverside, CA 0: Olfactometer assays to evaluate the response of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier) to the aggregation pheromone. J. R. Faleiro, King Faisal University, Al-Hassa, Saudi Arabia, and H. A. F. El-Shafie, Date Palm Research Centre of Excellence, Al-Hassa, Saudi Arabia 0: Effect of zinc sulfate against the red palm weevil, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, with reference to their histological changes on the larval midgut and adult reproductive system. Zamzam M. Al-Dhafar, Dammam University, Dammam, Saudi Arabia, and Aziza Sharaby, National Research Center, Cairo, Egypt : Red palm weevil chemical treatments on date palms in Saudi Arabia: Results of extensive experimentations. Abdulrahman Saad Aldawood, Fahad Alsagan 2, Hani Altuwariqi 2, Amer Almuteri 2, and Khawaja Ghulam Rasool, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, 2 Ministry of Agriculture, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia : Semiochemical based management of the red palm weevil. Lyndsie Stoltman, and Agenor Mafra-Neto, ISCA Technologies, Inc., Riverside, CA : Challenges in control of red palm weevil in agricultural and horticultural areas. Victoria Soroker, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel Member Symposium: Social Networks: The Mechanistic Basis and Evolution of Social Traits 200 C, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Sandra M. Rehan, Timothy A. Linksvayer, and Svjetlana Vojvodic 2, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 2 University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8: Connecting network structure to function in social and social-insect networks. Jennifer H. Fewell, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 8: Structural properties, functional outcomes and mechanistic basis of social networks in insect colonies. Dhruba Naug, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 8: Interaction networks and the foraging ecology of harvester ants (Pogonomyrmex barbatus). Deborah M. Gordon, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 8: The effects of colony size on interaction networks and division of labor in ants. Nathalie Stroeymeyt, Nathalie. University de Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland 9: Subterranean ant nest architecture: How do they do it? Walter R. Tschinkel, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 9: Chitin-out and chitin-in: Modeling how information flow affects division of labor. Sean O Donnell, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 9: Pathogen effects on behavioural networks and immune gene expression in ant societies. Line Ugelvig, Institute of Science and Technology Austria, Klosterneuburg, Austria 9:54 Break 0: The adaptive evolution of individual position in social networks. Edmund D. Brodie III, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 0: Colony level gene regulatory networks. Timothy A. Linksvayer, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 0: Genetic and behavioural basis of ant caste regulation. Sandra M. Rehan, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 0: The role of genotype in self organizing processes of task allocation in honey bees. Brian Johnson, edu, University of California, Davis, CA : Building busier bees with genetic diversity. Heather Mattila, Wellesley College, Wellesley, MA : The interplay of genes and ecology in the social behavior of a halictid bee. Sarah D. Kocher, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA : What drives the evolution of eusociality in insects? Combining the evidence. Juergen Liebig, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 7

120 Tuesday November 3 Tuesday November 3 Ten-Minute Papers, MUVE Section: Termites, Cockroaches, and Stored Products 200 D, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Carrie Owens and Frank H. Arthur 2, City of New Orleans Mosquito and Termite Control Board, New Orleans, LA, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Manhattan, KS 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8: Virtual approaches used to teach introductory entomology courses. Roger E. Gold, Janis Reed, and Bradley N. Metz, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 8: Innovative methods for evaluating ProFume gas fumigant (sulfuryl fluoride) for fumigation of cereal bunkers in Australia to control stored grain pests. Ellen Thoms, dow.com, Dow AgroSciences, Gainesville, FL, and Robert Annetts, Dow AgroSciences, Toowoomba, Australia 8: Comparative protozoacidal efficacy of E. cammeldulensis, D. sissoo and A. arabica extracts on entozoic flagellates of Coptotermes heimi and Heterotermes indicola. Naveeda A. Qureshi, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan 8: Effect of temperature on population genetic and colony breeding structure of Reticulitermes flavipes. Abdul Hafiz Ab Majid, and Shripat T. Kamble, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 8: Aggressive interactions among Formosan subterranean termite colonies (Coptotermes formosanus). Mary Cornelius, Mary. USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD, and Erin Gallatin, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, New Orleans, LA 9: Ability of Formosan subterranean termite (Coptotermes formosanus) colonies to survive prolonged inundation. Carrie Owens, Nan-Yao Su 2, and Claudia Riegel, City of New Orleans Mosquito and Termite Control Board, New Orleans, LA, 2 University of Florida, Davie, FL 9: Effect of aging for five years on a durable bait: Consumption by Reticulitermes flavipes (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) and subsequent mortality. Ronda L. Hamm, Joe E. Eger 2, Eva Chin-Heady, Joe J. DeMark 3, and Jackie A. Lee 4, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN, 2 Dow AgroSciences, Tampa, FL, 3 Dow AgroSciences, Fayetteville, AR, 4 Dow AgroSciences, Lubbock, TX 0: Efficacy of Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschnikoff) Sorokin (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) and diatomaceous earth against Periplaneta americana L. (Dictyoptera: Blattidae). Waqas Wakil, M. Usman Ghazanfar 2, Muhammad Asim, and Muhammad Yasin, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Punjab, Pakistan, 2 University of Sargodha, Sargodha, Punjab, Pakistan 0: Nest architecture of the wood-feeding cockroach Cryptocercus wrighti. Aaron Mullins, Paul Bardunias 2, and Nan-Yao Su 2, University of Florida, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, 2 University of Florida, Davie, FL 0: The Turkestan cockroach (Blatta lateralis) - an emerging urban pest in the Southwest. Michael K. Rust, michael. and Tina Kim, University of California, Riverside, CA 0: Assessing effects of esfenfalerate aerosol applications on resident populations of Tribolium castaneum (Herbst), the red flour beetle. Frank H. Arthur, James F. Campbell, Emily A. Fontenot 2, and Michael D. Toews 3, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Manhattan, KS, 2 Insect Pest Control Laboratory, Vienna, Austria, 3 University of Georgia, Tifton, GA : Efficacy of Arilon 0.005% against Trogoderma variabile (Coleoptera: Dermestidae). R. S. Mann, edu, and Stephen A. Kells, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN : The efficacy of methoprene + pyrethrin aerosols on Tribolium castaneum eggs. Angela M. Tucker, Frank H. Arthur 2, James F. Campbell 2, and Kun-Yan Zhu, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Manhattan, KS : Analysis of the responses of termites to tunnel irregularity. Sook Jung Ku, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, Kangwon, South Korea, Wonju Jeon, National Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Daejeon, South Korea, Nan-Yao Su, University of Florida, Davie, FL, and Sang- Hee Lee, National Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Daeieon, Chungnam, South Korea :42 Concluding Remarks Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section: Biological Control Summit (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderators: Michael Scott Crossley and Theresa M. Cira 2, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 2 University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 9: An introduction of a new post construction termiticide. Reid M. Ipser, and Dina Richman, FMC Corporation, Philadelphia, PA 9:39 Break 9: Elimination of Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki colonies in New Orleans using Recruit HD in above ground bait stations. Joe J. DeMark, Barry P. Yokum 2, Michelle S. Smith 3, and Claudia Riegel 2, Dow AgroSciences, Fayetteville, AR, 2 City of New Orleans Mosquito and Termite Control Board, New Orleans, LA, 3 Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN 0: Comparative efficacy and costs of total release foggers and baits in relation to insecticide resistance and pesticide residues. Coby Schal, and Richard G. Santangelo, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 8 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8: Why parasitize only a third of the available hosts? Saskya van Nouhuys, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland 8: Novel tri-trophic interactions: Exotic food plant effects on parasitic wasps. Tim Engelkes, University of California, Berkeley, CA 8: Natural parasitism of fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) in commercial sweet corn production in south Florida. Robert L. Meagher, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL 8: Seeing pink: The latest on mass rearing of Coleomegilla maculata. Margaret L. Allen, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Stoneville, MS

121 Tuesday November 3 Tuesday November 3 8: Nutritional ecology of lady beetles in culture: Twospotted spider mite is palatable but poor prey for an omnivorous predator Coleomegilla maculata. Eric W. Riddick, usda.gov, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Stoneville, MS 9: Influence of supplemental food sources on predatory mites (Amblyseius swirskii and Neoseiulus cucumeris) and their control efficacy for western flower thrips. Les Shipp, agr.gc.ca, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Harrow, Ontario, Canada, Julie Faucher Delisle, University de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada, Jacques Brodeur, Institut de Recherche en Biologie Végétale, Montréal, Québec, Canada, and Óscar Mollá Hernández, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Agrarias, Valencia, Spain 9: Developing a biologically-based IPM program for western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) in greenhouse floriculture. Michael Brownbridge, vinelandresearch.com, Taro Saito, and Paul Cote, Vineland Research and Innovation Centre, Vineland Station, Ontario, Canada 9:27 Break 9: Biology and efficacy of Aprostocetus (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) as a parasitoid of the blueberry gall midge complex: Dasineura oxycoccana Johnson and Prodiplosis vaccinii (Felt) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae). Blair Sampson, gov, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Poplarville, MS, and Oscar E. Liburd, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 9: The effects of intraguild predation of Lysiphlebus testaceipes by Chrysoperla rufilabris larvae. Casi N. Jessie, casi. Kristopher L. Giles, Kody Mullins, and W. Jessie, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 0: Evaluating risk to native Uroleucon aphids from predation by non-native lady beetles. Louis S. Hesler, ars.usda.gov, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Brookings, SD 0: Can we predict biocontrol services on cereal aphid populations in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) based on landscape diversity? Wendy A. Johnson, and Brian P. McCornack, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 0: Diversified bioenergy plantings to enhance ecosystems services: Biological control of soybean aphid. Julie A. Peterson, James O. Eckberg, Gregg A. Johnson, and George E. Heimpel, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 0: Fungal endophytes and their potential for biocontrol in cotton. Greg Sword, Maria Julissa Ek- Ramos, Diana Castillo Lopez, Lauren Kalns, Wenqing Zhou, and Cesar Valencia, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 0: Exploiting entomopathogenic nematodes sense of smell and manipulation of belowground trophic interactions enhance the control of the western corn rootworm. Ivan Hiltpold, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, Ted C. J. Turlings, University of Neuchatel, Neuchatel, Switzerland, and Bruce E. Hibbard, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Columbia, MO : Prospects for classical biological control of the bean plataspid or kudzu bug (Megacopta cribraria). Walker Jones, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Stoneville, MS, John R. Ruberson, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, and Jeremy K. Greene, Clemson University, Blackville, SC : Effects of biological control of the invasive weed Persicaria perfoliata by the Asian weevil, Rhinoncomimus latipes. Matthew S. Swain, Ray S. Williams, and Derick Poindexter, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC : Australia s weed biocontrol where to now? William A. Palmer, Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia :42 Concluding Remarks Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section: Environmental Entomology 300 D, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Ram B. Shrestha and C. Michael Smith 2, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Lubbock, TX, 2 Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8: Improving surface water quality through pesticide education and outreach. Brian Bret, Dow AgroSciences, Roseville, CA, and Nick Poletika, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN 8: Dragonflies associated with small farm dams in the Accra Plains. Angela Adjei, University of Ghana, Legon, Accra, Ghana 8: Long-term changes in the abundance of red imported fire ants and the frequency of polygyne colonies. Sanford D. Porter, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL 8: Comparing single and multiple in-season measurements as indicators of at-harvest cotton boll damage caused by verde plant bug. Michael J. Brewer, edu, Darwin J. Anderson, and J. Scott Armstrong 2, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Corpus Christi, TX, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Weslaco, TX 8: Effect of temperature on development and life table of Dinarmus basalis (Rondani) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae). Agnes Thomas-Odjo, Universite de Parakou, Parakou, Benin, Charles Gaspar, Universite de Liege, Gembloux, Belgium, and Francoise Djibode Favi, Virginia State University, Petersburg, VA 9: The effect of soil moisture and western corn rootworm on maize performance. Mervat A. B. Mahmoud, missouri.edu, Robert E. Sharp, Melvin J. Oliver, and Bruce E. Hibbard 2, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Columbia, MO 9: Changes of a mutualistic network over time and its influence on outcomes of interactions. Kleber Del-Claro, ufu.br and Denise Lange, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, Minas Gerais, Brazil 9:26 Break 9: Response of the aphid specialist Uroleucon nigrotuberculatum to clones of Solidago altissima growing at different elevations. Ray S. Williams, Megan A. Avakian, and Jessica M. Howells, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC 9: How do farm landscapes influence blueberry pests and natural enemies? Craig R. Roubos, and Rufus Isaacs, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 9

122 Tuesday November 3 0: Grasshopper herbivory affects grassland production and nutrient cycling in a northern mixed grass prairie. David H. Branson, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Sidney, MT 0: Colonization of host plants by Tamalia galling aphids during succession following wildfire. Donald G. Miller, csuchico.edu, Colleen Hatfield, and Rebecca Holden, California State University, Chico, CA 0: Agricultural insect pests in a changing climate. Robert B. Srygley, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Sidney, MT 0: Climate change: Life history adaptation by Bemisia tabaci. Alvin M. Simmons, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Charleston, SC, Levi Curnutte, College of Charleston, Charleston, SC, and Shaaban Abd-Rabou, Ministry of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Center, Dokki, Egypt 0: Climate, host plant, and selection for a key morphological trait in the symbiotic plant-ant, Azteca pittieri. Elizabeth G. Pringle, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI : Consequences of climate change for biotic disturbances in North American forests. Aaron S. Weed, dartmouth.edu, Mathew P. Ayres, and Jeffrey A. Hicke 2, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH, 2 University of Idaho, Moscow, ID Lutz Bachmann, and Vladimir I. Gusarov, University of Oslo, Natural History Museum, Oslo, Norway 8: Phylogenetic placement of the termite guest lineage, Termitohospitini (Coleoptera: Aleocharinae). K. Taro Eldredge, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 8: A large-scale morphological phylogeny for Euaesthetinae, and biogeography of the austral fauna (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae). Dave J. Clarke, The Field Museum, Chicago, IL 9: Six ways to befriend an ant, or a detailed molecular phylogeny of Lomechusini (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae). Quiyari Jatzé Santiago-Jiménez, Judith Osswald, and Vladimir I. Gusarov, University of Oslo, Natural History Museum, Oslo, Norway 9:8 000 Rove beetles roving on an ancient globe: Mesozoic fossils bend biogeography (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae). Margaret K. Thayer, Chenyang Cai 2, Diying Huang 2, and Alfred F. Newton, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL, 2 Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing, China 9:30 00 Molecular phylogeny and revised classification of the water scavenger beetles (Coleoptera: Hydrophilidae). Andrew Short, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS Tuesday November 3 :2 099 Impact of climate change on biocontrol of weeds: Paterson s curse as a model. Paul A. Weston, edu.au, Leslie A. Weston, and Shane Hildebrand, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, New South Wales, Australia : Differential response to climate change of two exotic weeds and their natural enemies: Implications for biological control in Florida. Veronica Manrique, Rodrigo Diaz, and William A. Overholt, University of Florida, Fort Pierce, FL : Canary in the coal mine: Do urban areas predict pest outbreaks in a warming climate? Elsa Youngsteadt, ncsu.edu, Steven D. Frank, Nathan J. Sanders 2, and Rob R. Dunn, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, 2 University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN : Effects of climate change on structure and dynamics of an ecological network. Claus Rasmussen, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark 2:00 Concluding Remarks 9: A molecular phylogenetic assessment of the Namib darkling beetle genus Onymacris (Tenebrionidae). Trip Lamb, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, and Jason Bond, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 9: So many beetles, so little time: Biogeographic history of Mecyclothorax beetles on Haleakala volcano, Maui. James Liebherr, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 0:06 Break 0:2 004 Diversification (or not) of seed beetles (Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae: Acanthoscelides) feeding on the species-rich genus Astragalus (Fabaceae) in the western United States. Geoffrey Morse, and Jessica Sully, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA 0: Diamond weevils and opal longhorns: The evolution of photonic crystals in Phytophaga. Ainsley E. Seago, ainsley. Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Canberra, Australia Ten-Minute Papers, SysEB Section: Beetle Systematics and Biogeography 30 C, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Andrew Short and Duane D. McKenna 2, Biodiversity Institute, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, 2 University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 8:5 Introductory Remarks 8: Systematics of xanthopygine rove beetles (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae: Staphylinini). Stylianos Chatzimanolis, University of Tennessee, Chattanooga, TN 8: Resolving aleocharine beetle phylogeny using molecular data a study of the tribe Oxypodini Thomson, 859 (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae: Aleocharinae). Judith Osswald, judith. 20 0: An enigmatic new taxon of neotropical Tenebrionoidea (Coleoptera). Maxwell V. L. Barclay, nhm.ac.uk, Natural History Museum, London, United Kingdom 0: The Paussus (Carabidae: Paussinae) of Madagascar: An explosive radiation of myrmecophilous beetles. James A. Robertson, and Wendy Moore, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ : A new automated tool for multi-scale sampling of spatial environmental data to predict the distribution of the Sulphur Springs diving beetle in northwest Arkansas. Douglas Ryan Leasure, Scott Longing, Pablo Andres Bacon, and Gary R. Huxel, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR :2 009 Dung happens and diversity follows: Dung beetle fauna in natural and managed systems. Jonathan Nixon, jonathan. and Kyle Schell, South Dakota State University, Rapid City, SD

123 Tuesday November 3 Tuesday November 3 :33 00 Assessing alternative hypotheses of homology and character coding in phylogenetic inference: Insight from simulated data and two beetle phylogenies. Sergei Tarasov, ru, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway :45 0 Genes and genomes reveal new insights into the phylogeny of Neuropteroidea and the evolution of beetle megadiversity. Duane D. McKenna, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN :57 Concluding Remarks Ten-Minute Papers, PBT Section: Biochemistry 300 A, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Jeffrey G. Scott and Jeff J. Stuart 2, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 2 Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 8:30 Introductory Remarks 8:33 02 Effect of the neuropeptides corazonin and CCAP on mosquito heart physiology. Julian F. Hillyer, vanderbilt.edu, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 8:45 03 Varroa mite vitellogenins: Molecular markers to better understand reproduction. Ana Cabrera-Cordon, ana. Paul Shirk, Adrian Duehl, Jay D. Evans 2, and Peter E. A. Teal, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD 8:57 04 Juvenile hormone and insulin signaling pathways interact to mediate lipid metabolism during tsetse pregnancy. Aaron A. Baumann, Joshua B. Benoit 2, Veronika Michalkova 2, Paul O. Mireji 3, Geoffrey M. Attardo 2, John K. Moulton 4, Tom Wilson 5, and Serap Aksoy 6, HHMI Janelia Farm Research Campus, Ashburn, VA, 2 Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, 3 International Center of Insect Physiology and Ecology, Nairobi, Kenya, 4 University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 5 Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 6 Yale University, New Haven, CT 9:09 05 Sphingomyelinase in tsetse fly milk is critical to progeny development and health. Joshua B. Benoit, edu, Geoffrey M. Attardo, Veronika Michalkova, Peter Takác 2, Jana Bohova 2, and Serap Aksoy 3, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, 2 Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia, 3 Yale University, New Haven, CT 9:2 06 Exploiting insect susceptibility to an essential amino acid used as an insecticide: Papilio cresphontes bioassays on methionine. Delano S. Lewis, James P. Cuda, and Bruce R. Stevens, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 9:33 07 Circadian clock is not ticking in the Antarctic midge, Belgica antarctica. Alena Kobelkova, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 9:45 Break 0:00 08 Update on the tomato/potato psyllid-candidatus Liberibacter transmission pathway. Joseph M. Cicero, ag.arizona.edu, Tonja Fisher, Della C. Gumm, Meenal Vyas, and Judith K. Brown, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 0:2 09 Effect of age and lifetime flight behavior on dipteran flight muscle ultrastructure. Emily E. Martinez, edu, and Stephen P. Roberts, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 0: Ligand binding profiles of Solenopsis invicta (red imported fire ant) chemosensory proteins. Almudena Ortiz- Urquiza, Arun Wanchoo, John Boswell, and Nemat O. Keyhani, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 0:36 02 Patterns of lipid storage in two strains of Spodoptera frugiperda during the corn cropping season. Mirian M. Hay-Roe, Rodney Nagoshi, and Robert L. Meagher, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL 0: Intraspecific variability of midgut Cys proteases in Colorado potato beetle fed different plant diets - a shotgun proteomics assessment. Asieh Rasoolizadeh, asieh. Frank Sainsbury, Marie-Claire Goulet, Conrad Cloutier, and Dominique Michaud, Universite Laval, Québec, Québec, Canada : A model system for investigating the underlying mechanism of speciation in the Braconidae. Karen M. Kester, Justin P. Bredlau, Bonnie L. Brown, Dawn E. Gundersen-Rindal 2, and Daniel Kuhar 2, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD :2 024 Survival and development of diamondback moth and its parasitoid Diadegma insulare under various short-term high extreme temperature regimes. Md Habibullah Bahar, Juliana J. Soroka, Lloyd M. Dosdall 2, and Owen O. Olfert, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, 2 University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada :24 Concluding Remarks Ten-Minute Papers, SysEB Section: Population Genetics, Biogeography, and Phylogeography 30 D, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Christiane Weirauch and Melissa Sanchez Herrera 2, University of California, Riverside, CA, 2 Rutgers University, Newark, NJ 8:30 Introductory Remarks 8: Rocky Mountain low: A non-linear Neuroptida (Insecta) longitude-landform age relationship in North America. Lawrence E. Stevens, Jeri D. Ledbetter 2, and Marguerite Hendrie 2, Museum of Northern Arizona, Flagstaff, AZ, 2 Springs Stewardship Institute, Flagstaff, AZ 8: An unexpected mid-peninsular Pleistocene refuge in Baja California revealed by phylogeographic analyses of a plant-insect species pair. Ryan C. Garrick, University of Mississippi, University, MS, John D. Nason, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, and Rodney J. Dyer, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 8: Pleistocene history of two Eastern North American stoneflies, Acroneuria frisoni and Allocapnia granulata. Massimo Pessino, Ember Chabot 2, Rosanna Giordano, and R. Edward DeWalt, University of Illinois, Illinois Natural History Survey, Champaign, IL, 2 New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, NY 9: Haplotype analysis of global chili thrips (Scirtothrips dorsalis) populations using the metazoan barcode. Aaron M. Dickey, Lance S. Osborne 2, Vivek 2

124 Tuesday November 3 Tuesday November 3 Kumar 3, Robert G. Shatters, and Cindy L. McKenzie, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Fort Pierce, FL, 2 University of Florida, Apopka, FL, 3 University of Florida, Homestead, FL 9:2 029 Large population size predicts the distribution of asexuality in scale insects. Nate B. Hardy, Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Cleveland, OH, Laura Ross, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom, and Benjamin B. Normark, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 9: Population genetics of stable and declining North American bumble bees (Bombus spp.). Jeffrey D. Lozier, as.ua.edu, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL, James Strange, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Logan, UT, and Sydney A. Cameron, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 9:45 03 Genetic diversity of human head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis) across the Americas. Marina Ascunce, Jackie Fane, Gebreyes Kassu, Ariel C. Toloza 2, Maria I. Picollo 2, Angélica González-Oliver 3, and David Reed 4, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2 Centro de Investigaciones de Plagas e Insecticidas, Villa Martelli, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 3 Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México, México City, 4 Florida Museum of Natural History, Gainesville, FL 9:57 Break 0:2 032 Conservation genetics of endangered prairie Lepidoptera. Emily V. Saarinen, University of Michigan, Dearborn, MI 0: Are the occurrences of remnant lepidopteran populations consistent with Compsilura concinnata as an agent of moth extirpation in New England? Paul Z. Goldstein, Shelah Morita 2, and Grace Capshaw 2, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, 2 Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 0: Genomics of an adaptive radiation in Heliconius butterflies. Brian A. Counterman, edu, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 0: Phylogeography of Pacific Islands Tortricidae (Lepidoptera). Peter T. Oboyski, University of California, Berkeley, CA : Mutations to sex pheromone receptors provide a mechanism for speciation in the genus Ostrinia. Jean E. Allen, Greg Leary 2, and Kevin W. Wanner, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT, 2 University of Montana, Missoula, MT :2 037 The invasive Argentine ant and the native winter ant disrupt each other s foraging success. Merav Vonshak, stanford.edu, and Deborah M. Gordon, Stanford University, Stanford, CA : Imported crazy ant extirpates imported fire ant, reduces and homogenizes grassland ant and arthropod assemblages. Edward G. LeBrun, John C. Abbott, and Lawrence E. Gilbert, University of Texas, Austin, TX :36 Concluding Remarks Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section: Crop Protection: Fruit Trees and Vines Cumberland (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderators: Roger I. Vargas and James E. Dripps 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Hilo, HI, 2 Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN 9:00 Introductory Remarks 9: Evaluating and optimizing mating disruption of navel orangeworm (Pyralidae) in almond orchards. Bradley S. Higbee, Paramount Farming Co, Bakersfield, CA, and Charles S. Burks, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Parlier, CA 9:5 040 The interplay between timing and duration of control for navel orangeworm (Amyelois transitella) in almonds and pistachios. Joel Siegel, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Parlier, CA, and Gary Weinberger, Weinberger & Associates, Hanford, CA 9:27 04 Winter and spring application of SPLAT-CLM for control of citrus leafminer (Phyllocnistis citrella). Craig P. Keathley, craig. USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Fort Pierce, FL, Lukasz, L. Stelinski, University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, and Stephen L. Lapointe, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Fort Pierce, FL 9: Weathering and chemical degradation of Static Spinosad ME for fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) control under California weather conditions. Roger I. Vargas, ars.usda.gov, Jaime C. Pinero 2, Luis E. Gomez 3, James E. Dripps 3, Lyndsie Stoltman 4, and Agenor Mafra-Neto 4, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Hilo, HI, 2 Lincoln University of Missouri, Jefferson City, MO, 3 Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN, 4 ISCA Technologies, Inc., Riverside, CA 9:5 043 Behavioral evidence for the exploitation of a novel host plant on the basis of vision in the melon fly, Bactrocera cucurbitae (Diptera: Tephritidae). Jaime C. Pinero, Steven K. Souder 2, and Roger I. Vargas, 2, Lincoln University of Missouri, Jefferson City, MO, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Hilo, HI 0: Static Spinosad ME: A new male attraction control option for Bactrocera species. James E. Dripps, com, Agenor Mafra-Neto 2, Roger I. Vargas 3, Luis E. Gomez, Michael Lysandrou 4, Lakshmipathi Srigiriraju 5, and Harvey A. Yoshida 6, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN, 2 ISCA Technologies, Inc., Riverside, CA, 3 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Hilo, HI, 4 Dow AgroSciences, Lavrion, Greece, 5 Dow AgroSciences, Hyderabad, India, 6 Dow AgroSciences, Richland, WA 0:5 045 Programmable precision insecticide application for control of the spotted wing drosophila in mature highbush blueberry. Lynell K. Tanigoshi, Beverly S. Gerdeman, and Hollis G. Spitler, Washington State University, Mt. Vernon, WA 0:27 Break 0: Response of light brown apple moth to oxygenated phosphine fumigation. Samuel Liu, Yong-Biao Liu, and Gregory S. Simmons 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Salinas, CA, 2 USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Salinas, CA 22 0: Closer - a new tool for the management of key

125 Tuesday November 3 Tuesday November 3 sap-feeding pests of tree fruits. Harvey A. Yoshida, dow.com, Dow AgroSciences, Richland, WA, Brian D. Olson, Dow AgroSciences, Geneva, NY, Bradley W. Hopkins, Dow AgroSciences, Westerville, OH, James D. Thomas, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN, and Alan G. McFadden, Dow AgroSciences, Guelph, Ontario, Canada : Effective and economical control of grape berry moth, Paralobesia viteana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), using temporally and spatially targeted applications of reduced risk insecticides. Keith S. Mason, Luis Teixeira 2, Steven VanTimmeren, Craig R. Roubos, and Rufus Isaacs, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 2 DuPont Crop Protection, Newark, DE :8 049 Sivanto - profile of a new systemic insecticide from Bayer CropScience. Georg S. Raupach, Wolfgang Thielert, and Ralf Nauen, Bayer CropScience, Monheim am Rhein, Germany : Sivanto - a new insecticide for control of citricola scale (Coccus pseudomagnoliarum) in California citrus. Richard Warner, Bayer CropScience, Clovis, CA, Matthias Haas, Bayer CropScience, Monheim am Rhein, Germany, Beth Grafton-Cardwell, University of California, Riverside, Exeter, CA, and Sam Wells, Bayer CropScience, Fresno, CA :42 05 Performance attributes of insecticides on secondary pests of pome fruits. John C. Wise, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI :54 Concluding Remarks Tuesday, November 3, 202, Afternoon Lunch and Learn: Hands-On Photography Demonstration Ballroom A, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Cheri M. Abraham, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA 2:5 - :5 Lunch and Learn with Sonny Ramaswamy and Colleagues from NIFA Ballroom B, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Sonny Ramaswamy, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Washington, DC 2:5-2:5 Student Session with Sonny Ramaswamy and Colleagues from NIFA Ballroom B, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Sonny Ramaswamy, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Washington, DC 2:30-4:00 Student Debates Lecture Hall, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Joy L. Newton, University of Nevada, Reno, NV :30 Welcoming Remarks : Unbiased Introduction, Topic : What is the best individual solution to feeding the world s growing population? Joy L. Newton, University of Nevada, Reno, NV : Team (University of Kentucky), Topic : What is the best individual solution to feeding the world s growing population? Meghan M. Curry, Sydney Crawley, Megha Kalsi, Abiya Saeed, and Bethany Hunt, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 2:02 Cross-Examination of Team by Team 2 for Topic 2: Team 2 (University of Idaho, faculty advisor - Mark Schwarzlaender), Topic : What is the best individual solution to feeding the world s growing population? Jessica K. Rendon, Shaonpius Mondal, Ikju Park, and Joel R. Price, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 2:2 Cross-Examination of Team 2 by Team for Topic 2:5 First Rebuttal by Team 2 for Topic 2:8 First Rebuttal by Team for Topic 2:2 Second Rebuttal by Team 2 for Topic 2:24 Second Rebuttal by Team for Topic 2:27 Questions from Judges and Audience for Topic 2:37 Break 2: Unbiased Introduction, Topic 2: What is the best individual solution to solving the threat of global climate change? Akua K. Antwi-Agyakwa, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana 3: Team 3 (University of California, Davis), Topic 2: What is the best individual solution to solving the threat of global climate change? Jenny S. Carlson, Matan Shelomi, Mohammad-Amir Aghaee, and Irina Shapiro 2, University of California, Davis, CA, 2 University of Maryland, College Park, MD 3:2 Cross-Examination of Team 3 by Team 4 for Topic 2 3:5 057 Team 4 (University of Arkansas, faculty advisor - Tim Kring), Topic 2: What is the best individual solution to solving the threat of global climate change? Jessica Hartshorn, Luis Ricardo Orellana, Ryan Rastok, and Sim Barrow, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 3:22 Cross-examination of Team 4 by Team 3 for Topic 2 3:25 First Rebuttal by Team 4 for Topic 2 3:28 First Rebuttal by Team 3 for Topic 2 3:3 Second Rebuttal by Team 4 for Topic 2 3:34 Second Rebuttal by Team 3 for Topic 2 3:37 Questions from Judges and Audience for Topic 2 23

126 Tuesday November 3 3:47 Break 4: Unbiased Introduction, Topic 3: What is the best individual solution to meeting the world s growing energy demand? Runxin Cao, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 4:5 059 Team 5 (Florida A&M University, faculty advisor -Raymond L. Hix), Topic 3: What is the best individual solution to meeting the world s growing energy demand? Eutychus M. Kariuki, Omotola Dosunmu, Megan Wilkerson, Julius Eason, Michael Cooke, and Saundra A. Wheeler, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL 4:22 Cross-Examination of Team 5 by Team 6 for Topic 3 4: Team 6 (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University), Topic 3: What is the best individual solution to meeting the world s growing energy demand? Sean D. M. Gresham, Jhalendra P. Rijal, Lígia C. Vieira 2, and Jake E. Bova 2, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Winchester, VA, 2 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 4:32 Cross-Examination of Team 6 by Team 5 for Topic 3 4:35 First Rebuttal by Team 6 for Topic 3 4:38 First Rebuttal by Team 5 for Topic 3 4:4 Second Rebuttal by Team 6 for Topic 3 Physiology, Biochemistry, and Toxicology (PBT) Section Symposium: RNAi: The Power, the Promise and the Frustration Ballroom E, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Jeffrey G. Scott, Kun-Yan Zhu 2, Blair D. Siegfried 3, and Angela Douglas, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 2 Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 3 University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE :00 Introductory Remarks : RNAi in mosquitoes: Location, location, location. Kristin Michel, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS : Efficient silencing of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry toxins receptors in Manduca sexta and Aedes aegypti using RNAi. Biviana Flores, Leydi Bedolla, Isabel Gómez 2, Alejandra Bravo 2, and Mario Soberón, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México, Cuernavaca, Morelos, México, 2 Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México, Morelos, México :45 Discussion # : Investigations of mosquito embryonic development using sirnas and artificial mirnas. Jake Tu, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA Tuesday November 3 4:44 Second Rebuttal by Team 5 for Topic 3 4:47 Questions from Judges and Audience for Topic 3 4:57 Concluding Remarks Program Symposium: Current Global Trends in Forensic Entomology Salon A (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderator and Organizer: Ralph E. Williams, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN :30 Introductory Remarks :40 06 Forensic entomology standards and compliance with the National Academy of Science. Neal Haskell, com, Forensic Entomology Investigations, Rensselaer, IN 2:5 062 A growing science? Blow fly thermal development and human death. Leon G. Higley, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 2: Genetics and forensic entomology. Jeffrey D. Wells, Florida International University, Miami, FL 2:5 070 Developing methods and potential applications for RNAi in western corn rootworms. Blair D. Siegfried, unlnotes.unl.edu, Chitvan Khajuria 2, Murugesan Rangasamy, Hong Chen, Haichuan Wang, and Analiza P. Alves 3, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 2 Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 3 Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., Johnston, IA 2:35 07 Aphid RNAi: Success, failure and speculation. Angela Douglas, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 2:55 Discussion #2 3:05 Break 3: RNAi in termites: An overview of successes and failures. Michael E. Scharf, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 3: Uptake of dsrna in cells to evaluate the efficacy of RNAi in insects. Guy Smagghe, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium 4: RNAi trigger target choice in Ecdysozoa: Lessons learned from shrimp, mosquitoes and nematodes. Lyric Bartholomay, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 4:20 Discussion #3 3:25 Break 3: Effects of marine submergence in carcass taphonomy. Gail Anderson, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada 4:5 065 The Forensic Anthropology Research Facility: Past and present research. Lee Meadows Jantz, and Rebecca Taylor-Wilson, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 4: Challenging forensic entomology cases. Ralph E. Williams, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 24 4: RNAi strategies: Problems to solve before advancing to solve problems. Wayne B. Hunter, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Ft. Pierce, FL 4: Parental RNAi for the production of male only progenies. Jayendra Shukla, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 5:0 Discussion #4 5:20 Concluding Remarks

127 Tuesday November 3 Tuesday November 3 Medical, Urban, and Veterinary Entomology (MUVE) Section Symposium: If the Epi Triad is Host, Pathogen and Environment, Where Are the Vectors? 300 C, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Dana Nayduch and Lee W. Cohnstaedt, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Manhattan, KS : Introductory Remarks: Defining the role of vectors in the epidemiological triad. Dana Nayduch, gov, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Manhattan, KS : Vector competence of Phlebotomus duboscqi for Leishmania major: Does the midgut bacterial community matter? Ludek Zurek, Dinesh Erram, Kamila Koci, and David Sacks 2, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 2 National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Health (NIAID, NIH), Bethesda, MD 2: The peritrophic matrix as an immune barrier in tsetse. Brian Weiss, Amy Savage, and Serap Aksoy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 2: The sand fly gut: From blood digestion to Leishmania development. Marcelo Ortigao, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 2:40 Break 2:55 08 Introductory remarks: Host-vector interactions. Lee W. Cohnstaedt, and D. Scott McVey, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Manhattan, KS 3: Tick-host interactions in the Lyme disease system: Opportunities for intervention? Graham J. Hickling, tennessee.edu, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, and Jean I. Tsao, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 3: Surveillance of Culicoides sonorensis and sentinel dairy cattle for bluetongue virus infection in California. Christie Mayo, Bradley A. Mullens 2, Ian Gardner 3, Alec Gerry 2, Christopher M. Barker, and N. James MacLachlan, University of California, Davis, CA, 2 University of California, Riverside, CA, 3 Canada Excellence Research Chair - Aquatic Epidemiology, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada 3: Vector-host interactions: Habitat or hosts play the key role? Zainulabeuddin Syed, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 4:00 Break 4:5 085 Introductory remarks: Environment-vector interactions. Lee W. Cohnstaedt, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Manhattan, KS 4: Ixodes scapularis: Does tick population genetics influence relationships with hosts and environment? Lorenza Beati, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA 4: Impact of environmental factors on the ability of mosquitoes to transmit arboviral diseases. Kenneth J. Linthicum, Assaf Anyamba 2, and Seth Britch, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL, 2 National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD 5: Culicoides-borne arboviruses in the E.U.: How does scientific consensus influence policy? Simon T. Carpenter, simon. Institute for Animal Health, Pirbright, Woking, United Kingdom 5: Concluding Remarks: The vectors tie it all together. D. Scott McVey, and Lee W. Cohnstaedt, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Manhattan, KS Physiology, Biochemistry, and Toxicology (PBT) Section Symposium: Transfer of Solutions from Nature to the Technical World: Latest Applications, Challenges and Future Trends in Insect Biotechnology 300 A, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Amit Sethi, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN :30 Introductory Remarks : Termite digestion: From transcriptomics to biofuel technology. Michael E. Scharf, and Amit Sethi, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN :58 09 Chemistry of insect cuticle as a model biomaterial. Michael R. Kanost, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 2:2 092 Spider silk biology and biotechnology: Fact, fiction, and future. Cheryl Hayashi, University of California, Riverside, CA 2: A genome-to-lead approach for discovery of nextgen insecticides. Jason M. Meyer, Karin F. K. Ejendal, Larisa V. Avramova, Elisabeth E. Garland-Kuntz, Gloria I. Giraldo-Calderón, Val J. Watts, and Catherine HIll, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 3:07 Break 3: Fusion protein technology: Exploiting arachnid venom peptides to generate novel biopesticides. Elaine Fitches, Elaine. Food and Environment Research Agency, York, United Kingdom 3: Transgenic fungi that specifically target malaria or it s vector. Raymond J. St. Leger, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 4: Design of a protozoacidal Trojan-horse: Use of ligands for selective targeting of lytic peptides to kill cellulose-digesting Protozoa within termite guts. Amit Sethi, Lane Foil 2, and Claudia Husseneder 2, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, 2 Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA 4:3 097 Designing Y driven shredding of the Anopheles gambiae X chromosome during male meiosis. Andrea Crisanti, imperial.ac.uk, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom 4: Treatment of infectious diseases: Lessons from Drosophila. Jean-Luc Imler, Unite Propre de Recherche, Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Strasbourg, France 5:7 Concluding Remarks 25

128 Tuesday November 3 Plant-Insect Ecosystems (P-IE) Section Symposium: Insect Resistance Management, Ecological Genetics and Computer Modeling: Tools for Solving Local Problems With Global Implications LeConte (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderator and Organizer: Bruce H. Stanley, DuPont Crop Genetics, Wilmington, DE : Opening Remarks. Ecology, genetics and modeling. J. Khai Tran, Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., Wilmington, DE :45 00 Landscape ecology applications for insect resistance management research. Megan E. O Rourke, com, and Laura E. Jones, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY :30 0 Introductory remarks - session overview. Robert G. Ahern, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Raleigh, NC :35 The inevitable pest outbreak: Can we break our dependence on methyl bromide as an emergency measure? Laura A. Jeffers, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Raleigh, NC :55 2 Sour grapes: Challenges associated with Lobesia botrana (EGVM). Scott W. Myers, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Buzzards Bay, MA 2:5 3 Cautionary tales of first host reports of newly identified invasive species. Lisa G. Neven, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Wapato, WA, and Scott W. Myers, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Buzzards Bay, MA Tuesday November 3 2:05 0 Field-evolved resistance to Bt crops: Theory and data. Bruce Tabashnik, and Yves Carriere, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 2:25 02 The impact of density-dependent mortality on the evolution of resistance. Michael A. Caprio, msstate.edu, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, and Jeannette C. Martinez, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Pesticide Programs, Washington, DC 2:45 03 Corn rootworm IRM: Modeling, population genetics and economics. David Onstad, Zaiqi Pan, and J. Khai Tran 2, DuPont Agricultural Biotechnology, Wilmington, DE, 2 Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., Wilmington, DE 3:05 04 Resistance modeling with RAMAS IRM v.0.9. Nicholas Friedenberg, and Kevin Shoemaker, Applied Biomathematics, Setauket, NY 3:25 Break 3:45 05 Genetics and the development of resistance. Richard Gomulkiewicz, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 4:05 06 Modelling quantitative genetics: How to be genetically explicit. Andrew Kanarek, and Xavier Thibert-Plante, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 4:25 07 From virtual to reality: Applying model outcomes to agricultural systems. Nicholas Storer, Dow AgroSciences, Kensington, MD 4:45 08 Forecasting the development of resistance in agriculture. J. Lindsey Flexner, DuPont Agricultural Biotechnology, Wilmington, DE 5:05 09 Concluding Remarks. Modeling vs reality. Zaiqi Pan, DuPont Agricultural Biotechnology, Wilmington, DE Plant-Insect Ecosystems (P-IE) Section Symposium: Researching Imminent or Newly Established Pests: Helping and Hurting at the Same Time Cumberland (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderator and Organizer: Robert G. Ahern, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Raleigh, NC 2:35 4 Host Suitability Index - a new method for quantifying host preference and its application to postharvest scenarios. David E. Bellamy, and Spencer Walse, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Parlier, CA 2:55 Break 3:0 5 Recommendations from the edge: How the New Pest Advisory Group (NPAG) supports PPQ. Christie A. Bertone, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Raleigh, NC 3:30 6 Megacopta cribraria: From ground zero and beyond. Wayne A. Gardner, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA 3:50 7 The challenge and impact of new pest/new host reports on international trade of fresh fruit. Mike Willett, nwhort.org, Northwest Horticultural Council, Yakima, WA 4:0 8 High profile research: Anything you say can (and likely will) be used against us. Robert G. Ahern, gov, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Raleigh, NC 4:30 9 Roundtable Discussion - How can research help without hurting? Robert G. Ahern, David E. Bellamy 2, Christie A. Bertone, Wayne A. Gardner 3, Laura A. Jeffers 2, Scott W. Myers 4, Lisa G. Neven 5, and Mike Willett 6, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Raleigh, NC, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Parlier, CA, 3 University of Georgia, Griffin, GA, 4 USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Buzzards Bay, MA, 5 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Wapato, WA, 6 Northwest Horticultural Council, Yakima, WA Systematics, Evolution, and Biodiversity (SysEB) Section Symposium: Biodiversity in Mexico 200 A, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Julieta Brambila, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Gainesville, FL :30 Welcoming Remarks :32 20 Mexican bark and ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae): Diversity, biogeography, and ecology. Thomas H. Atkinson, University of Texas, Austin, TX 26

129 Tuesday November 3 Tuesday November 3 :52 2 Diversity and relationships of Mexican cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae). Allen Sanborn, Barry University, Miami Shores, FL 2:2 22 Orthoptera in Mexico: Current status, challenges and future directions. Ricardo Mariño-Pérez, mx, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 2:32 23 Mites from Mexico: Diversity of mites in Mexico, species intercepted at U.S. ports of entry, and species of potential threat to U.S. agriculture. Eric McDonald, aphis.usda.gov, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Humble, TX 2:52 Break 3:2 24 Ichneumonidae (Hymenoptera) from the State of Tamaulipas, México. Enrique Ruiz Cancino, D. R. Kasparyan, A. I. Khalaim and J. M. Coronado B., Universidad Autónoma de Tamaulipas, Victoria, Tamaulipas, México 3:32 Break 3:47 25 Competitor-free-space and coexistence of fruit fly parasitoids in Mexico. John Sivinski, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL, and Martin Aluja, Instituto de Ecología, Xalapa, Veracruz, México 4:07 26 Thrips abundance in mangoes in southern Mexico. Joseph E. Funderburk, University of Florida, Quincy, FL 4:27 27 Abundance-distribution patterns of insect assemblages in tropical environmental gradients in southern Mexico. Jorge L. León-Cortés, Ubaldo Caballero, Lucrecia Arellano, Irma Miss, Arcángel Molina-Martínez, Marisol Almaraz, and Francisco Sarmiento, El Colegio de la Frontera Sur, San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas, México 4:47 28 Biodiversity, taxonomy and biogeography of arthropods in Mexico: Towards a synthesis. Jorge Llorente, net.mx, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México, México D. F., México 5:07 29 Collecting in Mexico: Rules, permits, and reports. Julieta Brambila, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Gainesville, FL Member Symposium: 20 Years After Comstock the Wireworm Battle Continues Ballroom F, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Robert Vernon and Kevin W. Wanner 2, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Agassiz, British Columbia, Canada, 2 Montana State University, Bozeman, MT :5 Introductory Remarks :25 30 Systematics of elaterid pest species in North America. Michael A. Ivie, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT, and Paul J. Johnson, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD :45 3 Pheromones and other semiochemicals of click beetles - a European perspective. Miklos Toth, Hungarian Academy of Science, Budapest, Hungary 2:05 32 Thinking beyond the field: Dispersal of click beetles in agricultural landscapes. Rod Blackshaw, ac.uk, University of Plymouth, Plymouth, Devon, United Kingdom 2:25 33 Wireworms: Management perspectives, present and future. Robert Vernon, Agriculture and Agri- Food Canada, Agassiz, British Columbia, Canada 2:45 Break 3:5 34 New insights into the feeding ecology of Agriotes larvae. Michael Traugott, Karin Staudacher, Nikolaus Schallhart, and Corinna Wallinger, University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Tyrol, Austria 3:35 35 Management of wireworms in potatoes. Christine Noronha, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Charlottetown, Prince Edwards Island, Canada 3:55 36 Impact and management of infesting wireworms on spring wheat in Washington state. Keith S. Pike, edu, Washington State University, Prosser, WA, and Aaron Esser, Washington State University, Lincoln/Adams Area Extension, Ritzville, WA 4:5 37 Resolving pest wireworm species identities using DNA barcoding. Frank E. Etzler, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 4:30 38 A complex of wireworm species infesting small grain fields in Montana. Anuar Morales-Rodriguez, montana.edu, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 4:45 Organizational Meeting Member Symposium: Tuta absoluta - The Global Threat on Tomatoes Ballroom G, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Aziz M. Ajlan, Khalid Alhudaib, and Jamal Hajjar, King Faisal University, Hofuf, Al-Hassa, Saudi Arabia :30 39 Effect of trap color on captures of Tuta absoluta moths (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae). A. M. Taha, B. H. Homam, A. F. E. Afsah, and F. M. El- Sharkawy 2, Plant Protection Research Institute, Giza, Egypt, 2 National Institute of Standards, Egypt :50 40 Management of Tuta absoluta with semiochemicals. Agenor Mafra-Neto, ISCA Technologies, Inc., Riverside, CA 2:0 4 Common thyme and castor oil plant extracts to control tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta. Abderrahim Alahyane, Abdellah Bagui, Rachid Bouharroud, and Abderrahim Jilale, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique d Agadir, Agadir, Morocco 2:30 42 Integrated pest management of tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta, in the Souss Valley of Morocco. Rachid Bouharroud, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique d Agadir, Agadir, Morocco 2:50 Break 3:05 43 Genetic study of Tuta absoluta in Saudi Arabia. Khalid Alhudaib, and Aziz M. Ajlan, King Faisal University, Hofuf, Al-Hassa, Saudi Arabia 27

130 Tuesday November 3 Tuesday November 3 3:25 44 IPM of Tuta absoluta in Alhasa, Saudi Arabia. Jamal Hajjar, King Faisal University, Hofuf, Alhasa, Al-Hassa, Saudi Arabia 3:45 45 Ecological study of Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) at Mzeraa, Biskra Oasis, Algeria. Nacer Tarai, Zohra Melaksou, Mohammed Belhamra, Kelthoum Benaissa, and Farid Allache, University Mohamed Khider, Biskra, Algeria Member Symposium: Chemical Ecology of Cerambycid Beetles 300 B, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Matthew D. Ginzel, Elizabeth E. Graham 2, and Ann M. Ray 3, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, 2 Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 3 Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH :30 Welcoming Remarks :35 46 New insights into the pheromone chemistry of cerambycid beetles from research on multi-species lures. Lawrence M. Hanks, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, and Jocelyn G. Millar, University of California, Riverside, CA :55 47 Role of host volatiles and pheromones in the mating system of Mallodon dasystomus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). Matthew D. Ginzel, Gabriel P. Hughes, Matthew A. Paschen, Jocelyn G. Millar 2, and Nathan M. Schiff 3, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, 2 University of California, Riverside, CA, 3 USDA, Forest Service, Stoneville, MS 2:5 48 Interaction of cerambycid pheromones and host plant volatiles. R. Maxwell Collignon, and Jocelyn G. Millar, University of California, Riverside, CA 2:35 49 Cerambycidae chemical ecology: Let s take some ideas from bark beetle research. Jorge Macias-Samano, and David Wakarchuk, Synergy Semiochemicals Corporation, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada 2:55 50 Potential for using volatile sex pheromone for managing prionine cerambycid pests of hops and other high-value crops. James D. Barbour, Douglas B. Walsh 2, Diane G. Alston 3, Arthur Agnello 4, James D. Dutcher 5, Brian W. Bahder 2, Jocelyn G. Millar 6, and Lawrence M. Hanks 7, University of Idaho, Parma, ID, 2 Washington State University, Prosser, WA, 3 Utah State University, Logan, UT, 4 Cornell University, Geneva, NY, 5 University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, 6 University of California, Riverside, CA, 7 University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 3:5 Break 3:30 5 Using synthetic pheromones to study the effect of fire on communities of cerambycid beetles. Elizabeth E. Graham, Deborah G. McCullough, Jocelyn G. Millar 2, and Therese M. Poland 3, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 2 University of California, Riverside, CA, 3 USDA, Forest Service, East Lansing, MI 3:50 52 Effect of tree species, trap height, and lure on species composition of longhorn beetle in traps. Jon Sweeney, nrcan.gc.ca, Reginald Webster 2, Robert Johns, and Peter J. Silk, Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada, 2 Charters Settlement, New Brunswick, Canada 4:0 53 Using generic pheromones to survey for longhorned beetles in Costa Rica. Ann M. Ray, Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH, Ian Swift, California State Collection of Arthropods, Sacramento, CA, and Jocelyn G. Millar, University of California, Riverside, CA 4:30 54 Trapping cerambycid beetles in China using generic pheromone lures. Stephen Teale, State University of New York, Syracuse, NY, Jacob D. Wickham, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhongguancun, Beijing, China, Lawrence M. Hanks, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, and Jocelyn G. Millar, University of California, Riverside, CA 4:50 55 Cerambycid diversity and vertical distribution in an Asian tropical forest. Jacob D. Wickham, com, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhongguancun, Beijing, China, Lawrence M. Hanks, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, and Jocelyn G. Millar, University of California, Riverside, CA 5:0 56 Partitioning a shared pheromone: New motifs of secondary pheromone components in the Cerambycinae. Robert F. Mitchell, Becca L. Striman, Jocelyn G. Millar 2, and Lawrence M. Hanks, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, 2 University of California, Riverside, CA Member Symposium: Advances in the Management of Some Global Pests In Greenhouses 200 E, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: John P. Sanderson and Steven D. Frank 2, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 2 North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC :30 Introductory Remarks :35 57 Seasonal and phenological patterns of pest abundance and interceptions of Dracaena marginata produced in Costa Rica for the export market. Eduardo Hidalgo, Fernando Cassanoves 2, Tamara Benjamin, and Clifford S. Sadof, 2, Tropical Agricultural Research and Higher Education Center, Turrialba, Costa Rica, 2 Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN :53 58 Unidentified species and invasive pests: Their impact on ornamental producers in California. James A. Bethke, University of California, Cooperative Extension, San Marcos, CA 2: 59 Integration of pest phenological monitoring and a management database to develop a decision support system for ornamental plants. Alfredo Rios, Luis A. Cañas, Christopher M. Ranger 2, Randall H. Zondag 3, and Heping Zhu 2, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Wooster, OH, 3 Ohio State University, Painesville, OH 2:29 60 Pesticide mixtures and western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis. Amy L. Willmott, Raymond A. Cloyd, and Kun-Yan Zhu, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 2:47 6 Management of western flower thrips by targeting the pupae: Is it realistic? Luis A. Cañas, Claudia H. Kuniyoshi, and Nuris Acosta, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH 3:05 62 Foliar applications of entomopathogenic fungi against western flower thrips: Efficacy assessment and predictability. Stephen P. Wraight, Mark E. Ramos, and R. Howes, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Ithaca, NY 28

