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1 .N4U35 r -;" I -I -07 ~Z qz *I*~ VD 76 2 U-435

2 Report Documentation Page Form Approved OMB No Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports, 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington VA Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE TITLE AND SUBTITLE Action in Normandy, France 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 82nd Airborne Division 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR S ACRONYM(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release, distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES JFSC - WW II Declassified Records. 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR S REPORT NUMBER(S) 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 64 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18

3 I -- ' iace A II -2- NARi.TIVE III - IV DISTRIBUTION A- MEXES...; 33 Days of action without relief, Without replacements, E:ery mission aocomplishied. Nio,otmudl gained ever relinquished. (Report of ilejor General RIDGW4i.Y.) * *. * * * O0OMDCT EFFIECIENCY: Excellent, short 60% Infantry, 90% Artillery. (?.Co G-3 report as of June 1944,) WMPS: GSGS 4347, ATIC~OE, 1/25,000, -f.eets 31/20 SE, 3k/18 NE, SE, -GSGS 42499, RANOE, l/loo00,0 Sheets 5E, 62, 5F, s 6F. * -* * '* * T41p

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5 ,82D1,.- DiVI L soit ACTIO1' IOfT F, 10 :DY' - JtES, JULY 1944 ES.SI2IOi I - P~FaCE

6 'RZ -S a T D SECTION I _- PREFACE The 82d Airborne Division arrived in the European Theater of Operations: on 9 December, 1943, bronzed by the summer suns of NORTH AFRICA and SICILY ead' bled and battle-tested in campaigns in SICILY and the ITALIAN mainland. One..egimental Combat Team, the 504th, -had been left behind when the Division sailed from. NAPLES ITALY, on 19 November, The 504th R'egimental Combat Team, (.consisting of the 504th Parachute Infantry, the 376th Parachute Field Artillery Battalion, and Company C, 307th i.rborne Engineer Battalion) was detached from the Division and was'fighting in the mountains north of the VOLTUTO River when the 82d sailed from 1iAPLES. ~ater it was 'o spend more than 60 days of gruelling warfare on the famous ANZIO Beachhead before rejoining the Division in May in ESTG LATD. The Division disembarked at BEL3F.ST, NORTH IIRELANrD, and occupied an area northwest, of thdt city. Division Headquarters was established at CASZE IDAW'SO1N,,which was approximately thirty miles from BELFAST. The Division was attached to XV Ccrps. 'e A shortage of adequate training facilities, the short days and long nights, and no facilities at all for airborne maneuvers, handicapped training. The need for such facilities and training became.-increasingly important with the attachment to the Division on 14-'January, 1944, of the 2d Airborne Brigade* which included the Brigade Headquarters and Headquarters Company and the 507th and 508th Parachute Infantry Regimonts, and preparations were made for the 82d to move to the NTOTTINGHAI - IICEST1, - MANREET HAi3ORO area in the English Midlands. Brig. Gen. lafiweell B. TAZLOR, Division Artillery Commander, rejoined the Division after duty with tho North African Theater of Operations. The move to the midlands: was made in mid-february, 1944, and an intensive program of airborne and other types of training was begun. A parachute school was opened to train reinforcements, and a series of para6hute problems was mapped out to begin with battalion drops and to culminate with a drop of three regiments. Glider personnel trained with the British Horsa gliders as well as with the CG-4A (Waco) gliders, took training rides of more than two hours duration? Division Headquarters was established in a hutted camp in Braulnstone Park, LEICESTER. The telephone code names of "ILeader" and ItKeystone"l, employed by the Division in NiORTH AFRILCA, SICILY, and ITALY, were dropped and the Divisionbecame kunown as "Champion". The 456th Parachute Field Artillery Battalion,. which had seen much of its personnel detached and left in ITALY, was reorganized. The 2d Battalion, 401-st Glider Infantry, 101st Airborne Division, was attached to the 325th Glider Infantry. This: move gave the 325th a totalof three batt,- lions. Brigadier General TAYLOR left the Division to become Oo.imzanding General of the 10lst Airborne Division. The Division was attached to VIII Corps. Meanwhile, preparations were being made for the Division s. participation in the invasion, of the NORIJANDY, TrANCE, Peninsula by Lllied forces in nope:ation. NEPTULE". 'Brigadier Genrral JAMES M. GAVIN, the assistant Division Commander, had preceded the Division on its move from ITALY end had been a member of the airborne planning staff established by the Allies' in LONDON. The Division Staff began preliminary planning work in January and started intensive planning in February when the Division Situation Room was opened at Camp Braunstono. The Division Comnander, Major General MATTEW B. RIDGFWAY, was the senior American Airborne representative on' an inter-allied airborne planning cozrmittee. - "WY-Day'", the day by which all plans were to be completed, had been set by Supreme Headqua~rters, Allied Expeditionary Force, as 1 June. Regimental staffs were "Ubriefodl m on y-60 and battalion staffs on y-3zg in accordance with instruco tions received from the First 'United States Army and VII Corps to which the Division whould be attached upon landing. 8.~~E5~9-1.-