131 Tuesday November 3 Tuesday November 3 3:23 Break 3:38 63 Mechanisms affecting the efficacy of aphid banker plant systems. Steven D. Frank, and Sara Prado, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 3:56 64 Pathogenicity of entomopathogenic fungi against the greenhouse pests green peach aphid (Myzus persicae Sulzer), cotton aphid (Aphis gossypii Glover) and foxglove aphid (Aulacorthum solani Kaltenbach). Sarah Jandricic, cornell.edu, Melanie Filotas 2, John P. Sanderson, and Stephen P. Wraight 3, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 2 Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Ontario, Canada, 3 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Ithaca, NY 4:4 65 Residual efficacy of systemic insecticides against the citrus mealybug, Planococcus citri. Amy L. Willmott, edu, Raymond A. Cloyd, and Kun-Yan Zhu, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 4:32 66 A degree day model for the invasive European pepper moth, Duponchelia fovealis Zeller (Lepidoptera: Crambidae). Bryan Vander Mey, and James A. Bethke, University of California, Cooperative Extension, San Marcos, CA 4:50 67 A case study: Is biologically based IPM a possibility in greenhouse gerberas? Cheri M. Abraham, com, S. Kristine Braman, and Ron D. Oetting, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA 5:08 68 Supporting the implementation of greenhouse biological control with cooperative extension programming in New York. Betsy Lamb, John P. Sanderson, Brian Eschenaur 2, Daniel Gilrein 3, and Nora Caitlin 3, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 2 Cornell University, Rochester, NY, 3 Cornell University, Riverhead, NY 5:26 Concluding Remarks Member Symposium: Biology and Management of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid in North America (Part 2) Ballroom C, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Albert E. Mayfield and Shimat V. Joseph 2, USDA, Forest Service, Asheville, NC, 2 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Winchester, VA :30 Welcoming Remarks :35 69 Survival, feeding and reproduction of Laricobius osakensis Montgomery & Shyiake, a predator of Adelges tsugae Annand. Lígia C. Vieira, Scott M. Salom, and Loke T. Kok, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA :55 70 Field assessment of hybridization between adelgid predators Laricobius nigrinus and L. rubidus (Coleoptera: Derodontidae). Melissa J. Fischer, Nathan Havill 2, Gina A. Davis 3, Carlyle C. Brewster, Scott M. Salom, and Loke T. Kok, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, 2 USDA, Forest Service, Hamden, CT, 3 University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 2:5 7 A case study of biological control of hemlock woolly adelgid using predatory beetles in the high country of northwestern North Carolina. Richard C. McDonald, Symbiont Biological Pest Management, Sugar Grove, NC 2:35 72 Purification of the Laricobius osakensis rearing colony at Virginia Tech following contamination by newly described species, Laricobius naganoensis. Carrie S. Jubb, Natalie C. Morris, Ashley B. Lamb 2, Nathan Havill 3, Brad Onken 4, and Scott M. Salom, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, 2 University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 3 USDA, Forest Service, Hamden, CT, 4 USDA, Forest Service, Morgantown, WV 2:55 Break 3:0 73 Sasajiscymnus tsugae: From Japan to the United States. Ashley B. Lamb, Jerome F. Grant, Shigehiko Shiyake 2, Gregory J. Wiggins, Abdul Hakeem, Paris L. Lambdin, J. Rusty Rhea 3, and Brad Onken 4, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2 Osaka Museum of Natural History, Osaka, Japan, 3 USDA, Forest Service, Asheville, NC, 4 USDA, Forest Service, Morgantown, WV 3:25 74 Sasajiscymnus tsugae in Tennessee: Where do we go from here? Gregory J. Wiggins, Jerome F. Grant, J. Rusty Rhea 2, Abdul Hakeem, Ashley B. Lamb, J. Patrick Parkman, Paris L. Lambdin, and Renee Follum, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2 USDA, Forest Service, Asheville, NC 3:40 75 Scymnus coniferarum (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), potential biological control agent of the hemlock woolly adelgid, Adelges tsugae (Hemiptera: Adelgidae), in the eastern United States. Thomas McAvoy, Michael Montgomery 2, Richard C. McDonald 3, Mark J. Dalusky 4, Scott M. Salom, and Molly Darr, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, 2 USDA, Forest Service, Hamden, CT, 3 Symbiont Biological Pest Management, Sugar Grove, NC, 4 University of Georgia, Athens, GA 4:00 76 Progress toward preparing an environmental assessment for Scymnus camptodromus release as a predator of hemlock woolly adelgid. Melody A. Keena, Kelli Hoover 2, Samita Limbu 2, Katie Cassidy 2, Patrick C. Tobin 3, R. Talbot Trotter, and Michael Montgomery, USDA, Forest Service, Hamden, CT, 2 Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 3 USDA, Forest Service, Morgantown, WV 4:20 77 Leucopis spp. associated with hemlock woolly adelgid in the Pacific Northwest: Potential biocontrol agents in the East. Darrell W. Ross, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, Kimberly F. Wallin, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, Glenn R. Kohler, Washington State Department of Natural Resources, Olympia, WA, Sarah M. Grubin, Plant Industries Division, Elkins, WV, and Stephen D. Gaimari, Plant Pest Diagnostics Branch, Sacramento, CA 4:40 Concluding Remarks Member Symposium: Ecology and Conservation of Saproxylic Insects 200 C, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Michael L. Ferro, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA :30 78 Importance of arthropods to wood decay and other ecosystem services. Michael D. Ulyshen, USDA, Forest Service, Starkville, MS :45 79 Biology of New World saproxylic ants. Stephen P. Yanoviak, University of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR 29

132 Tuesday November 3 2:00 80 Evolution and diversity of Diptera inhabiting decaying wood. Matthew Bertone, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 2:5 8 Community assembly in saproxylic Diptera: Patterns and opportunities. Terry A. Wheeler, McGill University, Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, Québec, Canada 2:30 82 Overview of saproxylic Coleoptera. Matthew L. Gimmel, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 2:45 83 A survey of the use of woody debris by aquatic beetles, with an emphasis on Neotropical Lutrochidae. Crystal A. Maier, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 3:00 84 Presence and biology of elateroid beetles in decaying wood. Paul J. Johnson, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD 3:5 Break 3:30 85 The trials and tribulations of hunting Bothrideridae and Zopheridae. Nathan P. Lord, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 3:45 86 Fire-colored beetle larvae of North America (Coleoptera: Pyrochroidae: Pyrochroinae): Diversity, natural history, and conservation implications. Daniel K. Young, entomology.wisc.edu, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI U.S. Borax, Rio Tinto, Greenwood Village, CO 2:0 95 Mechanisms of action of borates as pesticides. Lina Nunes, Laboratório Nacional de Engenharia Civil, Lisboa, Portugal, and J. D. Lloyd, Nisus Corporation, Rockford, TN 2:30 96 Ten-year field tests of borates against termites. Paul Morris, FPInnovations, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada 2:50 97 Pest control in national parks using borates. Brian T. Forschler, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 3:0 98 Integrated termite control. Kristen van den Meiracker, North Greenville University, Tigerville, SC 3:30 99 Borates as part of a perimeter pest management program. Austin Frishman, AMF Pest Management Services, Inc., Boca Raton, FL 3: Pest control using borates in the livestock industry. J. Chad Gore, Rentokil North American Pest Control, Carnegie, PA 4:0 20 Borates - another option for bed bug control. Dini M. Miller, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA Tuesday November 3 4:00 87 Beavers, boles and beetles: An assemblage of Coleoptera on beaver-girdled trees. Warren E. Steiner, si.edu, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 4:5 88 Morphology and systematics of Onciderini (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Lamiinae). Eugenio H. Nearns, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 4:30 89 Niche partitioning in Neotropical wood- and barkboring beetles, with conservation implications. Amy Berkov, City College of New York, NY 4:45 90 Geographic analysis of patterns of diversity of bark and ambrosia beetles in eastern North America. Thomas H. Atkinson, University of Texas, Austin, TX 5:00 9 Bugwood s tools as a common forum for ecological entomology. J. LaForest, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA 5:5 92 Capturing legacy coarse woody debris as a resource of future researchers. Michael L. Ferro, com, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA Member Symposium: Pest Control with Borates: The Science and the Art 200 D, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Janet Kintz-Early and Mark E. Mankowski 2, Nisus Corporation, Rockford, TN, 2 U.S. Borax, Rio Tinto, Greenwood Village, CO :30 93 History and use of borates as biocides. Mark E. Mankowski, U.S. Borax, Rio Tinto, Greenwood Village, CO :50 94 From FIFRA to REACH, the role of regulations in shaping the uses of borates. Craig Bernard, Member Symposium: Purdue s Contribution to ESA and Entomology: 00 Year Perspective. Ballroom A, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Tom Turpin, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 2:00 Introduction 2: Indiana entomological history: People, places and events. Serena Gross and Gabriel P. Hughes, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 2: Evolution of the urban pest control industry (honoring J. J. Davis and John Osmun). Robert M. Corrigan, com, RMC Pest Management Consulting, Richmond, IN 2: Insect and plant interactions: Then and now (honoring Hessian Fly USDA program). Jesusa C. Legaspi, usda.gov, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Tallahassee, FL 3: Capturing insects with pen and lens (honoring Don Schuder and Arwin Provonsha). Thomas V. Myers, com, All-Rite Pest Control, Lexington, KY 3:25 Break - Purdue Centennial Celebration Warm Up 3: Managing six-legged pests in farm and field (honoring Larry Pedigo and extension pest management programs). Kevin Steffey, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN 4: Sharing knowledge and excitement about insects (honoring Milan Busching). Eugene D. White II, earthlink.net, Rose Pest Solutions, White Lake, MI 4: Tarot cards, fortune cookies, and woollyworms: Predicting the future of entomology. J. Steve Yaninek, purdue.edu, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 30

133 Tuesday November 3 Tuesday November 3 4:25 Hail Purdue with Bug Scouts Three (Video of Purdue Environment/Insect Events) 4:35 Adjourn to Centennial Celebration with Spirits and Vittles Galore! Ten-Minute Papers, MUVE Section: Bed Bugs, Ants, and Other Urban Pests Salon C (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderators: Dina Richman and Karen M. Vail 2, FMC Corporation, Philadelphia, PA, 2 University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN :30 Introductory Remarks : A review of results from Verifi TM Bed Bug Detector lab and field assays. Dina Richman, FMC Corporation, Philadelphia, PA :45 20 Bed bug symbionts: Traumatic dissemination? Mark H. Goodman, Michael F. Potter, and Kenneth F. Haynes, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY :57 2 Effects of bed bug (Cimex lectularius L.) saliva on human skin. Jerome Goddard, and Kristine T. Edwards, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 2:09 22 Bed bug (Cimex lectularius L.) survivorship at various temperatures. Molly L. Stedfast, and Dini M. Miller, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 2:2 23 Capture of bed bugs by bean leaves: The physical interface between plant and insect. Catherine Loudon, uci.edu, Megan W. Szyndler, Kenneth F. Haynes 2, Michael F. Potter 2, and Robert M. Corn, University of California, Irvine, CA, 2 University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 2:33 24 Cuticular analysis of the pyrethroid resistant bed bugs Cimex lectularius L. Reina Koganemaru, Dini M. Miller, and Zach N. Adelman, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 2:45 25 Contact and residual efficacy of selected insecticides against the bed bug (Cimex lectularius). Susan C. Jones and Joshua L. Bryant, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 2:57 Break 3:2 26 Efficacy of essential oil based insecticides for bed bug (Cimex lectularius) control. Narinderpal Singh, aesop.rutgers.edu, Changlu Wang, and Richard Cooper, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 3:24 27 Defensive chemicals of Nylanderia pubens (Hymnoptera: Formicidae) and their toxicity to red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Jian Chen, jian. Tahir Rashid 2, Guolei Feng 2, David Oi 3, and Bart Drees 4, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Stoneville, MS, 2 Alcorn State University, Mound Bayou, MS, 3 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL, 4 Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 3:36 28 New research on Varroa destructor. Diana Sammataro, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Tucson, AZ 3:48 29 Standard and high volume-diluted pesticide applications for perimeter odorous house ant control. Karen M. Vail, Jennifer Chandler, and Clay Scherer 2, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2 DuPont Crop Protection, Newark, DE 4: Effectiveness of selected bait products for control of an invasive ant, Pachycondyla chinensis. Ying Mo, com, Patricia A. Zungoli, Eric P. Benson, Patrick D. Gerard, and Brittany Ellis, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 4:2 22 Adult transport in the Asian needle ant, Pachycondyla chinensis. Hamilton R. Allen, Patricia A. Zungoli, and Eric P. Benson, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 4: Essential oils and their compositions as spatial repellents for pestiferous social wasps. Qing-He Zhang, rescue.com, Rod G. Schneidmiller, and Doreen Hoover, Sterling International, Inc., Spokane, WA 4: Exotic brown widow versus native black widow spiders in urban southern California. Marty Lewis, com, and Dessie L. A. Underwood, California State University, Long Beach, CA 4:48 Concluding Remarks Ten-Minute Papers, MUVE Section: Mosquitoes, Part 30 A, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Michael G. Kaufman and Michelle Sanford 2, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 2 University of California, Davis, CA :30 Introductory Remarks : Mosquito-breeding site investigation and pesticide residue detection by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after the dengue fever outbreak in Yiwu, Zhejiang Province. Tian-ci Yang, Zhejiang Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Hangzhou 3005, China : Control of malaria and dengue vectros in Pakistan. Inamullah Khan, Nuclear Institute for Food and Agriculture, Peshawar, Pakistan : Examining the population structure of Anopheles gambiae s.s. in West Africa using RAD-Seq. Michelle Sanford, Yoosook Lee, Abdrahamane Fofana 2, Clare Marsden, Anthony Cornel, and Gregory Lanzaro, University of California, Davis, CA, 2 Malaria Research and Training Center, Bamako, Mali 2: Topographic based models for predicting malaria vector breeding habitat in western Kenya. Jephtha Christopher Nmor, Toshihiko Sunahara, and Noboru Minakawa, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki, Japan 2:2 228 Functional characterization of aquaporins in the disease vectors Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus. Lisa L. Drake, Sarah E. Aguirre, and Immo A. Hansen, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 2: The prevalence of the mosquito predator, Toxorhynchites splendens larvae, along with its prey, Aedes albopictus larvae, in Malaysia. Nurhafiza Mohamad, yahoo.com, and Wan Fatma Zuharah Wan Mustapha, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Minden, Penang, Malaysia 3

134 Tuesday November 3 2: Dual treatment enhanced transfer of insect growth regulator from autodissemination station to mosquito oviposition sites. Yi Wang, Jacques Bertrand 2, Devi S. Suman, Limin Dong, and Randy Gaugler, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, 2 Navy Entomology Center of Excellence, Gainesville, FL 2:57 23 Insecticide susceptibility of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) in Lahore City, Pakistan. Farkhanda Manzoor, Lahore College for Women University, Lahore, Pakistan 3:09 Break D. Harwood, and William E. Snyder 2, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 2 Washington State University, Pullman, WA 2:09 24 Feasibility of SIT to control red palm weevil (Rhynchophorus ferrugineus Olivier): An integrated physiological, ecological and genetic approach. Massimo Cristofaro, massimo. Silvia Arnone, Sergio Musmeci, Raffaele Sasso, Antonella Lai, Alessio De Biase 2, Alessandra La Marca, Silvia Belvedere, Veronica Marcari, Gabriele Senia, and Silvia Catarci 3, Agenzia nazionale per le nuove tecnologie, l energia e lo sviluppo economico sostenibile, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Labor, Rome, Italy, 2 University of Rome, Rome, Italy, 3 Biotechnology and Biological Control Agency, Sacrofano, Roma, Italy Tuesday November 3 3: Detection of dengue viruses in Aedes mosquitoes from different localities of Lahore, Pakistan. Nusrat Jahan, GC University, Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan 3: Growth of Aedes triseriatus (Diptera: Culicidae) larvae on individual strains or assemblages of microorganisms. Michael G. Kaufman, Craig Bateman, and Edward D. Walker, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 3: Molecular differences resulting from larval growth conditions in Aedes aegypti. David P. Price, com, and Immo A. Hansen, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 4: Ascogregarina parasites: New findings on host and parasite interactions. John Soghigian, Julie A. Erthal, Linda Valsdottir, Matt Warndorf, and Todd P. Livdahl, Clark University, Worcester, MA 4:2 236 Larval rearing temperature influences the effect of malathion on Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) life history traits and immune responses. Ephantus J. Muturi, edu, University of Illinois, Champaign, IL 4: Effect of intra-specific larval competition on expression of immune genes in Sindbis virus-infected Aedes aegypti. Chang- Hyun Kim, and Ephantus J. Muturi, University of Illinois, Champaign, IL 4:36 Concluding Remarks Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section: Biological Control 2 Summit (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderators: Christine Dieckhoff and Jian J. Duan, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Newark, DE :30 Introductory Remarks : Integration of biological control and native seeding to restore invaded plant communities. Kiri Joy Cutting, and Judith A. Hough-Goldstein, University of Delaware, Newark, DE : Enhanced insecticidal activity through combination of two entomopathogens. Ninfa M. Rosas-Garcia, Nadia D. Guido-Cira, and Jesús M. Villegas-Mendoza, Centro de Biotecnología Genómica, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Reynosa, México : Molecular characterization of the feeding habits of a predatory insect community in Washington potatoes. Eric G. Chapman, Christine Ann Lynch 2, James 2:2 242 Integrated management of sweetpotato weevil (Cylas puncticollis: Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Ethiopia: Focuses on cultural practices and resistant variety. Emana Getu Degaga, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 2: Olfactory response by Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) when presented with Diaphorina citri (Homoptera: Psyllidae) and Aphis craccivora (Homoptera: Aphididae). Joel A. Mendez, Jawwad A. Qureshi, and Philip A. Stansly, University of Florida, Immokalee, FL 2: Influence of the surrounding landscape on crop colonization by an insect pest. Frances S. Sivakoff, Frances_ North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, Jay A. Rosenheim, University of California, Davis, CA, Pierre Dutilleul, McGill University, St-Anne de Bellevue, Québec, Canada, and Yves Carriere, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 2: Measuring and designing pest suppressive landscapes for sustainable agricultural practice. Nancy A. Schellhorn, nancy. and Hazel R. Parry, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Dutton Park, Queensland, Australia 3:09 Break 3: Secondary metabolites from Artemisia sp. that prevent fruit infestation by codling moth neonates. Ariel Mollhagen, Kevin Durden 2, Noelle P. Mollhagen, Cory Creed, and Maciej A. Pszczolkowski, Missouri State University, Mountain Grove, MO, 2 University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 3: Impact of a generalist on a specialized plant-pollinator relationship: Interactions among Lasioglossum sg Dialictus, Centris rhodopus, and the oil-flower plant Krameria erecta in central Arizona. Laura E. Hannon Williams, and Deborah L. Finke, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 3: Trap crops for managing stink and leaf-footed bugs of peaches in Alabama. Clement Akotsen-Mensah, edu, Joseph Anikwe 2, and Henry Y. Fadamiro, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, 2 University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria 4: Vector-virus interactions: Implications for sustainable management of grape leafroll disease. Ashfaq A. Sial, yahoo.com, Christina M. Wistrom, Rodrigo P. P. Almeida, and Kent M. Daane, University of California, Berkeley, CA 4:2 250 Relative growth rates and competitive interactions of Rickettsia infected and uninfected sweetpotato whiteflies (Bemisia tabaci) on cotton. Peter Asiimwe, Suzanne E. Kelly, and Martha S. Hunter, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 32

135 Tuesday November 3 Tuesday November 3 4:24 25 Alfalfa stem nematode counteracts aphid resistance in alfalfa. Ricardo A. Ramirez, Utah State University, Logan, UT 4: Influence of endophyte-enhanced turfgrass on entomopathogenic nematode success. Lori R. Spears, usu.edu, and Ricardo A. Ramirez, Utah State University, Logan, UT 4: Production and performance of a greenhouse-based rearing system for the Russian knapweed gall midge (Jaapiella ivannikovi). Richard Hansen, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Fort Collins, CO 5:00 Concluding Remarks Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section: Invasive Species Salon B (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderators: David G. Hall and Srinivas K. Lanka 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Fort Pierce, FL, 2 Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA :30 Introductory Remarks : Introduction history and patterns of spread of an introduced parasitoid. Cheryl L. Bowker, edu, May R. Berenbaum 2, and Paul J. Ode, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, 2 University of Illinois, Urbana, IL : Comparison of entomofauna between native and medusahead-invaded habitats in northeastern California and northwestern Nevada. Kirk C. Tonkel, Carly Mathat 2, and Brian G. Rector, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Reno, NV, 2 University of Nevada, Reno, NV : Mite species causing damage to tropical fruit. Jorge E. Peña, University of Florida, Homestead, FL, C. W. Welbourn, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, Ronald Ochoa, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD, and Jose Carlos V. Rodrigues, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR 2: Defining ecotypic variation in the invasive moth, Cactoblastis cactorum (Berg), and its implication for spread in North America. Christopher P. Brooks, edu, and Gary N. Ervin, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 2:2 258 Spatial pattern of infestation risk and management of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug in corn and soybeans. P. Dilip Venugopal, Galen P. Dively, and William O. Lamp, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 2: Impact and management of brown marmorated stink bug in mid-atlantic soybean. D. Ames Herbert, Galen P. Dively 2, Katherine L. Kamminga 3, David R. Owens, Joanne Whalen 4, Cerruti Hooks 2, P. Dilip Venugopal 2, and Peter Coffey 2, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Suffolk, VA, 2 University of Maryland, College Park Maryland, MD, 3 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, 4 University of Delaware, Newark, DE 2: Does host origin influence patterns of utilization in brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys)? Erik J. Bergmann, Holly M. Martinson, and Michael J. Raupp, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 2:57 26 Evidence that explains absence of a latent period for Xylella fastidiosa in its sharpshooter vectors. Elaine Backus, Elaine. USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Parlier, CA 3:09 Break 3: First report of potato psyllid (Hemiptera: Triozidae) overwintering in the lower Columbia Basin of Oregon and Washington. Alexzandra F. Murphy, oregonstate.edu, Silvia I. Rondon, and Andrew S. Jensen 2, Oregon State University, Hermiston, OR, 2 Idaho, Oregon, and Washington Potato Commissions, Eagle, ID 3: Behavioral, ultrastructural, and chemical studies on the honeydew excretions in nymphs and adults of the Asian citrus psyllid, vector of citrus huanglongbing bacterium. El-Desouky Ammar, Rocco T. Alessandro, and David G. Hall, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Fort Pierce, FL 3: Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) tolerance to heat. David G. Hall, and Matthew G. Hentz, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Fort Pierce, FL 4: Spectral sensitivity of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri. Sandra A. Allan, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL 4:2 266 The salivary canal in the maxillary stylets of younger nymphs of the Asian citrus psyllid may be a barrier to transmission of citrus huanglongbing bacterium. David G. Hall and El-Desouky Ammar, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Fort Pierce, FL 4: Effect of ACP control on citrus leafminer can both pests be managed simultaneously? Moneen Jones, ufl.edu, and Philip A. Stansly, University of Florida, Immokalee, FL 4: Novel methods for dissemination of Isaria fumosorosea and control of Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, in residential citrus. Andrew Chow, Christopher Dunlap 2, Daniel Flores 3, Mark A. Jackson 2, William Meikle 4, Mamoudou Setamou, and Joseph Patt 5, Texas A&M University, Kingsville, Weslaco, TX, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Peoria, IL, 3 USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Edinburg, TX, 4 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Weslaco, TX, 5 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Fort Pierce, FL 4: Electroantennographic responses of the Asian citrus psyllid to citrus volatiles. Paul S. Robbins, usda.gov, Lukasz, L. Stelinski 2, and Stephen L. Lapointe, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Fort Pierce, FL, 2 University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL 5: System specific RNA interference induced mortality in the Asian citrus psyllid. J. Ramos, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Fort Pierce, FL 5:2 27 Effect of insecticidal peptides on the life history and behaviour of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, and brown citrus aphid, Toxoptera citricidus. Harsimran Gill, harsimrangill. Gaurav Goyal, Siddarame Gowda, and Kirsten S. Pelz-Stelinski, University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL 5:24 Concluding Remarks Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section: Pollinators 300 D, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Theresa L. Pitts-Singer and Logan M. Minter 2, USDA, 33

136 Tuesday November 3 Agricultural Research Service, Logan, UT, 2 University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY :30 Introductory Remarks : Attracting pollinators in atemoya: Commercial lures act synergistically when combined. David Alan Jenkins, David. Andrew R. Cline 2, Brian M. Irish, and Ricardo Goenaga, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Mayaguez, PR, 2 California Department of Food and Agriculture, Sacramento, CA : Pollinating insect communities in semi-natural grasslands managed for conservation benefits and biomass production. Joshua W. Campbell, James A. Martin 2, Samuel K. Riffell 2, Jerrold L. Belant 2, and L. Wes Burger 2, High Point University, High Point, NC, 2 Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS : Enhancing wild bees in agricultural landscapes: An experimental approach to quantifying foraging distances. Silvia Dorn, Antonia Zurbuchen, and Andreas Mueller, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland 4: Differential effects of Varroa infestations: Honey bee resistance or mite virulence? Berry J. Brosi, Jacobus C. De Roode, Jennifer Berry 2, Travis Dynes, and Keith Delaplane 3, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, 2 University of Georgia, Watkinsville, GA, 3 University of Georgia, Athens, GA 4:2 284 Where is the dance floor? Temporal variation in waggle dance location in the honey bee, Apis mellifera. Chelsea Corrigan, Ross Yost, Adam White, Ashley E. Wagner, Michele L. Joyner, Edith Seier, and Darrell Moore, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 4: Mathematical modeling of dance floor location in the honey bee, Apis mellifera. Adam White, etsu.edu, Ross Yost, Chelsea Corrigan, Ashley E. Wagner, Michele L. Joyner, Edith Seier, and Darrell Moore, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 4: The effects of memory and learning constraints on short-term foraging specialization in bees: An individual-based modeling approach. Carolyn A. Ayers, Paul R. Armsworth 2, and Berry J. Brosi, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, 2 University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN Tuesday November 3 2: Unusual nest density of a native bumble bee, Bombus nevadensis, in an agricultural landscape. Sujaya Rao, oregonstate.edu, and Kimberly Skyrm, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 2:2 276 Wild bumble bee (Bombus) and Nosema (Microsporidia: Nosematidae) infection levels associated with lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) production and commercial bumble bee pollinators. Sara Bushmann, sara_ and Frank Drummond, University of Maine, Orono, ME 2: Re-establishing pollinator communities and pollination services with hedgerow restoration in intensive agricultural landscapes. Lora Morandin, and Claire Kremen, University of California, Berkeley, CA 2: The microbial dynamics of pollination landscapes: Plant nectar and honey bees share beneficial bacteria. Kirk E. Anderson, Timothy Sheehan 2, Beryl M. Jones, Brendon Mott, Alexander R. Walton 2, and Vanessa Corby-Harris, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Tucson, AZ, 2 University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 2:57 Break 3:2 279 The influence of bee release points and nest density on Osmia lignaria (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) reproductive success in a commercial almond orchard. Derek R. Artz, usda.gov, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, North Logan, UT, and Theresa L. Pitts-Singer, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Logan, UT 3: Measuring the performance of honey bee pollinators: Bagging effects, nectar volume, and pollen deposition. Joan M. Leong, Jacob M. Cecala, and Sarah T. Saleemi, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA 3:36 28 The effects of commonly used miticides on honey bee (Apis mellifera) colony growth and queen survival. Juliana Rangel, David R. Tarpy, and Jennifer J. Keller, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 3: From study of honey bee P450s to honey bee management. Wenfu Mao, Mary Schuler, and May R. Berenbaum, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 4: Proteomic marker-assisted selection in honey bees. Stephen F. Pernal, Shelley E. Hoover, Heather A. Higo 2, Elizabeth Huxter 3, Marta M. Guarna 4, and Leonard J. Foster 4, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Beaverlodge, Alberta, Canada, 2 University of British Columbia, Langley, British Columbia, Canada, 3 Kettle Valley Queens, Grand Forks, British Columbia, Canada, 4 University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada 5:00 Concluding Remarks Ten-Minute Papers, SysEB Section: Ecology and Behavior 30 D, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: William R. Kuhn and Dominic Evangelista, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ :30 Introductory Remarks : Bacterial endosymbionts of Sitobion avenae: Transmission and ecological interactions. Hussein Alkhedir, Petr Karlovsky, and Stefan Vidal, Georg-August- Universität, Goettingen, Lower Saxony, Germany : Environmental effects on pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) defensive bacterial symbionts. Andrew H. Smith, drexel.edu, and Jacob A. Russell, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA : Evolution of diet breadth in Melissodes Latreille based on their phylogeny. Karen W. Wright, and Kelly B. Miller, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 2:03 29 Investigating host plant associated genetic differentiation in two Diatraea spp. (Lepidoptera: Crambidae). Andrea L. Joyce, Jose Miguel Sermeno 2, Leopoldo Serrano 2, Miguel R. Paniagua 3, and M. Alma Solis 4, University of California, Merced, CA, 2 University of El Salvador, San Salvador, El Salvador, 3 Hidroexpo S.A. de C.V, San Juan Opico, La Libertad, El Salvador, 4 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Washington, DC 2:3 292 Genetic variation in populations of two tachinid parasitoids of Diatraea spp (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) on different 34

137 Tuesday November 3 Tuesday November 3 host plants. Miguel R. Paniagua, Jose Miguel Sermeno 2, Leopoldo Serrano 2, and Andrea L. Joyce 3, Hidroexpo S.A. de C.V, San Juan Opico, La Libertad, El Salvador, 2 University of El Salvador, San Salvador, El Salvador, 3 University of California, Merced, CA 2: Is parasitoid host specificity dynamic? Keith R. Hopper, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Newark, DE, Sean M. Prager, University of California, Riverside, CA, and George E. Heimpel, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 2: Diploid males sire triploid females in the Wolbachiainfected parasitoid wasp, Trichogramma kaykai Pinto & Stouthamer (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae). Genet M. Tulgetske, genet. and Richard Stouthamer, University of California, Riverside, CA 2: Multispecies analysis of ecological speciation in Timema stick insects. Daniel J. Funk, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, and Patrik Nosil, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, England 2:53 Break 3: Genotype- by- environment interactions and sexual selection in the leaf-footed cactus bugs, Narnia femorata (Hemiptera: Coreidae). Christine W. Miller, Salvador A. Gezen, Patricio Munoz, and Allen J. Moore 2, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2 University of Georgia, Athens, GA 3:8 297 Interspecies sexual conflict: Evidence of interspecies sexual mimicry in a sympatric pair of traumatically inseminating insects. Nikolai J. Tatarnic, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia 3: How long-term ecological monitoring can inform fundamental questions in ecology and evolution: Abundance and phenology in butterfly mimicry systems. Elizabeth C. Long, Kyle F. Edwards 2, and Arthur M. Shapiro, University of California, Davis, CA, 2 Michigan State University, Hickory Corners, MI 3: Preferences of four species of Drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae) for differents bait types and crop varieties in southcentral Washington state, U.S.A. Luz D. Barrantes-Barrantes, Douglas B. Walsh, and Martin Hauser 2, Washington State University, Prosser, WA, 2 California Department of Food and Agriculture, Sacramento, CA 3: Diel rhythm in locomotor activity and antipredator behavior in three species of orb-weaving spiders (Araneae: Araneidae). Thomas C. Jones, J. Colton Watts, T. Chris Brown, and Darrell Moore, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 3:58 30 The genetic basis of saltwater tolerance in mosquitoes. Bradley J. White, University of California, Riverside, CA 4: An assessment of the dichotomous flight strategies in corduliid dragonflies. William R. Kuhn, and Jessica L. Ware, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ 4:8 303 The conundrum of gall morphology: Do carnivore pressures shape and maintain gall morphology in the Asteromyia carbonifera complex? Jeremy Heath, and John O. Stireman, Wright State University, Dayton, OH 4:28 Concluding Remarks Ten-Minute Papers, SysEB Section: Phylogeny and Taxonomy 30 C, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Torsten Dikow and Hojun Song 2, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL, 2 University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL :30 Introductory Remarks : The KITE insect phylogenetics initiative. Karl M. Kjer, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, Bernhard Misof, Museum Alexander Koenig, Bonn, Germany, and Xin Zhou, Beijing Genomics Institute, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China : A preliminary phylogenetic hypothesis of Prostigmata (Acari: Trombidiformes). Michael Skvarla, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR : A phylogeny of a grasshopper family Acrididae (Insecta: Orthoptera) based on molecular evidence. Hojun Song, edu, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 2: Phylogeny, revision, and morphological evolution within the flower mantises (Mantodea: Hymenopodidae). Gavin J. Svenson, Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Cleveland, OH 2: Molecular perspectives on the global diversification of the Cicadoidea (cicadas). David C. Marshall, uconn.edu, Katherine B. R. Hill, and Chris Simon, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 2: Too many tribes: A molecular phylogeny of a morphologically diverse Asian cicada clade (Auchenorrhyncha: Cicadidae). Katherine B. R. Hill, David C. Marshall, and Chris Simon, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 2: species & 0,000 specimens: A systematic revision of the New World assassin bug genus Zelus Fabricius (Reduviidae: Harpactorinae). Guanyang Zhang, and Christiane Weirauch, University of California, Riverside, CA 2:56 3 Preliminary phylogenetic analysis of North American Exaeretia (Gelechioidea; Elachistidae; Depressariinae). Melissa S. Sisson, and Sibyl R. Bucheli, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 3:08 32 Preliminary molecular phylogeny of Limacodidae (Lepidoptera: Zygaenoidea) and the evolution of sluglike caterpillars. Susan J. Weller, Jennifer Zaspel 2, Marc Epstein 3, and C. Taylor Wardwell, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, 2 University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh, WI, 3 California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA), Sacramento, CA 3:20 33 A molecular phylogeny for the pyraloid moths (Lepidoptera: Pyraloidea). Jerome C. Regier, Charles Mitter, M. Alma Solis, 2, James E. Hayden 3, Bernard Landry 4, Matthias Nuss 5, Thomas Simonsen 6, Shen-horn Yen 7, Andreas Zwick 8, and Michael C. Cummings, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Washington, DC, 3 Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Gainesville, FL, 4 Muséum National d Histoire Naturelle, Paris, Geneva, Switzerland, 5 Senckenberg Naturhistorische Sammlungen Dresden Museum für Tierkunde, Dresden, Germany, 6 Natural History Museum, London, England, 7 Department of Biological Sciences, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, 8 State Museum of Natural History Stuttgart, Stuttgart, Germany 35

138 Tuesday November 3 Tuesday November 3 3:32 Break 3:42 34 Backbone phylogeny of Lepidoptera estimated from 9 genes/4.8 kb in 483 exemplars. Jerome C. Regier, Charles Mitter, Michael C. Cummings, Don Davis 2, Susan J. Weller 3, Jae-Cheon Sohn, Cynthia Parr 2, John W. Brown 4, Akito Yuji Kawahara, Andreas Zwick 5, and Joaquin Baixeras 6, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, 2 National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian, Washington, DC, 3 University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, 4 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Washington, DC, 5 State Museum of Natural History Stuttgart, Germany, 6 Institut Cavanilles de Biodiversitat i Biologia Evolutiva, Valencia, Spain 3:54 35 Matinal and crepuscular bees of the genus Ptiloglossa Smith (Hymenoptera: Colletidae). Rita Isabel Vélez-Ruiz, rita. Severin-McDaniel Insect Research Collection, Brookings, SD 4:06 36 Species discovery, host associations and genetic characterization of North American Coptera (Hymenoptera: Diapriidae). James J. Smith, Serdar Satar 2, Gabriela Hamerlinck 3, Matthew J. Yoder 4, and Andrew A. Forbes 3, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 2 Cukurova University, Adana, Balcali, Turkey, 3 University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, 4 University of Illinois, llinois Natural History Survey, Champaign, IL 4:8 37 Pattern of host shifts among parasitoid wasps as indicated by a combined morphology and molecular phylogenetic analysis of the superfamily Platygastroidea (Hymenoptera). Norman F. Johnson, Alejandro A. Valerio, Luciana Musetti, Charuwat Taekul, Elijah Talamas, Andrew Polaszek 2, Andrew D. Austin 3, and Joseph Cora, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 2 Natural History Museum, London, United Kingdom, 3 University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia 4:30 38 Phylogeny and historical biogeography of Apioceridae and Mydidae inferred from morphological characters of imagines (Diptera: Asiloidea). Torsten Dikow, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL 4:42 39 A molecular phylogeny of deer flies and their closest relatives. Mauren Turcatel, and Brian M. Wiegmann, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 4: Resolving rapid radiations within Diptera: Transcriptomics to expand the evidence for higher-level fly phylogeny. Michelle D. Trautwein, Keith M. Bayless 2, and Brian M. Wiegmann 2, North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, Raleigh, NC, 2 North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 5:06 32 Reconciling succeeding taxonomic classifications. Nico M. Franz, Bertram Ludaescher 2, and Mingmin Chen 2, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, 2 University of California, Davis, CA 5:8 322 Four really cool things about introns: Evolution, phylogenetic signal, species identification, and bio-monitoring. Barbara J. Sharanowski, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada 5:30 Concluding Remarks Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section: Insect Resistance Management 30 B, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Bruce E. Hibbard and Jeannette C. Martinez 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Columbia, MO, 2 United States Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Pesticide Programs, Washington, DC 2:00 Introductory Remarks 2: Characterizing resistance and potential cross resistance of western corn rootworm larvae to transgenic corn. Bruce E. Hibbard, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Columbia, MO 2:5 324 Evaluation of the potential development of cross resistance between eight transgenic corn types in western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera). Sarah N. Zukoff, mail.missouri.edu, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, and Bruce E. Hibbard, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Columbia, MO 2: Characterization of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) colonies selected for tolerance to event DAS Stephen D. Thompson, Analiza P. Alves, Megan McCallister, and Matt Wihlm, Pioneer Hi- Bred International, Inc., Johnston, IA 2: Evaluation of a martyr hypothesis regarding the feeding behavior of larval western corn rootworm on Cry3Bb corn in field and laboratory experiments. Ryan Winslow Geisert, missouri.edu, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, and Bruce E. Hibbard, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Columbia, MO 2:5 327 Monitoring for field resistance in western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) to Cry34/35Ab in Bt maize. Miles Lepping, Analiza P. Alves 2, Nicholas Storer 3, and Elizabeth Owens 2, Dow AgroSciences, Indianaoplis, IN, 2 Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., Johnston, IA, 3 Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN 3:03 Break 3:8 328 Field trial performance of SmartStax for control of western corn rootworm. Kevin Johnson, Dow AgroSciences, Danville, IL, Patricia Prasifka, Dow AgroSciences, West Fargo, ND, Dwain M. Rule, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN, Amanda Jacobson, Dow AgroSciences, West Lafayette, IN, and Nicholas Storer, Dow AgroSciences, Kensington, MD 3: Field trial performance of Refuge Advanced powered by SmartStax for control of western bean cutworm in the U.S. Corn Belt. Bradley W. Hopkins, Dwain M. Rule, com 2, William H. Hendrix 2, Patricia Prasifka 3, Amanda Jacobson 4, and Nicholas Storer 5, Dow AgroSciences, Westerville, OH, 2 Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN, 3 Dow AgroSciences, West Fargo, ND, 4 Dow AgroSciences, West Lafayette, IN, 5 Dow AgroSciences, Kensington, MD 3: Evaluation of western corn rootworm susceptibility to rootworm Bt corn traits in Nebraska. Lance J. Meinke, unl.edu, Thomas E. Hunt 2, Greg R. Kruger 3, Robert J. Wright, and S. David Wangila 4, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 2 University of Nebraska, Concord, NE, 3 University of Nebraska, North Platte, NE, 4 Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA 36 3:54 33 Efficacy and yield performance of multiple blended refuge strategies with a CryAb-CryF-Vip3A stacked hybrid

139 Tuesday November 3 Tuesday November 3 against corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea) in the southern U.S. Jarrod T. Hardke, Robert L. Rorie, Murdick J. McLeod 2, and Steven R. Paszkiewicz 3, Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., Union City, TN, 2 Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., Windfall, IN, 3 Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., Johnston, IA 4: Compelling evidence of resistance to CryF corn in fall armyworm collected from south Florida. Fangneng Huang, Jawwad A. Qureshi 2, Ying Niu, Fei Yang, David Andow 3, B. Rogers Leonard, Robert L. Meagher 4, Ronnie Levy 5, Liping Zhang, and S. David Wangila, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA, 2 University of Florida, Immokalee, FL, 3 University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, 4 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL, 5 Louisiana State University AgCenter, Alexandria, LA 4:8 333 Fitness costs associated with Bt resistance in the European corn borer. Jennifer Petzold Maxwell, iastate.edu, Richard L. Hellmich 2, Blair D. Siegfried 3, and Aaron J. Gassmann, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Ames, IA, 3 University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 4:30 Concluding Remarks Tuesday, November 3, 202, Evening Linnaean Games Final Rounds Exhibit Hall B, Floor One (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Deane K. Zahn, Dow AgroSciences LLC, Lincoln, NE, and Phillip G. Mulder, Jr., Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 5:00 7:30 PM Student Awards Session Exhibit Hall B, Floor One (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Judith H. Myers, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada 7:30 Welcoming Remarks 7:33 ESA Student Awards - Judith H. Myers, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada 7:48 Entomological Foundation Awards Thomas A. Green, Chair, Entomological Foundation Board of Directors, IPM Institute of North America, Inc., Madison, WI 7:53 Student Competition for the President s Prize - Luis A. Cañas, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH, and Marianne Alleyne, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 8:8 Student Debate Winners - Joy Lynn Newton, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 8:23 Linnaean Games Winners - Deane K. Zahn, Dow AgroSciences LLC, Lincoln, NE, and Phillip G. Mulder, Jr., Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 8:28 Concluding Remarks - Judith H. Myers, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada Member Symposium: Overseas Chinese Entomologists Association (OCEA): Global Collaboration and Career Development in Entomology 200 A, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Shiyou Li, Haobo Jiang 2, and Nannan Liu 3, Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, 2 Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, 3 Auburn University, Auburn, AL 6:00 Welcoming and Introductory Remarks. Shiyou Li, gc.ca, Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 6: Effects of Wolbachia and Cardinium on the reproduction of the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae. Xiao-Yue Hong, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China 6: Career development and successful job hunting strategies in life sciences. Kun-Yan Zhu, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 7: Recruiting programs in Nanjing Agricultural University. Xiao-Yue Hong, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China 7:0 337 How to establish the short- and long-term collaboration between entomologists in China and abroad? Xiwu Gao, China Agricultrual University, Beijing, China 7: Strategies, tricks and traps for research funding applications in China. T. X. Liu, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi, China 7:50 Break 8: OCEA highlights of the year 202. Haobo Jiang, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 8:5 OCEA financial report of 202. Nannan Liu, edu, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 8:35 OCEA student paper competition and awards. Shiyou Li, nrcan.gc.ca, Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 8:55 OCEA business meeting and election. Shiyou Li, gc.ca, Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 9:25 OCEA service recognition awards. Haobo Jiang, okstate.edu, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK Member Symposium: IOBC Workshop Symposium: Risk Assessment for Natural Enemies used for Classical Arthropod Biocontrol: From Regulatory Requirements to Science-Based Approaches Ballroom F, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Jian J. Duan, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Newark, DE 6:00 Introduction. Jian J. Duan, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Newark, DE 37

140 Tuesday November 3 6: Current regulation of arthropod biocontrol agents: What it takes to get regulatory approval for biological control introductions. Robert H. Tichenor, gov, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Riverdale, MD 6:35 34 Quantitative risk assessment and host specificity testing - a case study with parasitoids of the invasive emerald ash borer. Jian J. Duan, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Newark, DE 7: Host specificity of predators of the hemlock woolly adelgid. Scott M. Salom, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 7: Centrifugal phylogenetic host specificity testing in aphid parasitoids. George E. Heimpel, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 8:05 Concluding Remarks. Jian J. Duan, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Newark, DE Member Symposium: Korean Young Entomologists (KYE) 200 D, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) 8: Attracting beneficial insects in apple orchard by using cowpea as a cover crop. Sunghoon Baek, com, Doo-Hyung Lee 2, Matthew I. McKinney, and Yong-Lak Park, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kearneysville, WV 8:9 35 Efficacy of herbal extracts against Japanese black pine bast scale, Matsucoccus thunbergianae (Homoptera: Margarodidae). Jin Sun Song, Suk Jun Lee, Chae Min Lee, DongWoon Lee, Young Hak Chung 2, and Dong Soo Kim 3, Kyungpook National University, Sangju, Gyeongbuk, South Korea, 2 Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Gyeongnam, South Korea, 3 Korea Forest Research Institute, Jinju, Gyeongnam, South Korea 8:3 352 New tools to improve pre-release host range prediction of Mogulones borraginis, a biocontrol agent for houndstongue. Ikju Park, Mark Schwarzländer, and Sanford D. Eigenbrode, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 8: Overwintering ecology of Lycorma delicatula (Hemiptera: Fulgoridae) in South Korea. Marana Park, and Joon-Ho Lee, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea 8:55 Concluding Remarks Member Symposium: Heteroptera Conference Tuesday November 3 Moderators and Organizers: Doo-Hyung Lee and Sunghoon Baek 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kearneysville, WV, 2 West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 6:00 Welcoming Remarks 6:0 344 How to find a faculty position that you will be happy with. Hojun Song, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 6: Getting faculty position in the U.S: Personal experience. Dong-Hwan Choe, University of California, Riverside, CA 6: Sampling and monitoring of black pine bast scale, Matsucoccus thunbergianae (Homoptera: Coccoidea), using stick trap in Korea. Dong Woon Lee, Young Hak Chung 2, Sang Myeong Lee, Ho Yul Choo 3, and Dong Soo Kim 4, Kyungpook National University, Sangju, Gyeongbuk, South Korea, 2 Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Gyeongnam, South Korea, 3 Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, Gyeongnam, South Korea, 4 Korea Forest Research Institute, Jinju, Gyeongnam, South Korea 7:0 347 Characterization of overwintering sites of Halyomorpha halys in natural landscapes. Doo-Hyung Lee, usda.gov, Starker E. Wright, and Tracy C. Leskey, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kearneysville, WV 7:8 348 Evolutionary aspects of insect two acetylcholinesterases. Young-Ho Kim, and Si Hyeock Lee, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea 7:35 Break 7:50 Introductory Remarks for Student Competition 7: Insect pests in vine orchards for export in Korea. Suk Jun Lee, Jin Sun Song 2, Chae Min Lee 2, and Dong Woon Lee 2, Dongbangagro Co., Ltd., Buyeo, Changnam, South Korea, 2 Kyungpook National University, Sangju, Gyeongbuk, South Korea 200 B, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Thomas J. Henry and Katrina L. Menard 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Washington, DC, 2 Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, Norman, OK 7: Ecology of tourist traps: Sticky plant hairs, insect carrion and scavenging predators. Billy Krimmel, com, University of California, Davis, CA 7: Madagascar s millipede assassin bugs (Reduviidae: Ectrichodiinae): A treasure trove of diversity. Michael Forthman, University of California, Riverside, CA 7: It s time to split-up: The redefinition of Phylini and new tribes in Phylinae. Katrina L. Menard, Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, Norman, OK 8: Big gaudy bugs: Exploring the morphology and taxonomy of Catacanthus and the Catacanthini. Michael A. Wall, sdnhm.org, San Diego Natural History Museum, San Diego, CA 8: Developmental genetics and allometry in the true bugs. David Angelini, American University, Washington, DC 8: Sympatry, sexual conflict and traumatic insemination in the Pacific. Nikolai J. Tatarnic, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia Member Symposium: North American Dipterists Society Meeting 200 C, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Keith M. Bayless, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 7:30 Welcoming Remarks 7: Two wings on the tundra: Diversity and ecology of arctic Diptera. Terry A. Wheeler, McGill 38

141 Tuesday November 3 Tuesday November 3 University, Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, Québec, Canada 7:55 36 Asiloidea field work in Australia and Namibia. Torsten Dikow, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL 8:5 362 Crane flies (Tipulidae sensu lato): Fragile legs supporting immense diversity. Matthew Bertone, matthew. North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 8: Progress and prospects in horse fly systematics throughout the Tabanidae PEET. Keith M. Bayless, edu, Bryan D. Lessard 2, Mauren Turcatel, Shelah Morita 3, David K. Yeates 2, and Brian M. Wiegmann, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, 2 Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Ecosystem Sciences, Acton, Australian Capital Territory, Australia, 3 Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC 8: Ultramorphology of eggs and first instar larvae in an egg-laying population of Blaesoxipha plinthopyga (Diptera: Sarcophagidae). Meaghan L. Pimsler, Thomas Pape 2, Jeffery K. Tomberlin, and Aaron M. Tarone, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 2 University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Hovedstaden, Denmark 9:5 365 Caught on the web: A dipterist s adventures with social media. Morgan D. Jackson, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada 9: MIDGEPEET (NSF): Advancements in dipterological research and education. John K. Moulton, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, Peter H. Adler, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, Gregory W. Courtney, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, Peter S. Cranston, University of California, Davis, CA and Bradley J. Sinclair, Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 9:55 Discussion 0:05 Concluding Remarks Member Symposium: The Coleopterist s Society Business Meeting Ballroom C, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Robert S. Anderson, Canadian Museum of Nature, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 7:30 Introductory Comments. Michael S. Caterino, sbnature2.org, Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, Santa Barbara, CA 7: Cucujoidea classification: Chipping away at a task beset with the most formidable difficulties. Joseph V. McHugh, mchugh. University of Georgia, Athens, GA 8:35 Break 8:50 Annual General Business Meeting Insect Photo Salon II Cumberland (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderator and Organizer: James E. Appleby, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 8:00 9:00 PM New in entomology from elsevier Use Code ESA30 at CheCkoUt for 30% OFF! Insect Pathology, 2 nd Edition Edited by Fernando E. Vega and Harry K. Kaya 202 / ISBN: Manual of Techniques in Invertebrate Pathology, 2 nd Edition Edited by Lawrence A. Lacey 202 / ISBN: Insect Pests of Potato Global Perspectives on Biology and Management Edited by Philippe Giordanengo, Charles Vincent and Andrei Alyokhin 203 / ISBN: Pests of Ornamental Trees, Shrubs and Flowers, 2 nd Edition By David V. Alford 202 / ISBN: Visit store.elsevier.com to order or for more information! 39

142 Wednesday, November 4 Wednesday, November 4, 202, Morning Poster Presentations Exhibit Hall A, Floor One (Knoxville Convention Center) Viewing: 8:00 am 2:00 pm Organizers: Andrew P. Norton and Paul J. Ode, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO Poster Presentatons: Section MUVE 2 D043 Effects of constant temperatures on development of the psocid Liposcelis fusciceps. Sandipa G. Gautam, okstate.edu, George P. Opit, and Kandara Shakya, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK D044 Fumigant toxicity of Mentha arviensis leaf extracts on Coptotermes heimi, Heterotermes indicola and their gut flagellates. Naveeda A. Qureshi, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan D045 The effect of gamma irradiation on the ovaries and testes of Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Phycitidae). Areej Kareem Al-Khalaf, Princess Nora Bint Abdulrahman University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Shoemaker 2, and David Oi 2, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL D0423 Palatability of field-collected eastern redcedar, Juniperus virginiana L., to the eastern subterranean termite, Reticulitermes flavipes Kollar (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae). Charles E. Konemann, and Brad Kard, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK D0424 Population structure of the stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (L.) (Diptera: Muscidae), assessed on a global scale using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism. Kathleen M. Kneeland, aol.com, S. R. Skoda 2, and John E. Foster, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kerrville, TX D0425 Seasonal prevalence of Cuterebra fontinella fontinella Clark among white-footed mice and other rodents in east-central Minnesota. Roger D. Moon, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, and Janet Jarnefeld, Metropolitan Mosquito Control District, St. Paul, MN D0426 Post-embryonic development of the compound eye of the bed bug, Cimex lectularius L. Gerald T. Baker, Amanda Lawrence, Richard Kuklinski, and Jerome Goddard, msstate.edu, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS D0427 Molecular characterization and immunolocalization of the olfactory co-recepter ORCO from the stable fly (Stomoxys calcitrans) and the horn fly (Haematobia irritans irritans). Pia Untalan Olafson, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kerrville, TX Wednesday, November 4 Poster Display D046 The effect of CO 2 and N 2 gases on different stages of Ephestia cautella (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). Khawaja Ghulam Rasool and Abdulrahman Saad Aldawood, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia D047 Identification of volatiles from waste larval rearing media that attract gravid screwworm flies. Muhammad Chaudhury, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Panama City, Panama, and Jerry Zhu, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Lincoln, NE D048 Molecular characterization of rickettsial agents and ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) from Sri Lanka. Gregory A. Dasch, gov, Maria L. Zambrano, Ranjan Premaratne 2, Senanayake A. M. Kularatne 3, and R. P. V. Jayanthe Rajapakse 3, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, 2 University of Kelaniya, Ragama, Sri Lanka, 3 University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka D049 Laboratory study of the influence of substrate type and temperature on the exploratory tunneling by Formosan subterranean termite. Bal Krishna Gautam, edu, and Gregg Henderson, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA D0420 The influence of fipronil on Reticulitermes flavipes (Kollar) feeding beyond treated plots. Thomas Shelton, USDA, Forest Service, Starkville, MS D042 The French Quarter pilot program for area-wide management of the Formosan subterranean termite in New Orleans, Louisiana: 202. Dennis R. Ring, Alan L. Morgan, Alan R. Lax 2, and Frank S. Guillot 2, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, New Orleans, LA D0422 Genetic diversity of a microsporidium parasite (Kneallhazia solenopsae) and its fire ant host species (Solenopsis invicta) in South America. Marina Ascunce, DeWayne D0428 Diurnal activity of biting flies in southern Alberta. Ravindra S. Walgama and Tim Lysyk, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada D0429 A progression of molecular genetic tools for identifying screwworm myiasis. S. R. Skoda, Kathleen M. Kneeland 2, J. Christen 3, and John E. Foster 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kerrville, TX, 2 University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 3 Beatrice High School, Beatrice, NE D0430 Laboratory evaluation of novaluron as a development site treatment for controlling larval horn flies, house flies, and stable flies (Diptera: Muscidae). K. H. Lohmeyer, usda.gov, and J. Mat Pound, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kerrville, TX D043 New mite species described in human death investigation: Implications for forensic entomology and decomposition ecology. Meaghan L. Pimsler, Charity G. Owings, edu, Barry O Connor 2, Aaron M. Tarone, and Jeffery K. Tomberlin, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 2 University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI D0432 Host suitability of several species of necrophagous flies for parasitism and development of the ectoparasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis (Walker). David B. Rivers, and Michael Losinger, Loyola University Maryland, Baltimore, MD D0433 ifly: An ipad program for recording forensic entomology field and case research. Trevor I. Stamper, me.com, Daniel Beard, Mark Binkley, and Abdullah Alfouzan, University of Findlay, Findlay, OH D0434 The use of remote thermography to assess physical and behavioral aspects of maggot masses present in goat carcasses (Capra hircus aegagrus L.) killed by ivermectin overdose. Daniel Brancoli, André G. Savino, and Aricio Xavier Linhares, State University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil 40

143 Wednesday, November 4 Poster Display Wednesday, November 4 D0435 The effect of methylphenidate and its association with phenobarbital in the development of immatures of Chrysomya albiceps (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Calliphoridae). Fabio Resende, Daniel Brancoli, Maicon D. Grella, Patrícia J. Thyssen 2, and Aricio Xavier Linhares, State University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil, 2 Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Capao do Leao, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil D0436 Examining the accumulated degree-day hypothesis for decomposition on exposed carrion in the California Central Valley using Sus scrofa. Jeff Mabry, and Donald G. Miller, California State University, Chico, CA D0437 The use of DNA barcode to identifying Sarcophagidae species (Diptera: Muscomorpha) of forensic importance from Brazil. Patrícia J. Thyssen, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Capao do Leao, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, Carina Mara Souza, State University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil, and Roseli Tuan, Superintendency for Endemic Diseases Control, São Paulo, Brazil Poster Presentatons: Section PBT 2 D0438 Temperature extremes of the brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys. John D. Aigner, Thomas P. Kuhar, Donald E. Mullins, Katherine L. Kamminga, Sandra E. Gabbert, and Benjamin L. Aigner, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA D0439 Rearing black soldier fly larvae, Hermetia illuscens (Diptera: Stratiomyidae), on diets of various costs and qualities: Production rates, conversion efficiencies and rates of financial return. John C. Schneider, and Alfredo Llecha, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS D0440 Toxicity effects of Etlingera elatior (Zingiberaceae) against Epilachna indica (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Epilachninae). Fauziah Abdullah, and Elana Radzmi, University Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia D044 Avoidance of prey toxicity by the Chinese mantid, Tenodera sinensis. Jamie L. Rafter, and Evan L. Preisser, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI D0442 Association of acephate resistance with elevated esterase gene expression and metabolic detoxification in the tarnished plant bug. Yu Cheng Zhu, and Randall G. Luttrell, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Stoneville, MS D0443 Involvement of several venomous proteases in the viability of the SF2 cell line. Ellen M. Formesyn, be, Ellen L. Danneels, and Dirk C. de Graaf, Ghent University, Ghent, Oost-Vlaanderen, Belgium D0444 Discovery and functional analysis of small RNAs (mirna/ sirna) of livestock ectoparasites. Alexander P. Tuckow, alex. Pia Untalan Olafson, Kevin B. Temeyer, and Adalberto A. Pérez de León, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kerrville, TX D0445 Effect of larval density on food utilization of Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae). Juan A. Morales-Ramos, juan. M. Guadalupe Rojas, and David Shapiro-Ilan 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Stoneville, MS, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Byron, GA D0446 Susceptibility of field populations of fall armyworm from United States and Puerto Rico to purified CryF protein. Ying Niu, Robert L. Meagher 2, Fei Yang, Jawwad A. Qureshi 3, B. Rogers Leonard 4, and Fangneng Huang, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL, 3 University of Florida, Immokalee, FL, 4 Louisiana State University AgCenter, Winnsboro, LA D0447 Recombinant expression and functional characterization of bursicon in mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Hongwei Zhang, mail.missouri.edu, Xi Chen, Shengzhang Dong, and Qisheng Song, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO D0448 Developing microsclerotia of Metarhizium brunneum for control of lesser mealmorm, Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae). Robert W. Behle, usda.gov, and Mark A. Jackson, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Peoria, IL D0449 Characterization of bursicon and its signaling pathway in Drosophila. Shengzhang Dong, Hongwei Zhang, Xi Chen, and Qisheng Song, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO D0450 Midgut insulin receptor phosphorylation in response to insulin-like peptides in the mosquito Anopheles stephensi. Andrew Nuss, and Mark R. Brown, University of Georgia, Athens, GA D045 Characterization and functional analysis of the Knk gene family in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Sujata S. Chaudhari, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS D0452 Cyt2Aa modification mediated by a pea aphid gut-binding peptide for improved aphid toxicity. Nanasaheb Chougule, Huarong Li 2, Sijun Liu, and Bryony C. Bonning, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, 2 Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN D0453 Genes involved in Colorado potato beetle insecticide resistance. Diana Karime Londoño, Alessandro Grapputo 2, and Zsofia Szendrei, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 2 University of Padova, Padova, Italy D0454 Acetylcholinesterase of the sand fly, Phlebotomus papatasi. Kevin B. Temeyer, Alexander P. Tuckow, Andrew Y. Li, and Adalberto A. Pérez de León, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kerrville, TX D0455 Insect effector proteins modulate plant defense responses. Joe Louis, Michelle Peiffer, Dawn S. Luthe, and Gary W. Felton, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA D0456 Characterization of lethal giant larvae gene in Tribolium castaneum. Da Xiao, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS D0457 Identification and functional analysis of three defensinrelated antimicrobial peptides genes from Manduca sexta. Xiangli Dang, Yun-chao Gai, and Xiao-Qiang Yu, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO D0458 Species-specific physiological response of common Coccinellidae to the impact of landscape composition. Julia Tiede, and Claudio Gratton, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI D0459 Aldehyde oxidase 2 gene from navel orangeworm (Amyelois transitella) expression and functional characterization. Young-Moo Choo, Julien Pelletier, Elizabeth Atungulu, and Walter S. Leal, University of California, Davis, CA D0460 Comparative metatranscriptomic signatures of wood and 4

144 Wednesday, November 4 Wednesday, November 4 Poster Display paper feeding in the gut of the termite Reticulitermes flavipes. Rhitoban Raychoudhury, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN D046 Ovary ecdysteroidogenic hormone activates egg maturation in the mosquito, Georgecraigius atropalpus, after adult eclosion and blood feeding. Mark R. Brown, Monika Gulia- Nuss, Jai H. Eum, and M. R. Strand, University of Georgia, Athens, GA D0462 Effects of juvenile hormone and soldier head extracts on gene expressions of the termite Reticulitermes flavipes and its symbionts. Ruchira Sen, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN D0463 Does dietary carbohydrate content affect the consequences of warmer temperatures? A test with the ant Ectatomma ruidum. Elizabeth S. Chambers, University of St. Thomas, St. Paul, MN, Michael Kaspari, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, and Adam Davidson Kay, University of St. Thomas, St. Paul, MN D0464 Functional characterizations of the G protein-coupled receptors for PRXamide peptides in Tribolium castaneum. Hongbo Jiang, and Yoonseong Park, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS D0465 Pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum) infected with a defensive symbiont can maintain high reproductive rate after parasitism. Adam J. Martinez, University of Georgia, Athens, GA D0466 Transcriptional basis for lipid conservation and metabolic restructuring during pharate larval diapause in Aedes albopictus. Julie A. Reynolds, Monica Poelchau 2, Peter Armbruster 2, and David L. Denlinger, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 2 Georgetown University, Washington, DC D0467 Monoterpenoid binding at the house fly (Musca domestica) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Aaron D. Gross, edu, Fan Tong, Michael J. Kimber, and Joel R. Coats, Iowa State University, Ames, IA D0468 Cyazypyr seed treatment to control soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumura (Hemiptera: Aphididae). Carolina Camargo, Thomas E. Hunt 2, and Blair D. Siegfried, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 2 University of Nebraska, Concord, NE D0469 Female-specific expression of ttav in immature Aedes aegypti. Daniel C. Totten, Byron E. Johnson, and Helen Benes, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR Poster Presentatons: Section P-IE 2 D0470 Control of mites in Arizona corn. Ayman Mostafa, cals.arizona.edu, University of Arizona, Phoenix, AZ D047 Integrating the building blocks of agronomy and biocontrol into an IPM strategy for wheat stem sawfly (Cephus cinctus). Brian L. Beres, Héctor A. Cárcamo, David K. Weaver 2, Lloyd M. Dosdall 3, Maya L. Evenden 3, Bernie D. Hill, Ross H. McKenzie 4, Rong-Cai Yang 3, and Dean M. Spaner 3, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada, 2 Montana State University, Bozeman, MT, 3 University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, 4 Alberta Agriculture and Rurual Development, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada D0472 Morphology of a west African local sorghum resistant to 42 storage insects. Bonnie B. Pendleton, E. Ann Ellis 2, and Michael W. Pendleton 2, West Texas A&M University, Canyon, TX, 2 Texas A&M University, College Station, TX D0473 Efficacy of Nigeria-derived diatomaceous earth, botanical insecticides, and riverbed sand against Sitophilus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Rhyzopertha dominica (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae). Grace O. Otitodun, George P. Opit, okstate.edu 2, and Ego U. Okwonkwo, Nigerian Stored Products Research Institute, Ilorin, Kwara, Nigeria, 2 Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK D0474 Benefits and risks of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in agriculture. Ahmed D. Tawer, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Arlington, VA, and Douglas G. Pfeiffer, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA D0475 Biology and management of emerald ash borer: A view from the South. Gregory J. Wiggins, Jerome F. Grant, Steve D. Powell 2, and Kenneth J. Copley 3, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2 Tennessee Department of Agriculture, Nashville, TN, 3 USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Murfreesboro, TN D0476 Auto-dissemination of Beauveria bassiana for control of brown spruce longhorn beetle, Tetropium fuscum (F.) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). Jon Sweeney, Peter J. Silk, C. Hughes, R. Lavallée 2, M. Blais 2, and C. Guertin 3, Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada, 2 Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Québec, Canada, 3 University of Québec, Laval, Québec, Canada D0477 Evaluation of log submergence to control emerald ash borer and preserve black ash for Native American basketry. Tina Ciaramitaro, and Therese M. Poland, USDA, Forest Service, East Lansing, MI D0478 Laboratory evaluation of the toxicity of systemic insecticides against emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) larvae. Therese M. Poland, Tina Ciaramitaro, Deborah G. McCullough 2, and Andrea C. Anulewicz 2, USDA, Forest Service, East Lansing, MI, 2 Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI D0479 Pinewood nematode retention rate for adults of its insect vector, Monochamus saltuarius, emerged from Pinus koraiensis in pine wilt disease-damaged stand in South Korea. Chan Sik Jung, Yil Sung Moon, and Chul Su Kim, Korea Forest Research Institute, Seoul, South Korea D0480 The distribution of pinewood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, and its vector, Monochamus saltuarius, in pine wilt disease-infected Korean white pine, Pinus koraiensis, in South Korea. Yil Sung Moon, Chan Sik Jung, and Chul Su Kim, Korea Forest Research Institute, Seoul, South Korea D048 Adult emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) bioassays on foliage from ash trees treated with three systemic insecticides. Andrea C. Anulewicz, Deborah G. McCullough, Therese M. Poland 2, Andrew R. Tluczek, and Jacob N. Bournay, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 2 USDA, Forest Service, East Lansing, MI D0482 Can systemic insecticides protect ash trees through the emerald ash borer invasion? Results after seven years of annual treatment. Deborah G. McCullough, Andrea C. Anulewicz, Therese M. Poland 2, Andrew R. Tluczek, Jacob N. Bournay, and Phillip A. Lewis 3, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 2 USDA, Forest Service, East Lansing, MI, 3 USDA, Animal

145 Wednesday, November 4 Poster Display Wednesday, November 4 and Plant Health Inspection Service, Buzzards Bay, MA D0483 Evaluating trap designs and lures at three stages of the emerald ash borer invasion wave. Jacob N. Bournay, msu.edu, Deborah G. McCullough, Therese M. Poland 2, and Stephen Burr, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 2 USDA, Forest Service, East Lansing, MI D0484 Attraction of Buprestidae, Cerambycidae, and Scolytinae to sticky traps baited with varying combinations of ethanol-injected red maple, Virginina pine, or white oak tree bolts. Jason B. Oliver, Christopher M. Ranger 2, Nadeer Youssef, Alicia M. Bray, Peter B. Schultz 3, Michael E. Reding 2, and Victor C. Mastro 4, Tennessee State University, McMinnville, TN, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Wooster, OH, 3 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia Beach, VA, 4 USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Buzzards Bay, MA D0485 Monitoring and distribution of emerald ash borer in Tennessee: Efficient, effective trapping gets the job done. Kenneth J. Copley, Steve D. Powell 2, Jerome F. Grant 3, and Gregory J. Wiggins 3, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Murfreesboro, TN, 2 Tennessee Department of Agriculture, Nashville, TN, 3 University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN D0486 Sanitation options for managing oak wood infested with the invasive goldspotted oak borer (Agrilus auroguttatus) in southern California. Michael I. Jones, Tom W. Coleman 2, Andrew D. Graves 3, Mary Louise Flint, and Steven J. Seybold 4, University of California, Davis, CA, 2 USDA, Forest Service, San Bernardino, CA, 3 USDA, Forest Service, Albuquerque, NM, 4 USDA, Forest Service, Davis, CA D0487 Discovery and evaluation of native predators of Pityophthorus juglandis on black walnut in eastern Tennessee. Katheryne Nix, Paris L. Lambdin, Jerome F. Grant, Mark T. Windham, Albert E. Mayfield 2, and Paul Merten 2, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2 USDA, Forest Service, Asheville, NC D0488 Interactions of stacked-trait Bt corn, irrigation, and hybrid background affect corn earworm damage and aflatoxin expressed by mycotoxigenic fungi. Michael J. Brewer, edu, Gary N. Odvody, Darwin J. Anderson, Jeffrey Remmers, and Charlene Farias, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Corpus Christi, TX D0489 Multi-year field trial performance of SmartStax for control of western corn rootworm. Patricia Prasifka, Kevin Johnson 2, Dwain M. Rule 3, Steve P. Nolting 3, Nicholas Storer 4, and William H. Hendrix 3, Dow AgroSciences, West Fargo, ND, 2 Dow AgroSciences, Danville, IL, 3 Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN, 4 Dow AgroSciences, Kensington, MD D0490 Monitoring honey bee (Apis mellifera) flight activity across blooming transgenic and conventional alfalfa seed production fields. James R. Hagler, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Maricopa, AZ, Shannon C. Mueller, University of California, Fresno, CA, and Larry R. Tueber, University of California, Davis, CA D049 Protection from lepidopteran insect feeding is unlikely to significantly alter the weediness potential of Glycine soja. Michael Horak, Hidetoshi Goto 2, Aqeel Ahmad, com, Baltazar Baltazar, Hiroshi Shimada 2, Duska Stojsin, Shuichi Nakai 2, Aya Arii 2, and Seiichiro Yamane 2, Monsanto Company, St. Louis, MO, 2 Monsanto Company, Ginza, Chuo-ku, Japan D0492 Environmental interactions data in support of environmental risk assessment of genetically enhanced crops. Aqeel Ahmad, aqeel. Christopher R. Brown, Michael Horak, and Bernard Sammons, Monsanto Company, St. Louis, MO D0493 How insecticidal seed treatments can help the plant better cope with abiotic stress factors. Michael Schade, syngenta.com, Syngenta Crop Protection, Basel, Switzerland D0494 Influence of imidacloprid soil treatment rates, soil texture, and irrigation regimes on imidacloprid titers in leaf terminal tissue. Philip S. McNally, Bayer CropScience, Lake Forest, CA, and Ed Ishida, Bayer CropScience, Ventura, CA D0495 Phytotoxic aphid plant interactions: Comparison between aphid species attacking wheat. Scott Nicholson, ars.usda.gov, and Gary J. Puterka, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Stillwater, OK D0496 Influence of plant type and artificial diet on the activity of thiamethoxam against fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda). Srinivas K. Lanka, Sengottayan Senthil Nathan, Jeffrey A. Davis, and Michael J. Stout, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA D0497 Lesser cornstalk borer a pest of energy crops? Reports of infestations on Miscanthus x giganteus from northeast Arkansas. Godshen Robert Pallipparambil, and Michael E. Gray, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL D0498 Distribution of psocids in temperature and moisture gradients in stored wheat. James Throne, gov, Paul W. Flinn, and John Diaz-Montano, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Manhattan, KS D0499 Monitoring strawberry rootworm (Paria fragariae Wilcox) populations: Efficacy of kairomonal lures. Chris Werle, chris. Blair Sampson and John M. Bland 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Poplarville, MS, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, New Orleans, LA D0500 Evaluation of potential attractants for stored-product psocids. John Diaz-Montano, James Throne, and James F. Campbell, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Manhattan, KS D050 Invention harvesting - pathway to prospecting intellectual property. Mike P. Tolley, Kirk Brewster, Paul W. Borth, and Richard K. Mann, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN D0502 A comparison of soy, paraffin, and microcrystalline wax emulsions used for the controlled release of insect pheromones. Cynthia A. Atterholt, Samuel Burrus, and Afton Harris, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC D0503 Results of a three-year survey to establish a base line for native stink bugs and detect arrival of invasive pests in Kentucky grown field crops. Douglas W. Johnson, Ric Bessin 2, Jerry Brown 3, Clint Hardy 4, Carla M. Harper 5, Tim Hendrick 6, Darian Irvan 7, Cam Kenimer 7, Tom L. Miller 8, Andy Mills 9, Traci Missun 0, Diane Perkins, Myron Evans 2, David Fourqurean 3, Darrell Jones 4, Philip Konopka 5, Christin Herbst 6, and Susan Fox 6, University of Kentucky (UK), Princeton, KY, 2 UK, Lexington, KY, 3 UK, Burlington, KY, 4 UK, Owensboro, KY, 5 UK, Bardwell, KY, 6 UK, Carrollton, KY, 7 UK, Hickman, KY, 8 UK, La Center, KY, 9 UK, Brandenburg, KY, 0 UK, La Grange, KY, UK, Hawesville, KY, 2 UK, Grayson, KY, 3 UK, Cadiz, KY, 4 UK, Smithland, KY, 5 UK, Vanceburg, KY, 6 UK, Eddyville, KY D0504 Effects of methyl salicylate on Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata) mortality in potato. Adam Wimer, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 43

146 Wednesday, November 4 Painter, VA, and Thomas P. Kuhar, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA D0505 Global technology transfer at Dow AgroSciences: Blended learning for employee and customer education. Kevin Steffey, and Ed King, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN D0506 Degree-day and temperature-dependent development of yellowmargined-leaf beetle, Microtheca ochroloma (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). Rammohan Rao Balusu, Clement Akotsen-Mensah, Angela Dobson, and Henry Y. Fadamiro, Auburn University, Auburn, AL D0507 Invasive pests and international trade: Reaching students via distance and E-learning. O. Youm, Kathleen M. Kneeland, and John E. Foster, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE D0508 Attempting to manage soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) in an organic production system. Phillip A. Glogoza, University of Minnesota, Moorhead, MN Service, Peoria, IL, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Lincoln, NE D056 Enhancing insecticides against codling moth with L-aspartate. Maciej A. Pszczolkowski, missouristate.edu, Missouri State University, Mountain Grove, MO, and John J. Brown, Washington State University, Pullman, WA D057 Screening wheat genotypes for resistance to Hessian fly and development of DNA markers for resistance breeding. Steven Odubiyi, Lana Unger, Kaori Ando 2, Michael Pumphrey 2, and Nilsa A. Bosque-Pérez, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, 2 Washington State University, Pullman, WA D058 Electrophysiological and field responses of Xylosandrus germanus to heterospecific pheromones. Christopher M. Ranger, Austin Gorzlancyk 2, David W. Held 2, Michael E. Reding, Peter B. Schultz 3, and Jason B. Oliver 4, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Wooster, OH, 2 Auburn University, Auburn, AL, 3 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia Beach, VA, 4 Tennessee State University, McMinnville, TN Wednesday, November 4 Poster Display D0509 Evaluation of larvicidal treatments for control of LBAM (Epiphyas postvittana). Sian M. O Sullivan Bailey, aphis.usda.gov, and Scott W. Myers, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Buzzards Bay, MA D050 Animating entomology for education: Designing interactive instructional modules. Joshua N. Grant, Paris L. Lambdin, Gregory J. Wiggins, and Jerome F. Grant, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN D05 Uptake and persistence of four neonicotinoid insecticides in table and wine grapes. Nilima Prabhaker, University of California, Riverside, CA, David R. Haviland, University of California, Cooperative Extension, Bakersfield, CA, Rhonda Smith, University of California, Cooperative Extension, Santa Rosa, CA, Lucia Varela, University of California, Santa Rosa, CA, S. J. Castle, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Maricopa, AZ, and Tom Perring, University of California, Riverside, CA D052 Entomological activities to expand the undergraduate experience. Jerome F. Grant, Gregory J. Wiggins, Paris L. Lambdin, Renee Follum, and Joshua N. Grant, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN D053 Trap saturation with navel orangeworm. L. P. S. Kuenen, Bas. USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Parlier, CA D054 IPMPro: A mobile app for pest, plant disease and weed management in mid and southern U.S. ornamental plant nurseries and landscapes. William Klingeman, Amy Fulcher, Juang-Horng Chong 2, Sarah White 3, Jean Williams- Woodward 4, Joe Neal 5, Jeff Derr 6, Matthew Chappell 4, Anthony LeBude 5, Frank A. Hale 7, Alan Windham, Steven D. Frank 8, S. Kristine Braman 9, Winston Dunwell 0, Craig Adkins 5, Stanton Gill, and Karen Rane 2, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2 Clemson University, Florence, SC, 3 Clemson University, Clemson, SC, 4 University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 5 North Carolina State University, Mills River, NC, 6 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia Beach, VA, 7 University of Tennessee, Nashville, TN, 8 North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, 9 University of Georgia, Griffin, GA, 0 University of Kentucky, Princeton, KY, University of Maryland, Ellicot City, MD, 2 University of Maryland, College Park, MD D055 Occurrence of enhanced insect resistance in sorghum with altered lignin. Patrick F. Dowd, Jeffery F. Pedersen 2, and Scott E. Sattler 2, USDA, Agricultural Research D059 Host switching of Pentalonia aphids on Guam. Julie Anne Duay, Ross H. Miller, Keith S. Pike 2, and Robert Foottit 3, University of Guam, Mangilao, Guam, 2 Washington State University, Prosser, WA, 3 Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada D0520 Efficacy of insecticides for control of brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys) in vegetable crops. Thomas P. Kuhar, Katherine L. Kamminga, and John D. Aigner, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA D052 Identification of resistance in Malus to codling moth and leafroller. Joseph Jeffrey Schwarz, edu, Washington State University, Tree Fruit Research & Extension Center, Wenatchee, WA D0522 Combined effects of different pest programs and mulch types in organic vegetable production. Gabriela Esparza-Diaz, Raul T. Villanueva, and Luis Ribera, Texas A&M University, Weslaco, TX D0523 Economic injury levels for the soybean aphid, Aphis glycines, on KS4202 soybean. Edson L. L. Baldin, br, Thomas E. Hunt 2, and Tiffany M. Heng-Moss, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 2 University of Nebraska, Concord, NE D0524 Relative toxicity and residual activity of insecticides used in blueberry pest management: Mortality of natural enemies in laboratory bioassays. Craig R. Roubos, Rufus Isaacs, Cesar Rodriguez-Saona 2, Keith S. Mason, and Dean Polk 2, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 2 Rutgers University, Chatsworth, NJ D0525 Virulence of four Diuraphis species to Russian wheat aphid resistance in wheat. Gary J. Puterka, and Scott Nicholson, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Stillwater, OK D0526 Factors contributing to the poor performance of the soybean aphid parasitoid Binodoxys communis on a resistant soybean cultivar. Elissa S. Ballman, Kiran Ghising, Deirdre A. Prischmann-Voldseth, and Jason P. Harmon, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND D0527 Management of a Neuroterus sp. (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) leaf galler in a live oak tree nursery. Eileen A. Buss, edu, David Holmes 2, Carmen Collazo, and Sarah Dombrowski, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2 University of Florida, Ocala, FL 44

147 Wednesday, November 4 Poster Display Wednesday, November 4 D0528 Integrated control of pecan leaf scorch mite (Eotetranychus hicoriae) with predatory mites and miticides. James D. Dutcher, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA D0529 Profiling expression of a peroxidase gene in tetraploid switchgrasses (Panicum virgatum) against the greenbug, Schizaphis graminum (Hemiptera: Aphididae). Lisa Baird, edu, Haichuan Wang 2, Gautam Sarath 3, and Tiffany M. Heng-Moss 2, University of San Diego, San Diego, CA, 2 University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 3 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Lincoln, NE D0530 Peroxidases, aphids, ROS and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.). Gautam Sarath, Tiffany M. Heng- Moss 2, Nathan Palmer 2, Travis J. Prochaska 2, Haichuan Wang 2, Lisa Baird 3, Kyle G. Koch 2, Jeffrey D. Bradshaw 4, Paul Twigg 5, Guoiqng Lu 6, and Mark Lagrimini 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Lincoln, NE, 2 University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 3 University of San Diego, San Diego, CA, 4 University of Nebraska, Scottsbluff, NE, 5 University of Nebraska, Kearney, NE, 6 University of Nebraska, Omaha, NE D053 Using ethanol-infused maple logs in an ambrosia beetle interception strategy in commercial nurseries. Peter B. Schultz, Jason B. Oliver 2, Christopher M. Ranger 3, and Michael E. Reding 3, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia Beach, VA, 2 Tennessee State University, McMinnville, TN, 3 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Wooster, OH D0532 Defense mechanisms in resistant wheat seedlings in response to Hessian fly attack. Chitvan Khajuria, edu, Haiyan Wang 2, Xuming Liu 2, Shanda Wheeler 2, John C. Reese 2, Mustafa El Bohssini 3, R. Jeff Whitworth 2, and Ming-Shun Chen 4, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 2 Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 3 International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas, Aleppo, Syria, 4 Plant Science and Entomology Research Unit, Manhattan, KS D0533 Systemic activity of neonicotinoids on Drosophila suzukii in blueberry. Charles Clark Coslor, Lynell K. Tanigoshi, Beverly S. Gerdeman, and Hollis G. Spitler, Washington State University, Mt. Vernon, WA D0534 Catch my drift? Bt pollen dispersal and the integrity of non-bt refugia for lepidopteran resistance management in maize. Eric C. Burkness and William D. Hutchison, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN D0535 Observations on organic insect pest management in perennial fruit hightunnels. Matthew Grieshop, edu, Emily Pochubay, Anne L. Nielsen 2, and John Pote, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 2 Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ D0536 Efficacy and infectivity of Isaria fumosorosea for controlling the Madeira mealybug (Phenacoccus madeirensis) on plants for shipping. Pasco B. Avery, Sarahlynne Guerrero 2, Amanda C. Hodges 2, Charles A. Powell, and Lance S. Osborne 3, University of Florida, Fort Pierce, FL, 2 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 3 University of Florida, Apopka, FL D0537 Fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda L.) CryF resistance monitoring program in the U.S. Mary Kubiszak, com, Luis E. Gomez, Dwain M. Rule, Nicholas Storer, and Abhilash Balachandran, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN D0538 Prevalence of corn earworm in late season volunteer corn in Mississippi and its implications on Bt resistance development. Arun Babu, Michael A. Caprio 2, Donald Cook 3, Clint Allen 4, and Fred R. Musser, Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, 2 Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, 3 Mississippi State University, Stoneville, MS, 4 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Stoneville, MS D0539 The emergence of Lygus hesperus (Knight) as a pest in gerbera cut flower production in southern California. Lucia E. Villavicencio, James A. Bethke, 2, Britta Dahlke, and Bryan Vander Mey 2, Center for Applied Horticultural Research, Vista, CA, 2 University of California, Cooperative Extension, San Marcos, CA D0540 Identification of novel insecticidal proteins active against western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera). Jonathan D. Giebel, Deepa Balasubramanian, Leonardo Magalhaes, Jill Hinson, and Brian Vande Berg, Bayer CropScience, Morrisville, NC D054 To spray or not to spray? Determining economic thresholds for Amyelois transitella using mass trapping. Elizabeth A. Boyd, California State University, Chico, CA, and Justin E. Nay, Integral Ag., Inc., Durham, CA D0542 Development of SPLAT MAT controlled release semiochemical bait formulations for long-lasting fruit fly management. Lyndsie Stoltman, Agenor Mafra-Neto, Roger I. Vargas 2, Diego Zeni, Lisiane Perez Silva, Rafael Borges 3, and Leandro Mafra 3, ISCA Technologies, Inc., Riverside, CA, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Hilo, HI, 3 ISCA Tecnologias Ltda, Ijui, Brazil D0543 Virulence of Beauveria bassiana (Bals.) Vuil to Alphitobius diaperinus (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) after successive subculture in vitro in different nutritional conditions. Patricia Santoro, Janaina Zorzetti 2, Kelly Constanski 2, and P. M. O. J. Neves, uel.br 2, Instituto Agronômico do Paraná, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil, 2 Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil D0544 Insect resistance to Bt plants: Five elephants in the room. Andrei Alyokhin, University of Maine, Orono, ME D0545 Strontium chloride as secondary dietary marker for pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella) mass-reared for sterile insect technique. Michelle Walters, gov, John Claus, Guolei Tang, Anna Lowe, Nathan J. Moses 2, R. Nelson Foster, Barry U. Barnes, Richard Zink 3, Robert Staten 4, F. Rob Anderson, Katherine B. R. Hill 5, Dominique Ramirez 6, David Klein 6, Doug Marsh 6, and Leighton Liesner 7, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Phoenix, AZ, 2 University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 3 USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Fort Collins, CO, 4 USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Gilbert, AZ (retired), 5 University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, 6 State of Arizona, Phoenix, AZ, 7 Arizona Cotton Research and Protection Council, Phoenix, AZ D0546 Determination of an effective dose of chlorantraniliprole (Prevathon ) for control of grasshoppers on rangeland. R. Nelson Foster, Larry E. Jech, K. Chris Reuter, Lonnie R. Black, Alexandre V. Latchininsky 2, Scott P. Schell 2, Daryl Hill 3, and John D. Cantlon 4, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Phoenix, AZ, 2 University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, 3 USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Edinburg, TX, 4 E. I. DuPont de Nemours and Company, Lakewood, CO D0547 Influence of Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner on the phytophagous activity of Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) on kale leaves. Alessandra Marieli Vacari, ig.com.br, Gustavo Oliveira de Magalhães, Vanessa Fabiola Pereira Carvalho, Dagmara Gomes Ramalho, Caroline Placidi De Bortoli, Ricardo Antonio Polanczyk, and Sergio Antonio De Bortoli, Faculdade de Ciências Agrárias e Veterinárias, Jaboticabal, São Paulo, Brazil 45

148 Wednesday, November 4 Wednesday, November 4 Poster Display D0548 Evaluation of ground applications of domestic strains of pathogenic fungi, Beauveria sp. and Metarhizium spp., on fourhectare and mini plots for control of rangeland grasshoppers. Larry E. Jech, R. Nelson Foster, Stefan T. Jaronski 2, K. Chris Reuter, Lonnie R. Black, Donald W. Roberts 3, Rob Schlothauer 2, and Chad A. Keyser 4, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Phoenix, AZ, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Sidney, MT, 3 Utah State University, Logan, UT, 4 Univesity of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark D0549 Getting the most out of Eretmocerus hayati: An introduced parasitoid to control Bemisia tabaci in Australia. Lynita J. Howie, Felix J. J. A. Bianchi 2, Paul DeBarro, and Nancy A. Schellhorn, nancy. Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Dutton Park, Queensland, Australia, 2 Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands D0550 A symbiotic relationship in the tea ecosystem: Tea shothole borer, Xyleborus fornicatus (=Euwallacea fornictus) Eichh. (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), in Sri Lanka. Ravindra S. Walgama, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada D055 Application of Grandevo TM for control of Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) and other key pests. Timothy Johnson, marronebio.com, Guy Wilson, Celeste Gilbert, Steven Whitesides, and Pamela Marrone, Marrone Bio Innovations, Inc., Davis, CA D0552 Effect of Grandevo TM on green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer). L. B. Flor-Weiler, A. Yang, Y. Perez, P. Himmel, and Pamela Marrone, Marrone Bio Innovations, Inc, Davis, CA D0553 Temporal trends in stink bug populations with implications for cotton planting date. Michael D. Toews, and Ishakh Pulakkatu-Thodi, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA D0554 Effects of Bactericera cockerelli and Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum on potato postharvest. Joseph E. Munyaneza, joseph. USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Wapato, WA, Jeremy L. Buchman, Frito-Lay, Inc., Rhinelander, WI, and Donald C. Henne, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Weslaco, TX D0555 Performance of SmartStax for control of corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea) in the U.S. corn belt. Amanda Jacobson, Dow AgroSciences, West Lafayette, IN, Bradley W. Hopkins, Dow AgroSciences, Westerville, OH, and Dwain M. Rule, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN D0556 Metarhizium anisopliae for biorational control of katydid pests on oil palms in Papua New Guinea. Genet M. Tulgetske, genet. and Thomas A. Miller, University of California, Riverside, CA D0557 Evaluating action thresholds for aphids in corn. Erin W. Hodgson, Iowa State University, Ames, IA D0558 Genetic modification of predator foraging traits enhances biological control of twospotted spider mites within experimental plantscapes. James R. Nechols, David C. Margolies, James F. Campbell 2, and Kimberly A. With, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Manhattan, KS D0559 The Pesticide Risk Mitigation Engine: A farmer-friendly online tool for field-specific risk assessment and mitigation. Thomas A. Green, Chuck Benbrook 2, Karen Benbrook 3, Michael Guzy 4, Paul Jepson 4, Jonathan Kaplan 5, Susan Kegley 6, Pierre Mineau 7, and Wade Pronschinske, IPM Institute of North America, Inc, Madison, WI, 2 Organic Center, Enterprise, OR, 3 BCS Ecologic, Inc., Enterprise, OR, 4 Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, 5 Natural Resources Defense Council, San Francisco, CA, 6 Pesticide Research Institute, Berkeley, CA, 7 Pierre Mineau Consulting, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada D0560 Development of a binomial sampling plan for Bactericera cockerelli using thebugspot.org. Jeffrey D. Bradshaw, unl.edu, Sean D. Whipple, Donald C. Henne 2, and Brian P. McCornack 3, University of Nebraska, Scottsbluff, NE, 2 Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Weslaco, TX, 3 Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS D056 Effect of flowering buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) on lepidopteran pest management in collards. Christopher R. Philips, Thomas P. Kuhar, D. Ames Herbert 2, Elizabeth L. Fread, and Ronald D. Morse, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, 2 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Suffolk, VA D0562 Efficacy of fenpyroximate (Portal & FujiMite ) against spider mites and their natural enemies in corn. Scott W. Ludwig, nichino.net, Pedro Hernandez 2, Botond Balogh 3, Jessica Samler 4, and James C. Adams 4, Nichino America, Inc., Arp, TX, 2 Nichino America, Inc., Visalia, CA, 3 Nichino America, Inc., Apollo Beach, FL, 4 Nichino America, Inc., Wilmington, DE D0563 Survey of Thysanoptera on Vicia faba (broad bean) in the arid Biskra region of Algeria. Sabah Razi, Universite Mohamed Khider Biskra, Algeria, and Ernest C. Bernard, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN D0564 Evaluation of storage methods for tree bolt bait preparations used as trap attractants for wood-boring insects. Alicia M. Bray, Jason B. Oliver, Nadeer Youssef, Victor C. Mastro 2, Christopher M. Ranger 3, Peter B. Schultz 4, and Michael E. Reding 3, Tennessee State University, McMinnville, TN, 2 USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Buzzards Bay, MA, 3 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Wooster, OH, 4 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia Beach, VA D0565 Furrow compaction associated with seed treatments to control root feeder termites in upland rice. J. Alexandre Barrigossi, Jose G. Silva, Tarcisio Cobucci, Veneraldo Pinheiro, Henrique M. R. Silva, Mábio C. Lacerda, and Tavvs M. Alves, Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária, Santo Antônio de Goiás, Goias, Brazil D0566 Comparing effectiveness of three Tribolium castaneum monitoring traps. Nisha Shakya, George P. Opit, Justin L. Talley, and Carol L. Jones, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK D0567 Soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) management using foliar applied insecticides in South Dakota. Bradley McManus, Bradley. Billy Fuller, and Kelley J. Tilmon, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD D0568 Plant-to-plant movement of western bean cutworm, Striacosta ablicosta, on corn. Logan A. Dana, edu, Silvana V. Paula-Moraes 2 and Thomas E. Hunt, University of Nebraska, Concord, NE, 2 Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária Cerrados, Planaltina, Brazil D0569 Survey of the invasive rice stem stink bug, Tibraca limbativentris (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), in rice fields in the Dominican Republic. Raymond L. Hix, Moses T. K. Kairo, and Enger German-Ramirez, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL D0570 A sequential binomial sampling plan for potato psyllid 46

149 Wednesday, November 4 Poster Display Wednesday, November 4 (Hemiptera: Triozidae) on bell pepper (Capsicum annum). Sean M. Prager, Casey D. Butler 2, and John T. Trumble, University of California, Riverside, CA, 2 Syngenta Crop Protection Inc., Greensboro, NC D057 Is management improved when seed treatments are applied to aphid-resistant soybeans? Michael T. McCarville, Kelley J. Tilmon 2, Eileen M. Cullen 3, Deirdre A. Prischmann-Voldseth 4, and Matthew E. O Neal, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, 2 South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD, 3 University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, 4 North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND D0572 Monitoring Amphorophora agathonica populations and spread of aphid transmitted viruses in red raspberry in the Pacific Northwest. Danielle Lightle, D. F. Quito-Avila 2, R. R. Martin 3, and Jana C. Lee 3, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, 2 Centro de Investigaciones Biotecnologicas del Ecuador, Guayaquil, Ecuador, 3 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Corvallis, OR D0573 Management of western bean cutworm, Striacosta albicosta (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), and mycotoxins in Ontario field corn. Jocelyn L. Smith, Victor Limay- Rios, and Arthur W. Schaafsma, University of Guelph, Ridgetown, Ontario, Canada D0574 Outdoor performance of Metarhizium acridum against grasshoppers and Mormon cricket in eastern Montana. Stefan T. Jaronski, and Rob Schlothauer, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Sidney, MT D0575 Role of insecticides in vertically integrated IPM program for thrips in fruiting vegetables. Mrittunjai Srivastava, ufl.edu, Joseph E. Funderburk, Stuart Reitz 2, and Steve Olson, University of Florida, Quincy, FL, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Tallahassee, FL D0576 Genotypic diversity as a pest management tool: Effects of crop intraspecific diversity on soybean aphid and natural enemy populations. Ian M. Grettenberger, and John F. Tooker, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA D0577 Managing thrips and tomato spotted wilt virus in tomato and pepper in the southeastern United States: A USDA RAMP funded website. David G. Riley, Chris Gunter 2, George G. Kennedy 2, J. Powell Smith 3, Mark R. Abney 2, Alton N. Sparks, James F. Walgenbach 4, Steve Olson 5, John W. Scott 6, David Langston, James Moyer 2, Esendugue Greg Fonsah, Ron Gitaitis, and Frank Louws 2, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, 2 North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, 3 Clemson University, Lexington, SC, 4 North Carolina State University, Fletcher, NC, 5 University of Florida, Quincy, FL, 6 University of Florida, Wimauma, FL D0578 Sweetpotato insect pest management research in Louisiana. J. M. Beuzelin, T. P. Smith 2, M. J. Murray 3, R. N. Story 3, and D. R. LaBonte 3, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Alexandria, LA, 2 Louisiana State University AgCenter, Chase, LA, 3 Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA D0579 Weather-mediated effects on thrips and tomato spotted wilt (TSW) inoculum potential interact to determine TSW prevalence in tobacco. Thomas M. Chappell, and George G. Kennedy, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC D0580 Adult Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor) flight in Oklahoma. N. Bradford, Kristopher L. Giles, and Tom A. Royer, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK D058 Movement of sweet potato leaf curl virus in sweetpotato fields. D. Michael Jackson, Alvin M. Simmons, Kai-Shu Ling, and Howard F. Harrison, Jr., USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Charleston, SC D0582 Evaluation of early season pre-tassel acaricide applications for management of Banks grass mites (Oligonychus pratensis Banks) in corn. E. D. Bynum, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Amarillo, TX, Monti Vandiver, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Muleshoe, TX, and Pat Porter, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Lubbock, TX D0583 The population genetic structure of North Carolina populations of Thrips tabaci and its implications for competency of T. tabaci to transmit tomato spotted wilt virus. Alana L. Jacobson, Warren Booth 2, Edward L. Vargo, and George G. Kennedy, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, 2 University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK D0584 Distribution of wheat stem sawfly in eastern Colorado winter wheat. Terri Randolph, Frank B. Peairs, Jack Mangels, and Darren Cockrell, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO D0585 Three-way interactions between soybean aphid (Aphis glycines), soybean mosaic virus (SMV) and soybean plants (Glycine max): An agent-based modeling approach to tease out epidemiological consequences. Buyung Hadi, sdstate.edu, and Kelley J. Tilmon, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD D0586 Abundance and dominance of soil arthropods in dry bean grown under different soil management systems and cover crops. Mábio C. Lacerda, J. Alexandre Barrigossi, and Daniel Ferreira Caixeta, Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária, Santo Antônio de Goiás, Goias, Brazil D0587 Walnut twig beetle and thousand cankers disease in Tennessee: Incidence and impact on black walnut. Steve D. Powell, Jerome F. Grant 2, Mark T. Windham 2, Paris L. Lambdin 2, Gregory J. Wiggins 2, and Walker Gray Haun, Tennessee Department of Agriculture, Nashville, TN, 2 University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN D0588 Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte) resistance to Bt corn: Laboratory assays and field evaluations. Christopher R. Dojutrek, Iowa State University, Ames, IA Poster Presentatons: Section SysEB 2 D0589 Harvest of hardwood forests impacts diversity of Lepidoptera in central Appalachia. Luke E. Dodd, edu, Michael J. Lacki, and Lynne K. Rieske-Kinney, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY D0590 Patterns of macroinvertebrate community composition between natural and restored wetlands in a Delmarva Bay. Elanor D. Stevens, University of Maryland, College Park, MD D059 Curculionidae species within isolated wetlands of southwestern Georgia. Nathalie D. Smith, and Stephen W. Golladay, Joseph W. Jones Ecological Research Center, Ichauway, Newton, GA D0592 Amphibian and invertebrate community interactions across an urbanization gradient in wetlands of southwestern Ohio. Chris Dobbs, Kevin Perkins, Joe Milanovich 2, Matthew Hopton 2, and Mollie D. McIntosh, Xavier University, 47

150 Wednesday, November 4 Cincinnati, OH, 2 United States Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH D0593 Water quality, stream habitat characteristics and macroinvertebrate assemblages for watersheds associated with managed and unmanaged areas in Bankhead National Forest. Rufina Ward, Heather Howell, and William Stone, Alabama A&M University, Normal, AL invertebrate collection digitization. Christopher H. Dietrich, Nahil Sobh 2, David Raila 2, Omar Sobh 2, and John Hart 2, University of Illinois, llinois Natural History Survey, Champaign, IL, 2 University of Illinois, Urbana, IL D0606 Selected fireflies (Coleoptera: Lampyridae) of east Tennessee, a photographic record. Lynn Faust, Great Smoky Mountains Conservation Association, Knoxville, TN Wednesday, November 4 Poster Display D0594 The ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and grasshopper (Orthoptera: Acrididae) fauna of the Big Thicket National Preserve. JoVonn Hill, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS D0595 A survey of Gelechioidea (Lepidoptera) in the Black Belt Region of Mississippi. Richard L. Brown, Mississippi Entomological Museum, Mississippi State, MS, Sangmi Lee, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, and David Pollock, National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC D0596 Estimating herbivorous insect diversity on the native Ilex vomitoria and the invasive Ligustrum sinense in southern Louisiana. Jeremy D. Allison, Natural Resources Canada, Great Lakes Forestry Centre, Sault St Marie, Ontario, Canada, Jessica McKenney, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, Matthew L. Gimmel, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, and R. A. Redak, University of California, Riverside, CA D0597 Genetic and spatial structure of ants along altitudinal gradients in the Atlantic Forest, Brazil. Flavia Esteves, California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, CA, and Carlos R. F. Brandão, Museu de Zoologia da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil D0598 Distributional patterns for species groups of Pselaphomorphus Motschulsky (Staphylinidae: Pselaphinae, Jubini) in Central and South America. Laura M. Vasquez-Velez, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, PR, and Nico M. Franz, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ D0599 Survey of necrophagous insects in the Nebraska Sandhills. Amanda Fujikawa, and Christian Elowsky, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE D0600 Monitoring the St. Anthony Dune tiger beetle (Cicindela arenicola) in the St. Anthony sand dune system. Shiloh D. Judd, Chistopher R. Wynn, Gavin J. Martin 2, and John T. Zenger, Brigham Young University-Idaho, Rexburg, ID, 2 Brigham Young University, Provo, UT D060 Eastern hemlock decline due to the exotic hemlock woolly adelgid alters benthic shredders in headwater streams. Joshua K. Adkins, and Lynne K. Rieske-Kinney, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY D0602 How much is enough? Performance of species distribution models depending on the amount of occurrence data. Bente Stoa and Vladimir I. Gusarov, University of Oslo, Natural History Museum, Oslo, Norway D0603 The Ohio Coleopterists and the Ohio beetle databasing project. David J. Horn, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH D0604 Three-dimensional structure of slide-mounted specimens reveals a new species of predaceous midge. Dustin A. Swanson, Thomas More College, Crestview Hills, KY, and Jessica I. Grant, Clemson University, Clemson, SC D0605 InvertNet.org: Cyber-infrastructure for high-throughput D0607 A degree-day model for Photinus carolinus (Coleoptera: Lampyridae): A tool for predicting the Light Show and evidence for climate change. Paul A. Weston, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, New South Wales, Australia, and Lynn Faust, gmail.com, Great Smoky Mountains Conservation Association, Knoxville, TN D0608 Current state of knowledge of the Typhlocybinae subfamily (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) from Argentina. María Inés Catalano, Universidad Nacional del Noroeste de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pergamino, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Susana Liria Paradell, Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Museo, La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina, and Christopher H. Dietrich, University of Illinois, llinois Natural History Survey, Champaign, IL D0609 A web of interlinked enhancements to a revision of a species-rich beetle taxon (Histeridae: Exosternini): An example using the genus Yarmister. Alexey K. Tishechkin, org, and Michael S. Caterino, Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, Santa Barbara, CA D060 A reclassification of the New World Exosternini (Coleoptera: Histeridae), based on phylogenetic analysis of morphological and molecular data. Michael S. Caterino, and Alexey K. Tishechkin, Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, Santa Barbara, CA D06 An mx-based revision of the Caribbean weevil genus Artipus Sahlberg (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Entiminae). Michael Andrew Jansen, and Nico M. Franz, School of Life Sciences, Tempe, AZ D062 Phylogenetic analysis and taxonomic revision of the Neotropical genus Argentinomyia Lynch Arribálzaga, 89 (Diptera: Syrphidae: Syrphinae): Preliminary results. Augusto L. Montoya, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagüez, PR, and Nico M. Franz, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ D063 Phylogenetic and comparative studies of tiger moths (Lepidoptera: Erebidae: Arctiinae). Jennifer Zaspel, edu, C. Taylor Wardwell 2, Stacey Coy, Kendra Casanova, and Susan J. Weller 2, University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh, WI, 2 University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN D064 The importance of inter- and intraspecific variation in critical thermal limits for estimating the distribution of ant species in the eastern U.S. Lacy D. Chick, and Nathan J. Sanders, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN D065 Intraspecific variation in mandible strike performance of Odontomachus trap-jaw ants. Fredrick Larabee, illinois.edu, Joseph C. Spagna 2, and Andrew V. Suarez, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, 2 William Paterson University, Wayne, NJ D066 Flash behavior of a Photuris spp. firefly. Lawrent Buschman, Kansas State University, Bailey, CO, and Lynn Faust, Great Smoky Mountains Conservation Association, Knoxville, TN D067 Do headless males really make better lovers? Sexual cannibalism in Carolina mantids. Kyle W. Hurley, 48

151 Wednesday November 4 Wednesday November 4 gmail.com, Nick E. Davis, and David E. Dussourd, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR D068 Investigating the role of neurexin I in honey bee (Apis mellifera) mite-grooming behavior. Jennifer M. Tsuruda, purdue.edu, Subhashree Subramanyam 2, Miguel E. Arechavaleta- Velasco 3, Karla I. Acala-Escamilla 3, Carlos A. Robles-Rios 3, Christie E. Williams 2, and Greg J. Hunt, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, West Lafayette, IN, 3 Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Ajuchitlan, Queretaro, México D069 Coevolution of Colorado potato beetle digestive Cys proteases and potato multicystatin inhibitory domains: An example of mutual functional diversification? Marie-Claire Goulet, Marie- Juan Vorster 2, and Dominique Michaud, Universite Laval, Québec, Québec, Canada, 2 University of Pretoria, Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa D0620 Could risk of pathogen infection constrain ant response to warming? A comparative test in a Neotropical forest. Tyler T. Abrahamson, Michael Kaspari 2, and Adam Davidson Kay, University of St. Thomas, St. Paul, MN, 2 University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK Wednesday, November 4, 202, Morning Oral Presentations Program Symposium: Ecological and Evolutionary Origins of Insect Pests in Agriculture: The Role of Crop Domestication and Global Crop Translocation Ballroom C, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Yolanda H. Chen and Raul F. Medina 2, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, 2 Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 8:00 Welcoming Remarks 8:0 368 Multi-trophic level consequences of domestication in a native U.S. crop. Cesar Rodriguez-Saona, rutgers.edu, Rutgers University, Chatsworth, NJ 8: Ecology and evolution of the cotton fleahopper: Possible influence of domesticated cotton cultivation. Apurba K. Barman, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, and Raul F. Medina, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 8: Origins of pest problems in commercial sunflower production. J. P. Michaud, Kansas State University, Hays, KS 9:5 37 Rice domestication influences arthropod diversity and community composition. Yolanda H. Chen, edu, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 9: Complex consequences of herbivore-induced plant responses: Problems and opportunities. André Kessler, cornell.edu, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 0:05 Break 0: Domestication of olive fly through a multi-regional host shift to cultivated olive. Francesco Nardi, University of Siena, Siena, Italy 0: Exploring the humble origins of a global superpest: The case of the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata. Victor Izzo, Tara Madsen-Steigmeyer 2, Joseph T. Labrum, Jordan Armstrong, and Yolanda H. Chen, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, 2 University of California, Berkeley, CA : Were corn leafhopper s host and geographic ranges expanded by maize domestication and spread? Julio Bernal, and Raul F. Medina, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX : Host-plant mediated interactions in a domesticated system: The case of beans, bruchids and parasitoids in Mexico. Betty Benrey, University of Neuchatel, Neuchatel, Switzerland :50 Concluding Remarks Medical, Urban, and Veterinary Entomology (MUVE) Section Symposium: Bed Bug Research: Catching Up With The Global Bed Bug Resurgence Salon A (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderators and Organizers: Alvaro Romero and Susan C. Jones 2, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, 2 Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8: Bed bug salivary extract causes release of potent chemo/ cytokines in macrophages. Jerome Goddard, msstate.edu, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 8: Bugs in bugs: Can bed bugs transmit infectious diseases? Stephen Doggett, nsw.gov.au, Institute for Clinical Pathology and Medical Research, Westmead Hospital, Wentworthville, Australia 8: Importance of detection and insights into population distribution in multifamily housing. Richard Cooper, aesop.rutgers.edu, Changlu Wang, and Narinderpal Singh, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 8: Methods of bed bug detection. Phil Koehler, edu, and Roberto M. Pereira, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 9:05 38 Exploring new tactics for bed bug management. Dong- Hwan Choe, University of California, Riverside, CA 9: Genetic insights into the origins and dispersal of bed bugs. Edward L. Vargo, W. Booth, Virna Saenz, Richard G. Santangelo, and Coby Schal, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 9:35 Break 9: Sampling bed bugs for DNA/forensic evidence to protect from conflicts or litigations. Shripat T. Kamble, unl.edu, and Ralph Narain, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 0: Bed bug impacts on the commercial viability of multiunit housing. Dini M. Miller, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 49

152 Wednesday November 4 0: Evolution and implications of insecticide resistance. Kenneth F. Haynes, Michael F. Potter, Jennifer Gordon, Fang Zhu, and Subba R. Palli, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 0: Susceptibility of recently-collected bed bugs to several insecticides. Alvaro Romero, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 0: Screening chemicals for efficacy against bed bugs. Mark F. Feldlaufer, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD : Effectiveness of a new botanical insecticide for control of bed bugs. Susan C. Jones, and Andrew T. Hoelmer, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH : Efficacy of repellents for preventing bed bug bites. Changlu Wang, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, and Aijun Zhang, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD : Bed bugs: Mechanical and physical control measures. Roger E. Gold, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX Medical, Urban, and Veterinary Entomology (MUVE) Section Symposium: The Return of Insurmountable Opportunities: More Novel Statistics for Entomologists 30 B, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Cynthia C. Lord, Steven A. Juliano 2 and Barry W. Alto, University of Florida, Vero Beach, FL, 2 Illinois State University, Normal, IL Conn, Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Slingerlands, NY :20 Discussion Physiology, Biochemistry, and Toxicology (PBT) Section Symposium: Novel Tools for Sustainable Pest Management 300 A, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Siddharth Tiwari, Ameya D. Gondhalekar 2, Lukasz, L. Stelinski, and Michael E. Scharf 2, University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL, 2 Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8:0 398 DNA methylation in the pea aphid. Jennifer A. Brisson, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, Owain R. Edwards, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Wembley, Western Australia, Australia, Denis Tagu, University Rennes, Le Rheu cedex, France, Stephanie Jaubert- Possimai, Institut Sophia Agrobiotech, Sophia Antipolis Cedex, France, Tom Walsh, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Clayton South, Victoria, Australia, and Fabrice Legeai, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Rennes cedex, France 8: New insecticides for the IPM toolbox. T. C. Sparks, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN 8: Potential use of single-stranded RNA viruses as microbial control agents against pest ants. Steven M. Valles, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL Wednesday November 4 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8:0 39 We have met the enemy and he is ANOVA: Nonlinear regression for analysis of experiments on interspecific competition. Steven A. Juliano, Ebony G. Murrell, and Paul A. O Neal, Illinois State University, Normal, IL 8: Multivariate analysis of variance: Analyzing multiple phenotypic traits in insects. Barry W. Alto, University of Florida, Vero Beach, FL 9: Behavioral data analysis: From χ 2 to Cochran-Mantel- Haenszel and binary logistic regression. Jeffery K. Tomberlin, and Micah Flores, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 9: Spatial analysis of habitat changes resulting from below-ground herbivory in red pine stands. Jesse A. Pfammatter, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 9:50 Break 9:0 40 Dissecting the complex life history of vector-borne pathogens: Novel venues to control disease spread. Nabil Killiny- Mansour, University of Florida, Lake Alfred, FL 9: Defining the pyrethroid receptor site on the Aedes aegypti mosquito sodium channel. Ke Dong, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 9:50 Break 0: Case studies on insecticide resistance: From mechanisms to management. Ralf Nauen, bayercropscience.com, Bayer CropScience, Monheim, Germany 0: Integrating vector behavior information into a management strategy of Huanglongbing. Joao R. S. Lopes, Marcelo P. Miranda 2, Rodrigo N. Marques 2, and Alberto Fereres 3, University of São Paulo, Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz, Piracicaba, Brazil, 2 Fundecitrus, Araraquara, Brazil, 3 Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias, Centro de Ciencias Medioambientales, Madrid, Spain 0: Mixing model selection and hypothesis testing: Useful or problematic? Cynthia C. Lord, University of Florida, Vero Beach, FL 0: Fusing traditional and geometric morphometrics - linear distances, landmarks and harmonics in perfect harmony. Thomas J. DeWitt, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 0: Statistics for population genetics and phylogeny. Jan E. 50 0: RNAi-based pest management: Opportunities and challenges. Subba R. Palli, and Fang Zhu, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY : Essential oils as synergists and control agents for vector mosquitoes. Fan Tong, and Jeffrey R. Bloomquist, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL : DuPont Cyazypyr (cyantraniliprole): A novel anthranilic diamideinsecticide for control of arthropod pests and

153 Wednesday November 4 Wednesday November 4 plant protection. Hector Portillo, com, I. Billy Annan, Juan M. Alvarez, G. Lahm, and Daniel Cordova, DuPont Crop Protection, Newark, DE :45 Concluding Remarks Plant-Insect Ecosystems (P-IE) Section Symposium: Ecological Considerations of the Rising Use of Systemic Insecticides Salon C (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderators and Organizers: Jonathan Lundgren and Adrianna Szczepaniec 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Brookings, SD, 2 Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8: Direct effects of systemic seed treatments on omnivorous natural enemies: When predators dine at the salad bar. Jonathan Lundgren, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Brookings, SD, and Michael Seagraves, Driscoll s Strawberry Associates, Inc., Watsonville, CA 8: Prey-mediated effects on predators of seed-applied insecticides in no-till agroecosystems. Maggie Douglas, psu.edu, and John F. Tooker, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 9:05 40 Externalization of plant systemic insecticides: Modes of exposure and potential consequences. S. J. Castle, ars.usda.gov, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Maricopa, AZ, and Nilima Prabhaker, University of California, Riverside, CA 9:25 4 Non-target effects of veterinary parasiticides on the insect communities of cattle dung. Kevin Floate, agr.gc.ca, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada 9:45 Break 0:05 42 Systemic insecticides as a tool for conservation of urban and natural forests. Daniel A. Herms, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH 0:25 43 A mechanism for honey bee sensitivity to sublethal concentrations of pesticides. David J. Hawthorne, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 0:45 44 Neonicotinoid pesticide reduces bumble bee colony growth and queen production. David Goulson, ac.uk, University of Stirling, Stirling, United Kingdom :05 45 From genes to communities: Mechanisms underlying secondary outbreaks of herbivores following use of neonicotinoid insecticides. Adrianna Szczepaniec, edu, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD :30 Concluding Remarks Plant-Insect Ecosystems (P-IE) Section Symposium: Invasive Insects: A Global Regulatory Challenge Salon B (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderators and Organizers: Scott W. Myers and Michael K. Hennessey 2, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Buzzards Bay, MA, 2 USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Raleigh, NC 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8:0 46 Why regulate this pest but not that pest? Alan K. Dowdy, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Riverdale, MD 8:30 47 Regulating and managing invasive insects in Florida. Greg Hodges, and Trevor R. Smith, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Gainesville, FL 8:50 48 Gypsy moth: Costs and benefits of a long term regulatory program. Victor C. Mastro, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Buzzards Bay, MA 9:0 49 Pest risk analysis and its role in preventing the introduction of invasive insects. Glenn Fowler, aphis.usda.gov, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Raleigh, NC 9: Developing ecological niche models to evaluate the probability of invasive species to establish and spread. Sunil Kumar, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 9:50 42 From gumbo to guacamole: Dealing with the redbay ambrosia beetle, an invasive pest of lauraceous plants in the southern U.S. Albert E. Mayfield, USDA, Forest Service, Asheville, NC 0:0 Break 0: Trials and tribulations in developing state regulations for thousand cankers disease. Walker Gray Haun, tn.gov, Tennessee Department of Agriculture, Nashville, TN 0: Drosophila suzukii in the Southeast: Monitoring and managing a devastating, yet unregulated invasive pest. Hannah J. Burrack, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC : Control of European grapevine moth in California: Cooperative efforts and logistics. Lucia Varela, edu, University of California, Santa Rosa, CA : Steps toward developing management programs for brown marmorated stink bug in the Mid-Atlantic region. Anne L. Nielsen, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, and Tracy C. Leskey, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kearneysville, WV :45 Concluding Remarks Plant-Insect Ecosystems (P-IE) Section Symposium: The Larry L. Larson Symposium: Global Challenges to Product Development and New Product Updates Cumberland (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderators and Organizers: Luis E. Gomez and Mike P. Tolley, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN 8:00 Introductory Remarks 5