7 82D AI.O' DI VI SIOLT ACTIOIT INT TO~tMKDY, FBOCS Ji,'EB - JULY 1944 BECTICI II - NTARTIVED E S L T2 I S T B D

8 SCTI0N II - NRa'RATIY$ 26 May 1944 al plans and preparations were completed for the Division to carry out the mission assi>.e'eitv-by First United States Army. Field and administrative orders had.been puisphed and distributod. In a series of fa-.p. maneuvers on a special 1/5,000 map-gimental and battalion commanders had u;t: lined their plans, in order that all commanders might be briefed thoroughlry r. the prospective Division operations. Divisional seaborne echelons already ~r d departed for the narshatllng yards and were assembled in camps scattered alol g hb.e Welsh and southern J glish coasts. Tte Divisionh,isiion was: to be as fol3, lows: 'Land by parachute and glider.before and after dawn of D-Dae west of ST. SAUVER LE VIOOMTE:. seize, clear andi secure the: general area ST, JA.CQUES EI NEFMU (136985) - 3ESMEVILIE (137928) (both inclusive) - ST. SUVEUR LE VI00MTE (exclusive) - BLAiDA!MUR (167982) (Inclusive), and reorganizie; seize and destroy the crossings of the PRAIRIES AREMCAGJUSES north of LA SANGSURIERE (188898), at ST. SAUVEUR DE PIERIEM PONT (145890); destroy the crossings of the OLIONONE River. in the vicinity of ST. 10 D'OURVILLE (090894) and block crossroads vicinity LE CHEMIN (102902), prevent enemy forces moving north between ST. O1 DWOURVILLE and& Jtntion of OUVE River with PRAIRIE MARECAGEUSES (2M2921):; and protect the south flank of VII Corps north of the same line." The mission, however, was :canged by the First Army Commander on 26 May due to confirmed intelligonce repo"rts the enemy had strengthened his -forces on the O0TENIN, (C0EIBOURG) Peninsula with the addition of the 91st. Infant"ry D;vision in the general area of ST. SAUVEU L- VICOMTE. The revised mission of the 82d Airborne Division was to be: GLand by parachute and glider before and f.ter dawn of D-Day astride the MMERD T River, seize, clear and secure the general area: CR (261938) - CR (265958) - CR (269975) - RJ (274982).- RO (283992) - bridge (308987) - NIEUVILLE AU PLAIN (3,40985) - BANDIEtVILLE (360987) within its zone; dapture ST. MERE EGLIST (349965); seize and secure the crossings of the MERDERET River at (315957) and (321930), and a bridgehead covering then, with MLR along the general line,: M (261938) - CR (265958) -.. (269975) - pr ( ) -RAJ (283992); seize and destroy the crossings of the DOVE River at DEUZEVILLE LA DASTILLE (309911) and ETT.TIL.-2" talso known as PONT LA3BE) (269927); protect the aortblwest flank of VII Corps within the Division Zone: m.d be pi epared to advance west on Corps order to the line of the DOEUtr north of its junction with the PRAIRIES M'A a"! S a":u ' Now orders and other administrative details made necessary by Uhp new mnis sion were worked out quickly' and disseminated within four days. The chornge did not effect the basic plan for movement in three echelons which had bon wc.rkd out as follows: borce.allnl? commanded by Brigadier General JAIES M. 0,'I.J: as i'tn::. Division Oolmander, to be committed by parachute before (.-.x c'nf o- Day and to include Det Hq & Iq Co, 82d Abn Div epq & o;es a. H~ E92