154 Wednesday November 4 8:0 426 Implications of regional regulatory environments on development of new chemical insect control products. Mike Shaw, Ken Racke, and Nick Simmons, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN 8: Assessing and managing risks to bees of insect control products: A new regulatory challenge. David Fischer, david. Bayer CropScience, Research Triangle Park, NC, and Thomas Moriarty, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 8: Global registration considerations for RNAi-mediated control of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera). Christina Lawrence, Monsanto Company, St, Louis, MO 9:0 429 Opportunities and challenges for development and registration of new biotech products for vegetables. Anthony M. Shelton, Cornell University, Geneva, NY 9: IRM for Bt crops: Regulatory challenges and market opportunities. Nicholas Storer, Dow AgroSciences, Kensington, MD 9:50 Break 0:05 43 Extending the global reach - cross industry collaboration drives new market opportunities. Douglas Wagner, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN 0: Global development and registration of TwinLink TM cotton. Timothy J. Dennehy, Bayer CropScience, Research Triangle Park, NC 0: Discovery and development of new microbial insecticides. Pamela Marrone, Marrone Bio Innovations, Inc., Davis, CA Australia, and William D. Hutchison, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 8: Sifting through and interpreting the multiple hypotheses surrounding honey bee declines. Nancy Ostiguy, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 8: Global process and local science: Stewardship through collaboration and cooperation. Clinton D. Pilcher, pioneer.com, Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Johnston, IA 8: Certified bed bug free: Actual results may vary. Mark H. Goodman, Kenneth F. Haynes, and Michael F. Potter, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 9:0 440 Educating the stakeholders and policy makers on field conditions affecting pest management legislation. T. E. Reagan, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA 9:25 Break 9:40 44 Taking it to the field: Working with growers to develop sustainable agricultural practices. Logan M. Minter, yahoo.com, Douglas W. Johnson 2, and Ric Bessin, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 2 University of Kentucky, Princeton, KY 9: Climbing out of the ivory tower into a cotton field: Delivery of new recommendations that rely on beneficial insects. Timothy J. Kring, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, and Adam Chappell, Chappell Family Farms, Cotton Plant, AR 0:0 443 Working with beekeepers to study pesticide contamination in Ohio: The Bee Healthy Landscapes Program. Scott P. Prajzner, Mary M. Gardiner, and Larry Phelan, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH Wednesday November 4 : A new insecticide with unique mode of action for cross-spectrum pest control: DuPont TM Cyazypyr TM (cyantraniliprole, DPX-HGW86). I. Billy Annan, dupont.com, Juan M. Alvarez, and Hector Portillo, DuPont Crop Protection, Newark, DE : Developing a novel insecticide with a sustainable profile: Sivanto TM. Matthias Haas, Bayer CropScience, Monheim am Rhein, Germany, John W. Bell, Bayer CropScience, Research Triangle Park, NC, Ralf Nauen, Bayer CropScience, Monheim, Germany, Richard Warner, Bayer CropScience, Clovis, CA, and Mark White, Bayer CropScience, Yuma, AZ :45 Concluding Remarks Plant-Insect Ecosystems (P-IE) Section Symposium: Thinking Globally and Acting Locally: Educating the World with Sound Science on Tough Issues Lecture Hall, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) 0: Citizen science and youth: Culturing scientific interest for the future. Blake L. Newton, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 0: Extending on climate change: Presenting the science is necessary but insufficient. Paul Vincelli, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY :05 Concluding Remarks Systematics, Evolution, and Biodiversity (SysEB) Section Symposium: Discover Life in America s All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory in Great Smoky Mountains National Park 200 C, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Todd P. Witcher, Discover Life in America, Gatlinburg, TN 8:00 Introduction and Welcoming Remarks. Todd P. Witcher, Discover Life in America, Gatlinburg, TN Moderators and Organizers: Logan M. Minter, Mark H. Goodman, and Jennifer Gordon, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8: Interacting with the popular press to clarify public perception of genetically modified crops. Rick Roush, unimelb.edu.au, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, 52 8: ATBI in the Smokies: A great partnership. Becky Nichols, National Park Service, Gatlinburg, TN 8: Coleoptera of the Smokies: Barking up a dead tree and the lessons learned. Victoria Bayless, edu, and Christopher E. Carlton, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA

155 Wednesday November 4 Wednesday November 4 9: Lepidoptera of the Smokies. David Wagner, uconnvm.uconn.edu, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 9:20 Break 9: Watermites of the Smokies. Andrea Radwell, razorbackroad.com, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 9: Springtails of the Smokies. Ernest C. Bernard, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN Systematics, Evolution, and Biodiversity (SysEB) Section Symposium: Foraging, Energetics and Life History - The Grand Connection 200 A, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Dhruba Naug, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8:03 45 A brief history of foraging theory: Foraging theory s love-hate relationship with energetics. David Stephens, edu, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 8: Foraging, energetics and life history strategies: A nutritional approach. Spencer T. Behmer, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 8: Allometric scaling of development time with body size in insects. Michael E. Dillon, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, and Melanie Frazier, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Newport, OR 9: Polydomy and provisioning in ants. Ronald Ydenberg, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada 9: On the evolution of ant thermal performance: Clues from a Neotropical forest. Michael Kaspari, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 9: Diel timing of army ant raids: Top-down and bottom-up factors in species and site differences. Sean O Donnell, drexel.edu, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, Michael Kaspari, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, Anjali Kumar, Organization for Tropical Studies, San Jose, Costa Rica, John Lattke, Museo del Instituto de Zoología Agrícola, Universidad Central Venezuela, Maracay, Venezuela, and Scott Powell, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 0:03 Break 0:8 457 Foraging, colony life history and colony lifetime reproductive success in harvester ants. Deborah M. Gordon, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 0: Energy matters: Metabolism and life history strategies in Africanized and European honey bees. Jennifer H. Fewell, asu.edu, and Jon F. Harrison, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 0: Integration of wing wear, foraging gain and mortality in worker bumble bees. Ralph Cartar, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada :8 460 Social and behavioral influences on the lifespan of worker honey bees. Olav Rueppell, University of North Carolina, Greensboro, NC :38 46 The effect of energetic stress on foraging and decision making in honey bees. Christopher Mayack and Dhruba Naug, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO :58 Concluding Remarks Member Symposium: Nepal Overseas Entomologists Symposium: Global Collaboration for the Development of Next Generation IPM Program Ballroom F, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Ram B. Shrestha and Raju R. Pandey 2, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Lubbock, TX, 2 University of California, Riverside, CA 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8: Experiences from community based IPM program in Nepal. Yubak GC, Plant Protection Directorate, Lalitpur, Bagmati, Nepal, Ram B. Shrestha, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Lubbock, TX, and Jhalendra P. Rijal, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Winchester, VA 8: Cordyceps sinensis, a natural viagara from the mountains of Nepal. Bhishma Subedi, org, Asia Network for Sustainable Agriculture and Bioresources, Kathmandu, Bagmati, Nepal, Megha N. Parajulee, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Lubbock, TX, and Raju R. Pandey, University of California, Riverside, CA 8: Opportunities and challenges for collaborative research between the United States and Nepal. Megha N. Parajulee, m- Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Lubbock, TX 9: Experiences of IPM CRSP program in south Asia including Nepal. Douglas G. Pfeiffer, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 9:25 Break 9: Biological control of Asian citrus psyllid using host specific parasitoids. Raju R. Pandey, University of California, Riverside, CA 0: Past, present and future of integrated pest management programs in developed and developing countries. Ram B. Shrestha, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Lubbock, TX 0: Approaches to improve the effectiveness of Farmers Field Schools for vegetable crop IPM. Sharad Marahatta, Kauai Community College, Lihue, HI, and Bal Krishna Gautam, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 0: Use of novel method to control Formosan subterranean termites in the southern United States: Potential application in termite management in developing countries. Bal Krishna Gautam, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA : Applications of geo-spatial techniques in quantitative sampling design and developing pest management strategies. Jhalendra P. Rijal, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Winchester, VA :20 Concluding Remarks :25 Business Meeting 53

156 Wednesday November 4 Member Symposium: Anatomy of an Invasion: Requirements, Benefits and Possible Implications for Successful Invaders. 200 B, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Fabio Manfredini and Elina L. Niño, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8:05 47 Drivers of invasion success and failure in Liriomyza leafminers. Stuart Reitz, Yulin Gao 2, and Zhongren Lei 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Tallahassee, FL, 2 Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, China 8: Invasions by ladybugs. Edward W. Evans, usu.edu, Utah State University, Logan, UT 9: Escape from competition and the success of ant invasions. Andrew V. Suarez, Shawn M. Wilder 2, Micky D. Eubanks 2, and David Holway 3, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, 2 Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 3 University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 9: Evolution of social structure in an invasive social wasp. Michael Goodisman, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 0:05 Break 0: The African honey bee in the Americas. Stanley S. Schneider, University of North Carolina, Charlotte, Charlotte, NC, and Gloria DeGrandi-Hoffman, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Tucson, AZ 0: Invasion genetics of fire ants. DeWayne Shoemaker, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL 8: IRM for Bt crops: Where we have been and where are we going? Graham P. Head, Monsanto Company, St. Louis, MO 8:50 48 Bt cotton - Past, present and future. Gus Lorenz, University of Arkansas, Lonoke, AR, and Jeffrey Gore, Mississippi State University, Stoneville, MS 9:0 482 Bt Maize: Perspectives from the Corn Belt. Marlin E. Rice, Laura Higgins, Tim Nowatzki, Susan Moser, and Clinton D. Pilcher, Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., Johnston, IA 9:30 Break 9: Bt corn - A southern perspective. Angus L. Catchot, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, and Scott D. Stewart, University of Tennessee, Jackson, TN 0: Resistance events - Monitoring, challenges and failures. Randall G. Luttrell, and Ryan Jackson, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Stoneville, MS 0: Compliance and remediation - EPA policy and standards. Alan Reynolds, and Jeannette C. Martinez, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Pesticide Programs, Washington, DC 0: GMO technologies - What s next? Ronald D. Flannagan, Monsanto Company, Chesterfield, MO :05 Wrap Up. Scott Stewart, The University of Tennessee, Jackson, TN Member Symposium: More than Pests: Cockroach Behavior, Ecology, Systematics and Taxonomy 30 C, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Wednesday November 4 : Evolution of the response to co-evolved and general parasites in the invasive paper wasps Polistes dominulus. Fabio Manfredini, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA : Origins of resistance: A genetic investigation of biotype origin in soybean aphid (Aphis glycines). Jacob A. Wenger, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH 2:25 Concluding Remarks Member Symposium: GMOs for IPM - Implications for Field Crops Ballroom B, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Scott D. Stewart, Jeffrey Gore 2, and Ryan Jackson 3, University of Tennessee, Jackson, TN, 2 Mississippi State University, Stoneville, MS, 3 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Stoneville, MS Moderators and Organizers: Jessica L. Ware and Dominic Evangelista, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ 8:00 Welcoming Remarks 8: Incisitermes (Isoptera: Kalotermitidae) haplotypes of Southern Arizona. Jayshree Patel, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ 8: A review of Dictyopteran molecular studies. John Deyrup, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ 8: Conquering the desert: The radiation of an unusual genus of polyphagid roach. Heidi E. Hopkins, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 9: The systematics of the lower termites based on molecular and morphological data: Where termites fit into roach phylogeny. Jessica L. Ware, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ, and David Grimaldi, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 8:00 Introductory Remarks. Jeff Gore, Mississippi State University, Stoneville, MS 8:0 479 The development, deployment and impact of GMO technologies. Walt Mullins, Bayer CropScience, Collierville, TN 9:25 Break 9:55 49 Phylogenetic and ecological diversity of cockroaches in the Guyana Sheild. Dominic Evangelista, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ 54

157 Wednesday November 4 Wednesday November 4 0:7 492 Phylogeny of Dictyoptera: Outgroups, ingroups and systematics. Marie Djernaes, Natural History Museum, London, United Kingdom 0: Evolution and microgeographic variation in the Hawaiian tree roaches (Blattodea: Blattellidae: Pseudophyllodromiinae). Robin Rice, Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HI 0:4 Concluding Remarks Member Symposium: The Entomological Foundation and You: A Global Outlook on Entomology Education and Outreach Ballroom A, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Rebecca W. Baldwin, Thomas A. Green 2, Dennis Kopp 3, Andrine A. Shufran 4, and Richard Noel Vineyard 5, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2 IPM Institute of North America, Inc., Madison, WI, 3 United States National Museum, Rockville, MD (volunteer), 4 Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, 5 Nevada Department of Education, Carson City, NV 8:00 Introduction. Tom Turpin, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 8: What can the Entomological Foundation do for you? Thomas A. Green, IPM Institute of North America, Inc., Madison, WI 8: Rural ecology and agricultural livelihoods (REAL) education: Teaching young people about nature and IPM in field schools in Thailand. Marut Jatiket, Thai Education Foundation, Bangkok, Thailand 8: Going buggy in the second grade: How insects impact life on earth. Babette Farrar, Eugene Field Elementary School, Springfield, MO (President s Prize for Education Teacher Award first winner) 9: Insect camouflage: Teaching high school students how insects disguise themselves. Kevin Crosby, Independence High School, Bakersfield, CA (President s Prize for Education Teacher Award second winner) 0:5 498 A passion for bugs: What a camper and bug camp director learned along the way. John Guyton, msstate.edu, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, and Stephanie Hill, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 0: Behind the scenes view of an insect zoo! Daniel Babbitt, Orkin Insect Zoo and Smithsonian Butterfly Pavilion, Washington, DC, and Andrine A. Shufran, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK :5 500 Free from the Entomological Foundation: Tools you can use! Rebecca W. Baldwin, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL :45 Closing Remarks. Tom Turpin, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN Member Symposium: The Walnut Twig Beetle and Thousand Cankers Disease: A Global View from Ground Zero in Knoxville, Tennessee Ballroom E, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Steven J. Seybold and Jerome F. Grant 2, USDA, Forest Service, Davis, CA, 2 University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8:05 50 Implementing the National Response Framework for Thousand Cankers Disease (TCD) on Walnut. Bruce Moltzan, USDA, Forest Service, Arlington, VA 8: Walnut twig beetle population genetics: The origin of the problem. Steven J. Seybold, Paul F. Rugman-Jones 2, Andrew D. Graves 3, and Richard Stouthamer 2, USDA, Forest Service, Davis, CA, 2 University of California, Riverside, CA, 3 USDA, Forest Service, Albuquerque, NM 8: Detecting incipient populations of the walnut twig beetle and the development of the National Trapping Guidelines. Paul L. Dallara, Mary Louise Flint, Tom W. Coleman 2, Norman L. Dart 3, Laura Dunning 4, Gail Durham 5, Andrew D. Graves 6, Carl L. Jorgensen 7, Jim Keener 8, Jennifer A. King, Danielle Martin 9, A. Steven Munson 4, Lori J. Nelson 0, Lee Pederson, Danielle Reboletti 4, Richard M. Turcotte 9, and Steven J. Seybold 0, University of California, Davis, CA, 2 USDA, Forest Service, San Bernardino, CA, 3 Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Richmond, VA, 4 USDA, Forest Service, Ogden, UT, 5 Nevada Division of Forestry, Carson City, NV, 6 USDA, Forest Service, Albuquerque, NM, 7 USDA, Forest Service, Boise, ID, 8 Tennessee Department of Agriculture, Knoxville, TN, 9 USDA, Forest Service, Morgantown, WV, 0 USDA, Forest Service, Davis, CA, USDA, Forest Service, Coeur d Alene, ID 9: Characterizing the impact of the walnut twig beetle on tree health in wildland and peri-urban forests within its native range in the southwestern United States. Andrew D. Graves, USDA, Forest Service, Albuquerque, NM, Tom W. Coleman, USDA, Forest Service, San Bernardino, CA, and Steven J. Seybold, USDA, Forest Service, Davis, CA 9:45 Break 0: Characterizing the impact of the walnut twig beetle on tree health in native and orchard habitats in California. Stacy M. Hishinuma, Mary Louise Flint, and Steven J. Seybold 2, University of California, Davis, CA, 2 USDA, Forest Service, Davis, CA 0: The discovery of walnut twig beetle in Colorado and pathways to the world. Whitney Cranshaw, ColoState.edu, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 0: Phytosanitary wood treatments for the walnut twig beetle and thousand cankers disease pathogen. Albert E. Mayfield, Scott W. Myers 2, Adam M. Taylor 3, Stephen W. Fraedrich 4, and Paul Merten, USDA, Forest Service, Asheville, NC, 2 USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Buzzards Bay, MA, 3 University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 4 USDA, Forest Service, Athens, GA :5 508 Answering the unanswered questions about walnut twig beetle and TCD in Tennessee: Development of an outreach and research program. Jerome F. Grant, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN :40 Concluding Remarks 55

158 Wednesday November 4 Wednesday November 4 Member Symposium: Update on Tuta absoluta, the Tomato Leafminer Ballroom G, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Julieta Brambila, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Gainesville, FL 8:00 Welcome and Introductory Remarks 8: A taxonomic and morphological overview of Tuta absoluta. Sangmi Lee, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 8:24 50 Detecting and managing Tuta absoluta with its sex pheromone. Lyndsie Stoltman, and Agenor Mafra-Neto, ISCA Technologies, Inc., Riverside, CA 8:43 5 CAPS Florida Survey: Early detection efforts for Tuta absoluta. Julieta Brambila, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Gainesville, FL, Douglas A. Restom Gaskill, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Palmetto, FL, Andrew Derksen, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Miami, FL, and Leroy Whilby, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Gainesville, FL 9:02 52 Chasing Phthorimaea operculella in the U.S.A.: What to expect when you are not expecting it. Silvia I. Rondon, siliva. Oregon State University, Hermiston, OR 9:2 53 Biological control of Tuta absoluta in Argentina: Studies on indigenous natural enemies as potential biocontrol candidates for augmentative releasing and/or conservation. Maria Gabriela Luna, and Norma Sanchez, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina 9:40 54 Bioecology and biological control of Tuta absoluta Meyrick (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae). José R. P. Parra, br, Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz, Universidade de São Paulo, Piracicaba, Brazil 9:59 Break 0:4 55 Tuta absoluta in areas of new invasion: Evaluation of survey tools and mitigation strategies in Panama. Amy L. Roda, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Miami, FL, Moses T. K. Kairo, Florida A&M University, Tallahassee, FL, Cheslavo Korytkowski, University of Panama, Panama City, Panama, and Julieta Brambila, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Gainesville, FL 0:33 56 Biological control options after establishment of Tuta absoluta in Europe. Alberto Urbaneja, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Agrarias, Moncada, Valencia, Spain, and Nicolas Desneux, French National Institute for Agricultural Research, Sophia-Antipolis, France 0:5 57 Impact of indigenous parasitoids on Tuta absoluta in Europe, and potential for inclusion in IPM schemes. Antonio Biondi, Nicolas Desneux 2, and Lucia Zappalà, University of Catania, Catania, Italy, 2 French National Institute for Agricultural Research, Sophia-Antipolis, France :0 58 Integrating community ecology theories for sustaining the development of effective Tuta absoluta management. Anaïs Chailleux, and Nicolas Desneux, French National Institute for Agricultural Research, Sophia Antipolis, France :29 59 Tuta absoluta, a regulatory view. Devaiah A. Muruvanda, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Riverdale, MD : Keiferia lycopersicella as a pest and a non-pest in south Florida: Would Tuta absoluta do the same? Philip A. Stansly, University of Florida, Immokalee, FL 2:07 Concluding Remarks and Discussion Member Symposium: Vector-Virus Interactions: Implications for Transmission and Management of Emerging Diseases in Specialty Crops at Local and Global Scale 200 D, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Ashfaq A. Sial, Douglas B. Walsh 2, Vaughn M. Walton 3, Rodrigo P. P. Almeida, and Kent M. Daane, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 2 Washington State University, Prosser, WA, 3 Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8:05 52 Invasive vectors, pathogens and plants and their impact on insect transmitted plant pathogens. David W. Ragsdale, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 8: Grape leafroll associated viruses have changed IPM tactics for vineyard mealybugs on the West Coast. Kent M. Daane, Rodrigo P. P. Almeida, Ashfaq A. Sial, Monica Cooper 2, and John T. Hutchins, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 2 University of California, Napa, CA 9:0 523 Grape leafroll disease in New York vineyards: Role of insect vectors and their management. Gregory M. Loeb, cornell.edu, and Marc F. Fuchs, Cornell University, Geneva, NY 9: Plum pox virus in the U.S.A.: Not all viruses are created equal. William Schneider, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Fort Detrick, MD 9:57 Break 0: Citrus tristeza virus, its vectors and its diseases: Relevance to the Florida citrus industry in the age of huanglongbing. Mark E. Hilf, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Fort Pierce, FL 0: Characterization of thrips-iris yellow spot virus interactions and IYSV epidemiology in Georgia s onion farmscapes. Rajagopalbabu Srinivasan, Ron Gitaitis, Hanu Pappu 2, David G. Riley, and Alton N. Sparks, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA, 2 Washington State University, Pullman, WA : Pathogen-plant-vector interactions in the newly emerging zebra chip disease of potatoes. Arash Rashed, ag.tamu.edu, Li Paetzold, Fekede Workneh, and Charles M. Rush, Texas A&M University, West Amarillo, TX :3 528 Understanding the impact of an invasive vector: Transmission efficiency, behavior, and pathogen spread. Matt Daugherty, University of California, Riverside, CA :59 Concluding Remarks 56

159 Wednesday November 4 Wednesday November 4 Ten-Minute Papers, MUVE Section: Mosquitoes (Part 2) and Other Hematophagous Diptera 30 A, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Alec Gerry and Dana Nayduch 2, University of California, Riverside, CA, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Manhattan, KS 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8: Role of autochthonous and allochthonous basal resources on tire insect communities. Alisa A. Abuzeineh, alisa. and Donald A. Yee, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS 8:5 530 Can Culex pervigilans (Bergorth) detect the presence of a key predator? Wan Fatma Zuharah, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Minden, Malaysia 8:27 53 Avian host preference of Culex mosquitoes in southern California. Alec Gerry, University of California, Riverside, CA, Taylor Lura, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom, and Robert Cummings, Orange County Mosquito and Vector Control District, Garden Grove, CA 8: Orientation to carbon dioxide by female Culex quinquefasciatus in a still-air olfactometer. Emerson S. Lacey, and Ring T. Carde, University of California, Riverside, CA 8:5 533 In like a lion or a lamb? Comparison of the competitive ability of a new mosquito invader, Culex coronator, to dominant resident container species. Donald A. Yee, and Jeffrey Skiff, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS 9: Transcriptome analyses of blood and sugar digestive processes in female Culicoides sonorensis midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). Dana Nayduch, gov, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Manhattan, KS, and Christopher A. Saski, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 9:5 Break 9: Novel topical repellents for biting insects. Robert Bedoukian, Bedoukian Research Incoproration, Danbury, CT 9: Disease vector surveillance in the age of crowdsourcing and social networking. Lee W. Cohnstaedt and Elin Maki, Elin. USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Manhattan, KS 9: New species under genus Phledotomus, Phlebotomus waragal sp. nov, and Sergentomyia, Sergentomyia tara sp. nov. Prakash Rumu Salunke, National Institute of Virology, Pune, Maharashtra, India 0: Determining landing preferences of the sand fly Phlebotomus papatasi for the development of lethal landing sites. Matt Aubuchon, and Gary G. Clark, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL 0:8 539 Hourly biting activity of black flies (Diptera: Simulidae) and transmission of onchocerciasis in the Imo River Basin, Nigeria. Emmanuel C. Uttah, Cross River University of Technology, Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria, and Dominic C. Ibeh, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria 0: Repellents for kissing bugs (Triatoma rubida)? Justin Schmidt, Joel A. Terriquez 2, Stephen Klotz 2, and John H. Klotz 3, Southwestern Biological Institute, Tucson, AZ, 2 University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 3 University of California, Riverside, CA 0:42 Concluding Remarks Ten-Minute Papers, PBT Section: RNAi and Immunology 300 C, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: David L. Denlinger and Kun-Yan Zhu 2, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 2 Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 8:00 Introductory Remarks 8:03 54 RNA interference of DNA methyl-transferase 3 affects alternative splicing in the honey bee (Apis mellifera). Hongmei Li, Yang Li, Thomas C. Newman, Megan Kaneda 2, Kirk Kohwa Hou 2, Samuel Wickline 2, Kim C. Worley 3, and Gene E. Robinson, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, 2 Washington University, St. Louis, MO, 3 Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 8:5 542 The effects of chlorpyrifos alone and with a fungicide on queen rearing in honey bees (Apis mellifera). Gloria DeGrandi- Hoffman, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Tucson, AZ, and Yanping (Judy) Chen, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD 8: Antimetamorphic effect of teratocytes and their secretory products of Cotesia plutellae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) on its parasitized host, Plutella xylostella. Md. Ramjan Ali, Wook Hyun Cha 2, Dae-weon Lee 2, and Yonggyun Kim, ac.kr, Andong National University, Andong, Gyeoungbuk, South Korea, 2 Kyungsung University, Busan, South Korea 8: Cells derived from the glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis, support infection and replication of viral RNA from a clone of Homalodisca coagulata virus (HoCV-). Jeremy A. Kroemer, Allyn Spear 2, Drake C. Stenger 3, W. Allen Miller, Bryce W. Falk 4, and Bryony C. Bonning, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Ames, IA, 3 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Parlier, CA, 4 University of California, Davis, CA 8:5 545 Multiple phenotypic impacts of PBAN RNA interference in an invasive ant, Solenopsis invicta. Robert K. Vander Meer, bob. and Man-Yeon Choi, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL 9: No adverse effect of an insecticidal dsrna on nymphal survival and development of insidiosus flower bug, Orius insidiosus (Heteroptera: Anthocoridae). Jianguo Tan, com, Mark S. Paradise, Pamela M. Bachman, and Steven L. Levine, Monsanto Company, Creve Coeur, MO 9:5 547 Effects of plant defenses on symbionts of Anoplophora glabripennis. Kelli Hoover, Erin D. Scully, Scott Geib 2, Ming Tien, and John Carlson, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Hilo, HI 9:27 Break 9: Effect of colony antibiotic application on individual honey bee development and fat reserves. Carlos J. Vega Melendez, Maria Gloria Dominguez-Bello, and Tugrul Giray, com, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico 57

160 Wednesday November 4 Wednesday November 4 9: Artificial in vitro infection of honey bee pupae with IAPV reveals viral interference with fundamental cell functions. Humberto F. Boncristiani, Jay D. Evans 2, Yanping (Judy) Chen 2, Jeff Pettis 2, Charles Murphy 2, Dawn L. Lopez 2, Michael S. Finstroem 3, Micheline Strand 4, David R. Tarpy 3, and Olav Rueppell, University of North Carolina, Greensboro, NC, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD, 3 North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, 4 Chemical and Biological Defense Laboratories, Durham, NC 0: A carbohydrate-rich diet increases social immunity in the ant Ectatomma ruidum. Adam Davidson Kay, stthomas.edu, Abbie J. Bruning, Andy Van Alst, William O. H. Hughes 2, and Michael Kaspari 3, University of St. Thomas, St. Paul, MN, 2 University of Leeds, Leeds, United Kingdom, 3 University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 0:8 55 RNAi pathway in an economically important corn pest, western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera). Chitvan Khajuria, Kenneth Narva 2, and Blair D. Siegfried, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 2 Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN 0: Development of RNAi methods for Peregrinus maidis, the corn planthopper. Jianxiu Yao, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 0: The interplay of SelK and SelM overcome antioxidant deficiencies in ticks injected with selk- or selm-dsrna. Steven W. Adamson, Sarah Nobles, Rebecca Browning, and Shahid Karim, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS 0: The mode of action of dsrna for control of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) larvae. Renata Bolognesi, Pamela M. Bachman 2, Ronald D. Flannagan, G. Segers, Barbara Elizabeth Wiggins, and Parthasarathy Ramaseshadri, Monsanto Company, Chesterfield, MO, 2 Monsanto Company, Creve Coeur, MO :06 Concluding Remarks Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section: Forest and Arboreal Entomology Summit (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderators: David E. Jennings and Jim Steffel 2, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, 2 LABServices, Hamburg, PA 8:5 Introductory Remarks 8:8 555 Evaluating sweet birch (Betula lenta) and yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis) as hosts of the Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis). Baode Wang, usda.gov, and Victor C. Mastro, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Buzzards Bay, MA 8: The genus Enoclerus Gahan (Coleoptera: Cleridae) in temperate climate forest stands of Mexico. Alan Burke, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 8: A new tool for directing management efforts of invasive forest pests. Tea Ammunét, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden 8: Northern outbreak epicentres of eastern spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) and boreal forest response early in the population cycle. Deepa S. Pureswaran, Deepa. Louis De Grandpré, and Daniel Kneeshaw 2, Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Québec City, Québec, Canada, 2 University du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada 9: Direct and indirect effects of host tree condition on the preference and performance of an exotic wood-borer, Tetropium fuscum (F.). Leah Flaherty, Jon Sweeney 2, and Dan Quiring, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada, 2 Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada 9:8 560 Range expansions of threshhold populations of mountain pine beetle in western Canada. Brian H. Aukema, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, Kishan Sambaraju, Natural Resources Canada, Québec, Québec, Canada, and Allan L. Carroll, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada 9:30 56 Modeling mountain pine beetle infestations in a dynamic landscape. Martha Garlick, James Powell, and Nicholas Friedenberg, 2, Utah State University, Logan, UT, 2 Applied Biomathematics, Setauket, NY 9: Influence of habitat fragmentation on community structure of cerambycid beetles. Linnea R. Meier, gmail.com, Joseph C. H. Wong, Judy A. Mongold-Diers, Peter F. Reagel, Taylor Stanton, Jocelyn G. Millar 2, and Lawrence M. Hanks, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, 2 University of California, Riverside, CA 9: Synergism of sex pheromones by host plant volatiles for cerambycid beetles. Joseph C. H. Wong, edu, Ann M. Ray 2, Jocelyn G. Millar 3, and Lawrence M. Hanks, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, 2 Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH, 3 University of California, Riverside, CA 0:06 Break 0:2 564 The use of semiochemicals to detect and monitor the granulate ambrosia beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in hardwood forests. Nicole Renee VanDerLaan, purdue.edu and Matthew D. Ginzel, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 0: Midwestern bark and ambrosia beetles (Curculionidae: Scolytinae) that attack stressed black walnut and their fungal associates. Sharon E. Reed, Jennifer Juzwik 2, and James T. English, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, 2 USDA, Forest Service, St. Paul, MN 0: Investigating the chemical and biological interactions of goldspotted oak borer and oaks to improve trap baiting for detection. Yigen Chen, Mary Louise Flint, Tom W. Coleman 2, Lori J. Nelson 3, Damon J. Crook 4, and Steven J. Seybold 3, University of California, Davis, CA, 2 USDA, Forest Service, San Bernardino, CA, 3 USDA, Forest Service, Davis, CA, 4 University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 0: The role of wound-induced response in host resistance of southern California oaks to feeding by the invasive goldspotted oak borer (Agrilus auroguttatus). Tom W. Coleman, USDA, Forest Service, San Bernardino, CA, Nancy E. Grulke, USDA, Forest Service, Riverside, CA, and Steven J. Seybold, USDA, Forest Service, Davis, CA : Monitoring dispersal of Oobius agrili, an egg parasitoid of emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis). David E. Jennings, Jian J. Duan 2, and Paula M. Shrewsbury, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, 2 USDA, 58

161 Wednesday November 4 Wednesday November 4 Agricultural Research Service, Newark, DE :2 569 Sampling for the balsam gall midge (Paradiplosis tumifex) in Christmas tree stands. R. Drew Carleton, nrcan.gc.ca, Peter J. Silk, Eldon Eveleigh, Stephen B. Heard 2, and Chris Dickie 3, Natural Resources Canada, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada, 2 University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada, 3 Infor, Inc., Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada : Role of the host plant in enhancing the outbreak potential of a conifer-defoliating tenthredinid sawfly. Robert Johns, Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada :45 57 Status of biological control of hemlock woolly adelgid in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Abdul Hakeem, Jerome F. Grant, Paris L. Lambdin, Gregory J. Wiggins, Frank A. Hale 2, J. Rusty Rhea 3, Glenn Taylor 4, and David Buckley, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2 University of Tennessee, Nashville, TN, 3 USDA, Forest Service, Asheville, NC, 4 Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Gatlinburg, TN :57 Concluding Remarks Ten-Minute Papers, SysEB Section: Social Arthropod Ecology and Evolution 30 D, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Chelsea R. Ross and J. Colton Watts, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 8:5 Introductory Remarks 8:8 572 Wood ants prefer neotectonic faults: 50 years of a Formica rufa supercolony in southwest Germany. Dietrich Klimetzek, Gabriele Berberich 2, Martin Berberich 3, and Ulrich Schreiber 2, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany, 2 University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany, 3 Buero Berberich, Erftstadt, Germany 8: A red wood ant supercolony as a bioindicator for neotectonic fault structures at the peninsula Bodanrueck (southwest Germany). Gabriele Berberich, uni-due.de, Dietrich Klimetzek 2, Martin Berberich 3, and Ulrich Schreiber, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany, 2 University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany, 3 Buero Berberich, Erftstadt, Germany 8: The evolution of colony structure in the ant genus Linepithema. Jo-anne C. Holley, Alexander L. Wild, and Andrew V. Suarez, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 8: Ant species (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in the diet of a Florida population of eastern narrow-mouthed toads, Gastrophryne carolinensis (Anura: Microhylidae). Mark A. Deyrup, Archbold Biological Station, Lake Placid, FL, Leif D. Deyrup, University of the Cumberlands, Williamsburg, KY, and James Carrel, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 9: A tale of two islands: The taxon cycle and anthropogenic impacts on de novo island ant faunas in the western tropical Pacific. Jesse Czekanski-Moir, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 9:8 577 Using historical and experimental data to uncover warming temperature effects on ant communities. Julian Resasco, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, Katharine L. Stuble, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, and Shannon L. Pelini, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, OH 9: Do army ants and their associated arthropods share symbiotic bacteria? Piotr Lukasik, Yi Hu, Sean O Donnell, and Jacob A. Russell, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA 9:42 Break 9: Learning and memory processes of honey bees (Apis mellifera) in association with a conditioned place preference assay. Arián Avalos, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras, San Juan, PR 0: Gut symbionts and the role they play in fungal pathogen suppression of honey bee brood. Svjetlana Vojvodic, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, and Kirk E. Anderson, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Tucson, AZ 0:33 58 Debunking the myth of termite pleometrosis: Costs and (few) benefits of group foundation in Nasutitermes corniger. Tamara R. Hartke, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, Australia, and Rebeca B. Rosengaus, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 0: Resource competition between two fungal parasites in subterranean termites. Thomas Chouvenc, Caroline Efstathion, and Nan-Yao Su, University of Florida, Davie, FL 0: Bacterial community composition in the Asian subterranean termite. Nurmastini Bujang, Nan-Yao Su, and Nigel Harrison, University of Florida, Davie, FL : Temporal and spatial positioning for foraging optimization in the subsocial spider Anelosimus studiosus (Araneae: Theridiidae). Chelsea R. Ross, edu, J. Colton Watts, Thomas C. Jones, Michele L. Joyner, and Edith Seier, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN :2 585 Diel rhythms in locomotor activity and antipredator behavior in the subsocial spider Anelosimus studiosus (Araneae: Theridiidae). J. Colton Watts, Chelsea R. Ross, Thomas C. Jones, Michele L. Joyner, and Edith Seier, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN :33 Concluding Remarks Ten-Minute Papers, PBT Section: Chemical Communication 300 B, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Shahid Karim and Blair D. Siegfried 2, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS, 2 University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 8:30 Introductory Remarks 8: Chemical communicaton regulating reproductive behavior in Lygus hesperus. Colin S. Brent, gov, and John A. Byers, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Maricopa, AZ 8: Biochemical and functional characterization of different coleopteran cytochrome P450s involved in insecticide resistance. C. T. Zimmer, and Ralf Nauen, Bayer CropScience, Monheim, Germany 59

162 Wednesday November 4 Wednesday November 4 8: Environmental factors that influence cuticular hydrocarbon profiles in cerambycid beetles. Christina A. Silliman, Jocelyn G. Millar 2, Adrian A. Smith, and Lawrence M. Hanks, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, 2 University of California, Riverside, CA 9: Gender, age, and diet influence locomotor activity rhythms in the flesh fly (Sarcophaga crassipalpis). Darrell Moore, Xinguo Lu, and Karl H. Joplin, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 9:2 590 Effects of a temporally restricted protein supplement on the nocturnal activity of the female flesh fly (Sarcophaga crassipalpis). Karl H. Joplin, Xinguo Lu, and Darrell Moore, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 9:33 59 Methodologies for analyzing behavioral organization in the flesh fly, Sarcophaga crassipalpis. Elijah Laws, goldmail.etsu.edu, Edith Seier, Michele L. Joyner, Darrell Moore, and Karl H. Joplin, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 9:45 Break 0: Candidate sex pheromones from the yucca moth (Tegeticula yuccasella), an archaic lepidopteran. Kevin W. Wanner, Jan Jorgensen, Gerhard Gries 2, Regine Gries 2, Jean E. Allen, Hugh M. Robertson 3, and Peggy Bunger, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT, 2 Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada, 3 University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 0:2 593 Effects of protein malnutrition on pheromone communication in honey bees. Mark J. Carroll, usda.gov, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Tucson, AZ 0: Why do insects groom their antennae? Removal of excess cuticular hydrocarbons enhances olfactory acuity. Katalin Böröczky, Ayako Wada-Katsumata, and Coby Schal, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 0: Molecular mechanisms of olfactory detection in Spodoptera littoralis: Deorphanization of odorant receptors via the Drosophila empty neuron system. William B. Walker, gmail.com, Muhammad Binyameen 2, Christelle Monsempes 3, Nicolas Montagné 4, Peter Anderson 2, Fredrik Schlyter 2, Rickard Ignell 2, Emmanuelle Jacquin-Joly 3, Bill Hansson 5, and Mattias Larsson 2, Lund Univeristy, Lund, Skåne, Sweden, 2 Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp, Skåne, Sweden, 3 Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), Versailles, France, 4 University Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France, 5 Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Jena, Germany 0: Recognizing reproductives and hydrocarbon signal variation in the trap-jaw ant Odontomachus brunneus. Adrian A. Smith, Lawrence M. Hanks, Jocelyn G. Millar 2, and Andrew V. Suarez, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL, 2 University of California, Riverside, CA Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section: Pheromones and Attractants LeConte (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderator: J. P. Michaud, Kansas State University, Hays, KS 8:30 Introductory Remarks 8: Comparative attractiveness of a single-component isomer vs. the racemic blend of a mating pheromone in Prionus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) traps. Arthur Agnello, edu, Cornell University, Geneva, NY, Dylan A. Tussey, University of North Carolina, Asheville, NC, Jocelyn G. Millar, University of California, Riverside, CA, and James D. Barbour, University of Idaho, Parma, ID 8: Attracting Sirex noctilio and Sirex nigricornis: Pheromones, fungus volatiles and more. Mark Sarvary, cornell.edu, Miriam F. Cooperband 2, and Ann Hajek, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 2 USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Buzzards Bay, MA 8: Detection dogs recognize pheromone from spruce bark beetle and follow it to source: A new tool from chemical ecology to forest protection. Fredrik Schlyter, Göran Birgersson, and Annette Johansson 2, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp, Skåne, Sweden, 2 Snifferdogs Sweden, Norrhult, Småland, Sweden 9:09 60 Response of females to a novel pheromone produced by male Diaprepes root weevils (Diaprepes abbreviatus). Stephen L. Lapointe, Paul S. Robbins, and Rocco T. Alessandro, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Fort Pierce, FL 9:2 602 Identification and field evaluation of wine and vinegar volatiles as attractants for spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii. Dong H. Cha, Todd B. Adams 2, Helmuth W. Rogg 2, and Peter J. Landolt, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Wapato, WA, 2 Oregon Department of Agriculture, Salem, OR 9: Using volatile chemicals from wine and vinegar to attract spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii. Todd B. Adams, Peter J. Landolt 2, Dong H. Cha 2, and Helmuth W. Rogg, Oregon Department of Agriculture, Salem, OR, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Wapato, WA 9: Assessment of attracticidal spheres as a tool for management of spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura). Brent D. Short, Starker E. Wright, and Tracy C. Leskey, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kearneysville, WV 9:57 Concluding Remarks : Trail pheromone of the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). Dong-Hwan Choe, David Villafuerte 2, and Neil Tsutsui 2, University of California, Riverside, CA, 2 University of California, Berkeley, CA :2 Concluding Remarks 60

163 Wednesday November 4 Wednesday November 4 Wednesday, November 4, 202, Afternoon Lunch and Learn: Politics and Science: How Congress and the President Impact Your Work (and what you can do about it) Lecture Hall, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Robert Gropp, American Institute of Biological Sciences, Washington, DC 2:5 - :5 Program Symposium: Genetic Pest Management: Global Strategies, Hurdles, and Future Directions Ballroom C, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Brian G. Rector and Fred Gould 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Reno, NV, 2 North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC : Genetic approaches to controlling vector-borne diseases. Anthony A. James, University of California, Irvine, CA 2: Engineering pathways and effectors of the Anopheles immune system for disease control. George Dimopoulos, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 2: Synthetic genetic drive for disease vector control. Andrea Crisanti, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom 3: Conditional lethality in transgenic tephritid flies for improvement of SIT. Alfred Handler, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL 3:30 Break 3: Development of male-only strains of the New World screwworm fly, Cochliomyia hominivorax. Max Scott, ncsu.edu, Felix Guerrero 2, Fang Li, Azhahianambi Palavesam 2, and Agustin Sagel 3, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kerrville, TX, 3 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Panama City, Panama 4:5 60 Governance strategies for genetic pest management: Options and impacts. Jennifer Kuzma, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 4:45 6 Engineering the genomes of wild insect populations. Bruce A. Hay, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 5:5 Panel Discussion Physiology, Biochemistry, and Toxicology (PBT) Section Symposium: Function, Regulation and Evolution of Environmental Response Genes in Post-Genomic Era Ballroom G, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Fang Zhu and Omprakash Mittapalli 2, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 2 Ohio State University, Wooster, OH :30 Welcoming Remarks :35 62 Guess how many? Environmental complexity and xenobiotic-metabolizing gene superfamilies. May R. Berenbaum, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL :55 63 Molecular making of a robust insect s olfactory system. Walter S. Leal, University of California, Davis, CA 2:5 64 The selfish allele: The molecular evolution of insecticide resistance. Jeffrey G. Scott, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 2:35 65 Cytochrome P450 gene up-regulation and its role in insecticide resistance. Nannan Liu, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 2:55 66 Evolutionary molecular neuroethology - studying chemosensory gene families in the post-genomic era. Richard Vogt, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 3:5 Break 3:30 67 P450 genes and physiology in the post-genomic era. Rene Feyereisen, Universite Nice Sophia Antipolis, Sophia Antipolis, France 3:50 68 Systems-scale analysis of insect responses to xenobiotics - coupling it back to hypothesis driven experiments. Barry R. Pittendrigh, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 4:0 69 Insecticide metabolism and resistance - towards a systems approach. Philip Batterham, au, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia 4: RNA-Seq and molecular docking reveal multi-level insecticide resistance in the bed bug. Omprakash Mittapalli, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH 4:50 62 Systemic analysis of CYPome in the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata. Fang Zhu, and Subba R. Palli, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 5:0 Concluding Remarks Plant-Insect Ecosystems (P-IE) Section Symposium: Beyond Borders: Global Research in Pest Management (Student Affairs Committee Sponsored Symposium) Ballroom F, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Joyce E. Parker and Joy L. Newton 2, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, 2 University of Nevada, Reno, NV :30 Introductory Remarks 6

164 Wednesday November 4 : Challenges and rewards of IPM for sorghum and millet in African countries. Bonnie B. Pendleton, edu, West Texas A&M University, Canyon, TX : Can high tech crops benefit low tech farmers? Socioeconomic impact of insect-protected biotech cotton in West Africa. John Greenplate, Monsanto Company, St. Louis, MO 2: Insect-fungus symbioses involved in climate changerelated tree die-offs on two continents. Diana Six, umt.edu, College of Forestry and Conservation, Missoula, MT 2: Repellents, attractants and compensatory responses to reduce pest pressure and increase yield in Andean potato systems. Katja Poveda, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, and Maria Isabel Gomez Jimenez, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota, Colombia 3:3 Break 3: Integrated management of the Andean potato weevil, Premnotrypes vorax (Hustache), in the Ecuadorian Highlands. Carmen Castillo, Patricio Gallegos 2, and Cesar Asaquibay 2, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, 2 Instituto Nacional Autónomo de Investigaciones Agropecuarias, Quito, Ecuador 3: Effects of on-farm botanical diversity and landscape context on insect pests in coffee agroforestry systems in Costa Rica. Sanford D. Eigenbrode, Nilsa Bosque- Perez, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID, Edgar Varón, Corporacion Colombiana de Investig Agropecuaria, Tolima, Colombia, and Mariangie Ramos, University of Puerto Rico, Utuado, Mayaguez, PR 4:8 628 R&D from a land down under: A view from Australia. Margaret C. Hardy, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia 4:43 Concluding Remarks 2: Risks and benefits of neonic seed treatments in field crops in U.S. corn belt. John F. Tooker, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 3: How Bt crops fit the IPM paradigm. William D. Hutchison, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 3:25 Break and Mixer 3: How likely is resistance to neonics to develop? Is IRM needed or possible for neonic seed treatments? Thomas E. Hunt, University of Nebraska, Concord, NE, Robert K. D. Peterson, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT, and Blair D. Siegfried, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 4:5 635 Do IPM/IRM and commerce fit together today in the corn belt? Clinton D. Pilcher, and Marlin E. Rice, Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., Johnston, IA 4: IRM conundrum for Bt corn - can science, regulators, end users andtechnology providers intersect? Jeannette C. Martinez, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Pesticide Programs, Washington, DC 4: Panel Discussion: What is the relevance of IPM in the Bt and neonic arena? Moderator and closing comment. Eileen Cullen, University of Wisconsin, and current Chair NCC 46. Plant-Insect Ecosystems (P-IE) Section Symposium: Variety is the Spice of Life: Biodiversity in Agricultural Systems Summit (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderators and Organizers: William R. Morrison and Alexandria N. Bryant, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI :30 Introductory Remarks Wednesday November 4 Plant-Insect Ecosystems (P-IE) Section Symposium: Remember IPM? Risks and Benefits of Global Expansion of Transgenes and Insecticide Seed Treatments in Field Crops Salon C (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderators and Organizers: Arthur W. Schaafsma, Christian H. Krupke 2, and John F. Tooker 3, University of Guelph, Ridgetown, Ontario, Canada, 2 Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, 3 Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA :30 Welcome and Opening Comments: Art Schaafsma, University of Guelph and Secretary NCC 46 : Setting the stage: IPM defined with current commentary. Michael E. Gray, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL : Impacts of local and broad-scale landscape structure on the diversity of pollinators in Wisconsin agroecosystems. Rachel E. Mallinger, Hannah R. Gaines, David Lowenstein, and Claudio Gratton, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI : Insect predation in bioenergy grasslands: Video surveillance implicates a diverse cast of suspects. Benjamin Werling, Julia Perrone, Matthew Grieshop, Timmothy D. Meehan 2, Claudio Gratton 2, and Doug A. Landis, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 2 University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 2:5 640 Finding your way in the dark: Belowground cues and the ecology and evolution of soil nematode chemotaxis. Jared G. Ali, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, Sergio Rasmann, University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland, Johannes Helder, Wageningen University, Wageningen, Netherlands, and Wim H. van der Putten, Netherlands Institute of Ecology, Wageningen, Netherlands 2: Usage and benefits of prophylactic insecticides (both Bt and neonics in Canadian corn belt). Arthur W. Schaafsma, University of Guelph, Ridgetown, Ontario, Canada 2:25 63 When bees meet corn: Effects of neonicotinoid-treated seeds upon pollinators. Christian H. Krupke, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 62 2:35 64 Context dependent responses across arthropod communities to herbivore induced plant volatiles in complex environments. Joseph E. Braasch, and Ian Kaplan, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 2:55 Break 3:0 642 Linking biodiversity and foraging: Tangled up in generalist. Jason M. Schmidt, Ann

165 Wednesday November 4 Wednesday November 4 L. Rypstra 2, and James D. Harwood, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 2 Miami University, Hamilton, OH 3: Questions of diversity in tree fruit orchards utilizing grazed hogs. Krista Buehrer, and Matthew Grieshop, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 3: Supporting pollinator and natural enemy diversity for sustainable fruit production: Testing tactics on farm. Rufus Isaacs, Brett R. Blaauw, Emily May, Julianna Tuell, and Keith S. Mason, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 4:0 645 Designing agricultural landscapes for biodiversity services. Doug A. Landis, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 4:30 Concluding Remarks Member Symposium: Think Globally, Teach Locally: Designing Your Presentation to Reach Your Target Audience 200 C, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Marianne S. Cruz and Martha Rosett Lutz 2, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, 2 Bluegrass Community and Technical College, Lexington, KY :30 Welcoming Remarks : Scientific literacy: Engaging the millennial student. Carol M. Anelli, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 2: Thinking like a kid helps you teach entomology to young students. Joseph Culin, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 2: Teaching inquiry-based entomological lessons to high school teachers and students. Tanja Mckay, Arkansas State University, State University, AR 2: Insects, systems-thinking and inquiry-based learning for non-majors. Tiffany M. Heng-Moss, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 3:5 650 Adapting outreaches to target multiple ages simultaneously. Marianne S. Cruz, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, and Martha Rosett Lutz, Bluegrass Community and Technical College, Lexington, KY 3:40 Break 3:55 65 Integrating insects into the pre-college curriculum through workshops at science teacher meetings. Robert Matthews, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 4: Effectively connecting with practitioners at educational seminars and workshops. Daniel A. Potter, edu, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 4: Using literary references to enhance entomology presentations. Tom Turpin, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 5:0 654 Levity in teaching Entomology? Charles A. Triplehorn, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 5:35 Concluding Remarks Member Symposium: Bugs, Bytes, and Basal Area How Forest Inventory & Analysis Programs Support Forest Entomology Research 30 B, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: James T. Vogt and Therese M. Poland 2, USDA, Forest Service, Southern Research Station, Knoxville, TN, 2 USDA, Forest Service, East Lansing, MI :30 Welcoming Remarks : Early signs of emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) infestations in Tennessee? Potential of forest inventory and analysis data for advance detection. James T. Vogt, and Christopher Oswalt, USDA, Forest Service, Southern Research Station, Knoxville, TN : Climatic constraints to emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) spread: Potential for ash survival in the wake of infestation. Ryan D. DeSantis, W. Keith Moser 2, Dale D. Gormanson 2, and Marshall G. Bartlett 3, University of Missouri, St. Paul, MN, 2 USDA, Forest Service, Northern Research Station, St. Paul, MN, 3 Hollins University, Roanoke, VA 2: Taking bytes out of time: Using forest inventory data to analyze mechanisms and impacts of insect dispersal. Susan J. Crocker, USDA, Forest Service, Northern Research Station, St. Paul, MN 2: Threatened resources: Fraxinus, Juglans, and Tsuga populations in Tennessee and Kentucky. Christopher Oswalt, USDA, Forest Service, Knoxville, TN 2: Forest inventory and analysis data and the hemlock wooly adelgid: Evaluating impacts in the eastern United States. R. Talbot Trotter, USDA, Forest Service, Hamden, CT, Randall S. Morin, USDA, Forest Service, Newtown Square, PA, Sonja N. Oswalt, USDA, Forest Service, Southern Research Station, Knoxville, TN, and Andrew M. Liebhold, USDA, Forest Service, Morgantown, WV 2: When two worlds collide: Invasions by the hemlock wooly adelgid and beech scale converge and destroy a climax forest type. Andrew M. Liebhold, USDA, Forest Service, Morgantown, WV, and Randall S. Morin, USDA, Forest Service, Newtown Square, PA 3:05 Break 3:20 66 The roles of forest inventory information in assessing impact of herbivory by the southern pine beetle and hemlock wooly adelgid. Robert N. Coulson, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 3: Impact of recent oak decline and red oak borer (Enaphalodes rufulus) on Arkansas oak-hickory forests. Laurel J. Haavik, Joshua S. Jones, Larry D. Galligan, James M. Guldin 2, and Fred M. Stephen, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR, 2 USDA, Forest Service, Arkansas, AR 3: From forest inventory data to risk maps to surveillance of invasive species: A case study. John W. Coulston, fs.fed.us, Frank H. Koch 2, William D. Smith 2, and Frank Sapio 3, USDA, Forest Service, Knoxville, TN, 2 USDA, Forest Service, Research Triangle Park, NC, 3 USDA, Forest Service, Fort Collins, CO 4: Predicting future spruce beetle occurrence using forest inventory and analysis data from the Intermountain West. R. Justin 63

166 Wednesday November 4 DeRose, John D. Shaw, James N. Long 2, and Barbara J. Bentz 3, USDA, Forest Service, Ogden, UT, 2 Utah State University, Logan, UT, 3 USDA, Forest Service, Logan, UT 4: Integration of pest damage survey and forest inventory data to assess regional gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) impacts. Randall S. Morin, USDA, Forest Service, Newtown Square, PA, and Andrew M. Liebhold, USDA, Forest Service, Morgantown, WV 4: Crown-condition assessment toolbox for forest entomology research. KaDonna C. Randolph, USDA, Forest Service, Knoxville, TN 4: Modeling urban distributions of host trees for invasive forest pests. Frank H. Koch, USDA, Forest Service, Research Triangle Park, NC, Mark J. Ambrose, North Carolina State University, Research Triangle Park, NC, Denys Yemshanov, Canadian Forest Service, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada, and P. Eric Wiseman, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 5:05 Discussion 5:25 Concluding Remarks Member Symposium: Feeding Future Generations: Expanding a Global Science to Answer a Global Challenge Salon A (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderators and Organizers: John Fitt and Boris A. Castro 2, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN, 2 Dow AgroSciences, Fresno, CA :30 Introductory Remarks : Feeding the world: How big is the challenge? John Fitt, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN Member Symposium: Forensic Expert Witness: Global Perspectives of Practice Ballroom B, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Mustapha Debboun, Jerry Hatch 2, and Stuart Mitchell 3, United States Army, Fort Sam Houston, TX, 2 Northwest Exterminating, Marietta, GA, 3 PestWest Environmental, Sarasota, FL : With certification comes opportunity; become a Board Certified Entomologist! Shripat T. Kamble, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE : Ethical issues in forensic entomology expert testimony. Robert Hall, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 2:5 678 Serving as an expert in an entomology lawsuit. Jeff Lipman, Lipman Law Firm, Des Moines, IA 2: The case report; basis for your trial testimony. Neal Haskell, Forensic Entomology Investigations, Rensselaer, IN 3:5 Break 3: Testifying in medico-legal or forensic entomology cases; land mines and pitfalls. Jerome Goddard, msstate.edu, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 4:00 68 Contributions of National Research Council report on forensics to medico-legal entomology. Jeffery K. Tomberlin, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 4: Food product infestations; whose fault is it? Ted Granovsky, Granovsky Associates, Inc., Bryan, TX Wednesday November 4 : Raising productivity in global agriculture. Keith Fuglie, USDA, Economic Research Service, Washington, DC 2: Crop protection solutions: The importance of pesticides in feeding the world. Leonard Gianessi, croplifefoundation.org, CropLife Foundation, Washington, DC 2:55 67 Feeding the 0 billion: Can biotechnology help? Bruce Chassy, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 3:25 Break 3: Balancing the risks and benefits of food innovation: Regulatory and public perceptions. Jeffrey D. Wolt, edu, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 4: Effects of transgenic crops on non-target organisms: A global synthesis and case studies. Steven Naranjo, ars.usda.gov, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Maricopa, AZ 4: Impact of production intensity on insecticide resistance management strategies. George G. Kennedy, and Alana L. Jacobson, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 4: Delivering agricultural technology to developing countries. Paul Anderson, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis, MO 5:20 Concluding Remarks 5: Forensic autopsy: To see for one s self. Stuart Mitchell, PestWest Environmental, Sarasota, FL Member Symposium: How Entomologists Manage: The Global Skills We Often Overlook LeConte (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderators and Organizers: Miriam F. Cooperband and Kamal J. K. Gandhi 2, USDA, APHIS, Buzzards Bay, MA, 2 University of Georgia, Athens, GA :30 Welcoming Remarks : Are young entomologists really being prepared as well as they could be for their careers? Miriam F. Cooperband, USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Buzzards Bay, MA : Challenges for a professor starting out. Kamal J. K. Gandhi, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 2: From getting the keys to an empty lab to full professor: A case study. Patricia V. Pietrantonio, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 2: When worlds collide: Bridging the gap between research and administration. S. Kristine Braman, edu, University of Georgia, Griffin, GA 64

167 Wednesday November 4 Wednesday November 4 2:45 Break 3: Metamorphasis from a scientist larva to a program manager adult in the federal government. Uli Bernier, uli. USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL 3: The ISCA Technologies experience. Agenor Mafra-Neto, ISCA Technologies, Inc., Riverside, CA 4: Essential skills for scientists who manage people, budgets, and laboratories. Randall Pierce, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 4:20 Panel Discussion Member Symposium: Improving the Safety and Effectiveness of Biological Control Agents of Weeds in the U.S.A. 200 D, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Lincoln Smith and James P. Cuda 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Albany, CA, 2 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL :30 Introductory Remarks :35 69 How safe are the agents that have been released? Gregory J. Wiggins, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN : How does nontarget damage in the field compare to host specificity data? Hariet L. Hinz, Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International, Delémont, Switzerland 2: Indirect nontarget effects and how to avoid them. Dean E. Pearson, USDA, Forest Service, Missoula, MT 2: Evaluating the potential threat of a weed biocontrol agent Diorhabda spp. to an endangered bird, the southwestern willow flycatcher. Dan Bean, Colorado Department of Agriculture, Palisade, CO, and Tom Dudley, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 2: The why and how of weighing evolutionary potential of candidate control organisms prior to release. Peter McEvoy, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 2: Criteria that the Technical Advisory Group (TAG) uses to evaluate weed biological control agents. Alfred F. CoFrancesco, United States Army, Corps of Engineers, Vicksburg, MS 3: APHIS-PPQ permitting criteria and compliance with NEPA and ESA regulations. Shirley A. Wager-Page, Shirley.A.Wager- USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Riverdale, MD 3:20 Break 3: Recent cases of agents that have been rejected and why. Lincoln Smith, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Albany, CA 3: Field testing of host plant specificity overseas. Urs Schaffner, Centre for Agriculture and Biosciences International, Delémont, Switzerland 4: Reversible field testing of host plant specificity in the U.S.A. James P. Cuda, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 4:20 70 Possible application of transgenics and sterile insect technique to evaluation of weed biological control agents. Daniel A. Strickman, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Beltsville, MD 4: The Australian regulatory process. William A. Palmer, Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia 4: Contrasts between the New Zealand and U.S. regulatory systems for new control agents. Richard Hill, Richard. Richard Hill and Associates, Christchurch, Canterbury, New Zealand 5:05 Panel Discussion Member Symposium: Peace Corps: Creating Global Entomologists for a Global Society Cumberland (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderators and Organizers: Jeffrey A. Davis and Katherine L. Kamminga 2, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA, 2 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA :30 Welcoming Remarks : Peace Corps: Opportunities for global collaboration. A. Panikowski, Peace Corps, Washington, DC 2: How my Peace Corps/Paraguay tour became my entomology Ph.D. and opened the door to everything else. Alexander L. Wild, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 2: Solving the math to bee a Peace Corps Volunteer: 3 missions + 2 jobs = great experience. Matthew E. O Neal, iastate.edu, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 2: Peace Corps service: How pesticide safety, erosion control, and goat cheese shaped my career. Jennifer Gillett- Kaufman, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 3: Peace Corps: A global extension of extension. Ric Bessin, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 3:20 Break 3: Volunteers in the land of the unexpected. Gregory Setliff, Kutztown University, Kutztown, PA 3:55 70 Fostering international research: Another benefit of a Peace Corps experience. Desiree R. Robertson, gmail.com, Frostburg State University, Frostburg, MD 4:5 7 Life as an agricultural volunteer in The Gambia ( ). Katherine L. Kamminga, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 4:35 72 Peace Corps Senegal: Helping farmers grow more with less. Jeffrey A. Davis, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA 4:55 Concluding Remarks 65

168 Wednesday November 4 Wednesday November 4 Member Symposium: The Insect Fat Body Symposium 300 C, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators and Organizers: Immo A. Hansen and Geoffrey M. Attardo 2, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, 2 Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT :30 Welcoming Remarks :50 73 Keynote lecture fat body symposium. Alexander S. Raikhel, University of California, Riverside, CA 2:20 74 A fat body-targeted in vivo RNAi screen identifies novel storage fat regulators of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Ronald Kuehnlein, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen, Hessen, Germany 2:40 75 Mechanisms of fat body lipid metabolism during pregnancy in the tsetse fly (Glossina morsitans morsitans). Joshua B. Benoit, Veronika Michalkova, Geoffrey M. Attardo, and Serap Aksoy 2, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, 2 Yale University, New Haven, CT 3:00 76 Regulation of energy homeostasis in Drosophila. Tania Reis, University of Colorado, Denver, CO 3:20 77 Amino Acid Transport Network (ATN) reconstruction upon blood meal ingestion by unautogenous mosquitoes. Dmitri Boudko, Rosalind Franklin University, North Chicago, IL 3:40 78 Targeting sex-specific gene expression to the dipteran fat body. Helen Benes, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 4:00 Break 4:5 79 Transcriptional regulation of the synthesis of JH during the nymphal-adult transition in Blatella germanica. David Martin, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain 4: Role of fat body in social insects: Morphophysiology of adipocytes and oenocytes. Maria Izabel Camargo-Mathias, rc.unesp.br, Instituto de Biociências, Rio Claro, Brazil 4:55 72 Manduca sexta fat body: Lipid storage and mobilization. Estela L. Arrese, Oklahoma State University, Oklahoma City, OK 5:5 722 CATs in the fat. Immo A. Hansen, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 5: Juvenile hormone-mediated, stage-specific expression of large lipid transfer proteins in noctuid fat body tissues. Norbert Haunerland, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada 5: Inflammation and insulin resistance in the Drosophila fat body. Michelle Bland, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 6:5 Concluding Remarks 66 Member Symposium: The Paris Lambdin Legacy: From Emergence to Convergence 200 B, Floor Two (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderator and Organizer: Gary L. Miller, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Belstville, MD :30 Welcoming Remarks : Intersection then collections or what happened when Paris Lambdin got involved. Gary L. Miller, gov, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Belstville, MD : Lambdinitis and the Lambdin Games: May the odds be ever in your favor. Jerome F. Grant, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 2: Coccidology: The link connecting Paris Lambdin and myself, from graduate school through a 40-year career in entomology. Michael L. Williams, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 2: A series of fortunate events. Melissa K. Miller, melissa. United States Army, Fort George G. Meade, MD 2: From Knoxville to Alexandria: The role of Paris Lambdin in my career. Christof F. Stumpf, Louisiana State University, Alexandria, LA 2:50 Break 3: The pedagogical Dr. Lambdin and his students: We ll always have Paris. Donald Sudbrink, Austin Peay State University, Clarksville, TN 3:20 73 Insects, generals, and cattle: Lessons from a stellar mentor. Carla I. Coots, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 3: My best years with my favorite Ph.D. candidate Paris Lambdin. Michael Kosztarab, Blacksburg, VA 3: A walk with my students: Something new every day! Paris L. Lambdin, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 4:05 Concluding Remarks Ten-Minute Papers, MUVE Section: Ticks, Higher Diptera, and Fleas 30 A, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Jimmy B. Pitzer and Jennifer L. Pechal 2, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, 2 University of Dayton, Dayton, OH :30 Introductory Remarks : Structure and function in ticks: Rhipicephallus appendiculatus (Ixodidae) salivary glands and the transmission of Theileria parva (Piroplasmida: Theileriidae). Esther Kibuka- Sebitosi, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa : Sensitivity of the brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, to fungal pathogens. Emma N. I. Weeks, ufl.edu, Sandra A. Allan 2, Lucas P. Carnohan, and Phillip

169 Wednesday November 4 Wednesday November 4 E. Kaufman, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL : Expanded definition of blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis Say) distribution in West Virginia. Eric J. Dotseth, West Virginia Department of Health & Human Resources, Charleston, WV 2: Spatiotemporal patterns of arthropod density in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) production facilities. Robert T. Puckett, Cassie A. Schoenthal, Danny L. McDonald, and Roger E. Gold, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 2:2 738 Efficient isolation and molecular characterization of Rickettisa amblyommii from the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae). Gregory A. Dasch, Amanda Jo Williams, and Maria L. Zambrano, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 2: Molecular characterization of rickettsial agents and fleas (Siphonaptera) from Colombia. Marina E. Eremeeva, William Alberto Canon- Franco 2, Jose Leandro Perez-Bedoya 2, Maria L. Zambrano 3, Kyle F Abramowicz 3, Kathryn G Dirks 3, and Gregory A. Dasch 3, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, GA, 2 Universidad de Caldas, Caldas, Colombia, 3 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 2: Bacteria communities predicting insect composition on an ephemeral resource. Jennifer L. Pechal, com, M. Eric Benbow, Tawni L. Crippen 2, Aaron M. Tarone 3, and Jeffery K. Tomberlin 3, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, College Station, TX, 3 Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 2:57 Break 3:2 74 Tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) oil for control of the sheep ectoparasites Bovicola ovis (Phthiraptera: Trichodectidae) and Lucilia cuprina (Diptera: Calliphoridae)? Peter J. James, University of Queensland, Dutton Park, Queensland, Australia, and Jason T. Callander, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia 3: Application of odour-baited targets in tsetse control: The challenge and causes of vandalism in north-east Zambia. Catherine Sakala, Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock, Petauke, Zambia, and Kalinga Chilongo, Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock, Chilanga, Zambia 3: Monitoring the progression of ingested, GFP-encoding Escherichia coli in the digestive tract of the stable fly. Pia Untalan Olafson, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Kerrville, TX, and Dana Nayduch, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Manhattan, KS 3: Evaluating house fly (Diptera: Muscidae) insecticide resistance to selected nicotinoids using topical application. Jimmy B. Pitzer, Sonia C. Nunez, and Brandon G. Smythe, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 4: Population structure of Lucilia mexicana Macquart 843 (Diptera: Calliphoridae) in Texas with a discussion of colonization and genetics. Alan D. Archambeault, shsu.edu, Christopher P. Randle, Natalie K. Lindgren, and Sibyl R. Bucheli, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 4:2 746 Curvilinear development modeling of the blow fly Lucilia sericata (Meigen). Amanda Fujikawa, hotmail.com, and Leon G. Higley, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 4: Quantifying pteridine fluorescence in blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae): Novel applications for forensic entomology. Jonathan A. Cammack, Lena Guisewite, Steve Denning, and D. Wes Watson, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 4: Improved sentinel method for surveillance of filth fly parasitoids. Christopher J. Geden, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Gainesville, FL, and David B. Taylor, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Lincoln, NE 4:48 Concluding Remarks Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section: Crop Protection: Horticulture and Turf Salon B (Holiday Inn Knoxville Downtown) Moderators: Jon M. Babcock and Phillip G. Mulder 2, Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN, 2 Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK :30 Introductory Remarks : Sivanto - A novel insecticide for management of sucking pests in annual and perennial crops. Amanda L. P. Beaudoin, John W. Bell, Matthias Haas 2, Mark White 3, and Richard Warner 4, Bayer CropScience, Research Triangle Park, NC, 2 Bayer CropScience, Monheim am Rhein, Germany, 3 Bayer CropScience, Yuma, AZ, 4 Bayer CropScience, Clovis, CA : Managing Bemisia tabaci and tomato yellow leaf curl virus in Florida. Hugh A. Smith, Yankai Li, and Mihai C. Giurcanu 2, University of Florida, Wimauma, FL, 2 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL :57 75 Mitigation of thrips-transmitted tomato spotted wilt virus in tomato: An update on the current USDA RAMP project in the southeastern U.S.A. David G. Riley, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA 2: Chemical and microbial control options for managing strawberry and lettuce pests. Surendra Dara, University of California, Santa Maria, CA 2:2 753 Optimizing control of lettuce aphid, Nasonovia ribisnigris,through improved insecticide placement. Vishal Shinde, Frank Sances, Amy J. Spence, Eric Flora, com, and Pedro Hernandez 2, Pacific Ag Research, San Luis Obispo, CA, 2 Nichino America, Inc., Visalia, CA 2: Development of Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) on kale and rocket. Caroline Placidi De Bortoli, Rafael Ferreira Santos, 2, Dagmara Gomes Ramalho, Sergio Leandro De Bortoli 2, Alessandra Marieli Vacari, and Sergio Antonio De Bortoli, Faculdade de Ciências Agrárias e Veterinárias, Jaboticabal, São Paulo, Brazil, 2 Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho, Jaboticabal, São Paulo, Brazil 2: Impact of biopesticides on feeding and mortality of adult spotted cucumber beetle (Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi) in laboratory assays. Mary Rogers, Bonnie Ownley, Pasco B. Avery 2, Annette Wszelaki, Juan L. Jurat- Fuentes,and David Butler, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, 2 University of Florida, Fort Pierce, FL 67

170 Wednesday November 4 2:57 Break 3:2 756 Movement of adult Colorado potato beetles following exposure to imidacloprid. Andrei Alyokhin, maine.edu, University of Maine, Orono, ME 3: Tolfenpyrad (Torac ): A new tool for the management of potato psyllids in potatoes. Scott W. Ludwig, net, Jessica Samler 2, Allison Walston 2, Pedro Hernandez 3, Botond Balogh 4, and James C. Adams 2, Nichino America, Inc., Arp, TX, 2 Nichino America, Inc., Wilmington, DE, 3 Nichino America, Inc., Visalia, CA, 4 Nichino America, Inc., Apollo Beach, FL 3: Interactions between tobacco thrips, Frankliniella fusca and Pantoea ananatis, causal agent of center rot of onion. Apurba K. Barman, Bhabesh Dutta, Rajagopalbabu Srinivasan, and Ron Gitaitis, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA 4: Activity of new insecticide modes of action on onion thrips life stages. Diane G. Alston, and Bonnie Bunn, Utah State University, Logan, UT 4:2 760 Indirect effects of insecticides on the pollination process in hybrid onion seed production. Sandra Gillespie, Rachael F. Long 2, and Neal Williams, University of California, Davis, CA, 2 University of California, Cooperative Extension, Woodland, CA 4:24 76 Management of pepper weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Dakshina R. Seal, edu, University of Florida, Homestead, FL 4: The effects of two turfgrass fungicides on the survival and development of black cutworm (Agrotis ipsilon). Patrick J. Liesch, Glen R. Obear, and R. Chris Williamson, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 4:48 Concluding Remarks pathogens have contrasting effects on disease dynamics. Adam Zeilinger, and Matt Daugherty, University of California, Riverside, CA 2:2 767 Seasonal occurrence of Characoma stictigrapta (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) damage to pods of two cocoa varieties in Ibadan, Nigeria. Joseph Anikwe, Winifred Ayinke Makanjuola, and Feyisara Abiodun Okelana 2, University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria, 2 Cocoa Research Institute of Nigeria, Ibadan, Nigeria 2: Testing the specificity of the French broom psyllid (Arytinnis hakani) on native California lupines. René Sforza, Thierry Bernard, and Lincoln Smith 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, St. Gely du Fesc, France, 2 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Albany, CA 2: Growth and development of Metamasius callizona on four host plants. Teresa M. Cooper, Ronald D. Cave, and J. Howard Frank 2, University of Florida, Ft. Pierce, FL, 2 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 2: Tradeoffs between defense and growth: Interactions between a dioecious shrub, giant swallowtail caterpillar, and emerald ash borer. Kevin Rice, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, and Daniel A. Herms, Ohio State University, Wooster, OH 3:09 Break 3:24 77 An inherited insect symbiont, Candidatus Liberibacter psyllaurous, suppresses plant defenses in favor of its herbivore insect host. Allison Hansen, Yale University, West Haven, CT 3: Host-plant fatty acids and their derivatives in plantinsect interactions. Fiona L. Goggin, Jiamei Li, and Carlos A. Avila, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR Wednesday November 4 Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section: Host Plant Resistance 300 A, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: John C. Reese and Nandi Nagaraj 2, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, 2 Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis, IN :30 Introductory Remarks : Behavioral response of grape root borer (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) larvae to grape root stimuli suggests attraction to host-specific volatiles. Jhalendra P. Rijal, and J. Christopher Bergh, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Winchester, VA : Tri-trophic benefits of host-plant mixing: A mixed diet provides caterpillars defense against the generalist predator Aphaenogaster cockerelli (Formicidae). Peri A. Mason, wesleyan.edu, Melissa A. Bernardo, and Michael S. Singer, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT : Assessment of the effects of intercropping patterns on incidence and damage to cotton by Diaparopsis castanea Hampson (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Magoye, Mazabuka District of Zambia. M. Chijikwa, P. O. Y. Nkunika 2, and B. Siamasonta, Cotton Development Trust, Mazabuka, Southern Province, Zambia, 2 University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia 2: Host resistance and tolerance to vector-borne 3: The negative effects of ant attraction by induced plant defenses. Stefanie Kautz, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL, and Daniel J. Ballhorn, Portland State University, Portland, OR 4: Response of Colorado potato beetles to different potato varieties. Erik J. Wenninger, and Nora Olsen, University of Idaho, Kimberly, ID 4:2 775 Evaluation of corn germplasm lines for fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) resistance using whorl damage rating and predator survey. Xinzhi Ni, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Tifton, GA, Wenwei Xu, Texas A&M, Lubbock, TX, Michael H. Blanco, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Ames, IA, and W. Paul Williams, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Mississippi State, MS 4: Genetic mapping of maize resistance to the corn leaf aphid (Rhopalosiphum maidis [Fitch]). Lisa N. Meihls, mail.mizzou.edu, Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research, Ithaca, NY 4: On the generality of defensive symbiosis by Hamiltonella defensa in the cowpea aphid, Aphis craccivora. Mark K. Asplen, and George E. Heimpel, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 4: Stress response in the soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura). Laramy Enders, Nicholas J. Miller, Tiffany M. Heng-Moss, Blair D. Siegfried, Jennifer A. Brisson, Ryan Bickel, and Anthony Zera, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68

171 Wednesday November 4 Wednesday November 4 5: Chemical analysis of spinach resistance to aphids and leaf miners. Nasir Masood, Islamia University, Bahawalpur, Punjab, Pakistan 5:2 780 Crop nutrient status and attractiveness to pests. Christian Nansen, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia 5:24 Concluding Remarks Ten-Minute Papers, P-IE Section: Transgenic Host Plants Ballroom A, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: David L. Kerns and Juan L. Jurat-Fuentes 2, Macon Ridge Research Station, Winnsboro, LA, 2 University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN :30 Introductory Remarks :33 78 Insecticidal activity of wheat Hessian fly responsive proteins HFR- and HFR-3 towards a non-target wheat pest, cereal aphid (Sitobion avenae F.). Prashant S. Pyati, Anitha Chellamuthu 2, Angharad M. R. Gatehouse 2, Elaine Fitches 3, and John Gatehouse, Durham University, Durham, United Kingdom, 2 Newcastle University, Newcastle, United Kingdom, 3 Food and Environment Research Agency, York, United Kingdom : The NIa protease of turnip mosaic virus improves growth and reproduction of its aphid vector, Myzus persicae (green peach aphid). Clare L. Casteel, and Georg Jander, Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research, Ithaca, NY : Bt crops expressing CryAc, Cry2Ab and CryF do not harm the green lacewing, Chrysoperla rufilabris. Junce Tian, Jörg Romeis 2, Steven Naranjo 3, Richard L. Hellmich 4, and Anthony M. Shelton, Cornell University, Geneva, NY, 2 Agroscope Reckenholz, Tänikon, Zürich, Switzerland, 3 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Maricopa, AZ, 4 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Ames, IA 2: Non-target effects of transgenic corn debris in streams: The changing picture of risk assessment. William O. Lamp, umd.edu, Galen P. Dively, and Chris M. Swan 2, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, 2 University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 2:2 785 Impact of Bt corn on the corn earworm in the Carolinas. Francis P. F. Reay-Jones, Clemson University, Florence, SC, Dominic R. Reisig, North Carolina State University, Plymouth, NC, Jack S. Bacheler, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, and Pawel Wiatrak, Clemson University, Blackville, SC 2: Effect of pollen contamination on larval survival and injury of corn earworm on F 2 corn ears in mixed plantings of Bt and non-bt corn. Fei Yang, David L. Kerns 2, B. Rogers Leonard, Ying Niu, and Fangneng Huang, Louisiana State University AgCenter, Baton Rouge, LA, 2 Macon Ridge Research Station, Winnsboro, LA 2: Eliminating host-mediated effects demonstrates that Bt corn expressing CryF has no adverse effects on Cotesia marginiventris. Xiangping Wang, Junce Tian Sharing 2, Jörg Romeis Insect Science 3, Steven Naranjo Globally 4, Richard L. Hellmich 5, and Anthony M. Shelton 2, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, Hubei, China, 2 Cornell University, Geneva, NY, 3 Agroscope Reckenholz, Tänikon, Zürich, Switzerland, 4 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Maricopa, AZ, 5 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Ames, IA 2:57 Break 3:2 788 Spider mite (Tetranychus cinnabarinus) infestations reduce Bt toxin concentration in corn leaves and predators avoid spider mites that have fed on Bt corn. Sean M. Prager, ucr.edu, University of California, Riverside, CA, Xavier Martini, Texas A&M University, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, Lubbock, TX, Jonathan Lundgren, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Brookings, SD, and Christian Nansen, University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia 3: A novel Bt trait Agrisure Duracade controlling for corn rootworm. Isaac Oyediran, Von Kaster, Miloud Araba, Dirk Bension, and David Laird, Syngenta Lawn & Garden, Greensboro, NC 3: The effect of nitrogen rate on volunteer corn Bt protein expression. Paul T. Marquardt, Christian H. Krupke, James Camberato, and William G. Johnson, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 3:48 79 Using resistant hosts demonstrates that Bt cotton expressing CryAc and Cry2Ab has no negative effects on Geocoris punctipes. Liping Long, Junce Tian 2, Jörg Romeis 3, Steven Naranjo 4, Richard L. Hellmich 5, and Anthony M. Shelton 2, Guangxi Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanning, Guangxi, China, 2 Cornell University, Geneva, NY, 3 Agroscope Reckenholz, Tänikon, Zürich, Switzerland, 4 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Maricopa, AZ, 5 USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Ames, IA 4: The role of Bt cotton in pest suppressive landscapes. Cate Paull, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, Michael Meissle, Agroscope Reckenholz, Tänikon, Zürich, Switzerland, Myron P. Zalucki, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia, and Nancy A. Schellhorn, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Dutton Park, Queensland, Australia 4:2 793 Non-target impact assessment of transgenic rice using up to third trophic level. Gong-yin Ye, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China 4:24 Concluding Remarks Ten-Minute Papers, SysEB Section: Morphology, Fossils, and Physiology 30 D, Floor Three (Knoxville Convention Center) Moderators: Matthew L. Buffington and Akito Yuji Kawahara 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Washington, DC, 2 University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 2:00 Introductory Remarks 2: A new lepidopteran fossil from the Canyon Ferry Reservoir Deposit in southwestern Montana. Jacqueline Miller, Lee D. Miller, and Michael A. Ivie 2, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 2 Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 2: Wettability of the butterfly proboscis. Matthew S. Lehnert, Daria Monaenkova 2, Charles E. Beard 2, Taras Andrukh 2, Terri Bruce 2, Peter H. Adler 2, and Konstantin G. Kornev 2, Kent State University, North Canton, OH, 2 Clemson University, Clemson, SC 69

172 Wednesday November 4 2: Evolution of ultrasound production in hawkmoths: An initial examination of the origins of sonic stridulatory files. Akito Yuji Kawahara, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, and Jesse R. Barber, Boise State University, Boise, ID 2:5 797 From corniculae to frontal shelves: A phrenological odyssey through the parasitic Hymenoptera. Matthew Buffington, Michael W. Gates, and Norman F. Johnson 2, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Washington, DC, 2 Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 3: Specialized facial hair in female bees: Geographic and phylogenetic distribution of modifications for pollen extraction from nototribic flowers. Terry L. Griswold, ars.usda.gov, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Logan, UT, Camden Hunt, Utah State University, Logan, UT, Victor H. Gonzalez, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS, and Molly Rightmyer, San Diego Natural History Museum, San Diego, CA 3:5 Break 3: Between two acetylcholinesterases, is AChE always predominately expressed as the major catalytic enzyme in the Class Insecta? Young-Ho Kim, and Si Hyeock Lee, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea 3: Functional morphology and phylogenetic value of a scutal structure unique to the Ceratopogonidae (Diptera). Dustin A. Swanson, Thomas More College, Crestview Hills, KY 3:54 80 Diversity of bacterial microflora associated with two thrips genera, Frankliniella and Stephanothrips. Rajagopalbabu Srinivasan, Sivamani Sundaraj, and Stan Diffie, University of Georgia, Tifton, GA 4: Interactions between thermal stress and insecticide resistance in geographically isolated Colorado potato beetle strains. Jie Chen, University of Maine, Orono, ME 4:8 803 Body size phenotypes are heritable and mediate fecundity but not fitness in the lepidopteran frugivore Cydia pomonella. Thomas Seth Davis, and Peter J. Landolt, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Wapato, WA 4:30 Concluding Remarks Wednesday, November 4, 202, Evening Closing Session Exhibit Hall B, Floor One (Knoxville Convention Center) 5:30 Welcoming Remarks - Grayson C. Brown, ESA President, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 5:40 Recognitions - Grayson C. Brown, ESA President 6:0 Vice President s Report - Robert N. Wiedenmann, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 6:40 Old Masters Linnaean Games 7:25 Concluding Remarks - Robert N. Wiedenmann, 203 ESA President, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR Wednesday November 4 We have a special gift for the first 00 members to join or renew at the ESA booth this year! Renew Your ESA Membership during Entomology 202 ESA is the primary source of news, knowledge, and information about the entomological sciences. Renew your membership today and continue to join nearly 6,400 members around the world in discussions, research, learning, advocacy, diversity, and camaraderie. Build your contacts, advance your career, access an expansive library of research and reference materials, and be recognized by colleagues. Renew your 203 membership early to take advantage of a full year s worth of benefits Stop by ESA booth #209 in the center of the exhibit floor during Entomology 202. Sharing Insect Science Globally 70

173 Stop by the Registration Desk for Details

174 Author Index Author Index Author Index Ab Majid, Abdul Hafiz Abad-Franch, Fernando... D0062 Abarca, Mariana... D038 Abbar, Salehe Abbot, Patrick Abbott, John C Abd-Rabou, Shaaban Abdullah, Fauziah , D0440 Abney, Mark R... D04, D039, D073, D0577 Abo-El-Saad, M. M Abraham, Cheri M...08, 67 Abrahamson, Tyler T... D0620 Abramowicz, Kyle F Abu Kassim, Nur Faeza... VP29 Abuzeineh, Alisa A , 0733, 529 Acala-Escamilla, Karla I... D068 Accardo, M , 0296, 0298 Acebes, Angelita Acevedo, Flor E... D0073 Ackerman, James... D098 Acosta, Nuris...6 Adachi, Ishizue... D0308 Adams, Benjamin , 0294, 0297 Adams, Brian P Adams, Christopher , 0275, 0276 Adams, James C , 757, D0562 Adams, Todd B...602, 603 Adamson, Steven W , 553, D0047 Adang, Michael... D0094, D0256 Addesso, Karla... D039 Adelfinskaya, Yelena A Adelman, Zach N , 24, D028 Adjei, Angela Adkins, Craig... D054 Adkins, Joshua K... D060 Adler, Cornel Adler, Peter H , 0288, 0378, 366, 795 Aduba, Obinna Lebechukwu Aflitto, Nicholas C... D0027 Afsah, A. F. E...39 Afzal, Muhammad... D054, D0304 Aghaee, Mohammad-Amir , 056 Agnello, Arthur...50, 598 Aguillard, D Aguirre, Sarah E Agunbiade, Tolulope A... D067 Ahern, Robert G...0, 8, 9 Ahmad, Alimah Ahmad, Aqeel... D049, D0492 Aigner, Benjamin L... D0438 Aigner, John D... D0438, D0520 Aikins, Michael Jamison Ajlan, Aziz M...092, 43 Akotsen-Mensah, Clement , D0506 Aksoy, Serap , 04, 05, 079, 75 Akwei Obuamah, Danny Nii Al-Dawsary, Mona Al-Dhafar, Zamzam M Al-Khalaf, Areej Kareem... D045, VP07 Alahyane, Abderrahim...4 Albeltagy, Abdallah Alborn, Hans T Aldawood, Abdulrahman Saad , D0395, D046 Alessandro, Rocco T...042, 263, 60, D037 Alford, Adam M Alfouzan, Abdullah... D0433 Alhudaib, Khalid...092, 43 Ali, A. D Ali, Abbas Ali, Jared G , 640 Ali, Md. Ramjan Alkhedir, Hussein All, John... D0295 Allache, Farid...45 Allan, Sandra A , 265, 735, D022 Allee, Leslie L Allen, Christine D Allen, Clint , 0630, D0538 Allen, Hamilton R...22 Allen, Jean E...036, 592 Allen, K. C Allen, Margaret L , 80 Allen, Tom Alleyne, Marianne , 808 Allison, Jeremy D , D0596 Alma, Alberto... D0308 Almaraz, Marisol...27 Almehmadi, Roqaya Mohammad A... D0228 Almeida, Rodrigo P. P...249, 522 Almuteri, Amer Alouw, Jelfina Alphey, Luke Alsagan, Fahad Alsaqabi, Souad M... VP6 Alston, Diane G , 50, 759 Altieri, Miguel Alto, Barry W , 392 Altstein, Miriam Altuwariqi, Hani Aluja, Martin...25 Aluvihare, Channa... D0073 Alvarado, Mabel... D096 Alvarez, Juan M , 407, 434 Alves, Analiza P , 070, 325, 327 Alves, Tavvs M... D0565 Alwang, Jeff Alyokhin, Andrei , D0544 Amaral, Dany Silvio S. L... VP3 Ambrose, Mark J Amdam, Gro V Ammar, El-Desouky , 266, D037 Ammunét, Tea Amoah, Barbara A Amundsen, Keenan L Andaloro, John T Ande, Adeolu Taiwo... D027 Anderson, Darwin J , D0488 Anderson, F. Rob... D0545 Anderson, Gail Anderson, Justin R , D0002, D0003, D029 Anderson, Kevin...0 Anderson, Kirk E...030, 278, 580 Anderson, Lucy Anderson, Michelle A... D028 Anderson, Paul Anderson, Peter Anderson, Troy D , 0433, D0080, D0085 Anderson, William F...089, 082 Ando, Kaori... D057 Andow, David Andrew, Nigel R , D0243 Andrukh, Taras Anelli, Carol M Angelella, Gina M Angelini, David Anikwe, Joseph...248, 767 Annan, I. Billy , 407, 434 Annetts, Robert Anthony, Francis... D042 Antony, Thomas Antwi, Josephine Antwi-Agyakwa, Akua Konadu Anulewicz, Andrea C...D0478, D048, D0482 Anyamba, Assaf Apanaskevich, Dmitry Aparicio, Ellen... D0334 Appleby, Margaret... D034 Araba, Miloud Archambeault, Alan D , D084 Arechavaleta-Velasco, Miguel E... D068 Arellano, Lucrecia...27 Arellano-Covarrubias, Arturo... D0383 Arenas, Yolima Arii, Aya... D049 Armbruster, Peter... D0466 Armstrong, J. Scott Armstrong, Jordan Armsworth, Paul R Arnone, Silvia...24 Aronstein, Kate , 078, 0782 Arp, Alex... D06 Arrese, Estela L...72 Arriaga, Francisco J... D0279 Arsenault, Arielle L... D063 Arthur, Frank H , 0955, 0957, D0323 Arthurs, Steven Artz, Derek R Aryan, Azadeh A... D0060, D028 Asaquibay, Cesar Asaro, Christopher... D0267, D0302 Ascunce, Marina... 03, D0422 Asiimwe, Peter Asim, Muhammad Asplen, Mark K Athanas, Michael M... D0366 Athanassiou, Christos Athey, Kacie J Atkinson, Thomas H...20, 90 Atray, Isha... D047 Attardo, Geoffrey M , 04, 05, 75 Atterholt, Cynthia A... D0502 Atungulu, Elizabeth... D0459 Aubuchon, Matt Augustin, J Aukema, Brian H , 0649, 560, D0379 Austin, Andrew D...37 Avakian, Megan A Avalos, Arián Averill, Anne Avery, Pasco B , 755, D0536 Avila, Carlos A , D062 Avramova, Larisa V , 093 Awuni, George... D02 Ayden, Bonnie Ayers, Carolyn A Ayres, Mathew P , 0087, 0990 Ayrinhac, Audrey... VP02 Azorsa Salazar, Frank... VP9 BC, Khem Raj... D0063 Ba, Sidy...84 Babbitt, Daniel Babu, Arun , D0538 Baca, Stephen M... D087 Bacheler, Jack S Bachman, Pamela M , 070, 546, 554 Bachmann, Lutz Backoulou, Georges Backus, Elaine...024, 26 Bacon, Pablo Andres Baek, Sunghoon , D044 Baez, Ignacio Bagui, Abdellah...4 Bagwell, Ralph Bahar, Md. Habibullah...032, 024 Bahder, Brian W...062, 50 Bailey, David... D0279 Bailey, Sian Mary O Sullivan , D0509 Baird, Lisa , 0594, D0529, D0530 Baixeras, Joaquin...34 Baker, Gerald T... D0426 Baker, Nathan Baker, Nicholas Baker, Thomas Bakken, Amanda J... D039 Balachandran, Abhilash... D0537 Balasubramanian, Deepa... D0540 Baldin, Edson L. L , D0523 Baldwin, Rebecca W , 500 Ball, Joan E , D0208 Ballenger, Joe... D0070 Ballhorn, Daniel J Ballman, Elissa S... D0526 Balme, Geoff... D0343 Balogh, Botond , D0562 Balogh, Chris Balser, Teri C Baltazar, Baltazar... D049 Balukjian, Brad Balusu, Rammohan Rao... D0506 Baneshi, Mohammad Mehdi... VP03 Bansal, Raman

175 Author Index Author Index Barber, Jesse R Barbercheck, Mary Barbour, James D...025, 50, 598 Barcinas, Joe... D0304 Barclay, Maxwell V. L Barden, Phillip M Bardunias, Paul , 0394, 0953 Bargeron, C. T Bargielowski, Irka E... D0232 Barker, Christopher M Barlow, Vonny Barman, Apurba K...369, 758 Barnes, Barry U... D0545 Barnes, Brittany... D0267 Barnes, Jeffrey K... D0386 Barney, Sarah K... D0033 Barrantes-Barrantes, Luz D Barrera, Carlos... D0073 Barrett, Audreylee... D0320 Barrett, Bruce A... D035 Barribeau, Seth M Barrigossi, J. Alexandre...D0565, D0586 Barrow, Sim Bartholomay, Lyric Bartlett, Marshall G Barton, Brandon Barton, Chandler S Barwary, Znar Basnet, Sanjay Bast, Joshua Basu, Sanjay P... D028 Bateman, Craig Batterham, Philip...69 Battisti, David S Bauce, Eric... VP28 Bauchan, Gary R... D040 Baumann, Aaron A...04 Baxendale, Fred , 0585 Baxt, Alec... D0393 Bayless, Keith M...320, 363 Bayless, Victoria Bean, Dan Beard, Charles E Beard, Daniel... D0433 Beati, Lorenza , 086, D0047 Beaudoin, Amanda L. P Beavers, Mark Beckelhimer, Emily E... D0226 Becnel, James J Bedolla, Leydi Bedoukian, Robert , D0294 Beech, Camilla Beers, Elizabeth H Begum, Mahmuda Behle, Robert W , D0448 Behmer, Spencer T , 452 Beier, Sandra Belant, Jerrold L Belhamra, Mohammed...45 Bell, Adam J Bell, John W...435, 749 Bell, Sarah... D0236 Bellamy, David E...038, 4, 9 Belvedere, Silvia...24 Ben-Mahmoud, Sulley Benaissa, Kelthoum...45 Benavides, Pablo... D0073 Benbow, M. Eric , 0725, 0897, 0900, 090, 740 Benbrook, Chuck , D0559 Benbrook, Karen , D0559 Benda, Nicole B Benes, Helen...78 Benjamin, Tamara...57 Benkoski, Kelsey A Bennett, Ashley , D0274 Benoit, Joshua B , 04, 05, 75 Benrey, Betty Bensalem, Amina... VP26 Bension, Dirk Benson, Eric P , 039, 220, 22 Bentley, Thomas Benton, Elizabeth P Bentur, J. S... D047 Bentz, Barbara J , 664 Berberich, Gabriele...572, 573 Berberich, Martin...572, 573 Berenbaum, May R , 0579, 254, 282, 62, D0086 Beres, Brian L... D047 Berg, Scott H Bergen, Jacqueline E Bergeron, Cody Bergh, J. Christopher... 02, 0569, 0660, 09, 763, D02, D0340 Bergmann, Erik J Berkov, Amy... 89, D0393 Bernal, Julio Bernard, Craig...94 Bernard, Ernest C , 450, D0563 Bernard, Thierry Bernardo, Melissa A Bernert, Ann C... D009 Bernhardt, Scott A... D022 Bernier, Uli...005, 688 Berry, Jennifer Bertone, Christie A...5, 9 Bertone, Matthew...80, 362 Bertrand, Jacques Bessin, Ric , 0599, 44, 708, D0503 Bethke, James A...09, 58, 66, D0539 Beuzelin, J. M , 0557, 0820, D0578 Bextine, Blake R , 0620, 0892, D0004, D007, D0036, D06 Beza-Beza, Cristian Fernando Bhandari, Krishna Bahadur... D0088 Bhattarai, Ganesh Bianchi, Felix J. J. A... D0549 Bibb, Jenny Bickel, Ryan Bickerton, Matthew W Biddinger, David J , D0275 Biesbrock, Anna Binkley, Mark... D0433 Binning, Rachel R Binns, Matt Binyameen, Muhammad Biondi, Antonio...57 Birgersson, Göran Birt, Andrew...075, 087 Blaauw, Brett R , 644, D003 Black, Brent L Black, Lonnie R... D0546, D0548 Blackburn, Michael B... D030 Blackledge, Todd... D0406 Blackshaw, Rod...32 Blair, Siegfried... D0248 Blais, M... D0476 Blanco, Carlos A... D0083 Blanco, Michael H Bland, John M... D0499 Bland, Michelle Blitzer, Eleanor J Bloese, Joanna B , D036 Bloetscher, Barbara... D0338 Bloodworth, J. Phillip... D0234 Bloomquist, Jeffrey R... 04, 0434, 0443, 406 Blount, Joni L... D045, D0295 Blow, Jamie Blubaugh, Carmen K Bluhm, Burton Blystone, Allissa M Bobo, Jack A Bockoven, Alison A Boe, Arvid... D0376 Boelio, Lisa Bohlmann, Joerg , 0495 Bohnenblust, Eric Bohova, Jana...05 Bohssini, Mustafa El... D0532 Bolognesi, Renata...069, 070, 554 Bolton, Samuel J... D040 Bon, Marie-Claude... D0349 Boncristiani, Humberto F...045,549 Bond, Jason Bonello, Pierluigi , D027 Bonning, Bryony C , D0452 Bonsignore, Carmello Peter... VP24 Booher, Doug... D0345 Booth, W , 382, D0583 Borges, Miguel... D0303 Borges, Rafael... D0542 Borovsky, Dov...042, 0462, 0628 Borth, Paul W... D050 Bosio, Giovanni... D0308 Bosque-Pérez, Nilsa A , 053, D004, D006, D057 Bossart, Janice L , 0732 Bostanian, Noubar J... D0283 Boswell, John...020, 0468 Botch, Paul S Boudinot, Brendon E... D0037 Boudko, Dmitri , 77 Bouharroud, Rachid...4, 42 Boukhris-Bouhachem, Sonia... VP0 Bourgeois, Gaetan... D0283 Bournay, Jacob N...D048, D0482, D0483 Bova, Jake E , 060 Bowker, Cheryl L Bowles, David E , 066, D0384 Boyd, Elizabeth A , 0346, 0548, D0239, D036, D054 Boyd, Olivia Boyle, Natalie K... D034 Braasch, Joseph E...64 Bracewell, Ryan Bradford, Mark Bradford, N , D0296, D0580 Bradshaw, Jeffrey D , 0596, 0605, 087, D0362, D0530, D0560 Brady, Cristina M , 086 Brady, Jeff Braham, Mohamed... VP26 Brainard, Daniel Braman, S. Kristine , 67, 687, D054 Brambila, Julieta...29, 5, 55 Bramblett, Debra... D00 Brancoli, Daniel... D0434, D0435 Brandeis, Thomas J Brandenburg, Rick...085, 0852 Brandão, Carlos R. F... D0597 Branham, Marc A D086, D088 Branson, David H Branstetter, Michael G Brar, Gurpreet. S Brar, Ramaninder Kaur... D005 Bratsas, Charalampos... VP23 Braun, Janet... D0399 Bravo, Alejandra Bray, Alicia M , D0325, D0484, D0564 Bredlau, Justin P , 023 Breining, Jim Brekke, Tom Brennan, James Andrew... D0220 Brent, Colin S Bret, Brian Breuil, Colette Brewer, Michael J , 0979, D0488 Brewster, Carlyle C , 0363, 040, 0420, 0477, 70, D02 Brewster, Kirk... D050 Brill, Nancy... D073 Brisson, Jennifer A...398, 778 Britch, Seth Brlansky, Ronald H... D0372 Broce, Alberto...02 Brodeur, Jacques Brodie III, Edmund D Brooks, Christopher P , 257, D0287 Brooks, Deborah... D0096 Brosi, Berry J , 283, 286, D002 Brown, Bonnie L Brown, Brian V... D093 Brown, Bryan L Brown, Christopher R... D0492 Brown, Desmond O

176 Author Index Author Index Brown, Jacqueline S... D025 Brown, Jerry... D0503 Brown, John J , D056 Brown, John W...34 Brown, Judith K...08 Brown, Kenneth S... D0005 Brown, Mark R..044, 0427, 0440, D0450, D046 Brown, Peter Brown, Preston H Brown, Richard L... D0595 Brown, Susan Brown, T. Chris Brownbridge, Michael Browne, Robert A Browning, Rebecca , 553, D0063 Bruce, Terri Bruck, Denny , 0905, 0906, 0907, D077, D0285 Brundage, Adrienne L Brunet, Johanne Bruning, Abbie J Brunke, A.J Brunner, Jay Brust, Mathew L... D075 Brust, Tarsis Bryant, Alexandria N Bryant, Joshua L...25 Bryson, A. K... D0055 Bucci, Angela Bucheli, Sibyl R , 073, 3, 745, D0042, D084, D097, D0200 Buchman, George W Buchman, Jeremy L... D0554 Buckley, David...57 Buckman, Karrie Buckman, Rebecca S Buddle, Christopher M...070, 0740 Budge, Giles Budsberg, Kevin J Buehrer, Krista , 643 Buergi, Linda P Buffin, Aurélie Buffington, Matthew , D032 Bujang, Nurmastini Bundy, C. Scott Bunger, Peggy Bunker, Daniel E... D009 Bunn, Bonnie Buntin, G. David , D0295 Burger, L. Wes Burke, Alan Burkett, Douglas Burkman, Caitlin E , D038 Burkness, Eric C... D08, D0534 Burks, Charles S...054, 039 Burr, Stephen... D0364, D0483 Burrack, Hannah J , 423, D05 Burrus, Samuel... D0502 Burt, Melissa A... D035 Burton, Laquita... D0047 Buschman, Lawrent... D066 Bushmann, Sara Buss, Eileen A , 0850, D0527 Bustillo, Alex Butler, Bryan...09 Butler, Casey D... D0570 Butler, David Bußhardt, Philipp Bybee, Seth M , D086, D088 Byers, John A Byers, Korey A. P... D0099 Bynum, E. D... D0582 Byrd, Brian D... D025 Byrne, David N , 080 Böröczky, Katalin Caballero, Ubaldo...27 Cabrera-Cordon, Ana...03 Cai, Chenyang Caitlin, Nora...68 Caixeta, Daniel Ferreira... D0586 Caldwell, Doug Calibeo, Dawn Calixto, Alejandro A Calixto, Luis Callander, Jason T...74 Calles Torrez, Veronica Camargo, Carolina , D0468 Camargo-Mathias, Maria Izabel Camberato, James Cameron, Rachel Cameron, Sydney A , 030 Cameron, Timothy M Cammack, Jonathan A Campbell, James F , 0442, 0955, 0957, D0500, D0558 Campbell, Joshua W Campbell, Kaitlin Uppstrom Campbell, Laura A... D0298 Canon-Franco, William Alberto Cantlon, John D... D0546 Cantrell, Charles L , D0242 Cao, Runxin Cao, Yang... D0075 Capinera, John. L Caprio, Emilio... D0258 Caprio, Michael A , 02, D0538 Capshaw, Grace Carde, Ring T Cardoza, Yasmin J , 064 Carleton, R. Drew Carlson, David C Carlson, Jenny S , 056 Carlson, John Carlton, Christopher E , D083 Carnohan, Lucas P , 735 Carpenetti, Tiffany L... D0080 Carpenter, Simon T Carragee, Anna L... D050 Carrasquilla, Maria Cristina... D0232 Carrel, James Carriere, Yves , 0, 244 Carroll, Allan L Carroll, Mark J Carson, David Cartar, Ralph Carter, Christian... D0287 Carter, Megan E Cartwright, P Carvalho, Vanessa Fabiola Pereira... D0547 Casanova, Kendra , D063 Cassanoves, Fernando...57 Cassidy, Katie...76 Casteel, Clare L Castiglione, Elvira... VP24 Castillo, Carmen Castillo, Jose Castle, S. J... 40, D05 Castro, Boris A...025, 0255 Castro, Ulises Catalano, María Inés... D0608 Catanach, Therese Anne Catarci, Silvia... 24, D0258 Catchot, Angus L , 0505, 0508, 0604, 483 Caterino, Michael S... D0609, D060 Cave, Ronald D , 042, 0462, 0600, 0628, 769 Cayia, Edward James Cañas, Luis A , 59, 6 Cañedo, Veronica... VP7 Cecala, Jacob M Cena, Jenni... D0398 Centenero-Alcalá, Eric... D0383 Centeno, Pedro... D0393 Cha, Dong H...602, 603 Cha, Wook Hyun Chabot, Ember Chaffin, Catherine... D0240 Chailleux, Anaïs...58 Chambers, Elizabeth S... D0463 Chancellor, Alex Chandler, Jennifer...29 Chandran, Predeesh , D053 Chang, Cheng... D0249, D0265 Chapela, Mariana Chapman, Eric G , 0699, 240 Chappell, Adam Chappell, Matthew... D054 Chappell, Thomas M... D0579 Chase, Kevin D Chassy, Bruce...67 Chatzimanolis, Stylianos , D0389 Chaudhari, Sujata S... D045 Chaudhury, Muhammad... D047 Chauhan, Kamlesh R Chaves-Ulloa, Ramsa Checa, Maria F Cheeseman, Andrew... D0003 Chellamuthu, Anitha...78 Chen, Hong , 070, D0246 Chen, Jian...27 Chen, Jie Chen, Jing Chen, Ming-Shun , D0532 Chen, Mingmin...32 Chen, Wang-Ting Chen, Weihan Chen, Xi...D0072, D0447, D0449 Chen, Xuan , 0294, 0295, 0296, 0297, 0298 Chen, Yang-Yuan Chen, Yanping (Judy) , 0783, 542, 549 Chen, Yi-Chen Chen, Yigen , D0032 Chen, Yolanda H...37, 374 Chen, Yuting Chen, Zhaorigetu Cherry, Ronald H Chi, Wei-Lien Chick, Lacy D... D064 Chien, Hsuan-Jen... D0265 Chijikwa, M Chille, Joelle N... D095 Chilongo, Kalinga Chin-Heady, Eva Chiriboga, Alejandro Chiu, J.C Chludzinski, Megan M Cho, Kijong... D0348 Choate, Beth A Choe, Dong-Hwan...345, 38, 597 Choi, Kyung San Choi, Man-Yeon Choi, Young Hae... VP30, VP3 Chong, Juang-Horng , D054 Choo, Ho Yul Choo, Young-Moo... D0459 Chougule, Nanasaheb... D0452 Chouvenc, Thomas Chow, Andrew Christen, J... D0429 Christiansen, Kenneth A Christianson, Lindsey D. E Chu, Chia-Ching... D030 Chung, Seung H Chung, Young Hak...346, 35 Ciaramitaro, Tina... D0477, D0478 Ciarlo, Timothy J Cibils-Stewart, Ximena , 0822, D0296 Cibrián-Tovar, Juan... D0278 Cicero, Joseph M...08 Cira, Theresa M... D08 Clark, Camron T Clark, Gary G Clark, John M... D0059 Clark, Kevin... D0070 Clark, Thomas L... D0247 Clark, Thomas M... D0262 Clarke, Dave J Clarke, Devin A , D0239 Clarke, Stephen R , 0884 Claus, John... D0545 Clay, Natalie A Clement, Prabahakar... D0279 Clifton, Eric H , 0792 Cline, Andrew R Cloonan, Kevin Rayne Cloutier, Conrad

177 Author Index Author Index Cloyd, Raymond A...095, 60, 65 Coates, Brad S , 0324, 0326, 0503, D067 Coates, Craig J Coats, Joel R , 0377, 0632, D0467 Cobucci, Tarcisio... D0565 Cockburn, Sarah Cockrell, Darren... D0584 Coffelt, Mark A Coffey, Peter CoFrancesco, Alfred F Cognato, Anthony Cohen, Allen C...D032, D0069, D0244 Cohnstaedt, Lee W... 08, 085, 089, 536 Coleman, Tom W , 503, 504, 566, 567, D0486 Collazo, Carmen... D0527 Collier, Timothy... D0339 Collignon, R. Maxwell... 48, D022 Collins, A. Grace Collins, Genoveva M... D0294 Colson, Thomas... D037 Colón-Gaud, Checo Comerford, Daniel P... D079 Conley, Jason Conn, Jan E Connelly, C. Roxanne , D0222 Conner, L. Mike Connolly, Craig... D0205 Constanski, Kelly... D0543 Contreras-Arquieta, Arturo... D0382 Contreras-Ramos, Atilano Cook, Donald , 0505, 0508, 0630, D0538 Cook, Jerry L , D082 Cooke, Michael Cooley, John Coon, Kerri L... D006 Cooper, Monica Cooper, Richard...26, 379 Cooper, Teresa M Cooperband, Miriam F...599, 684, 80 Coots, Carla I , 0875, 73, D0206 Copley, Kenneth J... D0475, D0485 Cora, Joseph...37 Corby-Harris, Vanessa...030, 278 Cordova, Daniel Corn, Robert M...23 Cornel, Anthony , 226 Cornelius, Mary Coronado B., J.M...24 Corpuz, Myleen Raymundo...05 Correa, Alberto S... D0360 Corrigan, Chelsea , 285, D0336 Corrigan, Robert M Cortinas, M. Roberto , D0055 Cory, Jennifer... VP33, VP34 Coslor, Charles Clark , D0533 Cossentine, Joan... VP34 Cossé, Allard... D0277 Cote, Paul Cottrell, Ted E... D0359 Coulson, Robert N...66, 087 Coulston, John W Counterman, Brian A Courdon, Thomas A... D09 Courtney, Gregory W Coutinot, Dominique... D0349 Covell, Charles V Cowles, Richard Cox, David L...088, 0884 Cox-Foster, Diana Coy, R. Murphey Coy, Stacey... D063 Coyle, David R... D0302, D0375 Crain, Philip Ray Cram, Erin J Cram, Michelle... D0302 Cranshaw, Whitney , 506 Cranston, Peter S Crawley, Sydney , 053 Creed, Cory Cregg, Bert M... D029 Crippen, Tawni L , 0897, 0900, 090, 0903, 740 Crisanti, Andrea...097, 607 Crist, Thomas O Cristofaro, Massimo... 24, D0258, D0259 Crocker, Susan J Cronin, James T Crook, Damon J Crosby, Kevin Crossley, Michael Scott... D056 Crowder, David W Crowe, Christopher M... D0307 Croxton, Scott D Crupi, Theresa Cruz, Marianne S Cryan, Jason R Cuda, James P...06, 700 Cui, Xinping Culbreath, Albert K Culin, Joseph , D0387 Cullen, Eileen M , D057 Culler, Lauren E Cullum, John P Cummings, Michael C...33, 34 Cummings, Robert...53 Cummins, Heather M Curnutte, Levi Currie, Cameron...058, 0738 Currie, Yaleaka B Curry, Meghan M , 053 Curzi, Matias J... D030 Cutter, Melanie... D027 Cutting, Kiri Joy Czekanski-Moir, Jesse Cárcamo, Héctor A... D047 D Amico, Vincent da Silva, Karen F... D0082 Daane, Kent M , 249, 522 Dabney, Kelly Elizabeth... D0053 Dahlem, Gregory A... D092 Dahlgren, Lizette... D0090 Dahlke, Britta... D0539 Dai, Shu-Mei... D0249, D0265 Dal Molin, Ana... D094 Dale, Adam Dallara, Paul L , D0325 Dalusky, Mark J...75 Damiens, David... VP02 Damos, Petros T... VP2 Dana, Logan A... D0568 Danforth, Bryan N...004, 0484 Dang, Xiang-li... D0457 Daniels, Jaret C... D0273 Danneels, Ellen L... D0443 Dara, Surendra Dark, Michael J Darr, Molly...75 Dart, Norman L Dasch, Gregory A , 738, 739, D048 Daugherty, Matt...528, 766 David, Abhinandini I... VP06 Davidowitz, Goggy , 0886 Davis, Don...34 Davis, Gina A...70 Davis, Jeffrey A , 72, D0496 Davis, Nick E... D067 Davis, Richard Davis, Ryan S... D022 Davis, Steven Ray Davis, Thomas Seth Davis, Timothy Dawson, William De Biase, Alessio... 24, D0349 De Bortoli, Caroline Placidi , 754, D0023, D058, D0282, D0329, D0547 De Bortoli, Sergio Antonio , 754, D0023, D0025,D058, D0282, D0329, D0350, D0547 De Bortoli, Sergio Leandro , D0023, D058, D0282, D0329 de Graaf, Dirk C , D0443 De Grandpré, Louis De La Riva, Deborah de Leon, Jesse H De Moraes, Consuelo M..0524, 0540, 0572, 0576 de Moya, Robert Samuel... D097 De Roode, Jacobus C De Smet, Lina de Souza, Brígida Deacutis, Juliane... D0255 DeBarro, Paul... D0549 DeBoer, Gerrit J DeBry, Ronald W... D092 Deczynski, Anthony DeGrandi-Hoffman, Gloria...475, 542 Dehnel, Allison Del Pozo, A Del-Claro, Kleber Delaney, Deborah A Delaplane, Keith , 283, D002 DeLay, Bridget D , D0292 Delong, Brittany Elise DeMarco, Bernice Bacon DeMark, Joe J , 0950 Denadai, Conrado Augusto Rosi... D0263 Denham, Sander Olivia... D03 Denlinger, David L , D0466 Dennehy, Timothy J Denning, Steve Dergousoff, Shaun... D02 Derksen, Andrew...5 DeRose, R. Justin Derr, Jeff... D054 DeSantis, Ryan D Deshmukh, Arunaditya... D0223 Desneux, Nicolas...56, 57, 58 Deustch, Curtis A DeVan, Caroline M... D009 Devos, Yann DeVries, Zachary C DeWalt, R. Edward DeWalt, Saara DeWitt, Thomas J Deyrup, John Deyrup, Leif D , D0272 Deyrup, Mark A , D0272, D036 Dhara, Animesh Dharithreesan, Nidhi Di Ilio, Vincenzo... D0258, D0259 Diamond, Sarah E Diaz, Rodrigo , 0992 Diaz-Montano, John... D0498, D0500 Dickey, Aaron M... 08, 028, D0405 Dickie, Chris Dida, Gabriel O... D0229 Dieckhoff, Christine , D032 Diehl, Ben Diehl, Susan V Diepenbrock, Lauren M Diers, Brian... D053 Dietrich, Christopher H , D0605, D0608 Diettrich, Bryce... D0320 Diffie, Stan...80 DiFonzo, Christina Dikow, Torsten...38, 36 Diller, John Taylor... D0024 Dillon, Michael E , 453 Dimopoulos, George Dinesh, Anegunda Shankar... VP09 Dirks, Kathryn G Discua Duarte, Samuel Dively, Galen P , 258, 259, 784 Djebali, Noura... VP26 Djernaes, Marie Dobbs, Chris... D0592 Dobbs, Emily K , D0377 Dobson, Angela... D0506 Doccola, Joseph Dodd, Luke E... D0589 Doggett, Stephen Dojutrek, Christopher R... D0588 Dombrowski, Sarah... D0527 Domec, J. C Dominguez-Bello, Maria Gloria Donelson, S. L , D0296 Dong, Ke , D0087, D024 75