9 Pathfinders '. 9' Det Hq 82d Div Arty... 2 Dot 82d Abn Sig Co Det 456.rcht FA.2n (atchd 505 Prcht Inf) Alr 8upport Party (ttch'd: -Hq8d' Abn-l.iv), 505 Pcreht, Inf ' rcht- f P?"rcht In' ',',. 117 Co. B "07.bi' Engr:3":.'... ", 9 Naval, Shore itle CO6ntiol Party (atchd. 505 Prcht Inf) - :. ;.:TOTA. 378 FPorce '13'f I.T oranded by MLjor General MATT 9W B i IDICWAY, Division Commnpier, to. bo comnitt ;4,by glider Before and after dawn of I Dsvy and to; include. '._li der Hq. &-I o.82 Abn iv (-). 22 Hq &.q 3try, 82d Abn MDl vatyy(') ' d Abn Sig Co.: (') G].i Inf Gli -FA : Dn... ; 14.C 320.P.i A 3n.,,. 31trys A 3 AD C 80 Abn AA n... (AT)",7. ;30. d,, O.2 i:. ' :,c;, l' ;:.(-;) 13. Air C.-, r t: - t "... 0o:ma-m vol-n ivo.cit. Pr cht Ri gt. 12 * '':--.:,:. 'L T - 428: : 456-.FA Dn (-)'Ar 87'...'.nd d FA.a': A Dn, atchd 80 Abn AA '3n (--) '.";'; 899 T:D nt atchd 307 Abn ingr.n (-). ', 4 Cav Sqdn, atch 7[82 Abn Ord Maint Co Co. Q, 746 Tk.3n (M), atchd :407 Abn- QP Co.- 09Q.S.O Trk- Co, 'atchd 82 Abn M Plat 'I Trk 0o, atohd Corps lod Dets: lst Rlati 603 qjm (UR).T o, atchd Seaborne eiements of uani$s i-n Forces '; "". ' ' -':'.-r: ;nali and. n. " Force MCf - Com.mcn'9od by D3ri.gdier Generhl GEGiE) 1P..IW-=. Conrianma. ing. Gener[i of' 2. ITifaat,y ii:bo'rng 3Brigade, to'be eoimmitted, by sea; to ianai botw3en D.)ltus 2.and D pl' s: 7 and to include.- t-uder.the plan Force "'A" in its entirety was to approach the OCERBOURG (C00T,TIV)' Poenn'sila: fronm the wes.t'and.to.drop between 0100 and 0315 hours on the night of D i.ld:-da o:ai;t tree drop -ones.- -The 505thi Parachute Infantry-. Reginent' and'its 'a:,tahneonts.wore:to land east of the MERDE.ET River about 1,000 yards northwast.,iof,s'e;1' EiM EGI;ISE (3397?). Tho 507.th e. rachute In.:fantry Regiment 'was t0 lad wt.ao. t.h 'N.ERDMRfT Rliver.aboout 1,000. yards north of AM2REVIL' (3098).; The,,5QBh.Parachut,5 Infantry. Rogiment and. Force H i,. eadquarters, ;eo" t'o La'.. w.t of' the RIMiBERET River abo0ut 1,000 yards north, of PICaWUVILLE (29 5).':',:.;, Fifty -two gliders of Force I 3 n? were to approach the -CHDRB3OURG Peninsula from the. west prior to.. uer.and liand on the 505th drop zone. The reaaindor of Force "ID" was to approach' the peninaiia from the e6st and was to land lata nt Qarlr D