178 Author Index Author Index Dong, Limin Dong, Shengzhang...D0072, D0447, D0449 Dooley, John W Dorn, Silvia...274, 82 dos Santos, Helder Hugo... VP3 Dosdall, Lloyd M , D047 Dosunmu, Omotola Dotseth, Eric J , D0226 Dotson, Ellen Douce, G. Keith Douglas, Angela...07 Douglas, Maggie Dowd, Patrick F... D055 Dowd, Scot E , 0903 Dowdy, Alan K...46 Dowling, Ashley P. G , D076, D0202 Drake, Lisa L Drees, Bart...27 Dreves, Amy J , D077 Dreyer, Jamin Drezen, Jean-Michel...8 Dripps, James E...042, 044 Drons, David J... D0394 Drummond, Frank...00, 0777, 276 Du Comb, William S Du, Yuzhe... D0087, D024 Duan, Jian J...34, 568 Duarte, Marcus Vinicius Alfenas... VP3 Duarte, Rogério Teixeira... D0350 Duay, Julie Anne... D059 Dubelman, Samuel Dubie, Trisha... D0056 Dudley, Tom Duehl, Adrian...03 Duennes, Michelle A Duffield, Richard M... D0345 Dunbar, Mike W , 0792 Dunigan, Jermaine... D0324 Dunkel, Florence...804, 84, 87 Dunlap, Christopher Dunn, Rob R , 0993, D035, D0353 Dunning, Laura Dunwell, Winston... D054 Duong, Gina... D00 Duong, Nhi Durden, Kevin Durden, Lance Durham, Gail Dussourd, David E... D067 Dutcher, James D... 50, D0528 Dutilleul, Pierre Dutta, Bhabesh Dvorak, Bill Dworkin, Ian... D0224 Dyer, Kelly A... D0375 Dyer, Rodney J Dynes, Travis Eason, Julius Eaton, Alan... D034 Ebert, Timothy... D0372 Echeverri, Diego Eckberg, James O Eckhardt, Lori Eckman, Laura E... D066 Edwards, Amanda Lee... D0039 Edwards, Kristine T...2 Edwards, Kyle F Edwards, Owain R Edwards, Travis... D0202 Efstathion, Caroline , 582 Egekwu, N Eger, Joe E Eiben, Jesse A Eiden, Amanda L Eigenbrode, Sanford D , 0480, 0525, 0530, 352, 627, D0074, D004, D006 Eiri, Daren M Eitzer, Brian D , 0779 Ejendal, Karin F. K , 093 Ek-Ramos, Maria Julissa El-Shafie, H. A. F El-Sharkawy, F. M...39 Eldredge, K. Taro Eljemai, Chafik... VP26 Elkinton, Joseph S , D040, D04 Elliott, Norman Ellis, Andrew T Ellis, Brittany...039, 220 Ellis, E. Ann... D0472 Ellis, James D , D0273 Ellis, Marion D , D0090 Ellison, Aaron M , D0396 Elnitsky, Michael A... D004, D0257 Elowsky, Christian... D0599 Emery, Sara Elizabeth... D072 Emery, Virginia Encalada, Andrea C Enders, Laramy Engel, M. S Engelkes, Tim English, James T Enloe, Stephen Epsky, Nancy D... D036, D0322 Epstein, Marc...32 Eremeeva, Marina E Ernst, Crystal M Erram, Dinesh Erthal, Julie A Ervin, Gary N Eschenaur, Brian...68 Escobedo, Francisco J Esparza-Diaz, Gabriela , D0522 Espino, Luis Espinoza, Hernán Roberto... D0322 Esquivel, Jesus F , 089 Esser, Aaron...36 Estes, Ronald E...050, 0635 Esteves, Flavia... D0597 Etzler, Frank E...37 Eubanks, Micky D..0470, 0539, 0575, 0578, 0667, 0670, 473 Euliss, Ned Eulitz, Ute... VP05 Eum, Jai H , D046 Evangelista, Dominic , 066, 49 Evans, Alexander Evans, Edward W , 0888, 472 Evans, Jay D , 0783, 0895, 03, 549 Evans, Katherine Evans, Myron... D0503 Eveleigh, Eldon Evenden, Maya L... D047 Ezeakacha, Francis N , 0733 Fabrick, Jeffrey A , 0446, D0245 Fadamiro, Henry Y...248, D059, D0290, D0506 Fah, Lauren... D0286 Fahrner, Samuel J , D0379 Fair, Conor Faleiro, J. R...092, 0923 Falk, Bryce W Falkowski, Michael J Fane, Jackie...03 Fang, Quentin Q... D020 Fardisi, Mahsa Farfan, Monica A Farias, Charlene... D0488 Farrar, Babette Farrar, Robert... D030 Fashing, Norman J Fashing, Peter J Fassbender, Joyce... D0393 Faucher Delisle, Julie Faust, Lynn... D0607, D066 Favi, Françoise Djibode , D0242, D027 Favret, Colin Feldlaufer, Mark F , D0045 Fell, Richard D , 0420, 0433, 0477 Felton, Gary W , D060, D0455 Feng, Guolei...27 Fereres, Alberto Ferguson, Kanisha... D0366 Feria, Teresa Fernandes, Kenner Morais... D0225 Fernandes, Leonardo Fernandez, Lisa Ferraudo, Antonio Sergio... D0350 Ferreira, Hugo N... D0237 Ferrill, Emily... D0373 Ferro, Michael L...92 Fettig, Christopher J Fewell, Jennifer H , 458 Feyereisen, Rene...67 Fields, Andrew , 0903 Fierke, Melissa K... D030, D095 Figueroa, Claudio Antonio Salas... D058 Filcek, Kimberly... D0002, D029 Fill, Andrew... D035 Filotas, Melanie...64 Fine, Michael L Finke, Deborah L...057, 0647, 247, D0266 Finstroem, Michael S Fischer, Daniel... D038 Fischer, David Fischer, Joshua Fischer, Melissa J...70 Fischman, Brielle J Fisher, Ray Fisher, Tonja...08 Fitches, Elaine...094, 78 Fithian, R Fitt, John Flaherty, Leah Flanagan, Stephen David , 0733 Flanders, Kathy... D0268 Flannagan, Ronald D...069, 486, 554 Flecker, Alex S Fleischer, Shelby J , 0633, D002 Fletcher, Jacqueline Flexner, J. Lindsey...08 Flinn, Paul W... D0323, D0498 Flint, Mary Louise...503, 505, 566, D0032, D0486 Floate, Kevin...4 Flor-Weiler, L. B... D0552 Flora, Eric Flores, Biviana Flores, Daniel Flores, Micah , 0900, 0903, 393 Foelker, Christopher J... D030 Fofana, Abdrahamane Foil, Lane...00, 096 Fok, Elaine J Follum, Renee... 74, D0355, D052 Fonsah, Esendugue Greg... D0577 Fontenot, Emily A , VP4 Foottit, Robert... D059 Forbes, Andrew A...36 Formby, John P Formesyn, Ellen M... D0443 Forschler, Brian T...97 Forthman, Michael , D089 Foster, John E... D075, D09, D0424, D0429, D0507 Foster, Leonard J Foster, R. Nelson...D0545, D0546, D0548 Fourqurean, David... D0503 Fowler, Glenn...49 Fowler, Jarrod... D0022 Fox, Aaron F , D0343 Fox, Susan... D0503 Fradette, Jared Fraedrich, Stephen W Frampton, John Frances, Stephen P Frandsen, Paul B...006, 0690 Frank, Daniel L Frank, J. Howard Frank, Steven D , 0534, 0840, 0845, 0993, 63, D054 Frank-Bolton, Pablo... D038 Frantz, Galen... D069 Franz, Alexander W. E Franz, Nico M...32, D0598, D06, D062 Franz, Trisha M Fraser, Malcolm J Fraser, Sara L

179 Author Index Author Index Frazier, James Frazier, Maryann Frazier, Melanie , 453 Fread, Elizabeth L... D056 Freeman, Nicole D Fregoso, Veronica...D000, D002, D0068 French, B. Wade , D0280 Freytag, Ed D... D0005 Fried, Ian Friedenberg, Nicholas...04, 56 Frierson Faust, Lynn... D0606 Friesen, Kristina...05 Friley, Karen L... D0324, D0326 Frishman, Austin...99 Fritz, Megan L... D0224 Frost, Kenneth E Fu, Qiang Fuchs, Marc F , 523 Fuentealba, Alvaro... VP28 Fuglie, Keith Fujikawa, Amanda...746, D0006, D0007, D0599 Fukatsu, Takema Fulcher, Amy... D054 Fuller, Billy... D0567 Funayama, Ken Funderburk, Joseph E... 26, D069, D0575 Funk, Daniel J Funk, W. Chris Futami, Kyoko... D0229 Futuyma, Douglas J Fyfe, Chris Gabbert, Sandra E... D0438 Gai, Yun-chao... D0457 Gaimari, Stephen D...77 Gaines, Hannah R...002, 0476, 638 Gakhar, Surendra Kumar... D0223 Galbraith, Sara M... D004 Gallatin, Erin Gallegos, Patricio Galligan, Larry D , 662 Galvan, Tederson... D0247 Gandhi, Kamal JK , 0499, 064, 685, D0078, D0267, D0302, D0375 Gao, Xiwu Gao, Yulin...47 Garcia, Anamaria Garcia, Loriann C , D0342 García-Vázquez, Uri Omar... D0382 Gardiner, Mary M..076, 0479, 0570, 0590, 443, D038 Gardner, Ian Gardner, Wayne A...6, 9 Garland-Kuntz, Elisabeth E , 093 Garlick, Martha...56 Garrick, Ryan C , D0403 Gaspar, Charles Gassmann, Aaron J , 0598, 0634, 0792, 333, D046 Gatehouse, Angharad M. R...78 Gatehouse, John...78 Gates, Michael W Gaugler, Randy Gautam, Bal Krishna , 469, D049 Gautam, Sandipa G , D043 GC, Yubak Ge, Xie Geden, Christopher J...043, 748 Geib, Scott Geisert, Ryan Winslow , D052 Gelhaus, Jon K Gengler, Bart... D079 George, Justin Gerard, Patrick D , 220 Gerdeman, Beverly S..0436, 045, D0297, D0533 Gerhardt, Reid R German-Ramirez, Enger... D0569 Gero, Patrick D Gerry, Alec...042, 083, 53 Getu Degaga, Emana Gezen, Salvador A Gezon, Zachariah J Ghalambor, Cameron K Ghazanfar, M. Usman Ghising, Kiran... D0526 Gianessi, Leonard Giebel, Jonathan D... D0540 Gifford, Neil... D033 Giguere, Allison... D00 Gilbert, Celeste... D055 Gilbert, Lawrence E...042, 038 Gilbertson, Robert L Giles, Kristopher L , 0659, 0822, 0967, D0296, D0580 Gill, Aman Gill, Brian A Gill, Harsimran...27 Gill, Jocelyn Gill, Kelly Ann Gill, Stanton... D054 Gillespie, Sandra Gillespie, Thomas Gillett-Kaufman, Jennifer Gilrein, Daniel...68 Gimmel, Matthew L... 82, D0596 Ginzel, Matthew D...050, 47, 564, D028, D064 Giordano, Rosanna Giraldo-Calderón, Gloria I , 093 Giray, Tugrul Gitaitis, Ron , 758, D0577 Giurcanu, Mihai C Glasgow, William C , 0733 Gleim, Elizabeth R Glogoza, Phillip A... D0508 Goblirsch, Mike Goddard, Jerome...2, 377, 680, D0426 Godfrey, Larry Godoy, Veronica Goemans, Geert Goenaga, Ricardo , D0367 Goggin, Fiona L , D062 Gold, Roger E , 0388, 0390, 0942, 390, 737 Goldstein, Paul Z Golizadeh, Ali... D0374 Golladay, Stephen W... D059 Gomez Jimenez, Maria Isabel Gomez, Luis A Gomez, Luis E , 044, D0537 Gomez, Sara , D0299 Gomulkiewicz, Richard...05 Gonda-King, Liahna , D0284, D0299 Gondhalekar, Ameya D Gong, Liang... D0083 Gonzalez, Victor H Gonzalez-Karlsson, Adrea Susan González-Oliver, Angélica...03 Goodisman, Michael Goodman, Mark H...20, 439 Goolsby, John , 0827, D0344 Gora, Rajni... D038 Gorb, Stanislav N Gordon, Deborah M , 037, 457 Gordon, Eric Robert Lucien... D090 Gordon, Jennifer...038, 385 Gordy, John Gore, J. Chad Gore, Jeffrey , 0604, 48 Gormanson, Dale D Gorski, Stephanie L Gorzlancyk, Austin , D058 Gotelli, Nicholas J , D0396 Gotham, Steve Goto, Hidetoshi... D049 Gott, Ryan C... D0093 Goulet, Marie-Claire , D069 Goulson, David...44 Gowda, Siddarame , 27 Goyal, Gaurav , 27 Graf, Benno... VP20 Grafton-Cardwell, Beth Graham, Elizabeth E...5 Grandy, Stuart Granovsky, Ted Grant, Jerome F , 066, 0875, 73, 74, 508, 57, 726, D037, D0206, D0355, D0368, D0475, D0485, D0487, D050, D052, D0587 Grant, Jessica I... D0604 Grant, Joshua N... D050, D052 Grapputo, Alessandro... D0453 Gratton, Claudio , 0476, 0567, 0824, 638, 639, D0274, D0458 Graves, Andrew D...502, 503, 504, D0486 Gray, Michael E...050, 0635, 087, 629, D0497 Graziosi, Ignazio Green, Ellen S... D0380 Green, Thomas A , 494, D0559 Greene, A. Daniel , 0372, D0233 Greene, Jeremy K , 0584, 0973, D020 Greenplate, John Greenwood, Carmen M , D00, D099 Greer, Chris Grella, Maicon D... D0435 Gresham, Sean D. M , 060, D0340 Grettenberger, Ian M , D0576 Grewal, Parwinder S Gries, Gerhard Gries, Regine Grieshop, Matthew , 0629, 639, 643, D035, D074, D0535 Grijalva, Mario J... D0062 Grimaldi, David Griswold, Terry L , 798, D0400 Grof-Tisza, Patrick Grosman, Don Gross, Aaron D , D0467 Gross, Serena Groves, Russell L , 0607, 079 Grozinger, Christina M , 0308, 0478, 078 Grubbs, Kirk J Grubin, Sarah M...77 Grulke, Nancy E Grzymala, Traci L Guarna, Marta M Guedes, Raul Narciso C...D0263, D0360 Guerrero, Felix...00, 0377, 609 Guerrero, Sarahlynne , D0536 Guertin, C... D0476 Guido-Cira, Nadia D Guidry, Eric... D0005 Guillot, Frank S... D042 Guisewite, Lena Guisti, Bailee... D0240 Gujar, Hemant Guldin, James M Gulia-Nuss, Monika... D046 Gumm, Della C...08 Gundersen-Rindal, Dawn E , D030 Gunter, Chris... D0577 Guo, Yaping... D026 Gururajan, Srikanth... D0346 Gusarov, Vladimir I , 0999, D0602 Gustafson, Grey... D087 Gut, Larry J , 0275, 0276 Gutierrez, Rebeca Guyton, John Guzy, Michael , D0559 Gwynne, Darryl Gyamfi, Philomina , 0254 Gómez, Isabel Günter, Sven... D004 Haas, Matthias...050, 435, 749 Haavik, Laurel J Habib, Cameron Hackett, Ryan... D0034 Haddad, Stephanie Hadi, Buyung... D0585 Hagler, James R , 0822, D077, D0296, D0490 Hahn, Dan A Hahn, Noel , D06 Haight, Robert G Hail, Daymon , D007, D0036 Hain, Fred P Hajek, Ann ,

180 Author Index Author Index Hajjar, Jamal...44 Hakeem, Abdul...73, 74, 57, D037 Halbrendt, Noemi O... D0275 Hale, Frank A , 57, D037, D054 Hall, David G , 0462, 263, 264, 266 Hall, Paula M... D0405 Hall, Robert Hallack, M. Haroun Hallman, Guy J... VP4 Halloran, Sean T Hamby, Kelly A Hamerlinck, Gabriela...36 Hamilton, Finn Hamilton, George C , 095, D0057, D06 Hamm, Ronda L Hammack, Leslie... D0280 Hance, Thierry... VP02 Hancock, Joseph Handler, Alfred Hanks, Lawrence M... 46, 50, 54, 55, 56, 562, 563, 588, 596 Hannon Williams, Laura E Hannon, Eugene R Hanrahan, Shawn Hansen, Allison...77 Hansen, Immo A...228, 234, 722, D005 Hansen, Jason... D032 Hansen, Karolyn M Hansen, Richard Hanshew, Alissa Hanson, Anthony A Hansson, Bill Hardin, Jesse A Hardke, Jarrod T...33 Hardy, Clint... D0503 Hardy, Margaret C Hardy, Nate B Harmon, Bradley L...D0029, D0030, D055 Harmon, Jason P , D0526 Harper, Carla M... D0503 Harrell, Robert A... D0073 Harris, Afton... D0502 Harris, Alice L Harris, Christina Harris, Marvin Harrison, Bruce... D025 Harrison, Howard F... D058 Harrison, Jon F , 458 Harrison, Kyle Harrison, Nigel Hart, John... D0605 Hart, Robert... D0243 Hartel, Peter G Hartke, Tamara R...58 Hartshorn, Jessica...049, 057 Harwood, James D , 0509, 0593, 0646, 0654, 240, 642, D0028, D0033, D0098, D070, VP3 Haseeb, Muhammad Haselkorn, Tamara Hash, John M... D093 Haskell, Neal...06, 679 Hatfield, Colleen Haun, Walker Gray , D0587 Haunerland, Norbert Hauser, Martin Haviland, David R... D0327, D05 Havill, Nathan , 0870, 70, 72, D025, D063 Hawkings, Chloë Hawlena, Dror Hawley, Dana Hawthorne, David J... 43, D0097 Hay, Bruce A...6 Hay-Roe, Mirian M...02 Hayashi, Cheryl Hayden, James E...33 Haygood, Robert Haynes, Kenneth F..0379, 038, 0509, 0646, 20, 23, 385, 439, D0046 Hazlerig, Justin R... D007 Head, Graham P , D046, D049 Heard, Stephen B Heath, Allyn M... D003 Heath, Jeremy Heck, G Hedstrom, Christopher S Heerman, Matthew C Heimpel, George E , 0656, 0970, 293, 343, 777 Hein, Gary L...054, 0605 Heinz, Kevin Held, David W..046, 084, 0849, D0268, D0279, D058 Helder, Johannes Hellmich, Richard L , 0324, 0632, 333, 783, 787, 79 Helms, Anjel M Helms, Brian A Hemly, Sara... D033 Henderson, Gregg... D0066, D049 Hendrick, Tim... D0503 Hendricks, Brian M , 0372, D0233 Hendrie, Marguerite Hendrix, William H , D0489 Heng-Moss, Tiffany M , 0564, 0585, 0594, 0596, 087, 649, 778, D0523, D0529, D0530 Henne, Donald C , D0554, D0560 Hennessey, Michael K Hentz, Matthew G Henze, Trief K... D007 Herard, Franck... D0337 Heraty, John M...097, 0687, 0839, D093 Herbert, D. Ames , D056 Herbert, John J... D0378 Herbst, Christin... D0503 Hermann, Sara Lynn Hermans, C. M... VP30 Herms, Daniel A , 0700, 0703, 0842, 0883, 42, 770, D027 Hernandez, Chelsea... D0042 Hernandez, Natalie Hernandez, Pedro , 757, D0562 Hernández-Jerónimo, Jessica... D0382 Herrera, Andrés Herrick, Nathan J Hesler, Louis S Hess, Anna N Hess, Robert J Hessler, Sheri N Hesson, B , 0296, 0298 Heth, Rachel L. S... D042 Hibbard, Bruce E , 098, 323, 324, 326 Hicke, Jeffrey A Hickling, Graham J , 0374, 082 Hidalgo, Eduardo...57 Hietala, Katie G... D032 Higbee, Bradley S , D0358 Higgins, Laura Higley, Leon G , 746, D0006, D0007 Higo, Heather A Hijaz, Faraj... D033 Hildebrand, Shane Hilf, Mark E Hill, Bernie D... D047 HIll, Catherine , 093 Hill, Daryl... D0546 Hill, JoVonn... D0594 Hill, Katherine B. R , 309, D0545 Hill, Richard Hill, Sarah Hill, Stephanie... D0044 Hillyer, Julian F , 02 Hiltpold, Ivan Himler, Anna G Himmel, P... D0552 Hincapie, Marinia Hinds, Jermaine Hinkle, Nancy C Hinson, Jill... D0540 Hinz, Hariet L Hinze, Lori Hipkins, Valerie Hishinuma, Stacy M , D0032 Hites, Roxie... D0399 Hix, Raymond L... D0569 Hoback, W. Wyatt... D075, D09 Hoberg, James Hoctor, Terri Hoddle, Mark S , 0267, 0492, 053, 0858, 0922, D0330 Hodges, Amanda C , D09, D0536 Hodges, Greg...47 Hodgson, Erin W , D0557 Hoekman, David , D0356 Hoelmer, Andrew T Hoelmer, Kim A , D032, D0349 Hoffmann, Amanda M , 0792 Hofstetter, Richard W , D0027 Hogg, David B , D056 Hogsette, Jerome A...02, 03, 036 Hokanson, Karen E...02 Holden, Rebecca Holderman, Chris J...04 Holland, Jeffrey D...059, 0779 Holland, Nikki Holley, Jo-anne C Holmes, David... D0527 Holt, Holly Holt, Jame... D0209 Holway, David , 473 Homam, B. H...39 Homziak, Nicholas T... D004 Honaker, Jessica Hong, Soon Yeong... D0357 Hong, Xiao-Yue...334, 336 Hooks, Cerruti , 0655, 093, 259 Hooper-Bui, Linda M , 0294, 0295, 0296, 0297, 0298, D038 Hoover, Angela M Hoover, Doreen Hoover, Kelli , 0644, 76, 547 Hoover, Shelley E Hopkins, Bradley W , 329, D0555 Hopkins, Heidi E Hopper, Julie V Hopper, Keith R Hopton, Matthew... D0592 Horak, Michael... D049, D0492 Horn, David J... D0603 Horton, Dan L Horvath, David P... D0253 Hossain, Tanjim Taswar Hou, Kirk Kohwa...54 Hough-Goldstein, Judith A , 0344, 238 Houle, Jessica L Houseman, Richard M , D0058 Houtz, Philip L... D0255 Howard, Kenneth J Howell, Heather... D0593 Howells, Jessica M Howes, R...62 Howie, Lynita J... D0549 Hoy, Casey W Hoy, Marjorie A Hu, Jinping... D0229 Hu, Xing Ping , D0268 Hu, Yi , 0809, 578 Hu, Zhaonong... D024 Hua, Gang... D0094, D0256 Huang, Diying Huang, Fangneng , 332, 786, D049, D0446 Huang, Jen-Pan Huang, Xin-Yi... D0249, D0265 Huang, Yongping Hubbard, Jamee Lee... D023 Hughes, Austin L Hughes, C... D0476 Hughes, Gabriel P...050, 47, 202 Hughes, William O. H Hughson, Sarah A Hull, Larry A , D0235 Hummel, Natalie A Hung, Kim

181 Author Index Author Index Hunt, Bethany Hunt, Camden Hunt, Greg J... D068 Hunt, Laura G... D0226 Hunt, Thomas E , 0463, 0585, 330, 634, D037, D0468, D0523, D0568 Hunter, Martha S...080, 250 Hunter, Wayne B..0238, 0336, 0620, 075, D037 Huot, Ordom Brian , D005 Hurley, Kyle W... D067 Husen, Timothy J Huseth, Anders S , 079 Husseneder, Claudia Hutcheson, H. Joel Hutchins, John T Hutchinson, Pamela JS , 053 Hutchison, William D , 436, 633, D003, D08, D0534 Huxel, Gary R Huxter, Elizabeth Hwang, Wei Song Höhn, Heinrich... VP20 Höpli, Hans Ulrich... VP20 Ibeh, Dominic C Ibrahim, Shihabudin Iburg, Joseph P Iglesias, Lindsy E Ignell, Rickard Ileleji, Klein Imamura, Jennifer L Imler, Jean-Luc Ingber, David A , D046 Ingerslew, Kathryn Suzanne... D0266 Ingersoll, Tammy Ingram, E. M Inskeep, Jess R... D0029, D0030 Ipser, Reid M Irby, William...D0008, D0053, D0234 Irish, Brian M Irvan, Darian... D0503 Irwin, Rebecca E Isaacs, Rufus.000, 0269, 0824, 0984, 048, 644, D0026, D003, D0273, D0274, D0524 Ishida, Ed... D0494 Ismail, Ibnu Sina Ives, Anthony R Ivie, Michael A...028, 30, 794 Izzo, Victor Jabbour, Randa Jack, David Jackson, D. Michael... D058 Jackson, Jerreme J... D006, D0084 Jackson, Mark A , D0448 Jackson, Morgan D Jackson, Ryan , 0793, 484 Jacobsen, Barry Jacobson, Alana L , D0583 Jacobson, Amanda , 329, D0555 Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle Jaenike, John Jahan, Nusrat Jakka, Siva R. K... D0079, D0083 James, Anthony A James, Peter J...74 James, Rosalind Jameson, Mary Liz...028, 0264 Jander, Georg Jandricic, Sarah...64 Jansen, Michael Andrew... D06 Jantz, Lee Meadows Jarnefeld, Janet... D0425 Jaronski, Stefan T , D0252, D0548, D0574 Jasinski, James... D038 Jatiket, Marut Jaubert-Possimai, Stephanie Jech, Larry E... D0546, D0548 Jeffers, Laura A..., 9 Jenkins, David Alan , D0367 Jenkins, Jeanna D Jenkins, Karla H Jennings, David E Jensen, Andrew S Jenson, Lacey J Jeon, Wonju Jeong, Jaeyoung Jepson, Paul , D0559 Jeske, Daniel R Jessie, Casi N , 0967, D0296 Jessie, W , 0967, D0296 Jetton, Robert M Jiang, Haobo Jiang, Hongbo , D0464 Jilale, Abderrahim...4 Jiménez, F. Agustin Jochim, Mackenzie Joern, Anthony Jogesh, Tania Johansson, Annette Johar, Harman... D000 Johns, Robert...52, 570 Johnson, Brian Johnson, Crawford W... D0078 Johnson, Donn T , 090 Johnson, Douglas W... 44, D070, D0503 Johnson, Erica Johnson, Gregg A Johnson, Gregory Johnson, Holly Lynn Johnson, Jaree Johnson, Kelsy K Johnson, Ken B... D009 Johnson, Kevin , 0739, 328, D0489 Johnson, Norman F , 37, 797, D033 Johnson, Paul J... 30, 84, D0376, D0394 Johnson, Reed... D0090 Johnson, S. E Johnson, Seth J... D0385 Johnson, T. Scott... VP34 Johnson, Timothy... D055 Johnson, Todd D... D026 Johnson, Wendy A Johnson, William G Johnson, Wood... D0267 Johnston, Michelle Jones, A. C , D0238 Jones, Ashley L Jones, Beryl M...030, 278 Jones, Carol L , D0566 Jones, Corbin D Jones, Darrell... D0503 Jones, Guinevere Z Jones, Joshua R Jones, Joshua S Jones, Laura E...00 Jones, Michael I... D0486 Jones, Moneen Jones, Susan C...25, 388 Jones, T. H... D0238 Jones, Thomas C...300, 584, 585, D0068 Jones, Walker , 0973 Joplin, Karl H , 590, 59, D000, D002, D003, D0068 Jordan, Timothy A... D00 Jorgensen, Carl L Jorgensen, Jan Joseph, Ann Smittu Joseph, Shimat V...02, 09 Joshi, Deepak... D0054 Joshi, Neelendra K... D0235, D0275 Joyce, Andrea L...29, 292 Joyner, Chet Joyner, Michele L..284, 285, 584, 585, 59, D0336 Jubb, Carrie S...72 Judd, Shiloh D... D0600 Juliano, Steven A... 39, D0049 Jung, Chan Sik...D0369, D0479, D0480 Jung, Jewon... D0203 Jung, Myung-Pyo , D0243 Jurat-Fuentes, Juan L..0453, 755, D006, D0079, D0083, D0084 Juzwik, Jennifer , 565, D064 Kaftanoglu, Osman Kairo, Moses T.K , 55, D0569 Kaiser, Matthew C Kakkar, Garima... D0067 Kalsi, Megha Kamble, Shripat T..0396, 0945, 383, 676, D075 Kamgang Mbouhom, David Basile... D023 Kamminga, Katherine L..020, 259, 7, D0438, D0520 Kanarek, Andrew...06 Kanda, Kojun Kandemir, Irfan Kaneda, Megan...54 Kang, Jung Koo Kang, Seong Geun... D0357 Kanga, Lambert H. B , 0555 Kanost, Michael R , 09 Kaplan, Ian , 059, 0597, 64, D057 Kaplan, Jonathan , D0559 Karagozian, Peter... D00 Karampatakis, Sotiris... VP2 Kard, Brad... D0423 Karim, Shahid , 0456, 553, D0047, D0063 Kariuki, Eutychus M Kariyat, Rupesh Ram , 0573 Karl, Zachary Karlovsky, Petr Karunammorthi, Kaliyaperumal Kaser, Joe M Kaspari, Michael.035, 455, 456, 550, D0463, D0620 Kasparyan, D. R...24 Kassu, Gebreyes...03 Kaster, Von Kaufman, Alex... D06 Kaufman, Michael G , D0052 Kaufman, Phillip E..04, 036, 0369, 0375, 04, 735 Kautz, Stefanie Kawada, Hitoshi... D0229 Kawahara, Akito Yuji...34, 796 Kay, Adam Davidson , 550, D0463, D0620 Keathley, Craig P...04 Keefer, Chris Keena, Melody A , 76 Keene, Georgia R... D033 Keener, Jim Keesey, Ian W... D035 Kegley, Susan , D0559 Keller, Jennifer J...28 Kells, Stephen A...049, 0956 Kelly, Alyssa... D0236 Kelly, Jessica L Kelly, Suzanne E...080, 250 Kemp, William P... D0253, D0254 Kendra, Paul E... D036, D0322 Kenimer, Cam... D0503 Kennedy, George G , 674, D0577, D0579, D0583 Kepler, Ryan Kern, Bill Kerns, David L , 786 Kessler, André Kester, Karen M , 023, 86, 87 Kevan, Peter Keweshan, Ryan S Keyhani, Nemat O , 0468, 020 Keyser, Chad A... D0548 Khadempour, Lily Khajuria, Chitvan , 55, D0532 Khalaim, A.I...24 Khan, Azhar A... D054, D0304 Khan, Ikhlas Khan, Inamullah Kharel, Kabita Khrimian, Ashot Khusro, Mohammad Kibuka-Sebitosi, Esther Killiny, Nabil... D025, D033 Killiny-Mansour, Nabil...40 Kim, Chang-Hyun Kim, Chul Su...D0369, D0479, D0480 Kim, Dong Soo...346, 35 Kim, Dong-Joo

182 Author Index Author Index Kim, Donghun... D0064 Kim, Ju Hyeon... D0059 Kim, Kyung Seok... D07 Kim, Tina Kim, Yonggyun Kim, Young-Ho...348, 799 Kimball, Valkyrie Piper... D0230 Kimber, Michael J , D0467 Kimbirauskas, Ryan Kimsey, Lynn S King, Ed... D0505 King, Edgar G King, Jennifer A King-Fowler, Mickey Z... D0226 Kinney, Michael... D0262 Kist, Benjamin J... D0204 Kistner, Erica J Kittelson, Neal T Kjer, Karl M...006, 304 Klapwijk, Maartje Klass, Klaus-Dieter... VP05 Kleiber, Joe Klein, Alexandra-Maria Klein, David... D0545 Klick, Jimmy , D077 Klimetzek, Dietrich...572, 573 Kline, Dan Klingeman, William..0280, D064, D0325, D054 Klinkhamer, Peter G. L... VP30, VP3 Kloepper, Joseph , D0290 Klompen, Hans , D040 Klotz, John H Klotz, Stephen Kneeland, Kathleen M...D075, D09, D0424, D0429, D0507 Kneeshaw, Daniel Knight, Victoria R... D006, D0079 Knippa, Zoe... D00 Knoll, Joseph E Knutson, Eric... VP8 Knutson, Eric M... VP8 Ko, Alexander Kobelkova, Alena...07 Koch, Frank H...663, 667 Koch, Kyle G , 0596, 087, D0530 Koch, Robert L... D08 Kocher, Sarah D Koci, Kamila Koehler, Phil Koga, Ryuichi Koganemaru, Reina...24 Koh, Sang Hyun... D0369 Kohler, Glenn R...77 Kok, Loke T , 69, 70, D025 Kolich, Lindsay A... D028 Kolomiets, Michael V Kondo, Demian Takumasa Kondratieff, Boris Konemann, Charles E... D0423 Kongere, James O... D0229 Konishi, Kazuhiko... D0289 Konopka, Philip... D0503 Konstantinov, Alexander S... D0390 Kontodimas, Dimitris... VP2, VP25 Koppenhöfer, Albrecht..0066, 0574, 0853, D0363 Kornev, Konstantin G Korytkowski, Cheslavo...55 Kos, S. P... VP30 Kostromytska, Olga , D0363 Kosztarab, Michael Kovaleva, Elena S Kowles, Katelyn A... D070 Kraemer, Mark E... D0242, D027 Kratzer, Kyle... D0326 Krause, Tyler Krauth, Steven J... D026 Krawczyk, Greg... 09, 094, D0235 Kreitlow, Kimberly L Kremen, Claire Krimmel, Billy , 354 Kring, Timothy J , 0658, 0822, 442, D0296 Krishnan, Natraj Kritsky, Gene Kroemer, Jeremy A Kroschel, Jürgen... VP5, VP7 Kruger, Greg R Krupke, Christian H , 63, 790, D048 Ku, Sook Jung Kubiszak, Mary... D0537 Kuczaj, Isis M Kuehn, Kevin Kuehnlein, Ronald...74 Kuenen, L. P. S... D053 Kuhar, Daniel , D030 Kuhar, Thomas P...020, 0568, 095, D0438, D0504, D0520, D056 Kuhn, William R Kuklinski, Richard... D0426 Kularatne, Senanayake A. M... D048 Kumar, Anjali Kumar, Sandeep Kumar, Sunil Kumar, Vivek Kumari, Meera... D008 Kund, Greg Kuniyoshi, Claudia H...6 Kunkel, Grace... D0097 Kuntz, Cody D... D07 Kuster, Ryan D Kuzma, Jennifer...60 Kwon, Deok Ho , D0095 Kwon, Hyung wook... D0203 La Marca, Alessandra...24 LaBonte, D. R... D0578 Labrum, Joseph T Lacerda, Mábio C... D0565, D0586 Lacey, Emerson S Lacki, Michael J... D0589 Lafon, Nelson W LaForest, J...078, 9 Lagrimini, Mark... D0530 Lahm, G Lai, Antonella...24 Laird, David Lamb, Ashley B...72, 73, 74, D0368 Lamb, Betsy...68 Lamb, Trip Lambdin, Paris L , 066, 0875, 73, 74, 57, 733, D037, D0206, D0487, D050, D052, D0587 Lamp, William O..0454, 0734, 258, 784, D0093, D0292, D0347 Lampert, Evan , D0236, D0320 Lan, Que Lan, Yemin Landis, Doug A , 639, 645 Landolt, Peter J...602, 603, 803 Landry, Bernard...33 Lane, Steven J Lanford, Kevin Lang, Emma Lang, Jennifer M Langdon, Kevin W... D04 Lange, Denise Langston, David... D0577 Langston, Vernon B Lanka, Srinivas K , D0496 Lanza, Janet Lanzaro, Gregory Lapointe, Stephen L , 0462, 04, 269, 60 Lara, Jesus R , 053 Larabee, Fredrick , D065 Larrick, Stephanie Larsen, Kirk J... D0020, D0370 Larsen, Nicholas Larson, Erick Larson, Jonathan L , D0377 Larsson, Mattias Lasnier, Jacques... D034 Lassiter, Ralph B Latchininsky, Alexandre V... D0546 Lattke, John Laub, Curt A Laumann, R. A... D0303 Laurentis, Valéria Lucas de , D0025, D0350 Lavallée, R... D0476 Lavine, Laura Corley... D0 Lawrence, Amanda... D0426 Lawrence, Christina Laws, Angela N Laws, Elijah...59 Lawson, Sarah P Lax, Alan R... D0005, D042 Layton, Raymond J...08 Leal, Walter S , 63, D0459 Leary, Greg Leasure, Douglas Ryan Leavengood, John Moeller LeBlanc, Helene N , 0902 LeBrun, Edward G...042, 038 LeBude, Anthony... D054 Ledbetter, Jeri D Ledesma, Elmer... D00 Lee, Chae Min...349, 35 Lee, Dae-weon Lee, Dong Woon...346, 349, 35 Lee, Doo-Hyung , 347, 350 Lee, Jackie A , 0948 Lee, Jana C , 904, 0905, D0285, D0572 Lee, Joon-Ho , D07, D078 Lee, Kwang Pum... D0369 Lee, Neal Lee, Sang Myeong Lee, Sang-Hee Lee, Sangmi , D0595 Lee, Shin Chan... D0357 Lee, Si Hyeock , 348, 799, D0059, D0095 Lee, Siwoo Lee, Suk Jun...349, 35 Lee, Sun Kyung... D078 Lee, Yoosook Legan, Andrew W Legaspi, Jesusa C Legeai, Fabrice Legrand, Ana... D0333 Legters, Courtney... D0257 Lehman, Michael R Lehnert, Margie P Lehnert, Matthew S Lei, Zhongren...47 Lein, Melissa... D0007 Leiner, Rosalie Leiss, Kristen A... VP30, VP3 Lejeune, Brian Lekveishvili, Mariam Leland, Jarrod E Lelito, Jonathan , D026 LeMay, Valerie Lenhart, Paul A Lentz, Anthony J Leonard, B. Rogers.0447, 0505, 0643, 332, 786, D049, D0446 Leong, Joan M Leong, Misha Leontie, Roxana... D038 Leppanen, Christy J... D0354 Lepping, Miles Leppla, N. C Leskey, Tracy C , 02, 0569, 09, 092, 347, 425, 604 Leslie, Alan Lessard, Bryan D LeValley, Stephanie... D0224 Levine, Richard Levine, Steven L...070, 546 Levron, Danielle C Levy, Ronnie Lewis, Delano S...06 Lewis, Marty Lewis, Michelle L , D084 Lewis, Phillip A... D0482 Lewis, Taylor , D0233 León-Cortés, Jorge L , 27 Li, Andrew Y , 0377, D0454 Li, Fang

183 Author Index Author Index Li, Hongmei...54 Li, Huarong...D0246, D0248, D0452 Li, Jiamei , D062 Li, Jianyong Li, Ming... D0092 Li, Ting Li, Xianchun , D0220, D0264 Li, Yang...54 Li, Yankai Liao, Ling-Hsiu... D0086 Liburd, Oscar E , 052, 0550, 0609, 0966 Licht, William Liebherr, James , D0392 Liebhold, Andrew M , 0878, 659, 660, 665 Liebig, Juergen Lien, Yi-Yang Liere, Heidi , D0274 Liesch, Patrick J , 762 Liesner, Leighton... D0545 Lightle, Danielle , D0572 Lill, John T , D038 Lill, Markus Limay-Rios, Victor... D0573 Limback, Chenin K... D050 Limbu, Samita...76 Lin, Chung-Chi Lin, Hui-Min Lindgren, B. Staffan Lindgren, Natalie K , 745, D0042, D084 Lindroth, Richard L Ling, Kai-Shu... D058 Linhares, Aricio Xavier... D0434, D0435 Linkous, Emily K Linksvayer, Timothy A Linthicum, Kenneth J Lipman, Jeff Little, Nathan S Liu, Feng... D0077 Liu, Nannan , 65, D0077, D0089, D0092 Liu, Samuel Liu, Sijun... D0452 Liu, Sisi... D0264 Liu, T. X Liu, Xuming... D0532 Liu, Yong-Biao Livdahl, Todd P , D0048, D0065 Llecha, Alfredo... D0439 Llorente, Jorge...28 Lloyd, J. D...95 Loboda, Sarah Loeb, Gregory M Lohmeyer, K. H... D0430 Loiseau, Claire Londo, Andrew J Londoño, Diana Karime... D0453 Long, Elizabeth C Long, Elizabeth Y Long, James N Long, Lawrence C Long, Lewis S Long, Liping...79 Long, Rachael F Long, Stefan Longing, Scott Longino, John T Lopes, Joao R. S Lopez, Dawn L Lopez, Vanessa López-Arroyo, J. Isabel Lopez-Martinez, Giancarlo López Quintero, Isis J... D098 Lord, Cynthia C , 395, D0222 Lord, Nathan P , 85 Lorenz, Gus... 48, D076 Lorenzen, Marce Losey, John E Losinger, Michael... D0432 Lott, Terry A... D0388 Loudon, Catherine...23 Loughlin, Kyle Michael... D0046 Louis, Joe... D0455 Lounibos, Philip... D0232 Louton, Jessica E... D088 Louws, Frank... D0577 Lowe, Anna... D0545 Lowenstein, David Lowenstein, Nancy Lowery, D.T... VP34 Lozier, Jeffrey D Lu, Guoiqng... D0530 Lu, Xinguo , 590, D002, D0068 Lubin, Yael Lucas, Jane Ludaescher, Bertram...32 Ludwig, Scott W , D0562 Lukasik, Piotr , 0809, 578 Luna, Maria Gabriela...53 Lundgren, Jonathan , 0522, 408, 788 Lundy, Anthony...D000, D002, D0068 Luong, Ky-Phuong...84 Lura, Taylor...53 Luthe, Dawn S , D0455 Luttrell, Randall G , 484, D0442 Lutz, Martha Rosett Luzio, Gary A... D037 Lwetoijera, Dickson Wilson... D0227 Lyman, Roberta...0 Lynch, Christine Ann , 240 Lysandrou, Michael Lysyk, Tim... D02, D0428 Ma, Enbo Ma, Qun Mabry, Jeff... D0436 Mace-Hill, Kevi C... D024 MacGown, Joe A... D0345 Machado, Renato Machado, Rita de Cássia de Melo... D0303 Machtinger, E. T Macias Velasco, Juan F Macias, Nicholas A... D0207 Macias-Samano, Jorge...49 MacLachlan, N. James MacRae, Ted C , D0247 Maddison, David Madere, Timmy... D0005 Madsen-Steigmeyer, Tara Maestas, Lauren Paul Mafra, Leandro... D0542 Mafra-Neto, Agenor , 689, 50, 0926, 042, D0542, 044, 40 Magalhaes, Leonardo... D0540 Magalhães, Gustavo Oliveira de...d0350, D0547 Mahmoud, Mervat A. B Mahroof, Rizana M Maier, Chris T... D0409 Maier, Crystal A...83 Makanjuola, Winifred Ayinke Maki, Elin Makino, Takashi T Mallinger, Rachel E...002, 638 Manandhar, Roshan Mancinelli, Georgina E Manfredini, Fabio Mangels, Jack... D0584 Mankin, Richard W Mankowski, Mark E...93 Mann, Alyssa N... D0038 Mann, R. S Mann, Rajinder , D025 Mann, Richard K... D050 Manrique, Veronica , 0992 Manti, Fransesco... VP24 Manwaring, Katherine F Manzoor, Farkhanda...23 Mao, Wenfu Maori, Eyal Marahatta, Sharad Marcari, Veronica... 24, D0349 Marchese, JI Marchi, Lia S Marcum, Daniel Marden, James H Margolies, David C... D0558 Margosan, Dennis Mariño-Pérez, Ricardo , 22 Marksbury, S. N... D0377 Marquardt, Paul T Marques, Rodrigo N Marrone, Pamela , D055, D0552 Marsden, Clare Marsh, Doug... D0545 Marshall, David C , 0339, 309 Marshall, Jordan M... D032 Martin, Danielle Martin, David...79 Martin, Gauthier... VP02 Martin, Gavin J... D086, D0600 Martin, James A Martin, Phyllis A. W , D030 Martin, R. R... D0572 Martin, Randy Martin, Sallie Martinelli, Samuel... D0247 Martinez, Adam J... D0465 Martinez, Elida Yesenia... D005 Martinez, Emily E...09 Martinez, Jeannette C...02, 485, 636 Martini, Xavier Martins, Gustavo Ferreira...D0225, D0263 Martinson, Holly M...023, 260 Martínez, José-Cristian , D042 Masloski, Kenneth E... D099 Mason, Charles , D023 Mason, Hope... D025 Mason, Keith S..0269, 048, 644, D0026, D0273, D0524 Mason, Linda J...050, 0354, 0370 Mason, Makena... D0076 Mason, Peri A Masood, Nasir Mast, Jeff Mastro, Victor C , 48, 555, D0484, D0564 Matabanchoy, Jesus Mateos, Mariana...082, 084 Mathat, Carly Mathews, Clarissa Matos, Yvonne Matsuura, Kenji Matthews, Deborah L... D0388 Matthews, Robert...65 Mattila, Heather Mauck, Kerry , 0572 Maveety, Sarah A Maxwell, Jennifer Petzold May, Bernie P May, Emily , D0273 Mayack, Christopher...46 Mayfield, Albert E...066, 42, 507, D063, D0368, D0487 Maynard, Leigh J Mayo, Ann B... D0397 Mayo, Christie Mbora, David N. M... D0039 McAvoy, Thomas...75 McCallister, Megan McCarville, Michael T , D057 McCaskill, David... D0248 McCord, Joshua McCormick, Lydia L... D002 McCornack, Brian P...074, 0277, 0583, 0587, 0589, 06, 0822, 0969, D0034, D0296, D0560 McCreadie, John W McCullough, Deborah G , 5, D029, D036, D0478, D048, D0482, D0483 McCullough, Erin L... D085 McDonald, Danny L , 737 McDonald, Eric...23 McDonald, Richard C...7, 75 McDonough, Marissa X McElrath, Thomas C McEvoy, Peter McEwen, Crystal McFadden, Alan G

184 Author Index Author Index McFarland, Clint McGaha, Tommy W McGhee, Peter S , 0276 McGovern, Daniel C... D020 McHugh, Joseph V...367, 0678 McIntosh, Clay E... D0040 McIntosh, Mollie D , D0592 Mckay, Tanja McKee, Fraser R , D0379 McKenna, Duane D...00, 0680, 0, D009 McKenney, Jessica... D0596 McKenzie, Cindy L , D0405 McKenzie, E. A... D04 McKenzie, Ross H... D047 McKinney, David Arthur McKinney, Matthew I , D008 McKinney, Tanya K... D0380 McLeod, Murdick J...33 McManus, Bradley... D0567 McMechan, Anthony J McMichael, Collin Cutrone McNally, Philip S... D0494 McQuate, Grant T McVey, D. Scott...08, 089 Meador, Heidi... D0288 Meagher, Robert L , 0850, 096, 02, 332, D049, D0446 Means, Jackson C Mech, Angela M , D0302 Medina, Raul F , 0720, 08, 084, 369, 375 Medina-Ortega, Karla J... D0276 Medrano, Enrique Meehan, Timmothy D , 639 Meeker, James R... D0078, D0267 Meier, Linnea R Meihls, Lisa N Meijer, Alan Meikle, William Meineke, Emily K Meiners, Joan M Meinke, Lance J , 330, D052 Meissle, Michael Melaksou, Zohra...45 Mellinger, Charles... D069 Menard, Katrina L , D0399 Mendes, Simone Martins... D0365 Mendez, Joel A , D065 Meng, Peter S Meng, Xian-Ying Merchant, Michael E Merrill, Scott C Merritt, Richard Merten, Paul , 507, D0487 Mertl, Amy... VP9 Mescher, Mark C , 0540, 0572, 0576, 0645 Meszaros, Anna Metwaly, Nabawy... D0258 Metz, Bradley N Meyer, Jason M , 093 Meyers, Kathleen... D0339 Meyerson, Laura A Mian, M. Rouf Mian, Yousuf Michalkova, Veronika , 04, 05, 75 Michaud, Dominique , D069 Michaud, J. P Michel, Andrew P , 046, 0586, 0587 Michel, Kristin Miglani, Monika... D0223 Milanovich, Joe... D0592 Miles, Albie Millar, Jocelyn G... 46, 47, 48, 50, 5, 53, 54, 55, 56, 562, 563, 588, 596, 598, D022 Miller, Christine W Miller, Daniel R... D0267, D0307 Miller, Dini M , 20, 22, 24, 384 Miller, Donald G , D0436 Miller, Gary L...064, 725 Miller, Jacqueline , D0388 Miller, James R , 0275, 0276 Miller, Jeffrey C...022, 0908 Miller, Kelly B , 0754, 290, D004, D087 Miller, Lee D Miller, Melissa K Miller, Nicholas J , 0449, 0503, 0642, 778 Miller, Robert J Miller, Ross H... D029, D059 Miller, Sally A...03 Miller, Thomas A... D0556 Miller, Tom L... D0503 Miller, W. Allen Miller-Pierce, Mailea Mills, Andy... D0503 Mills, Mary Mills, Nicholas J , 0430, 065, 0836 Minakawa, Noboru , D0229 Mineau, Pierre , D0559 Minteer, Carey R , 0658 Minter, Logan M , 0599, 44 Miranda, Marcelo P Mireji, Paul O...04 Misof, Bernhard Miss, Irma...27 Missun, Traci... D0503 Mitchell, Paula Levin Mitchell, Robert F...56 Mitchell, Stuart Mittapalli, Omprakash...030, 0452, 620 Mitter, Charles...33, 34 Miwa, Kentaro...025, 0506 Mo, Ying Moar, William Mochizuki, Atsushi... D0289 Mock, Karen Mogren, Christina Loraine Mohajer, Yasha J Mohamad, Nurhafiza Mohan Rao, Korada... VP08 Mohankumar, S Mohd Sabri, Mohd Shukri Molina-Martínez, Arcángel...27 Mollhagen, Ariel Mollhagen, Noelle P Mollá Hernández, Óscar Moltzan, Bruce...50 Monaenkova, Daria Mondal, Shaonpius , 053, 054 Mongold-Diers, Judy A Monsempes, Christelle Montagné, Nicolas Montgomery, Michael...75, 76 Montgomery, Wayne S... D036 Montoya, Augusto L... D062 Monzo, Cesar Moon, Roger D... D0425 Moon, Yil Sung...D0369, D0479, D0480 Moore, Allen J Moore, Darrell , 285, 300, 589, 590, 59, D000, D002, D003, D0068, D0336 Moore, Frank... D0047 Moore, Sarah Moore, Wendy Moorhead, D. J Moorman, Chris , D0343 Moraes, Maria CB... D0303 Morales-Ramos, Juan A...D0293, D0445 Morales-Rodriguez, Anuar... 38, D05 Moran, Patrick J... D0344 Morandin, Lora Morawo, Tolulope O... D059 Moreau, Corrie S , 0809 Moreno, Carlos A Morey, Amy C , D003 Morgan, Alan L... D042 Morgan, J. Kent , 0628, D037 Morgan, Jeanelle M... D0236 Moriarty, Thomas Morin, Randall S...659, 660, 665 Morita, Shelah...033, 363 Moriya, Seiichi... D0308 Morningstar, Rebecca J... D0052 Morreale, Rachel... D0234 Morris, E. Erin Morris, Natalie C...72 Morris, Paul...96 Morrison, William R Morse, Geoffrey , 004 Morse, John Morse, Ronald D... D056 Mosca, Laurel A... D003 Moser, John C Moser, Susan Moser, W. Keith Moses, Nathan J... D0545 Mostafa, Ayman... D0470 Mostek, Carmen... D0006 Mota-Sanchez, David , 0445 Mott, Brendon Mottern, Jason Moulton, John K...04, 366 Mound, Laurence Moyer, James... D0577 Mueller, Andreas Mueller, Geoffrey Mueller, Shannon C... D0490 Mugleston, Joseph D Muilenburg, Vanessa L , D027 Mujica, Norma... VP5 Mukherjee, Nabanita... D0047 Mullens, Bradley A...008, 083 Mullin, Chris Mullins, Aaron Mullins, Donald E , D0238, D0438 Mullins, Kody , 0822, 0967, D0296 Mullins, Walt Mullis, Damon Muniappan, Rangaswamy Munoz, Patricio Munson, A. Steven Munyaneza, Joseph E , D0554 Murphy, Alexzandra F Murphy, Charles Murray, Elizabeth Murray, M. J... D0578 Murrell, Ebony G...39 Muruvanda, Devaiah A...59 Musetti, Luciana... 37, D033 Musli, Iris Musmeci, Sergio...24 Musser, Fred R , 0505, 0508, 0604, 0630, D0538 Mustafa, Fatima... D075, D09 Mutters, Randall Muturi, Ephantus J...236, 237 Muñiz-Merino, Manolo... D0278 Muñoz, Sofia I... D0062 Myers, Scott W , 2, 3, 9, 507, D0509, VP4 Myers, Thomas V Myles, Kevin M... D028 Nachappa, Punya...08 Nachman, Ronald J Nadel, Hannah , D032 Naegle, Michael A Nagaraju, Javaregowda Nagoshi, Rodney...02 Nair, C. R. M Nair, Suresh... D047 Naithani, Kusum J... D0275 Nakai, Shuichi... D049 Nakamura, Satoshi... D0289 Nam, Hwa Yeun... D07 Nansen, Christian...780, 788 Narain, Ralph Naranjo, Steven , 783, 787, 79 Nardi, Francesco Narva, Kenneth... 55, D0248 Nason, John D Nathan, Sengottayan Senthil... D0496 Natwick, Eric T Nauen, Ralf , 049, 403, 435, 587 Naug, Dhruba , 46 Nault, Brian A , 0547, 0657, 0797 Nava, Kenneth... D

185 Author Index Author Index Navarrete, Jose Bernardo... D000 Navarro, Lucio Nay, Justin E , 0548, D0239, D054 Nayduch, Dana , 077, 534, 743 Naylor, Rosamond L Neal, Joe... D054 Nearns, Eugenio H...88 Nechols, James R... D0558 Neese, Paul Neff, Richard Nehme, Maya Nelson, David R... D009 Nelson, Lori J , 566, D0325, D0352 Nelson, Peter Neven, Lisa G...3, 9 Neves, Clóvis Andrade... D0225 Neves, P. M. O. J... D0543 Newman, Thomas C...54 Newton, Alfred F Newton, Blake L Newton, Joy L Nguyen, Nga Ni, Xinzhi...089, 775 Nichols, Becky Nichols, Lauren M , D035 Nicholson, Scott... D0495, D0525 Niedbala, Jack C , D034 Nieh, James C Nielsen, Anne L , 024, 425, D0535 Niogret, Jerome... D036, D0322 Niu, Ying , 332, 786, D049, D0446 Nix, Katheryne , 066, D0487 Nixon, Jonathan Niño, Angie A Niño, Elina L Nkunika, P. O. Y Nmor, Jephtha Christopher Nobles, Sarah Noblet, Raymond Nolting, Steve P... D0489 Nomura, Yoshiko... D0087, D024 Normark, Benjamin B , 029 Noronha, Christine...35 Northfield, Tobin Nosil, Patrik Nowak, John T Nowatzki, Tim Nuessly, Gregg S Nunes, Lina...95 Nunez, Sonia C Nuringtyas, Tri Rini... VP3 Nuss, Andrew... D0450 Nuss, Matthias...33 Nyoike, Teresia Nystrom Santacruz, Erica C... D0379 O Brochta, David , D0073 O Connor, Barry... D043 O Donnell, Katie O Donnell, Sean , 456, 578 O Leary, Patricia F O Neal, Matthew E , 0523, 0587, 0598, 706, D005, D07, D057 O Neal, Paul A...39 O Neill, Ruth... D05 O Rourke, Megan E...00 Obadi, Obadi... D0236 Obando, Johanna Obear, Glen R , 762 Ober, Karen Ann... D0205 Oboyski, Peter T Obrycki, John J Ochoa, Ronald , D040 Ode, Paul J Odubiyi, Steven... D057 Odvody, Gary N... D0488 Oetting, Ron D...67 Ogilvie, Jane E Ohrn, Amanda Oi, David , 27, D0422 Oi, Faith M , 0386 Okelana, Feyisara Abiodun Okusu, Akiko Okwonkwo, Ego U... D0473 Olafson, Pia Untalan , 743, D0427, D0444 Olfert, Owen O Oliveira, Luiz Orlando... D0360 Oliver, Jason B , D0300, D0325, D0484, D058, D053, D0564 Oliver, Kerry M , 083 Oliver, Melvin J Olsen, Jeff Olsen, Nora Olson, Brian D Olson, Calla... D0020 Olson, Dawn M Olson, Steve...D069, D0575, D0577 Onken, Brad...72, 73 Onstad, David...03 Opatovsky, Itai Opit, George P..0458, 062, D043, D0473, D0566 Orbán, L. L... VP27 Orellana, Luis Ricardo , D076 Orr, David , D0343 Ortigao, Marcelo Ortiz-Urquiza, Almudena , 020 Osborne, Jason... D073 Osborne, Lance S...069, 0799, 028, D0405, D0536 Osisioma, O Osswald, Judith , 0999 Ostiguy, Nancy , 437 Ostlie, Kenneth Oswald, John D...06 Oswalt, Christopher , 655, 658 Oswalt, Sonja N Oten, Kelly F Otitodun, Grace O... D0473 Ott, Daniel S... D063, D079 Overall, Lisa M Overholt, William A , 0992 Overton, E Owen, Christopher L , 0723 Owens, Carrie Owens, David R Owens, Elizabeth Owings, Charity G , D043 Ownley, Bonnie Oyediran, Isaac Pace, Rebecca C Paetzold, Li Page, Robert E Paige, Ken N Palavesam, Azhahianambi Palli, Subba R , 385, 405, 62 Pallipparambil, Godshen Robert , D0497 Palmer, Nathan... D0530 Palmer, William A , 702 Palumbo, John C Pan, Hsuan-Jen Pan, Zaiqi...03, 09 Pandey, Raju R...463, 466 Paniagua, Miguel R...29, 292 Panikowski, A Papa, Jacklyn... D0257 Pape, Thomas Pappu, Hanu Paradell, Susana Liria... D0608 Paradis, Anne Paradise, Mark S...070, 546 Parajulee, Megha N...463, 464 Parakh, Shilpa Park, Chang-Gyu... D078 Park, Christina...0 Park, Ikju , 054, 352 Park, Ji Hyun , D0095 Park, Jong-Seok... D083 Park, Jung-Joon... D0348 Park, Kun woong... D0203 Park, Marana , D07, D078 Park, Mia G...004, 0484 Park, Yong-Lak...350, D008, D044, D0346 Park, Yoonseong , 0465, D0064, D0464 Park, Youngjin... D0256 Parker, Nicole S Parker, Roy Parkman, J. Patrick... 74, D0368 Parr, Cynthia...34 Parra, José R. P...54 Parry, Dylan , D033, D095 Parry, Hazel R Parys, Katherine A... D0385 Paschen, Matthew A... 47, D064 Passoa, Steven Paszkiewicz, Steven R...33 Patch, Harland M Patel, Jayshree Pati, Supriya... D009 Patnaude, Michael Patrick, Kevin R Patt, Joseph Patterson, Courtney... D0353 Patton, MacKenzie F... D008 Paudel, Sunil Paul, Deborah Paul, Michael J Paula-Moraes, Silvana V... D0568 Paull, Cate Paulsen, David , 0372, D0233 Paulson, Sally , 0363 Pavuk, Daniel M... D039 Payne, Daniel D... D0226 Peace, Cameron Peace, Hannah , 0372, D0233 Peairs, Frank B... D0584 Pearse, Ian S Pearson, Cole Pearson, Dean E Pechal, Jennifer L , 090, 740 Peck, Daniel C Pedersen, Jeffery F... D055 Pederson, Lee Peiffer, Michelle , D0455 Pelini, Shannon L...029, 577 Pelletier, Julien... D0459 Pelz-Stelinski, Kirsten S , 0856, 0898, 27 Pence, J. Akers... D0273 Pendleton, Bonnie B , 622, D0472 Pendleton, Michael W... D0472 Penn, Hannah J... D0098 Penn, Jerrod M Pereira, Eliseu Jose G... D0365 Pereira, Roberto M , 380 Perera, Omaththage P , 0793, D0084 Perez de Leon, Adalberto Perez Silva, Lisiane... D0542 Perez, Y... D0552 Perez-Bedoya, Jose Leandro Perkins, Diane... D0503 Perkins, Kevin... D0592 Perlman, Steve Pernal, Stephen F Perrimon, Norbert Perring, Tom... D05 Perrone, Julia Perry, Kayla I Pessino, Massimo Peter, McGhee Peters, Jeff... D0273 Petersen, Jessica D Petersen, Matthew J...04 Peterson, A. Townsend Peterson, Brittany F Peterson, Julie A Peterson, Robert K. D...080, 634 Pettis, Jeff , 549 Petty, Bryan Petzold-Maxwell, Jennifer L Pezar, Seth... D004 Peña, Jorge E , 0624, 256, D000 Pfammatter, Jesse A , 394 Pfeiffer, Douglas G , 0568, 090, 465, D00, D0474 Pfrender, Michael Pham, Ngoc N... D0080 Phelan, Larry Philips, Christopher R... D056 83

186 Author Index Author Index Phillips, Ben W , D038 Phillips, Mark...D000, D002, D0068 Phillips, Polly K... D0408 Phillips, Thomas W , 0459, 0465, 056 Pick, David A Pickering, John... D0375 Picollo, Maria I...03 Pierce, Naomi E Pierce, Randall Pietrantonio, Patricia V...686, 80 Pike, Keith S... 36, D059 Pilcher, Clinton D , 438, 482, 635 Pilkay, Grant L Pimenta, Jéssica Fernanda... D0263 Pimsler, Meaghan L , 364, D043 Pinero, Jaime C , 042, 043 Pinheiro, Veneraldo... D0565 Piraneo, Tara... D0096 Pittendrigh, Barry R , 68, D0059, D067 Pitts, James P , 0203, 075, 0736 Pitts-Singer, Theresa L...003, 279 Pitzer, Jimmy B...04, 744 Pizzichini, Massimo... D0259 Plotkin, David M Plouffe, Dominique... D0283 Plowes, Rob M Plowright, C. M. S... VP27 Plowright, R. C... VP27 Pochubay, Emily... D074, D0535 Poelchau, Monica... D0466 Poff, N. LeRoy Pohedra, Joseph J... D0222 Poindexter, Derick Polanczyk, Ricardo Antonio , D0025, D0547 Poland, Therese M , 5, D0477, D0478, D048, D0482, D0483 Polaszek, Andrew...37 Poletika, Nick Polk, Dean... 09, D0524 Pollock, David Pollock... D0595 Pontikakos, Costas... VP2, VP25 Pook, Victoria G Poole, Toni L Poplin, Ashley V... D09 Portell, Roger W... D0388 Porter, Pat... D0582 Porter, Sanford D Portillo, Hector , 407, 434 Portman, Scott L Pote, John... D0535 Potter, Bruce D Potter, Daniel A , 0855, 652 Potter, Kevin M Potter, Michael F , 20, 23, 385, 439, D0046 Pound, J. Mat , D0430 Poveda, Katja Powell, Charles A...042, 0462, 0628, D0536 Powell, Chris M... D0004, D007 Powell, James , 56 Powell, Scott Powell, Steve D...D0475, D0485, D0587 Prabhakar, C. J... VP08 Prabhaker, Nilima... 40, D05 Prado, Julia Prado, Sara...63 Prager, Sean M , 788, D0570 Prajzner, Scott P , D038 Prasifka, Jarrad , D0335 Prasifka, Patricia , 328, 329, D0489 Pratt, Stephen C , 035 Preisser, Evan L , D0284, D0299, D044 Premaratne, Ranjan... D048 Preston, Kristine Pretorius, Rudolph Johannes Previte, Domenic J... D0059 Price, David P Price, James F Price, Joel R , D055 Price, Michele B... D0043 Pringle, Elizabeth G Prischmann-Voldseth, Deirdre A , D0526, D057 Prisco, Gennaro DI Prochaska, Travis J , D0530 Pronschinske, Wade , D0559 Pszczolkowski, Maciej A , D056 Puche, Helena... D0209 Puckett, Gwyn L Puckett, Robert T , 737 Puerta, Dewalf... D0236 Pulakkatu-Thodi, Ishakh , D020, D0553 Pulig, Cassandra... D0275 Pulsinelli, Gary Pumphrey, Michael... D057 Purcell-Miramontes, Mary Pureswaran, Deepa S Puterka, Gary J... D0495, D0525 Pyati, Prashant S...78 Pérez de León, Adalberto A..0377, D0444, D0454 Qian, Michael Quacchia, Ambra... D0308 Quemada, Hector D Quesada, Carlos , D043 Quick, Jim Quigley, Rita... D0240 Quiring, Dan Quito-Avila, D. F... D0572 Qureshi, Jawwad A , 243, 332, D049, D054, D065, D0304, D0446 Qureshi, Naveeda A , D044 Racke, Ken Radville, Laura , D0284 Radwell, Andrea , 449 Radzmi, Elana... D0440 Raffa, Kenneth F , 0542, D023, D026 Rafter, Jamie L... D044 Ragsdale, David W...52 Rahlwes, Brent C , D084 Raikhel, Alexander S...73 Raila, David... D0605 Raja Jamil, Raja Zalinda... D068 Rajapakse, R. P. V. Jayanthe... D048 Rajarapu, Swapna Priya Rajotte, Edwin G... D0235, D0275 Ramalho, Dagmara Gomes , D0329, D0547 Ramalho-Ortigao, Marcelo Ramaseshadri, Parthasarathy...069, 070, 554 Ramirez, Dominique... D0545 Ramirez, Gerson Ramirez, Ricardo A , 25, 252, D022 Ramm, Crystal M Ramos, J , 270 Ramos, Mariangie Ramos, Mark E...62 Rana, Neha Rand, Tatyana Randle, Christopher P Randolph, KaDonna C Randolph, Terri... D0584 Rane, Karen... D054 Rangasamy, Murugesan Rangel, Juliana , 28 Ranger, Christopher M , 59, D0300, D0484, D058, D053, D0564 Ransom, Corey V Rao, Sujaya Rapti, Zoi Rashed, Arash Rashid, Tahir...27 Rasmann, Sergio Rasmussen, Claus Rasool, Khawaja Ghulam , D046 Rasoolizadeh, Asieh Rastok, Ryan Raszick, Tyler...07 Ratcliffe, Brett C...028, 0220 Ratcliffe, Susan...07 Rauf, Aunu Raupach, Georg S Raupp, Michael J...023, 260 Ravoet, Jorgen Ray, Ann M...53, 563 Ray, Charles H Rayapati, Naidu Raychoudhury, Rhitoban... D0460 Raymundo, Maia... D029 Razavi, Elisabeth... VP20 Razi, Sabah... D0563 Razze, Janine Read, Harry Reagan, T. E , 0557, 0820,440 Reagel, Peter F Reall, Tamra... D0058 Realpe, Emilio Reay-Jones, Francis P. F , 0566, 0584, 785, D020 Rebek, Eric J Reberg-Horton, S. Chris , D0343 Reboletti, Danielle Rector, Brian G Redak, R. A , D0596 Reddick, Kristie Reding, Michael E...084, D0300, D0484, D058, D053, D0564 Redmond, Carl T Reed, David...03 Reed, Janis , 0942 Reed, Sharon E , 565 Reese, John C , 0585, D053, D0532 Reeve, Jennifer R Reeve, John D Reeves, Alison M Regier, Jerome C...33, 34 Rehan, Sandra M...002, 0937 Rehill, Brian... D03 Reid, William R... D0092 Reifenrath, William Reis, Tania...76 Reisig, Dominic R , 785, D020, D05 Reiskind, Michael H...D0050, D099, D026 Reitz, Stuart... 47, D0575 Remmers, Jeffrey... D0488 Rendon, Jessica K , D0074 Resasco, Julian Resende, Fabio... D0435 Resh, Vincent H Rest, Joshua Restom Gaskill, Douglas A...5 Reuter, K. Chris... D0546, D0548 Reyna, Steven Michael Reynolds, Alan Reynolds, Julie A... D0466 Reynolds, Ryan... D00 Reynoso-Velasco, Daniel , D040 Rhea, J. Rusty , 0867, 0875, 73, 74, 57, D037, D0206 Rhoades, Paul Raymond... D006 Rhodes, Elena M Riasat, Tahira Ribeiro, Lilian M. S... D0237 Ribera, Luis... D0522 Rice, Kevin Rice, Marlin E , 482, 635 Rice, Robin Richards, Stephen Richardson, Jesse M...025, 0255 Richman, Dina , 209 Riddick, Eric W , D0293 Riddiford, Lynn M Riddle, Joseph Samuel , D074 Ridley, Emma Ridling, Sayde... D0407 Riegel, Claudia , 0950, D0005 Riehle, Michael A... D0220 Rieske Kinney, Lynne , D0352 Rieske-Kinney, Lynne K , D0589, D060 Riffell, Samuel K Riggins, John J , 0490, 0640 Rightmyer, Molly Rijal, Jhalendra P..060, 462, 470, 763, D02 Riles, Michael... D025 Riley, David G , 526, 75, D0088, D0577 Riley, Edward G Rill, Stephanie M... D0327 Rincon, Diego F

187 Author Index Author Index Rinehart, Joseph... D0253, D0254 Ring, Dennis R... D042 Rios, Alfredo...59 Risser, Kyle Rivaldi, Chissa-Louise Rivera Vega, Loren... D060 Rivera, Julio... VP32 Rivera, Laura N Rivera, Monique J Rivera-Rivera, Carlos Rivers, David B... D0432 Robbins, Paul S...269, 60 Roberts, Andrew F...023, 07 Roberts, Dana C Roberts, Donald W... D0548 Roberts, Phillip M Roberts, Stephen P...037, 0466, 09 Robertson, Derek J... D0078 Robertson, Desiree R...70 Robertson, Hugh M , 592 Robertson, James A Robideau, Xandra Robinson, Amanda M... D029 Robinson, Andrew E Robinson, Gene E , 54 Robison, Brett... D038 Robles-Rios, Carlos A... D068 Rochon, Kateryn... D02 Roda, Amy L...55 Roderick, George K , 0727 Rodrigues, Jose Carlos V , 256, D098 Rodriguez, Bree A Rodriguez, Juanita...020, 0736 Rodriguez, Stacy D... D005 Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar.. 024, 0574, 0720, 368, D06, D0363, D0524 Rodstrom, R. Andrew Roehrdanz, Richard L... D0402 Rogers, Devon A Rogers, Mary Rogers, Michael E , 0860, D0372 Rogg, Helmuth W...602, 603 Rojas, M. Guadalupe... D0293, D0445 Romeis, Jörg... 09, 025, 783, 787, 79 Romero, Alvaro Romero-Verdin, Gabriela Rondon, Silvia I...262, 52 Rong, J. I Rorie, Robert L...33 Rosa, Cristina Rosario-Lebron, Armando Rosas-Garcia, Ninfa M Rose, Sarah... D038 Rosell, Rosemarie... D00 Rosen, Gail Rosengaus, Rebeca B , 0422, 0424, 58 Rosenheim, Jay A Rosero, Myriam Rosillo, Araceli... D080 Ross, Chelsea R...584, 585 Ross, Darrell W...085, 77 Ross, Kristen A Ross, Laura Rotenberry, John Roth, Greg Rothery, Jessica E... D0208 Roubos, Craig R , 0984, 048, D0524 Roush, Rick Roy, Helen Royer, Tom A , D0580 Ruberson, John R...048, 0654, 0973 Rubin, Benjamin E. R... D0404 Rudramuni, Chethan... D038 Ruen, Dave Rueppell, Olav...045, 460, 549 Rugman-Jones, Paul F , 502 Ruiz Cancino, Enrique...24 Rule, Dwain M , 329, D0489, D0537, D0555 Rupp, Stuart... D0043 Rush, Charles M Russell, Jacob A , 0809, 289, 578 Russell, Richard C... VP29 Rust, Michael K Ryan, Shawna... D0054 Rypstra, Ann L Saarinen, Emily V Sacks, David Sadler, Emily A , 075 Sadof, Clifford S , 0597, 0840, 0847, 57, D043 Saeed, Abiya , 053 Saenz, Mayra Saenz, Virna Sagel, Agustin Sagili, Ramesh R... D009 Sainsbury, Frank Saito, Taro Sakala, Catherine Saleemi, Sarah T Salom, Scott M , 69, 70, 72, 75, 342, D025, D0238 Salunke, Prakash Rumu...537, VP04 Sambaraju, Kishan Samietz, Jörg... VP20 Samler, Jessica , D0562 Sammataro, Diana...28 Sammons, Bernard... D0492 Samota, Patricia... D0026 Sampson, Blair , D0499 Sanborn, Allen... 2, D0408 Sances, Frank Sanchez, Norma...53 Sanchez-Cordero, Victor Sanchez-Herrera, Melissa Sancomb, Elizabeth J... D0347 Sanders, Jon G Sanders, Nathan J , 0993, D035, D0353, D064 Sanderson, John P...64, 68 Sandhu, Hardev Sanford, Michelle Sant Ana, Josué... D0303 Santangelo, Richard G...095, 382 Santiago-Jiménez, Quiyari Jatzé Santoro, Patricia... D0543 Santos, Katia Santos, Rafael Ferreira , D0023, D058, D0282, D0329 Saona-Rodriguez, Cesar Sapio, Frank Sappington, Thomas W Sarath, Gautam , D0529, D0530 Sarkar, Sahotra Sarmiento, Francisco...27 Sarmiento-Cordero, Mariza A Sarvary, Mark Saski, Christopher A Sasso, Raffaele...24 Satar, Gul... D024 Satar, Serdar...36 Sattler, Scott E... D055 Saunders, Daniel... D038 Savage, Amy Savinelli, Caydee Savino, André G... D0434 Savopoulou-Soultani, Matilda... VP22 Sawyer, Alan J Scates, Sara S... D0080, D0085 Schaafsma, Arthur W , D0573 Schaberg, Paul G... D079 Schade, Michael... D0493 Schaffner, Urs Schal, Coby.03, 033, 0368, 0402, 095, 382, 594 Schallhart, Nikolaus...34 Schapaugh, William T... D053 Scharf, Michael E..0305, 033, 0444, 045, 072, 090, D057 Schartel, Tyler E Schaub, Lukas... VP20 Schell, Kyle Schell, Scott P... D0546 Schellhorn, Nancy A , 792, D0549 Scherder, Eric Scherer, Clay...29 Schiff, Nathan M... 47, D0380 Schlothauer, Rob... D0548, D0574 Schlyter, Fredrik...595, 600 Schmehl, Daniel R Schmid, Ryan B Schmidt, Chris Schmidt, Jason M , D0028, D0033 Schmidt, Justin Schmidt, Rebecca Schmitz, Oswald Schneider, John C... D0439 Schneider, Stanley S Schneider, William Schneidmiller, Rod G Schoenthal, Cassie A Scholes, Daniel R Scholtens, Brian G... D0387 Schrader, Preston M...050, 0635 Schreiber, Ulrich...572, 573 Schroeder, Ashley M... D023 Schuler, Mary Schultz, Peter B... D0300, D0484, D058, D053, D0564 Schultz, Tor P Schwartzberg, Ezra G Schwarz, Joseph Jeffrey , D052 Schwarzländer, Mark.0480, 352, D0029, D0030, D0074, D055 Schöller, Matthias Sconiers, Warren B Scott, Clare H Scott, Jarrod J Scott, Jeffrey G...64 Scott, John W... D0577 Scott, Max , 609 Scott, Tessa M... D0029, D0030 Scully, Brian Scully, Erin D , 547 Seago, Ainsley E Seagraves, Michael Seal, Dakshina R...76 Sears, Sheila G... D0402 Sedlacek, John D... D0324, D0326 Segers, G...069, 554 Sehgal, Blossom Sehgal, Ravinder N. M Seier, Edith.284, 285, 584, 585, 59, D000, D003, D0068, D0336 Seiter, Nicholas J Selby, Roger Duncan Sellers, Michael... D0047 Selmi, Marco... D024 Sen, Ruchira... D0462 Sendoya, Carlos Senia, Gabriele...24 Senn, Robert Sensenig, Andrew... D0406 Sermeno, Jose Miguel...29, 292 Serrano, Leopoldo...29, 292 Setamou, Mamoudou , 086, 268 Sethi, Amit , 045, 090, 096 Setliff, Gregory Seufferheld, Manfredo J... D030 Sexton, Timothy R Seybold, Steven J..502, 503, 504, 505, 566, 567, D0032, D0325, D0486 Sforza, René Shaffer, Lindsay Shaffer, Zachary Shahan, Thomas Shahraki, Gholam Hossein... VP0, VP03 Shakya, Kandara... D043 Shakya, Nisha , D0566 Shao, Honglian... D0072 Shapiro, Arthur M Shapiro, Irina Shapiro-Ilan, David , D0445 Sharaby, Aziza Sharaf, Mostafa R... D0395 Sharanowski, Barbara J ,

188 Author Index Author Index Sharkey, Michael J...098, 0699, 0722 Sharma, Richa... D0223 Sharma, Shweta Sharp, Robert E Shatters, Robert G..0238, 042, 0462, 0628, 0865, 028, D037, D0405 Shaw, John D Shaw, Mike Shearer, Peter W , 0907, 0908, 0909 Sheehan, Timothy Sheffield, Cynthia L Shelomi, Matan , 056 Shelton, Anthony M... 02, 0796, 0797, 429, 783, 787, 79 Shelton, Thomas... D0420 Shen, Jun , 0658 Shen, Wen-Kai... D0249 Shepherd, Natalie... D0320 Shepherd, William P , D0078 Sheppard, Walter S , 0777, 0784, D006 Sherrod, Daniel W Shetlar, David J...039, 079 Shields, Elson J Shik, Jonathan Shik, Jonathan Z Shikano, Ikkei... VP33 Shimada, Hiroshi... D049 Shin, Chulwoo Shinde, Vishal Shipp, Les Shirazi, Kambiz Karimzadeh... VP0 Shirk, Paul...03 Shiyake, Shigehiko...73 Shockley Cruz, Marianne... D000 Shoemaker, DeWayne , D0422 Shoemaker, Kevin...04 Short, Andrew... 00, D0040 Short, Brent D...02, 604 Showalter, David... D027 Shrestha, Anita Shrestha, Deepak , 053 Shrestha, Ram B...462, 467 Shreve, Scott M Shrewsbury, Paula M , 568 Shufran, Andrine A Shukla, Jayendra Sial, Ashfaq A...249, 522 Siamasonta, B Sidhu, C. Sheena... D002 Siebert, Melissa Willrich Siegel, Joel Siegfried, Blair D , 067, 0324, 0326, 0429, 043, 0448, 0585, 070, 333, 55, 634, 778, D0082, D0090, D0246, D0250, D0468 Sigmon, Elisha Sikes, Derek S... D0407 Silcox, Diane E Silk, Peter J... 52, 569, D0307, D0476 Sillett, Scott... D079 Silliman, Christina A Silva, Henrique M. R... D0565 Silva, Isabel Silva, Jefferson E... D0237 Silva, Jose G... D0565 Silva, Wellington M... D0237 Silverman, Jules...03, 033 Sime, Karen R... D028, D04 Simmons, Alvin M , D058 Simmons, Gregory S Simmons, Nick Simo, Ladislav... D0064 Simon, Chris , 0339, 309 Simone-Finstrom, Michael Simonsen, Thomas...33 Sims, Christopher M Sinclair, Bradley J Singer, Michael S Singh, Baneshwar , 0903 Singh, Harvir Singh, Manvender... D0223 Singh, Narinderpal...26, 379 Singleton, Lauren A Sinha, Deepak Kumar... D047 Siqueira, Herbert Alvaro Abreu... D0237 Sissel, Blake Sisson, Melissa S...3, D0042, D084, D0200 Sites, Robert W... D040, D042 Sivakoff, Frances S Sivinski, John...25 Six, Diana Skeen-Esterheld, Heather... D00 Skelley, Paul Skidmore, Amanda Skiff, Jeffrey , 0733, 533 Skinner, John A Skoda, S. R , D0424, D0429 Skvarla, Michael Skyrm, Kimberly Slack, Jeffrey Slater, Russell Smagghe, Guy Smart, Matthew Smith, Adrian A...588, 596 Smith, Andrew B. T Smith, Andrew H Smith, Ben C Smith, Chelsea , D038 Smith, Erik A Smith, Hugh A Smith, Ian Smith, J. Powell , D0577 Smith, James D Smith, James J...36 Smith, Jason D Smith, Jason. A Smith, Jeffrey R Smith, Jocelyn L... D0573 Smith, Jonathan Smith, Lincoln...698, 768 Smith, Michael T... D0334, D0337 Smith, Michelle S Smith, Nathalie D... D059 Smith, Rhonda... D05 Smith, Steven Joel... D048 Smith, T. P... D0578 Smith, Tom... D0387 Smith, Trevor R...47 Smith, Wendy Smith, William D Smitley, David , 0844 Smyth, Linda A Smyth, Rebecca Smythe, Brandon G Snodgrass, Gordon Snyder, John... D0387 Snyder, William E , 0593, 240 Soberón, Mario Sobh, Nahil... D0605 Sobh, Omar... D0605 Soderstrum, Gerald , 0295, 0296, 0298 Soghigian, John , D0048, D0065 Sohl-Smith, Laura... D0399 Sohn, Jae-Cheon...34 Solis, M. Alma...29, 33 Solodovnikov, Alexey Solter, Leellen , 0780 Song, Hojun.0425, 0677, 0689, 07, 072, 306, 344 Song, Jeong Heub... D0357 Song, Jin Sun...349, 35 Song, Jinbo Song, Qisheng...D0072, D0447, D0449 Song, YuanYuan... D0290 Sonye, George O... D0229 Soper, Alysha M...06 Soper, Anna L... D0330 Sorensen, Kenneth A , 0082 Sorensen, Mary A... D0230 Soroka, Juliana J Soroker, Victoria Sotiroudas, Vasilis Souder, Steven K Sousa, Fernanda Freitas... D0365 Souza, Carina Mara... D0437 Spacht, Drew... D004 Spafford, Helen Spagna, Joseph C... D065 Spaner, Dean M... D047 Sparks, Alton N , D0295, D0577 Sparks, T. C Spear, Allyn Spears, Lori R Spence, Amy J Spencer, Joseph L , D030 Spencer, Terence A , D0082 Spitler, Hollis G , 045, D0533 Spivak, Marla , 0432, 0472, 0777, 0785 Spomer, Neil Sponsler, Douglas B Srigiriraju, Lakshmipathi Srinivasan, Rajagopalbabu , 526, 758, 80 Srivastava, Mrittunjai... D0575 Srygley, Robert B , D0252 St. Leger, Raymond J , D0045 St. Sean, Jack... D020 Staeben, J. C Stamm, Mitchell Stamper, Trevor I... D0433 Stamps, William Terrell... D0309 Stanley, David W... D09 Stanley, Margaret Stansly, Philip A , 0544, 0859, 243, 267, 520, D054, D065, D0304 Stanton, Taylor Starcher, Brenda... D0236 Stark, John D Staten, Robert... D0545 Staudacher, Karin...34 Steckel, Sandy Stedenfeld, Shelby E Stedfast, Molly L...22 Steffey, Kevin , D0505 Steiner, Warren E...87 Steinkraus, Donald C Stelinski, Lukasz, L..0332, 0794, 0898, 04, 269, D025 Stenger, Drake C Stephen, Fred M...049, 0502, 662 Stephens, David...45 Stephens, Erica P Stephenson, Andrew G , 0573 Stevens, Bruce R...06 Stevens, Elanor D... D0590 Stevens, Lawrence E Steward, Victor B Stewart, C. Neal Stewart, Scott D , 0507, 483 Stireman, John O Stoa, Bente... D0602 Stojsin, Duska... D0247, D049 Stoltman, Lyndsie , 042, 50, D0542 Stone, Julie M Stone, William... D0593 Stoops, C. A Storer, Andrew J , D032 Storer, Nicholas... 07, 327, 328, 329, 430, D0489, D0537 Story, R. N... D0578 Stout, Joe Stout, Michael J , 0643, D0496 Stouthamer, Richard , 294, 502, D0330 Strand, M. R , 0440, 0457, 0752, D006, D0070, D046 Strand, Micheline Strange, James , D002 Strecker, R , 0295, 0296, 0298, D038 Strickland, Michael Strickland, Tim Strickman, Daniel A...083, 70 Striman, Becca L...56 Stroeymeyt, Nathalie Strohm, Christopher J Stuart, Jeff J Stuart, Robin J... D0328 Stuble, Katharine L , D

189 Author Index Author Index Stumpf, Christof F Styrsky, John D... D0342 Stöckli, Sibylle... VP Su, Nan-Yao.0393, 0394, 0947, 0953, 0958, 582, 583, D0067 Suarez, Andrew V..0470, 067, 0673, 473, 574, 596, D065 Subedi, Bhishma Sublett, Clayton A... D082 Subramanyam, Bhadriraju...047, 037 Subramanyam, Subhashree... D068 Suckling, D. Max Sudbrink, Donald Suits, Rachel... D05 Sullivan, Brian T , D0078 Sully, Jessica Suman, Devi S Sun, Jing Sunahara, Toshihiko Sundaraj, Sivamani...80 Sussky, Elizabeth M... D040 Sutherland, Ian Suwannapong, Guntima Svenson, Gavin J...069, 307, VP32 Swain, Matthew S Swale, Daniel R Swan, Chris M Swanson, Dustin A , D0604 Sweeney, Jon... 52, 559, D0307, D0476 Sweeney, Kevin Swift, Ian... 53, D022 Sword, Greg , 084 Syed, Zainulabeuddin , 084 Szalanski, Allen L , D0035, D0332 Szczepaniec, Adrianna...45 Sze, Sing-Hoi Szendrei, Zsofia , 0650, 0720, D0453 Szyndler, Megan W...23 Sáenz, Laura Sánchez y Gándara, Arturo... D0383 Sääksjärvi, Ilari E Tabashnik, Bruce , 0 Taekul, Charuwat...37 Tagu, Denis Taha, A. M...39 Takano, Shun-ichiro... D0289 Takasu, Keiji , D0289 Takác, Peter...05 Talamas, Elijah , 37 Talley, Justin L..040, 062, D0050, D0056, D0566 Talley, Mary Tamborindeguy, Cecilia.0306, 047, 08, D005 Tan, Jianguo...070, 546 Tan, Sek Yee... D0246, D0248 Tang, Guolei... D0545 Tanigoshi, Lynell K , 0907, 045, D0297, D0533 Tanis, Sara R... D029 Tanner, David A... D0400 Tanner, Latasha D Tarai, Nacer...45 Tarasov, Sergei , 00 Tarone, Aaron M , 0897, 0900, 090, 0903, 364, 740, D043 Tarpy, David R...008, 28, 549 Tashpulatova, Barno... D0306 Tatarnic, Nikolai J...297, 359 Tatem, Andrew Tatiossian, Kristina J... D0032 Tatman, Daria... D0334 Tatman, Kathy... D0349 Tauber, Catherine A Tawer, Ahmed D... D0474 Taylor, Adam M Taylor, Brad W Taylor, David B...05, 748 Taylor, Glenn...57 Taylor, Phil... D0349 Taylor, Steven J Taylor-Wilson, Rebecca Tchakerian, Maria D Teal, Peter E. A , 03 Teale, Stephen...54 Tebeau, Andrew S Teixeira, Luis Teixeira, Thaís Patrícia M... D0365 Temeyer, Kevin B , D0444, D0454 Templar, Pamela H... D079 Terblanche, John... D0243 Terriquez, Joel A Teskey, Robert O Tewksbury, Joshua J Thairu, Margaret W Thayer, Margaret K , 000 Thibert-Plante, Xavier...06 Thielert, Wolfgang Thistlewood, Howard M. A Thomas, Annie Thomas, Donald B... D0344 Thomas, James D..025, 0252, 0255, 0259, 0260, 047 Thomas-Odjo, Agnes Thompson, E Thompson, James F Thompson, Stephen D Thompson, Taylor Thoms, Ellen Thomson, James D Thorne, Barbara L... D0045 Throne, James... D0498, D0500 Thyssen, Patrícia J... D0435, D0437 Tian, Junce...783, 787, 79 Tian, Yanlin Tichenor, Robert H Tiede, Julia... D0458 Tien, Ming Tilmon, Kelley J , D0567, D057, D0585 Tinsley, Nicholas A...050, 0635 Tishechkin, Alexey K...D0609, D060 Tiwari, Siddharth , 0898, D025 Tluczek, Andrew R... D048, D0482 Tobin, Patrick C , 76 Toews, Michael D , D020, D0378, D0553 Tofangsazi, Nastaran Tollerup, Kris Tolley, Mike P... D050 Toloza, Ariel C...03 Tomascak, Paul... D04 Tomberlin, Jeffery K , 0404, 0890, 0897, 0900, 090, 0903, 364, 393, 68, 740, D0057, D043 Tomé, Hudson Vaner Ventura... D0263 Tong, Fan , D0467 Tong, Reina L... D0076 Tonkel, Kirk C Tooker, John F , 0587, 0633, 0645, 409, 632, D0576 Toomey, James K... D0388 Torrisi, Gary J Toth, Amy L Toth, Miklos...3 Trammel, Clint E... D0035 Tran, J. Khai...099, 03 Traugott, Michael...34 Trautwein, Michelle D Traver, Brenna E Trenholm, Laurie E Trevisan, Maíra... D0023 Tribull, Carly M Triplehorn, Charles A Tripodi, Amber D , D0035, D0332 Trotter, R. Talbot , 0868, 0870, 76, 659 Trout Fryxell, Rebecca T , 0372, D0233 Trujano-Ortega, Marysol...D0382, D0383 Truman, James W Trumble, John T , 0537, D0570 Tsai, Chi-Wei , 0526 Tsai, Wen-Shi Tsai, Yi-Lun Tsao, Jean I , 082 Tscharntke, Teja Tschinkel, Walter R Tsuchida, Tsutomu Tsuruda, Jennifer M... D068 Tsutsui, Neil , 0672, 597 Tu, Jake Tuan, Roseli... D0437 Tucker, Angela M Tucker, Erika...098, 0722 Tucker, Graham Tuckow, Alexander P... D0444, D0454 Tueber, Larry R... D0490 Tuell, Julianna , 644, D0273 Tulgetske, Genet M , 83, D0556 Tulig, Melissa Tumlinson, James H , 060 Turcatel, Mauren...39, 363 Turcotte, Richard M , 503 Turlings, Ted C. J Turner, R. E Turner, Scott Turpin, Tom Tussey, Dylan A Twarakavi, Navin... D0279 Twigg, Paul , D0530 Tyler-Julian, Kara A... D069 Tymochko, Larae... D0257 Ueckermann, Eddie A Uelmen, Johnny A Uffman, Joshua Ugelvig, Line Ullah, Muhammad Irfan...D075, D09 Ullmann, Katharina... D0273 Ulrich, Kevin R... D0045 Ulyshen, Michael D...78 Unckless, Robert Underwood, Dessie L. A , 223, D0286, D0373 Underwood, H. Brian... D033 Underwood, Will Unelius, C. Rikard Unger, Lana... D057 Unnasch, Thomas R Urban, Joshua R Urbaneja, Alberto...56 Urquidi, Jacob... D005 Usry, Daniel J Uttah, Emmanuel C Vacari, Alessandra Marieli , 754, D0023, D0025, D058, D0282, D0329, D0350, D0547 Vaidyanathan, Rajeev Vail, Karen M , 29 Valencia J, Arnubio... D0250 Valerio, Alejandro A...37 Valles, Steven M Valley, Steve... D032 Valsdottir, Linda , D0065 Van Alst, Andy Van Dam, Alex R van den Meiracker, Kristen...98 van der Putten, Wim H Van Ekert, Evelien Van Nest, Byron N... D0336 van Nouhuys, Saskya Van Steenwyk, Robert A Van Timmeren, Steven Vande Berg, Brian... D0540 Vander Meer, Robert K Vander Mey, Bryan... 66, D0539 VanDerLaan, Nicole Renee Vandiver, Monti... D0582 VanTimmeren, Steven VanWeelden, M.T , 0557, 0820 Varadarajan, Aishwarya... D038 Varela, Lucia , D05 Varenhorst, Adam J Vargas, German Vargas, Roger I...042, 043, 044, D0542 Vargo, Edward L , 382, D0583 Varón, Edgar Vasquez-Velez, Laura M... D0598 Vaughan, Mace... D0275 Vega Melendez, Carlos J Veiga, Ana Carolina Pires , D0025, D0350 Velez, Ana Maria Venette, Robert C , 0500, 0639, D003 87

190 Author Index Author Index Venkatesha, Melally Giddegowda... VP06, VP09 Venturini, Eric Matthew... D0270 Venugopal, P. Dilip...258, 259 Venzon, Madelaine... VP3 Vernon, Robert...33 Verpoorte, Rob... VP3 Versteirt, Veerle... VP02 Vidal Gómez, Ulianova... D057 Vidal, Stefan Vieira, Lígia C...065, 060, 69 Vilaire, Auriel-Robert... D0 Villafuerte, David Villanueva, Raul T , D0522 Villavicencio, Lucia E... D0539 Villegas-Mendoza, Jesús M Vincelli, Paul Vincent, Charles... D0283, D034 Vinchesi, Amber C Visscher, Kirk Vogt, James T Vogt, Richard...66 Vojvodic, Svjetlana Volpe, Haroldo Xavier Linhares , D0025, D0282, D0350 von Dohlen, Carol D...020, 0736 Von Kanel, Ben Vonshak, Merav Vorster, Juan... D069 Vossbrinck, Alice M Vreysen, Marc J.B... VP4 Vu, Philene D... D0080 Vyas, Meenal...08 Vyavhare, S Vélez-Ruiz, Rita Isabel...35 Wada-Katsumata, Ayako...03, 594 Wager-Page, Shirley A Wagge, Don... D0273 Wagner, Ashley E , 285, D0336 Wagner, David Wagner, Douglas...43 Wagner, Steven M Waichert, Cecilia Waits, Lisette... D006 Wakarchuk, David...49 Wakil, Waqas...052, 0952 Walgama, Ravindra S... D0428, D0550 Walgenbach, James F... D039, D0577 Walker, Daniel... D0380 Walker, Edward D , D0052, D0224 Walker, Gregory P... D0276 Walker, Wesley Walker, William B Wall, Michael A Wallace, John M... D028 Wallace, Mariah A... D028 Wallin, Kimberly F...77, D050, D063, D079 Wallinger, Corinna...34 Wallner, Adam M Walse, Spencer...038, 0458, 4 Walsh, Douglas B..025, 0553, 062, 0823, 50, 299, D0096, D0, D034 Walsh, Tom Walston, Allison Walter, Abigail Walters, Michelle... D0545 Walther, Erika Walton, Alexander R...030, 278 Walton, Larry Walton, Nathaniel J... D035 Walton, Vaughn M Walton, William Wan Mamat, Wan Zaki... D037 Wan Mustapha, Wan Fatma Zuharah Wanchoo, Arun , 020 Wang, Baode Wang, Cai... D0066 Wang, Changlu...26, 379, 389 Wang, Haichuan , 0326, 070, D0248, D0250, D0529, D0530 Wang, Haiyan... D0532 Wang, Jian... D0292 Wang, Lingxin... D0087 Wang, Mo... D0264 Wang, Xiangping Wang, Yi Wang, Ying Wang, Yueguang Wangila, S. David , 330, 332, D049 Wanner, Kevin W , 592, D05 Ward, Kimiora... D0273 Ward, Rufina... D0593 Ward, Tyler Benjamin... D0050 Wardwell, C. Taylor... 32, D063 Ware, Jessica L , 066, 0683, 302, 490 Warmund, Michele... D0309 Warndorf, Matt , D0009 Warner, Richard...050, 435, 749 Warren, D. Rashad... D0380 Waters, James Watson, D. Wes...0, 0402, 747 Watson-Horzelski, Erin J Watts, J. Colton...300, 584, 585 Watts, Val J...093, 0307 Way, M. O , 0820 Wayadande, Astri , 0894, D0056 Weaver, David K... D047 Webb, Bruce... 85, D0255 Webb, Cameron E... VP29 Webb, Samuel M Weber, Donald C , D0366 Webster, R. Jesse , 0876 Webster, Reginald...52 Webster, Robert... D037 Webster, Ted Weed, Aaron S , D0029, D0030 Weeks, Emma N. I , 735, D022 Wehner, Nicholas G... D08 Weidner, Lauren M... D0057 Weier, Jeffrey A...05 Weilin, Sun... D067 Weinberger, Gary Weintraub, Phyllis G Weinzierl, Richard...06 Weirauch, Christiane , 0832, 30, D089, D090 Weiss, Brian Welbourn, C. W...003, 256 Welch, Elwyn Wayne... D03 Welch, Kelton D Weldon, Stephanie Weller, Marc O Weller, Susan J , 076,32, 34, D063 Wells, Jeffrey D Wells, Sam Welty, Celeste , D038 Weng, Sung-Hsia Wenger, Jacob A , 478 Wenninger, Erik J , 053, 774, D025 Wente, Rebecca L... D0028 Werle, Chris... D0499 Werling, Benjamin...043, 0824, 639 Wessel-Beaver, Linda... D098 Wesselman, Casey... D0008 Westby, Katie May... D0049 Weston, Leslie A Weston, Paul A , D0607 Whalen, Joanne...095, 259 Whalon, Mark E , 0445, 0653 Wheeler, Saundra A , 059 Wheeler, Shanda... D0532 Wheeler, Terry A...8, 360 Wheelock, Michael Joseph... D005 Whilby, Leroy...5 Whipple, Sean D , D0362, D0560 Whipps, Christopher M... D095 White II, Eugene D White, Adam , 285, D0336 White, Bradley J...30 White, Eugene D White, Jennifer A , 0520, 052, 0665, 086 White, Mark...435, 749 White, Sarah... D054 Whitehill, Justin G. A Whitesides, Steven... D055 Whiting, Michael F , 0343, 0677, 0692, 0706, 0753, D086 Whitney, Thomas D Whitworth, Jonathan L , 053 Whitworth, R. Jeff... 06, D0532 Why, Adena M Wiatrak, Pawel Wickham, Jacob D...54, 55 Wickings, Kyle Wickline, Samuel...54 Wiedenmann, Robert N Wieferich, James Bryan... D036 Wiegmann, Brian M...39, 320, 363 Wiggins, Barbara Elizabeth...069, 070, 554 Wiggins, Gregory J... 73, 74, 57, 69, D037, D0355, D0475, D0485, D050, D052, D0587 Wihlm, Matt Wild, Alexander L , 574, 705 Wilder, Shawn M , 473 Wiles, Sean A Wilkerson, Megan Willett, James R... D0042 Willett, Mike...7, 9 Williams, Amanda Jo Williams, Christie E... D068 Williams, David W Williams, Jake... D0049 Williams, Jennifer L Williams, Jennifer R , 0433 Williams, Mark... D0033 Williams, Michael L Williams, Neal , D0273 Williams, Ralph E Williams, Ray S , 0983 Williams, Scott Williams, W. Paul Williams-Newkirk, Amanda Jo Williams-Woodward, Jean... D054 Williamson, R. Chris , 762 Willis, Jonathan D Willmott, Amy L...60, 65 Willmott, Keith R Wills, Bill D Wilson, B. E , 0557, 0820 Wilson, Christopher M... D084 Wilson, Guy... D055 Wilson, Houston Wilson, James McKee Wilson, Laura Wilson, Megan M Wilson, Rob Wilson, Tom...04 Wimer, Adam... D0504 Windham, Alan... D054 Windham, Mark T , D0487, D0587 Winkler, Laura B... D020 Wise, David H Wise, John C , 05, D068 Wiseman, P. Eric Wistrom, Christina M With, Kimberly A... D0558 Witte, Adam , D043 Woller, Derek A Woloshuk, Charles Wolt, Jeffrey D Wong, Evan S... D092 Wong, Joseph C. H...562, 563 Wood, Thomas , 0900, 0903 Woodruff, Jessica... D0036 Woolley, James B... D094 Workneh, Fekede Worley, Kim C...54 Worthington, Reese J Wraight, Stephen P...62, 64 Wright, Karen W Wright, Mark G Wright, Robert J , D037 Wright, Starker E , 09, 092, 347, 604 Wszelaki, Annette Wu, Jinquan... D0334, D0337 Wu, Judy Y

191 Author Index Author Index Wu, Qingfa Wulff, Jason A Wynn, Chistopher R... D0600 Wyss, Peter Xi, Zhiyong... D0054 Xia, Yulu Xiao, Da... D0456 Xing, Lin Xu, Hanfu Xu, Jingjing Xu, Junhuan Xu, Wenwei Xu, Yao... D0268 Yabsley, Michael J Yadamsuren, Oyunchuluun Yamamoto, Pedro Takao Yamane, Seiichiro... D049 Yan, Yuanxin Yanahan, Alan David Yanchuk, Alvin D Yang, A... D0552 Yang, Fan Yang, Fei , 332, 786, D049, D0446 Yang, Meiling... D0260 Yang, Rong-Cai... D047 Yang, Tian-ci Yang, Ting... D0089 Yang, Wei Q , D077 Yang, Young Taek... D0357 Yaninek, J. Steve Yanney, Megan L... D050 Yanoviak, Stephen P...79 Yao, Jianxiu Yara, Kaori... D0308 Yasin, Muhammad...052, 0952 Yates, Ashley D Yates, Michelle Ydenberg, Ronald Ye, Gong-yin Ye, Xianghai... D0247 Yeates, David K Yee, Donald A , 0357, 0362, 0733, 529, 533 Yemshanov, Denys Yen, Shen-horn...33 Yi, Huiyu... D0075 Yocum, George D... D0253, D0254 Yoder, Matthew J...36 Yokoyama, Victoria Y Yokum, Barry P , D0005 Yonovitz, Al... D0240 Yoon, Kyong Sup... D0059 Yoshida, Harvey A...025, 044, 047 Yost, Ross , 285, D0336 Youm, O... D0507 Young, Bryan G... D0298 Young, Daniel K...86 Youngs, Kate Youngsteadt, Elsa Youssef, Nadeer , D0484, D0564 Yturralde, Kasey Maria Yu, Xiao-Qiang... D0075, D0457 Yu, Ziniu Yurchenco, Helen... D079 Yuri, Tamaki... D0399 Zack, Richard S Zalom, Frank G Zalucki, Myron P Zambrano, Maria L , 739, D048 Zamudio, Kelly R Zangerl, Arthur Zappalà, Lucia...57 Zarabi, Mehdi... D0269 Zarrabi, Ali A... D026 Zaspel, Jennifer , 0707, 32, D063 Zavala, Jorge A... D030 Zebelo, Simon Atsbaha... D0290 Zeilinger, Adam Zenger, John T... D0600 Zeni, Diego... D0542 Zera, Anthony Zha, Chen... D0069 Zhang, Aijun , 092, 389 Zhang, Guanyang...30 Zhang, Hongwei...D0072, D0447, D0449 Zhang, Jianzhen Zhang, Liping , 332, D049 Zhang, Min Zhang, Qi... D0094 Zhang, Qing-He Zhang, Xuan Zhang, Zhanpan Zhao, S Zhao, Zixiao Zheng, Longyu , 0900, 0903 Zhong, Ling Zhong, Xue... D007 Zhorov, Boris S... D024 Zhou, Huizhe Zhou, Xin...006, 304 Zhou, Xuguo Joe Zhu, Fang...385, 405, 62 Zhu, Heping...089, 59 Zhu, Jerry... D047 Zhu, Kun-Yan.0442, 0763, 0957, 60, 65, 335 Zhu, Lieceng Zhu, Wanyi Zhu, Yu Cheng... D0442 Zieman, Elliott A Zilkowski, Bruce W... D0277 Zimmer, C. T , 587 Zink, Richard... D0545 Zinna, Robert A... D085 Zobel, Emily Zondag, Randall H...088, 59 Zorzetti, Janaina... D0543 Zuharah, Wan Fatma Zukoff, Sarah N Zungoli, Patricia A , 039, 220, 22 Zurbuchen, Antonia Zurek, Ludek , 0893, 078 Zwick, Andreas...33, 34 Publish in Journal of Integrated Pest Management An open access online extension journal published by the Entomological Society of America Editors-in-Chief: Dr. Marlin E. Rice, Pioneer Hi-Bred International and Dr. Kevin L. Steffey, Dow Agrosciences Journal of Integrated Pest Management is an open-access, peer-reviewed, extension journal covering the field of integrated pest management. The journal is multi-disciplinary in scope, publishing articles about all aspects of pest management, including entomology, plant pathology, weed science, nematology, and other subject areas. The readership for the journal are professionals who are engaged in any aspect of integrated pest management, including crop producers, individuals working in crop Through June 202, 9 of the 0 most downloaded ESA journal articles were from Journal of IPM. protection, retailers, manufacturers and suppliers of pest management products, educators, and pest control operators. Original, extension-oriented article submissions are requested about all aspects of pest management in the broadest sense. There is a moderately priced article publication fee. For more information see jipm ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA Published by the Entomological Society of America 89

192 Common Names Index Common Names Index Common Names Index * Approved common name according to ESA s Common Names of Insects and Related Organisms ( common_names) African cotton leafworm African hissing cockroach African sweetpotato weevil agrarian sac spider alfalfa leafcutting bee* , 003, D0253, D0254, D034 alkali bee*...003, 0553 alligatorweed flea beetle amber-winged spreadwing damselfly ambrosia gall midge American beech... D036 American cockroach* , 0952, 99, 594 American dog tick* American foulbrood American grasshopper* American serpentine leafminer... VP30 anagrus Andean potato weevil annual bluegrass weevil , 0853, D0363 Antarctic midge...07 apefly... VP09 apple...000, 002, 004 apple maggot fly*...36 Arabidopsis Argentine ant* , 0284, 039, 0392, 0537, 037, 473, 574, 597, D0286 ash... D029, D048 ashygray ladybird beetle... D065 Asian bush mosquito , 0733, D0002, D0009, D0049, D0052, D025, D0226, VP02 Asian chestnut gall wasp* , D0308 Asian citrus psyllid* , 0306, 0332, 0336, 042, 0544, 0628, 0794, 0856, 0857, 0858, 0859, 0860, 086, 0862, 0863, 0864, 0865, 0898, 243, 263, 264, 265, 266, 267, 268, 269, 270, 27, 404, 466, 6, 749, D000, D054, D025, D0304, D033, D0328, D0330, D037, D0372, D0494, D055 Asian cockroach* Asian corn borer...05, 036 Asian longhorned beetle*...00, 0549, 42, 547, 555, D0334, D0337 Asian needle ant*...220, 22 Asian palm weevil... VP25 Asian rhinoceros beetle... D085 Asian rice gall midge... D047 Asian subterranean termite , D0076 Asian tiger mosquito* , 0357, 0358, 0360, 036, 0362, 0363, 0733, 0749, 0769, 229, 230, 533, 70, D0003, D0009, D0048, D0049, D0050, D024, D025, D026, D029, D0222, D0226, D0232, D0233, D0466, Asiatic garden beetle*... D066 asparagus miner* balsam gall midge* , 569 balsam twig aphid* banana aphid*... D059 Banks grass mite*... D0562, D0582 bean plataspid... D0295 bed bug* , 0379, 0380, 038, 0382, 0426, 0748, 20, 209, 20, 2, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 377, 378, 379, 380, 38, 382, 383, 384, 385, 386, 387, 388, 389, 390, 439, 620, D0045, D0046, D0426 beech scale* , D036 beet armyworm* , 239, D0264, D0290 belowground mosquito... VP29 bigheaded ant*... D000 bird cherry-oat aphid* , 0250, 0252, 0523, 0543, 058, 0594, 0647, 0969, D070, D0557 bitter leaf... D0242 black and gold bumble bee* black birch black blow fly* , 040, 040, D0057, D0433 black carpenter ant* , 594 black cherry aphid* black cutworm* , 762, D0377 black pecan aphid*... D0359 black pine bast scale...346, 35 black soldier fly* , D0439 black swallowtail*...62 black turpentine beetle... D03 black walnut black walnut curculio... D0309 Blackburn dragonfly* blackdotted brown moth... D0375 blackfaced leafhopper* blacklegged tick* , 009, 068, 0307, 0337, 0373, 0374, 0455, 086, 728, 736, D0064 blackmargined aphid*...08 blind army ant... D0037 bloodred ladybird beetle... VP3 blue orchard bee , 279, D027, D0402 blueberry gall midge* , 0966 blueberry gall wasp... D0026 blueberry maggot* blueberry tip midge* bluegrass webworm* body louse* , 68, D0059 Boisduval scale* bollworm* , 0637, 0793, 48, 785 broad necked root borer* bronze birch borer*... D026 bronze poplar borer*... D026 brown ambrosia aphid brown citrus aphid* , 27 brown dog tick* , 0375, 535, 735 brown lacewing... D0304 brown marmorated stink bug* , 0206, 0207, 0208, 0209, 020, 02, 022, 023, 024, 0273, 0568, 0569, 063, 0654, 0655, 0825, 090, 09, 092, 093, 094, 095, 5, 258, 259, 260, 347, 425, D06, D08, D09, D0292, D0294, D032, D0438, D0503, D0520 brown planthopper brown recluse spider* brown spruce longhorned beetle , D0476 brown stink bug* , D0553, 0566, 0654, 248, D020, D0378 brown wheat mite* brown widow spider* brownbanded cockroach* Bt...D0256, D030, D0365 buck moth*... D033, D028 cabbage... D060 cabbage looper* , 783, 79, D060, D0236, VP33 cactus moth* , D0287 calico scale* , D043 California sister camphor shoot borer cape broom psyllid carambola fruit fly... D0542 cardinal airplant Caribbean crazy ant , 0386, 0387, 27, D0044 Caribbean fruit fly* carmine spider mite...780, 788 Carolina mantid*... D067 cat flea* catalpa sphinx , D0320 celery leafminer , 47, VP30 cereal leaf beetle* chalcedon checkerspot chestnut chili thrips* , 028, D0357 chinchorro... D0062 Chinese rose beetle* cigarette beetle*...049, 055 citricola scale* citrus leafminer...04, 267 citrus mealybug*...65, VP09 citrus orthezia citrus rust mite* , 0038 clearwinged grasshopper* coast live oak , D0373 cochineal insect* cocoa pod borer coconut leaf beetle... D0289 codling moth* , 0275, 0276, 067, 0795, 246, 643, 803, D035, D0235, D056, D052, VP, VP20 coffee berry borer* , D0073 coffee mealybug... VP09 Colorado potato beetle* , 0449, 0593, 0607, 0644, 079, 022, 240, 374, 587, 62, 756, 774, 802, D0453, D0504, D069 Comanche harvester ant... D0397 common buckwheat common damsel bug* common eastern bumble bee*...005, 0349, 0460, 047, 0482, 276, 286, D002, VP27 common fruit fly , 0309, 037, 0434, 0435, 0466, 09, 299, 595, 609, 67, 68, 69, 74, 76, 78, 724, 799, D00, D0072, D0087, D0449 common green bottle fly , 746, 747, D0006, D0007, D0057 common green lacewing* , 0967, 783 common malaria mosquito* common oak moth... D0375 common tarweed confused flour beetle*...056, 0442 convergent lady beetle* , 0589, 0590, 0595, 0659, 243, D0296, D0524 corn earworm* , 0277, 0446, 0505, 06, 0630, 0633, 0637, 0793, 33, 48, 483, 723, 785, 786, D003, D05, D0236, D0488, D055, D0534, D0538, D0555 corn leaf aphid* , 0523, 776, D054, D0557 corn leafhopper* , 375 corn planthopper , 552 corn sap beetle* corn wireworm... D04 cotton , 369 cotton aphid* , 0250, 0255, 0260, 059, 049, 64, 442, cotton fleahopper* , 084, 369 cowpea cowpea aphid* , 0254, 052, 059, 0665, 086, 243, 777, D0367 cowpea weevil* , 0980 cranberry , 0476, 0720, 368 cranberry fruitworm* , 0984 crazy ant*... VP06 crimson patched longwing cross-striped cabbageworm*... D056 Dakota skipper Dalmatian toadflax... D0029, D0030 dark mealworm*... VP05 dark rover ant , D000 darksided cutworm* Darwin s hawkmoth decapitating fly desert locust diamondback moth* , 0648, 0650, 0796, 0800, 024, 543, 754, D0023, D0025, D0088, D058, D0237, D0282, D0329, D0547, D056 Diaprepes root weevil , 0462, 60 differential grasshopper*... D0574 driedfruit beetle* dwarf periodical cicada , D0409 eastern fivespined ips* eastern hemlock , D04, D060 eastern larch beetle* , D0379 eastern redcedar... D0423 eastern salt marsh mosquito... D0055 eastern subterranean termite* , 0395, 0396, 0397, 0444, 045, 0945, 0948, 0949, 090, D0403, D0420, D0423, D0460, D

193 Common Names Index eastern tent caterpillar* , D038 eastern tiger swallowtail eastern treehole mosquito , 0363, 233, D0009, D0049, D0052, D0065, D025, D0226 Egyptian cotton leafworm elderberry elongate hemlock scale*...d0284, D0299 emerald ash borer* , 0497, 0500, 050, 0559, 0649, 0700, 0703, 0844, 34, 42, 568, 655, 656, 657, 658, 770, D027, D028, D029, D030, D032, D032, D0364, D0475, D0477, D0478, D048, D0482, D0483, D0485 English grain aphid* , 0969, 78, D070 European apple sawfly*... D034, VP20 European corn borer*...026, 0324, 0503, 0636, 0793, 036, 04, 33, 333, 482, D0082, D044, D0455, D0534 European crane fly*...04 European earwig* European grapevine moth*...2, 4, 424 European oak borer European paper wasp*...222, 477 European pepper moth...66 European red mite* European spruce bark beetle European woodwasp , 0487, 0490, 049, 599, D095, D04 fall armyworm* , 0443, 0447, 0448, 0632, 0643, 088, 0849, 096, 02, 239, 332, 775, 783, 787, D0079, D0083, D049, D0236, D0365, D0377, D0446, D0496, D055, D0537 firebrat* flasher... D0388 flatheaded appletree borer*...d054, D0564 Florida flower thrips... D069 Florida harvester ant* flour moth... D0304 fly...80, 8 fog basking beetle forest tent caterpillar* forked fungus beetle Formosan subterranean termite* , 0394, 0946, 0947, 0949, 0950, 0958, 096, 93, 94, 96, 469, 582, D0005, D0066, D0067, D0076, D049, D042 foxglove aphid*...64 French broom gallforming aphid... VP0 geiger tree tortoise beetle German chamomille... D0228 German cockroach*... 03, 033, 033, 095, 492, 594, 79, VP0, VP03 German yellowjacket* ghost ant...576, VP06 giant looper giant mosquito giant swallowtail giant wild pine gibberella ear rot Glanville fritillary butterfly glassy-winged sharpshooter* , 26, 40, 544, D007, D03 gloomy scale* , 0993 goldenrod gall fly , D004 goldenrod leaf beetle goldspotted oak borer* , 0496, 566, 567, D0486 granary weevil*... VP05 granulate ambrosia beetle*...084, 0843, 564, 565, D039, D0484, D053, D0564 grape berry moth* , D00 grape colaspis* grape mealybug* grape root borer* , D02 greater wax moth* , D0058 green ash , D028 green bottle blow fly green guard disease... D0574 green muscardine disease , 0063, 0064, 0065, 0422, D0058, D0556 green peach aphid* , 0255, 0530, 053, 0576, 0593, 049, 64, 407, 772, 782, D062, D0552 green stink bug* , 248, D020, D037, D0553 greenbug* , 0596, 0967, 0969, D0495, D0529, D0530 greenhouse whitefly*... D0306, D0348 Guatemalan potato moth* Gulf Coast tick* , 0456, 0536, 553, D0063 gypsy moth* , 368, 48, 665, D023, D03 hairy maggot blow fly* , 0404, D0432, VP6 ham mite , 056 handsome fungus beetle... D0043 hardwood stump borer... 47, D0380 head louse*... D0059 hemlock woolly adelgid*...046, 064, 065, 0627, 0729, 0866, 0867, 0868, 0869, 0870, 087, 0872, 0873, 0874, 0875, 0876, 69, 70, 7, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 342, 42, 57, 658, 659, 660, 66, D037, D040, D04, D044, D063, D0238, D0284, D0299, D0352, D0368, D060, Hessian fly* , 0256, 0730, 204, 78, D057, D0532, D0580 hide beetle*... D0436 highbush blueberry...000, 0720 hoary cress... D0074 honey bee*.005, 008, 009, 0020, 0097, 005, 0289, 030, 0303, 0308, 034, 039, 0350, 045, 048, 049, 0420, 043, 0432, 0433, 0472, 0473, 0475, 0477, 0478, 0479, 0532, 0727, 0738, 0757, 0776, 0779, 078, 0783, 0784, 0785, 0895, 0929, 0936, 0938, 0939, 278, 280, 28, 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 287, 322, 43, 44, 437, 443, 458, 460, 46, 475, 54, 542, 548, 549, 579, 580, 593, 62, 706, 760, D009, D002, D0086, D0090, D0097, D0203, D0332, D0336, D0338, D0490, D068 honeycomb moth... D0058 horn fly*... 00, 04, D0427, D0430 hornfaced bee , D0275 horsenettle , 0572 house cricket* , D0240 house fly*... 0, 06, 07, 0409, 040, 042, 043, 0434, 0893, 64, 65, 67, 744, 748, D0056, D0092, D0430, D0467, VP6 Huanglongbing... D0372 human louse...03 hunting billbug* Idaho dune tiger beetle... D0600 imperial moth* imported cabbageworm*...048, 0648, 0650, D056, Indianmeal moth* , 33, D045 inland floodwater mosquito , D0055 insidious flower bug* , 06, 408, 546 Japanese beetle* , 0608, 0623, D07, D0333, D054 Japanese orchard bee... D0275 jumping oak gall... D0527 Karner blue butterfly kennel tick kissing bug Klamathweed beetle* Korean white pine... D0479, D0480 kudzu bug , 0584, 0973, 6, D045, D0295 lantana bug large bigeyed bug* larger Mexican pine beetle* latania scale* leaffooted bug* leafhopper assassin bug*...30 least skipper... D0020 legume pod borer... D067 lesser chestnut weevil... D035 lesser cornstalk borer*... D0497 lesser grain borer* , 062, D0323, D0473 lesser mealworm* , D0256, D0277, D0448, D0543 lettuce aphid light brown apple moth* , 0639, 065, 0960, 046, D003, D0509 lime swallowtail*...06 little fire ant*... D029 live oak... D0527 lodgepole pine...56 lone star tick* , 068, 0337, 0372, 0376, 0536, 0750, 728, 738 longlegged ant* longlegged desert ant...035, 764 longlegged wolf spider lowbush blueberry... 00, D0270 lowland tree termite*... D0076 lupine Lyme disease... D022 madeira mealybug* , D0536 maize , 064, 375 maize weevil*... D0360 manzanita leafgall aphid* matsucoccus scale... D0302 meat ant... D0243 Mediterranean fruit fly*...d0259, D0322 melaleuca snout beetle melon aphid* , 0250, 0255, 059 melon fly* Mexican bromeliad weevil Mexican fruit fly* , D0542 Mexican pine beetle...20 Mexican rice borer* , 0557 migratory grasshopper* , D0252 migratory locust , 0328, D0260 mile-a-minute weed , 238 mile-a-minute weevil , 0344, 0974, 238 milkweed aphid millet head miner minute pirate bug* , 0970, D069 mold mite*...049, 0459 monarch butterfly* , D044 Montpellier broom Mormon cricket*... D0574 mound-building termite mountain pine beetle* , 0495, 0705, 560, 56 muga silkworm... VP08 mulberry mealybug... VP09 multicolored Asian lady beetle*...00, 0509, 057, 0589, 0590, 0968, 0970, 472, D009, D0458, VP3 navel orangeworm* , 0346, 0458, 0548, 0625, 039, 040, D0239, D0358, D0459, D053, D054 ninespotted lady beetle* northern California black walnut... D0032 northern checkerspot northern corn rootworm* , 063, D052, D0280 northern fowl mite* northern house mosquito*...d0224, D0233 northern tamarisk beetle* nosema , 048, D0332, D0338 oak processionary moth odorous house ant*...29 old world bollworm...623, 792 oleander aphid* olive fruit fly* onespotted stink bug*... D037 onion thrips* , 0657, 0797, 759, D0583 orangedog*...06 orb weaver spider... D0406 oriental beetle* , 0574 oriental fruit fly*...042, 044,, D0542 oriental fruit moth* , 0275, 0276, 643, D0502, VP22, VP23, VP24 Pacific dampwood termite*...006, 0422 Pacific spider mite* , D0470 painted hickory borer* painted lady* , D0069 pale green weevil... D034 Common Names Index 9

194 Common Names Index Common Names Index parsnip webworm passion vine butterfly patilla clearwing pea aphid* , 0576, 0595, 0666, 0808, 083, 25, 289, 398, D0266, D0276, D0452, D0465 peach fruit fly peach twig borer*... VP2, VP22 pecan... D0359 pecan leaf phylloxera*...08 pecan leaf scorch mite*... D0528 pepper pepper weevil*... 76, D0278 periodical cicada* , D0409 persea mite , 053 Pharaoh ant* pickleworm* pine bark adelgid*... D025 pine engraver* , D0027 pine sawyer...d0369, D0479, D0480 pinewood nematode... D0479, D0480 pink bollworm*... D0245, D0545 pink hibiscus mealybug... VP09 pink spotted lady beetle...09, 020, 02, 022, 023, 025, 027, 0962, 0963, D0028, D0293, D0324, D0366, D0458 pitcherplant midge pitcherplant mosquito*... D0234, 0546, D0008 plum curculio* , 0629, 0653, 643, D039 plume moth... D0388 poison hemlock polished lady beetle... D0458 pollen beetle , 587 potato...374, D0374, D069, VP7 potato aphid* , 772 potato leafhopper* , D0347, D0535 potato leafminer fly... VP5 potato psyllid*...024, 0272, 0306, 047, 0892, 08, 262, 757, D005, D008, D0036, D06, D0554, D0560, D0570 potato tuberworm*... 52, D0374 poweshiekskipperling prickly pear cactus purple carnivorous pitcher plant pyramid ant*... D0397 rabbiteye blueberry ragwort flea beetle Ranchman s tiger moth raspberry sawfly*... D0535 red and black flat mite* red bollworm red flour beetle* , 048, 0354, 0370, 037, 0465, 062, 0955, 0957, 405, 587, D008, D009, D045, D0456, D0464, D0566 red harvester ant* red imported fire ant*...042, 0389, 0390, 0468, 0470, 0534, 0535, 0536, 0667, 0670, 067, 0932, 0978, 020, 038, 27, 400, 473, 476, 545, D0004, D0343, D0422, D0594 red maple red oak borer* red palm weevil* , 097, 098, 099, 0920, 092, 0922, 0923, 0924, 0925, 0926, 0927, 24, D0258, VP2, VP25 red wood ant...572, 573 redbanded stink bug* , D0580 redbay ambrosia beetle* , 0555, 0624, 42, D036 redlegged grasshopper* , 0899 rice stalk stink bug... D0303, D0569 rice stem borer... D0265 rice stink bug*... D02 rice water weevil* , 0602, 0603 rice weevil* , D0360, D0473 robust oak borer... D0564 rock pool mosquito...78 rock-cavity ant , 0025 Rocky Mountain wood tick*... D02 rosy apple aphid*...05, VP20 royal palm bug Russian knapweed Russian wheat aphid* , D0495, D0525 sagebrush grasshopper... D075 saltmarsh caterpillar* sawtoothed grain beetle*...037, VP05 scaly-winged bark louse Schoene spider mite*...45 screwworm* , 609, D047, D0429 secondary screwworm* , 0405, D047 secondary symbiont type-t , 083, 288, D0465 seed-harvester ant , 0928 sevenspotted lady beetle*...057, 0659, 0968, D0028, D0296 sheep biting louse*...74 sheep blow fly , 609, 74 silkworm* , 0074, 0309, 0758, 0759, 0762, D0075 silverfish* sitka spruce sixspined ips* sixspotted thrips*... D0562 small hive beetle* , D002 small southern pine engraver* , D03 smaller Mexican pine beetle*...20 soldier beetle... D0324 Solenopsisinvicta virus... D0004 sorghum midge sour cherry South American cactus moth , 257 southern cattle tick*... D0444 southern chinch bug* southern green stink bug*...036, 0566, 0654, 0728, 0828, 089, D020, D0553 southern house mosquito* , 0733, 228, 53, 532, 533, 63, 64, 65, D0003, D0077, D0089, D022, D0228 southern pine beetle* , 657, 66, D0027 southwestern corn borer* , 483 soybean , 0583, D0585 soybean aphid*...009, 0252, 030, 0429, 0463, 059, 0523, 058, 0585, 0586, 0587, 0588, 0589, 0592, 0598, 0656, 0970, 293, 478, 778, D053, D056, D0468, D0508, D0523, D0526, D0567, D057, D0576, D0585 soybean looper* , D0070, D0247 soybean mosaic virus... D0585 soybean stem borer...370, 0583 spined soldier bug* , 0826, D057, D09, D037, D0346 spotless lady beetle... D0458, VP3 spotted cucumber beetle* spotted knapweed , 693 spottedwing drosophila* , 038, 0436, 0550, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0907, 0908, 0909, 090, 045, 0, 7, 8, 9, 299, 423, 602, 603, 604, D0, D077, D0285, D0297, D0327, D0533 spruce beetle* spruce budworm*...558, VP28 squash , 0609 squash bee squash bug* , 0894, St. Anthony Dunes tiger beetle... D0600 stable fly* , 007, 0, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 043, 535, 743, 748, D0424, D0427, D0430, D0444 stored-product mite strawberry strawberry rootworm*... D0499 striped bark scorpion... D0035 striped cucumber beetle* , 44 striped rice borer... D0265 sugarbeet wireworm*... D05 sugarcane aphid* sugarcane beetle* , 0852, D0578 sugarcane borer*...088, 29, 292 Sulphur Springs diving beetle sunflower , D0335 sunflower leafminer... D072 sunflower tortoise beetle sweet birch sweetpotato weevil*... D0578 sweetpotato whitefly* , 0320, 0526, 0560, 0609, 0799, 080, 0988, 049, 250, 403, 750, D0242, D0269, D0405, D0549, D058 switchgrass , D0529, D0530 tall goldenrod tamarack tansy ragwort... VP3 tarnished plant bug* , 0304, 0604, 752, D0283, D0349, D0442 tea shothole borer... D0550 Texas leafcutting ant* thick-tipped greta thousand cankers disease threecornered alfalfa hopper* , 025 tiger moth toadflax stem-mining weevil...d0029, D0030 tobacco budworm*...399, 48, 85, D006, D0084, D0255 tobacco hornworm* , 0424, 0540, 0552, 0572, 0573, 023, 068, 72, 796, D007, D0457 tobacco thrips* , 75, 758, 80, D0577, D0579 tomato , D060, D069, VP27 tomato fruitworm* , D0236, D055 tomato leafminer... 39, 40, 4, 42, 43, 44, 45, 509, 50, 5, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 520, VP26 tomato pinworm* tomato psyllid* , 0892, 08, 262, 757, 77, D0362, D0554, D0560, D0570 tomato spotted wilt virus trap-jaw ant , D065 tropical bed bug* tropical cattle fever tick , 0829 tropical fire ant*... VP06 tropical sod webworm* tsetse fly , 04, 05, 079, 75, 742 Turkestan cockroach* twolined chestnut borer*... D026 twospotted bumble bee* twospotted lady beetle*... D054 twospotted spider mite* , 027, 052, 0963, 45, D0095, D0096, D076, D0470, D055, D0558, D0562, VP30 variable checkerspot varroa mite , 0477, 03, 28, 283, 287, D002, D0338 vegetable leafminer*...47 velvetbean caterpillar*... D0247 verde plant bug* vinchuca... D0062 vine mealybug , D05 walnut aphid*... D024 walnut twig beetle* , 0280, 066, 0880, 422, 50, 502, 503, 504, 505, 506, 507, 508, 565, D0032, D064, D0325, D0487, D0587 warehouse beetle*...049, 0956 water ragwort... VP3 watermelon wax bee moth...33 wekiu bug western bean cutworm* , 060, 329, D0568, D0573 western black widow spider* western blacklegged tick*... D022 western chinch bug* western corn rootworm* , 069, 0326, 0438, 0439, 050, 063, 0634, 0635, 0638, 064, 0642, 0766, 0792, 0972, 098, 070, 00, 03, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 330, 428, 482, 55, 554, 789, 790, D046, D048, D0246, D0248, D0250, D0256, D030, D0489, D0493, D0503, D0540, D0588 western damsel bug* , 240 western encephalitis mosquito

195 Common Names Index western field wireworm*... D05 western flower thrips* , 0327, 0528, 068, 0964, 0965, 60, 6, 62, 75, 752, 80, D069, D078, D0348, D0575, D0577, VP30 western grape leafhopper* western mosquitofish western pine beetle*... D0027 western predatory mite* , D0528 western red wood ant... D0037 western tarnished plant bug*..025, 0260, 244, 586, D0539 western thatching ant*...d0037, D020 western treehole mosquito*... D0230 western wheat aphid*... D0525 western yellowjacket* wheat curl mite* wheat stem sawfly*... D047, D0584 wheat streak mosaic virus white ash white muscardine disease , 0063, 0064, 0533, 0653, 752, D0058, D0543 white oak... D035 white pine weevil* white-footed mouse... D0425 whitelined sphinx* whitetop... D0074 whitewhiskered grasshopper , 0985, D0546 winter ant winter moth* , D0022 woolly apple aphid* , 047, D0340 woolly bear caterpillar , D0257 yaupon holly... D0596 yellow birch yellow mealworm*... D000, D0445 yellow pecan aphid*...08 yellow sugarcane aphid* , 0596, D0530 yellow tea thrips... D0357 yellow-faced bee yellowbanded bumble bee* yellowfever mosquito* , 007, 0073, 028, 0307, 0360, 0364, 0367, 044, 0427, 0434, 0440, 0445, 068, 228, 23, 232, 234, 236, 237, 402, 535, 605, 6, 73, 77, 78, 722, D0002, D0048, D005, D0054, D0060, D006, D0085, D023, D028, D0225, D0232, D024, D0249, D0262, D0447 yellowheaded spruce sawfly* yellowmargined leaf beetle* , D0506 yucca moth* zebra chip disease , D005 zebra fish...66 ESA Thanks 202 The President s ESA Circle President s Membership Contributors Circle ESA thanks the following members who are supporting the ESA President s Circle membership this year. This program allows Committed Members members to provide extra support to the society, which in turn allows Giving scientists Back from to around Their the Society world to and experience Profession ESA membership on their behalf. If you would like to know more about how you can help preserve and expand ESA through this program, ESA s prestigious President s Circle membership allows you please visit the opportunity to give back to your Society and profession. Dr. Help May a fellow R. Berenbaum entomologist enjoy the Dr. benefits Douglas of G. being Pfeiffer an Dr. ESA Ricardo member T. Bessin through your membership Mr. Salvatore donation, W. and Porcellini be Mr. recognized Gary D. Curl for your contribution at Dr. the Bruce Annual L. Parker, Meeting. BCE Dr. Ernest S. Delfosse Dr. Michael P. Parrella Mr. You Norman may sponsor Goldenberg, an entomologist BCE Dr. in a Marlin developing E. Ricecountry, Dr. or someone Theodore else A. Granovsky, who needs BCE financial Dr. Nan-Yao assistance, Su by Dr. providing David B. him Hogg, or her BCEwith a one year Dr. ESA Robert membership J. Wright Dr. you Guy designate J. Hallman where your extra dues Dr. dollars David A. are Jenkins spent. Dr. Scott H. Hutchins, BCE Dr. Myron P. Zalucki Dr. Make William a difference. D. Hutchison, Give PhD back to your Ms. Society Sandra and Drolshagen become Dr. a President s Richard L. Jones Circle Member today! Mr. Daniel Killingsworth Dr. Melody A. Keena Mr. John Zukowski Dr. For Dennis more information, D. Kopp visit Mr. Marc C. Gilkey Dr. B. Rogers Leonard Dr. Yan Hua Wang, PhD Dr. or call Phillip G. Mulder, Jr. Common Names Index Sharing Insect Science Globally You make a living by what you get, but you make a life by what you give. Winston Churchill 93

196 Scientific Names Index Scientific Names Index Scientific Name Index Acari , 0035, 0230, 023 Acari Acaridae Acari Acaridae Tyrophagus putrescentiae...049, 0459, 056 Acari Digamasellidae Dendrolaelaps quadrisetus Acari Eriophyidae Aceria salsolae Acari Eriophyidae Aceria tosichella Acari Eriophyidae Phyllocoptruta oleivora , 0038 Acari Erythraeidae Balaustium... D036 Acari Erythraeidae Leptus Acari Hydrachnidiae , 449 Acari Ixodidae , D048 Acari Ixodidae Amblyomma Acari Ixodidae Amblyomma americanum...009, 068, 0337, 0372, 0376, 0536, 0750, 728, 738 Acari Ixodidae Amblyomma longirostre... D0047 Acari Ixodidae Amblyomma maculatum...068, 0456, 0536, 553, D0063 Acari Ixodidae Boophilus microplus... D0444 Acari Ixodidae Dermacentor andersoni... D02 Acari Ixodidae Dermacentor variabilis Acari Ixodidae Haemaphysalis... D0047 Acari Ixodidae Ixodes affinis Acari Ixodidae Ixodes muris... D020 Acari Ixodidae Ixodes pacificus... D022 Acari Ixodidae Ixodes scapularis , 009, 068, 0307, 0337, 0373, 0374, 0455, 086, 728, 736, D0064 Acari Ixodidae Rhipicephallus appendiculatus Acari Ixodidae Rhipicephalus microplus , 0829 Acari Ixodidae Rhipicephalus sanguineus , 0375, 535, 735 Acari Laelapidae Stratiolaelaps miles... D074 Acari Macronyssidae Ornithonyssus sylviarum Acari Oribatidae Acari Oribatidae Scheloribates moestus Acari Phytoseiidae Amblydromella caudiglans Acari Phytoseiidae Amblyseius largoensis Acari Phytoseiidae Amblyseius swirski Acari Phytoseiidae Amblyseuis fallacis... D068 Acari Phytoseiidae Galendromus occidentalis , D0528 Acari Phytoseiidae Metaseiulus occidentalis.0225 Acari Phytoseiidae Neoseiulus cucumeris...068, 0964, D074 Acari Phytoseiidae Phytoseiulus persimilis...788, D0528, D0558 Acari Scutacaridae Acari Tenuipalpidae Brevipalpus Acari Tenuipalpidae Brevipalpus phoenicis Acari Tetranychidae Bryobia Acari Tetranychidae Eotetranychus hicoriae... D0528 Acari Tetranychidae Oligonychus perseae , 053 Acari Tetranychidae Oligonychus pratensis.d0562, D0582 Acari Tetranychidae Panonychus ulmi Acari Tetranychidae Petrobia latens Acari Tetranychidae Tetranychus cinnabarinus , 788 Acari Tetranychidae Tetranychus pacificus...026, D0470 Acari Tetranychidae Tetranychus urticae , 027, 052, 0963, 45, D0095, D0096, D076, D0470, D055, D0558, D0562, VP30 Acari Torrenticolidae Kongsbergia robisoni Acari Trombidiformes Aphelenchida Parasitaphelenchidae Bursaphelenchus xylophilus...d0479, D0480 Apiales Apiaceae Conium maculatum Aquifoliales Aquifoliaceae Ilex vomitoria... D0596 Araneae Araneae Araneidae Eustala oblonga... D0342 Araneae Araneidae Larinioides cornutus... D0406 Araneae Araneidae Micrathena gracilis Araneae Araneidae Micrathena mitrata Araneae Araneidae Verrucosa arenata Araneae Linyphiidae Alioranus pastoralis Araneae Linyphiidae Graminota Araneae Linyphiidae Grammonota inornata Araneae Linyphiidae Mermessus Araneae Linyphiidae Mermessus fradeorum Araneae Lycosidae Pardosa palustris Araneae Lycosidae Rabidosa rabida Araneae Lycosidae Schizocosa ocreata Araneae Miturgidae Cheiracanthium inclusum Araneae Philodromidae Thantus vulgaris Araneae Sicardiidea Loxoscelees reclusa Araneae Theridiidae Anelosimus studiosus..584, 585 Araneae Theridiidae Enoplognatha Araneae Theridiidae Latrodectus geometricus Araneae Theridiidae Latrodectus hesperus Arecales Arecaceae Serenoa repens... D0272 Ascomycota Hypocreales Geosmithia morbida Asparagales Asparagaceae Asparagus officinalis Asterales Asteraceae Acroptilon repens Asterales Asteraceae Artemisia herba-alba... D0228 Asterales Asteraceae Centaurea stoebe , 693 Asterales Asteraceae Chromolaena odorata... D0354 Asterales Asteraceae Helianthus annuus...370, D0335 Asterales Asteraceae Jacobaea aquatica... VP3 Asterales Asteraceae Jacobaea vulgaris... VP3 Asterales Asteraceae Madia elegans Asterales Asteraceae Matricharia camomella... D0228 Asterales Asteraceae Silphium perfoliatum.d0376 Asterales Asteraceae Solidago altissima Asterales Asteraceae Vernonia galamensis var. ethiopica... D0242 Bacillales Bacillaceae Bacillus thuringiensis... D0256, D030, D0365 Bacillales Paenibacillaceae Paenibacillus larvae Blattodea Blattodea Blaberidae Blaberus...49 Blattodea Blaberidae Epilampra bromeliacea , 49 Blattodea Blaberidae Gromphadorhina portentosa..007 Blattodea Blattellidae Blattodea Blattellidae Blattella asahinai Blattodea Blattellidae Blattella germanica...03, 033, 033, 095, 492, 594, 79, VP0, VP03 Blattodea Blattellidae Supella longipalpa Blattodea Blattidae Blatta lateralis Blattodea Blattidae Periplaneta americana.0942, 0952, 99, 594 Blattodea Cryptocercidae Cryptocercus punctulatus... D0403 Blattodea Cryptocercidae Cryptocercus Blattodea Cryptocercidae Cryptocercus wrighti Blattodea Kalotermitidae Incisitermes immigrans. D0076 Blattodea Polyphagidae Arenivaga...489, 493 Blattodea Polyphagidae Holocompsa...49 Blattodea Polyphagidae Polyphaga Blattodea Polyphagidae Polyphaga aegyptiaca Brassicales Brassicaceae Arabidopsis thaliana Brassicales Brassicaceae Brassica oleracea... D060 Brassicales Brassicaceae Lepidium draba... D0074 Bromeliales Bromeliaceae Tillandsia fasciculata Bromeliales Bromeliaceae Tillandsia utriculata Carnivora Canidae Canis lupus familiaris Caryophyllales Cactaceae Opuntia Caryophyllales Polygonaceae Fagopyrum esculentum Caryophyllales Polygonaceae Persicaria perfoliata , 238 Coleoptera.. 028, 0453, 070, 0996, 009, 0, 82, 447, D080, D0472 Coleoptera Dermestidae Dermestes maculatus... D0436 Coleoptera Mordellidae Conalia helva Coleoptera Aderidae Coleoptera Agyrtidae Lyrosoma opacum... D0407 Coleoptera Anobiidae Lasioderma serricorne , 055 Coleoptera Apionidae Ceratapion basicorne Coleoptera Bostrichidae Rhyzopertha dominica , 037, 062, D0323, D0473 Coleoptera Bothrideridae Bothrideres...85 Coleoptera Buprestidae Coleoptera Buprestidae Agrilus anxius... D026 Coleoptera Buprestidae Agrilus auroguttatus , 0496, 566, 567, D0486 Coleoptera Buprestidae Agrilus bilineatus. D026 Coleoptera Buprestidae Agrilus liragus... D026 Coleoptera Buprestidae Agrilus planipennis , 0497, 0500, 050, 0559, 0649, 0700, 0703, 0844, 34, 42, 568, 655, 656, 657, 658, 770, D027, D028, D029, D030, D032, D032, D0364, D0475, D0477, D0478, D048, D0482, D0483, D0485 Coleoptera Buprestidae Agrilus sulciollis Coleoptera Buprestidae Chrysobothris... D0380 Coleoptera Buprestidae Chrysobothris femorata.. D054, D0564 Coleoptera Buprestidae Hylaeogena jureceki Coleoptera Cantharidae Chauliognathus pensylvanicus... D0324 Coleoptera Carabidae.0605, 0704, D0326, D0356, D0392, D0603 Coleoptera Carabidae Amerinus linearis Coleoptera Carabidae Anisodactylus sanctaecrucis Coleoptera Carabidae Carabus serratus Coleoptera Carabidae Chlaenius Coleoptera Carabidae Cicindela arenicola. D0600 Coleoptera Carabidae Galerita janus Coleoptera Carabidae Harpalus pennsylvanicus , 0534, 0597, D0343 Coleoptera Carabidae Mecyclothorax... D0392 Coleoptera Carabidae Mecyclothorax montivagus Coleoptera Carabidae Mecyclothorax punctipennis Coleoptera Carabidae Metius... VP7 Coleoptera Carabidae Notiobia (Anisotarsus) peruviana... VP7 Coleoptera Carabidae Paussus sikoranus Coleoptera Carabidae Poecilus chalcites , D0298 Coleoptera Carabidae Pterostichus Coleoptera Carabidae Scaphinotus petersi... D0205 Coleoptera Cerambycidae , 0680, 005, 46, 48, 49, 50, 5, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 88, 89, 562, 563, D039, D0603 Coleoptera Cerambycidae Anoplophora glabripennis... 94

197 Scientific Names Index Scientific Names Index 00, 0549, 42, 547, 555, D0334, D0337 Coleoptera Cerambycidae Dectes texanus , 370 Coleoptera Cerambycidae Dryobius sexnotatus Coleoptera Cerambycidae Enaphalodes atomarius... D0564 Coleoptera Cerambycidae Enaphalodes rufulus Coleoptera Cerambycidae Longitarsus echii.099 Coleoptera Cerambycidae Mallodon dasystomus. 47, D0380 Coleoptera Cerambycidae Megacyllene caryae Coleoptera Cerambycidae Monochamus alternatus.d0369 Coleoptera Cerambycidae Monochamus saltuarius.d0369, D0479, D0480 Coleoptera Cerambycidae Neoclytus acuminatus. 0843, 588, D0307 Coleoptera Cerambycidae Neoclytus mucronatus. D0307 Coleoptera Cerambycidae Neoclytus scutellaris... D0307 Coleoptera Cerambycidae Prionus laticollis..598 Coleoptera Cerambycidae Tetropium fuscum , D0476 Coleoptera Cerambycidae Xylotrechus colonus Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Acalymma vittatum , 44 Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Acanthoscelides aureolus Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Acanthoscelides pullus Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Agasicles hygrophila Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Borinken elyunque... D0390 Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Brontispa longissima. D0289 Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Callosobruchus maculatus , 0980 Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Cangshanaltica nigra... D0390 Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Chrysolina quadrigemina Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Colaspis brunnea Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Colaspis crinicornis Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Diabrotica barberi , 063, D052, D0280 Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Diabrotica virgifera virgifera , 069, 0326, 0438, 0439, 050, 063, 0634, 0635, 0638, 064, 0642, 0766, 0792, 0972, 098, 070, 00, 03, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 330, 428, 482, 55, 554, 789, 790, D046, D048, D0246, D0248, D0250, D0256, D030, D0489, D0493, D0503, D0540, D0588 Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Diorhabda carinulata. 694 Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Eurypepla calochroma 0684 Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Galerucella calmariensis Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Galerucella pusilla Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Kiskeya baorucae... D0390 Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Leptinotarsa decemlineata , 0449, 0593, 0607, 0644, 079, 022, 240, 374, 587, 62, 756, 774, 802, D0453, D0504, D069 Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Longitarsus jacobaeae Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Metaparia... D082 Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Microtheca ochroloma , D0506 Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Oulema melanopus Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Paria fragariae... D0499 Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Phyllotreta Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Physonota helianthi Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Plectonycha correntina Coleoptera Chrysomelidae Trirhabda virgata Coleoptera Cleridae Enoclerus ablusus Coleoptera Cleridae Enoclerus arachnodes Coleoptera Cleridae Enoclerus erro Coleoptera Cleridae Isohydnocera curtipennis Coleoptera Cleridae Phyllobaenus humeralis Coleoptera Cleridae Thanasimus dubius Coleoptera Cleridae Wolcottia pedalis Coleoptera Coccinellidae , 0888, D003 Coleoptera Coccinellidae Adalia bipunctata... D054 Coleoptera Coccinellidae Coccinella transversalis Coleoptera Coccinellidae Coccinella novemnotata Coleoptera Coccinellidae Coccinella septempunctata...057, 0659, 0968, D0028, D0296 Coleoptera Coccinellidae Coleomegilla maculata... 09, 020, 02, 022, 023, 025, 027, 0962, 0963, D0028, D0293, D0324, D0366, D0458 Coleoptera Coccinellidae Cycloneda munda... D0458 Coleoptera Coccinellidae Cycloneda sanguinea... VP3 Coleoptera Coccinellidae Diomus notescens Coleoptera Coccinellidae Epilachna indica... D0440 Coleoptera Coccinellidae Harmonia axyridis... 00, 0509, 057, 0589, 0590, 0968, 0970, 472, D009, D0458, VP3 Coleoptera Coccinellidae Hippodamia convergens , 0589, 0590, 0595, 0659, 243, D0296, D0524, Coleoptera Coccinellidae Olla v-nigrum... D065 Coleoptera Coccinellidae Sasajiscymnus tsugae...73, 74, 57, D037 Coleoptera Coccinellidae Scymnus coniferarum Coleoptera Coccinellidae Scymnus camptodromus...76 Coleoptera Curculionidae...005, 89, 90, D0099, D039, D054 Coleoptera Curculionidae Anthonomus eugenii... 76, D0278 Coleoptera Curculionidae Araptus attenuatus Coleoptera Curculionidae Artipus floridanus... D06 Coleoptera Curculionidae Artipus monae... D06 Coleoptera Curculionidae Artipus psittacinus... D06 Coleoptera Curculionidae Aulobaris anthracina... D059 Coleoptera Curculionidae Ceutorhynchus cardariae... D0074 Coleoptera Curculionidae Cnestus mutiliatus Coleoptera Curculionidae Conotrachelus nenuphar , 0629, 0653, 643, D039 Coleoptera Curculionidae Conotrachelus retentus... D0309 Coleoptera Curculionidae Curculio pardalis Coleoptera Curculionidae Curculio sayi... D035 Coleoptera Curculionidae Cylas formicarius elegantulus... D0578 Coleoptera Curculionidae Cylas puncticollis. 242 Coleoptera Curculionidae Dendroctonus Coleoptera Curculionidae Dendroctonus approximatus Coleoptera Curculionidae Dendroctonus brevicomis... D0027 Coleoptera Curculionidae Dendroctonus frontalis , 657, 66, D0027 Coleoptera Curculionidae Dendroctonus mexicanus...20 Coleoptera Curculionidae Dendroctonus ponderosae , 0495, 0705, 560, 56 Coleoptera Curculionidae Dendroctonus rufipennis Coleoptera Curculionidae Dendroctonus simplex , D0379 Coleoptera Curculionidae Dendroctonus terebrans... D03 Coleoptera Curculionidae Diaprepes abbreviatus , 0462, 60 Coleoptera Curculionidae Dirabius... D059 Coleoptera Curculionidae Hadroplontus litura... D055 Coleoptera Curculionidae Hypothenemus hampei , D0073 Coleoptera Curculionidae Ips avulsus , D03 Coleoptera Curculionidae Ips calligraphus Coleoptera Curculionidae Ips grandicollis Coleoptera Curculionidae Ips pini , D0027 Coleoptera Curculionidae Ips typographus Coleoptera Curculionidae Larinus minutus..0538, 0658 Coleoptera Curculionidae Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus , 0602, 0603 Coleoptera Curculionidae Listronotus maculicollis 028, 0853, D0363 Coleoptera Curculionidae Mecinus janthiniformis... D0029, D0030 Coleoptera Curculionidae Metamasius callizona Coleoptera Curculionidae Mogulones borraginis. 0480, 352 Coleoptera Curculionidae Mogulones geographicus Coleoptera Curculionidae Mogulones larvatus Coleoptera Curculionidae Oxyops vitiosa Coleoptera Curculionidae Piazurus alternans... D0393 Coleoptera Curculionidae Piazurus incommodus.. D0393 Coleoptera Curculionidae Piazurus pseudoalternans... D0393 Coleoptera Curculionidae Pissodes strobi Coleoptera Curculionidae Pityophthorus juglandis , 0280, 066, 0880, 422, 50, 502, 503, 504, 505, 506, 507, 508, 565, D0032, D064, D0325, D0487, D0587 Coleoptera Curculionidae Pityophthorus lautus Coleoptera Curculionidae Polydrusus impressifrons... D034 Coleoptera Curculionidae Premnotrypes vorax Coleoptera Curculionidae Rhinocyllus conicus Coleoptera Curculionidae Rhinoncomimus latipes 0243, 0344, 0974, 238 Coleoptera Curculionidae Rhynchophorus ferrugineus , 097, 098, 099, 0920, 092, 0922, 0923, 0924, 0925, 0926, 0927, 24, D0258, VP2, VP25 Coleoptera Curculionidae Sitophilus granarius... VP05 Coleoptera Curculionidae Sitophilus oryzae , D0360, D

198 Scientific Names Index Scientific Names Index Coleoptera Curculionidae Sitophilus zeamais... D0360 Coleoptera Curculionidae Sphenophorus venatus vestitus Coleoptera Curculionidae Trichosirocalus horridus...69 Coleoptera Curculionidae Xyleborus affinis... D036 Coleoptera Curculionidae Xyleborus ferrugineus.. D036 Coleoptera Curculionidae Xyleborus fornicatus... D0550 Coleoptera Curculionidae Xyleborus glabratus , 0555, 0624, 42, D036 Coleoptera Curculionidae Xylosandrus crassiusculus..084, 0843, 565, 564, D039, D0484, D053, D0564 Coleoptera Curculionidae Xylosandrus germanus. 084, D0300, D058 Coleoptera Dermestidae Trogoderma variabile , 0956 Coleoptera Derodontidae Laricobius naganoensis 72 Coleoptera Derodontidae Laricobius nigrinus , 70, D0352, D063, D0368 Coleoptera Derodontidae Laricobius osakensis , 69, 72 Coleoptera Derodontidae Laricobius rubidus... 70, D025, D063 Coleoptera Dytiscidae Colymbetes dolabratus Coleoptera Dytiscidae Heterosternuta sulphuria Coleoptera Elateridae... 30, 32, 33, 34, 35, 37, 38, 84 Coleoptera Elateridae Limonius californicus... D05 Coleoptera Elateridae Glyphonyx bimarginatus... D04 Coleoptera Elateridae Hypnoidus bicolor... D05 Coleoptera Elateridae Limonius infuscatus... D05 Coleoptera Elateridae Melanotus communis... D04 Coleoptera Elmidae Ancyronyx variegata.. D08 Coleoptera Elmidae Elmis... D0399 Coleoptera Elmidae Macronychus glabratus... D08 Coleoptera Elmidae Microcylloepus... D08 Coleoptera Endomychidae Danae testacea... D0043 Coleoptera Erotylidae Coleoptera Erotylidae Loberus testaceus Coleoptera Glaphyridae Lichnanthe Coleoptera Histeridae... D060 Coleoptera Histeridae Yarmister... D0609 Coleoptera Hydrophilidae...00 Coleoptera Hydrophilidae Hydrophilus... D0040 Coleoptera Lampyridae... D086 Coleoptera Lampyridae Photinus carolinus... D0606, D0607 Coleoptera Lampyridae Photuris frontalis. D0606 Coleoptera Lampyridae Photuris versicolor quadrifulgens... D066 Coleoptera Lampyridae Pyractomena borealis... D0606 Coleoptera Lutrochidae...83 Coleoptera Melyridae Dicranolaius bellulus Coleoptera Monotomidae Crowsonius meliponae 0678 Coleoptera Monotomidae Europs Coleoptera Monotomidae Monotoma longicollis Coleoptera Monotomidae Rhizophagus sayi Coleoptera Mordellidae Mordella atrata Coleoptera Mordellidae Yakuhananomia bidentata Coleoptera Nitidulidae Aethina tumida , D002 Coleoptera Nitidulidae Carpophilus hemipterus Coleoptera Nitidulidae Carpophilus dimidiatus Coleoptera Nitidulidae Meligethes aeneus , 587 Coleoptera Nitidulidae Omosita colon Coleoptera Noteridae Liocanthydrus... D087 Coleoptera Passalidae Odontotaenius disjunctus. D0403 Coleoptera Passalidae Petrejoides Coleoptera Pyrochroidae...86 Coleoptera Scarabaeidae...026, 027, 0222, 0223, 0244, 00 Coleoptera Scarabaeidae Adoretus sinicus Coleoptera Scarabaeidae Anachalcos convexus... D0039 Coleoptera Scarabaeidae Anomala orientalis , 0574 Coleoptera Scarabaeidae Dynastes Coleoptera Scarabaeidae Euetheola humilis rugiceps , 0852, D0578 Coleoptera Scarabaeidae Maladera castanea... D066 Coleoptera Scarabaeidae Onthophagus variegatus... D0039 Coleoptera Scarabaeidae Pachnoda marginata Coleoptera Scarabaeidae Phyllophaga... D0578 Coleoptera Scarabaeidae Plectris aliena... D073 Coleoptera Scarabaeidae Popillia japonica , 0608, 0623, D07, D0333, D054 Coleoptera Scarabaeidae Sisyphus seminulum... D0039 Coleoptera Scarabaeidae Trypoxylus dichotomus. D085 Coleoptera Silphidae... D0603 Coleoptera Silphidae Nicrophorus orbicollis... D0204 Coleoptera Silphidae Oiceoptoma inaequale... D084 Coleoptera Silphidae Oiceoptoma noveboracense D084 Coleoptera Silphidae Oiceoptoma rugulosum... D084 Coleoptera Silvanidae Oryzaephilus surinamensis 037, VP05 Coleoptera Staphylinidae , 0995, 0998, 0999, 00, D0326, D0389, D0599 Coleoptera Staphylinidae Atheta coriaria.. D074 Coleoptera Staphylinidae Prosolierius Coleoptera Staphylinidae Pselaphomorphus... D0598 Coleoptera Staphylinidae Quedius lineipennis Coleoptera Staphylinidae Sagola... D083 Coleoptera Staphylinidae Termitohospes Coleoptera Tenebrionidae , 006 Coleoptera Tenebrionidae Alphitobius diaperinus 0890, D0256, D0277, D0448, D0543 Coleoptera Tenebrionidae Bolitotherus cornutus Coleoptera Tenebrionidae Eleodes Coleoptera Tenebrionidae Onymacris unguicularis Coleoptera Tenebrionidae Tenebrio molitor... D000, D0445 Coleoptera Tenebrionidae Tenebrio obscurus... VP05 Coleoptera Tenebrionidae Tribolium madens Coleoptera Tenebrionidae Tribolium castaneum , 048, 0354, 0370, 037, 0465, 062, 0955, 0957, 405, 587, D008, D009, D045, D0456, D0464, D0566 Coleoptera Tenebrionidae Tribolium confusum , 0442 Coleoptera Zopheridae Coleoptera Zopheridae Eudesma...85 Collembola , 450 Cucurbitales Cucurbitaceae Citrullus lanatus Cucurbitales Cucurbitaceae Cucurbita pepo , 0609 Cucurbitales Cucurbitaceae Momordica.. D098 Cypriniformes Cyprinidae Danio rerio...66 Cypriniformes Cyprinidae Gila orcutti Cyprinodontiformes Poeciliidae Gambusia affinis Dermaptera Dermaptera Forficulidae Forficula auricularia Dipsacales Adoxaceae Sambucus nigra Diptera , 074, 80, 8, 320, 360, 36 Diptera Ceratopogonidae Sphaeromias Diptera Culicidae Anopheles merus...30 Diptera Agromyzidae Liriomyza sativae...47 Diptera Agromyzidae Liriomyza helianthi.. D072 Diptera Agromyzidae Liriomyza huidobrensis... VP5 Diptera Agromyzidae Liriomyza langei... D072 Diptera Agromyzidae Liriomyza trifolii , 47, VP30 Diptera Agromyzidae Ophiomyia simplex Diptera Apioceridae Apiocera haruspex...38 Diptera Asilidae Stichopogon... D0386 Diptera Calliphoridae , 0900, 090, D0599 Diptera Calliphoridae Calliphora vomitoria , D0436 Diptera Calliphoridae Chrysomya albiceps... D0434, D0435 Diptera Calliphoridae Chrysomya rufifacies , 0403, D0432, VP6 Diptera Calliphoridae Cochliomyia hominivorax , 609, D047, D0429 Diptera Calliphoridae Cochliomyia macellaria , 0405, D047 Diptera Calliphoridae Lucilia Diptera Calliphoridae Lucilia cuprina , 609, 74 Diptera Calliphoridae Lucilia mexicana Diptera Calliphoridae Lucilia sericata , 746, 747, D0006, D0007, D0057 Diptera Calliphoridae Phormia regina , 040, 040, D0057, D0433 Diptera Cecidomyidae Orseolia oryzae... D047 Diptera Cecidomyiidae Asteromyia carbonifera Diptera Cecidomyiidae Dasineura balsamicola Diptera Cecidomyiidae Dasineura oxycoccana , 0966 Diptera Cecidomyiidae Jaapiella ivannikovi.253, D0339 Diptera Cecidomyiidae Lasioptera donacis... D0344 Diptera Cecidomyiidae Mayetiola destructor , 0256, 0730, 204, 78, D057, D0532, D0580 Diptera Cecidomyiidae Paradiplosis tumifex , 569 Diptera Cecidomyiidae Prodiplosis vaccinii Diptera Cecidomyiidae Stenodiplosis sorghicola Diptera Ceratopogonidae , D0202 Diptera Ceratopogonidae Culicoides...088, 737, 800 Diptera Ceratopogonidae Culicoides sonorensis , 534, D0428 Diptera Ceratopogonidae Stilobezzia bulla... D0604 Diptera Chamaemyiidae Leucopis...77 Diptera Chironomidae , D0202 Diptera Chironomidae Belgica antarctica...07 Diptera Chironomidae Chironomus Diptera Chironomidae Chironomus islandicus Diptera Chironomidae Chironomus riparius.0437, 044 Diptera Chironomidae Metriocnemus knabi Diptera Culicidae , 0086, 067, 224, 225, D023, D0356 Diptera Culicidae Culex erraticus... D

199 Scientific Names Index Scientific Names Index Diptera Culicidae Aedes Diptera Culicidae Aedes aegypti , 007, 0073, 028, 0307, 0360, 0364, 0367, 044, 0427, 0434, 0440, 0445, 068, 228, 23, 232, 234, 236, 237, 402, 535, 605, 6, 73, 77, 78, 722, D0002, D0048, D005, D0054, D0060, D006, D0085, D023, D028, D0225, D0232, D024, D0249, D0262, D0447 Diptera Culicidae Aedes albopictus , 0357, 0358, 0360, 036, 0362, 0363, 0733, 0749, 0769, 229, 230, 533, 70, 78, D0003, D0009, D0048, D0049, D0050, D024, D025, D026, D029, D0222, D0226, D0232, D0233, D0466 Diptera Culicidae Aedes japonicus , 0733, D0009, D0049, D0052, D0226, VP02 Diptera Culicidae Aedes nigripes Diptera Culicidae Aedes sierrensis... D0230 Diptera Culicidae Aedes triseriatus , 0363, 233, D0009, D0049, D0052, D0065, D025, D0226 Diptera Culicidae Aedes vexans , D0055 Diptera Culicidae Anopheles arabiensis... D0227 Diptera Culicidae Anopheles gambiae , 0443, 077, 02, 095, 097, 226, 30, 406, 605, 606, 6, 84, D0094, D027, D0229 Diptera Culicidae Anopheles punctipennis... D0233 Diptera Culicidae Anopheles quadrimaculatus Diptera Culicidae Anopheles stephensi , 0365, 605, 606, D0220, D0223, D0450 Diptera Culicidae Coquillettidia perturbans... D0053 Diptera Culicidae Culex... D027 Diptera Culicidae Culex coronator , 533 Diptera Culicidae Culex erythrothorax...53 Diptera Culicidae Culex molestus... VP29 Diptera Culicidae Culex pervigilans Diptera Culicidae Culex pipiens...d0224, D0233 Diptera Culicidae Culex quinquefasciatus , 0733, 228, 53, 532, 533, 63, 64, 65, D0003, D0077, D0089, D022, D0228 Diptera Culicidae Culex tarsalis.0359, 044, 53, 536, D0055, D0428 Diptera Culicidae Culex tritaeniorhynchus Diptera Culicidae Culiseta inornata... D0428 Diptera Culicidae Culisita alaskaensis Diptera Culicidae Georgecraigius atropalpus... D046 Diptera Culicidae Ochlerotatus communis Diptera Culicidae Ochlerotatus japonicus. D0002, D025 Diptera Culicidae Ochlerotatus sollicitans.. D0055 Diptera Culicidae Ochlerotatus triseriatus. D0002 Diptera Culicidae Toxorhynchites rutilus... D0065 Diptera Culicidae Toxorhynchites splendens. 229 Diptera Culicidae Wyeomyia smithii.0546, D0008, D0234 Diptera Cylindrotomidae Cylindrotoma distinctissima Diptera Drosophilidae Drosophila , 082, 098 Diptera Drosophilidae Drosophila hydei Diptera Drosophilidae Drosophila melanogaster , 0309, 037, 0434, 0435, 0466, 09, 299, 595, 609, 67, 68, 69, 74, 76, 78, 724, 799, D00, D0072, D0087, D0449 Diptera Drosophilidae Drosophila neotestacea Diptera Drosophilidae Drosophila suzukii , 038, 0436, 0550, 0904, 0905, 0906, 0907, 0908, 0909, 090, 045, 0, 7, 8, 9, 299, 423, 602, 603, 604, D0, D077, D0285, D0297, D0327, D0533 Diptera G