10 on ld-day and early on D plus one on landing zones a ' ie STE. Mi:2 EGZLIS$ -3 LLOSTILLSE (3694). Iod In. a last-minute change of plai,neral IDG,,'AY parachuted wi-th orce "AH". Aerial rpsiupply missions were scheduled automatically for the morni,.g of. p'u!a one T on Oh i3 theroafter if 'need&e,. The automatic mission was the Q4 parachute is.sion utintelsy flow but a small amot f eq eat and ";pio.were receivdved,ater by glider. All airborne elements of the- Division had closed and wee -eal.ed in special camps at the take-.off fieddss by 24 hour' before the. schedled& tok-off twime. Parachute elints were :located at seven airfields in the GiiT.T"ii; - :JOTTES$RE.- I1 ~GA R;%arJ of th~e -ritish ipmidlandsi and glider elements. wore at seven air-fields in the' :A.rSOS RUJIS:UitY - vi ERY=ZLD area. (See 'Anne No. 3.. ".4t;l ;eni were briefed thonoughly on their missions, a recheck was made of ell eoquipraent. and personnel, aud planes and gliderser'ore loaded with equipment, The Altie.,D-)ay was postponed 24 hours because of weather conditions, a4,d the first planes of eorce "A" took off 'at June T.e i4ain flight was preceded by the three.regimental pathfinder teams. which :dropped don-half hour prior to the first group. The pathfindr.ers sustain. ed many casualties and had difficulty in- using lights, but they agomnplished their mission an. d set up beacons to guide the incoming '. nes to the tlaree desilgated drop zones. The flitht over the :,-gish Ohannel iwas in good formation and without.irn idxet, but between thoe we:et S1t, coast: the crop zd zones a heavy fog bank tended to break up -the fo ria'tito'n '- thelanes:,. alk and.d some eneny night fighters activity caused soe of -the tr0. carrier planes to take up evasive action, and by the time. the drcp izones 0 were reached ra.ry planes were scattered, and were flying at, excessive 'sp~,de'ds. ead at altitudes- hi-ler thn. those ideal for julping. " The 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment landed gen-erilly in the Viicinity of its drop zone. The 507tlh Pa:r'achute Infantry was scattefod, one el'ecant dropping in the-"vicinity of.iq1t'.oursg, another south of Cia! TTEA and the remainder astride the MEaDET River east df- the drop zone. The 508th.Par.chuto Infantlr ~egiment was lrewise sc'attered widely, the bulk of its parachutists dropping dist of the Drop Z6ne and somre personel landing as far away as nine kilometers 'soith of -tym30utpg' the 52 gliders contlaining batteries of the 80th Airborne Antiaircraft Battalion ahd detachments and forward parties of artillery, sinal. and. Division Headqutrters groups f11,owed the main body of pnratroopers,nd be'gan landing at hours. Tho gliders also encountered fog and flak. They too were scattered and mr.any of then were damaged upon crashing into the small fields and high hedgerows.: Snemy reaction to 'the landing of the' 82d Airborrne Div sion in the!t3pnitdy area was prompt. and severe, but from the time the.first meber landed until 33 days later, when the Division, was finally relieved, every ission ~was accoipli'shed and. no ground gained. was ever. relinquished.' A day-by-day account' of the Divisionls activities fo4lows: J..g, 6 '0TE 1944 (See Annexes 5and Smal.l groups and some.units.attackhed to secure the Division zone. Groups :The first elemcngt of the main body of the Division jumped at 0151 hours, having been preceded 30 minutes by the Pathfinder teams..' By 0312 hours all paratroopers had.landed, and at 0404 hours the first: of 52 giders in the initial gli.der serial crash landed. Both parachutists and gliders were scatter ~e aa ICT ~a.

11 strc. T.ED.. of mem and individuals who had been scattered in the ljandings rejoined their units throughout the'.dayj and by nightfall approximately 30.per cent of the Divisionts forces were under control, At 2100 hours: 100 gliders landed with artillery, engineers, and special tropps, Seaborne elements set sail'at 0645 fromr BRISTOL except for a taik force consisting of Comparny O 7.46th Tank Battalion;' the, Jlst' Pla,,o., Troop B 4th V ocavlry Squadron; and el nments of Compap-r F Md :B.3a;talioz.originaly B2d 2 ad;ta-.oirx 41Olsst G.id~er I-anir-y) s 325'th Glider infantry,. Thia task force: landled on Utah.:Re-3eDeach ab 1400 hou:s and proceeded inl.and wi.th the- mission of' cont;.ctin.g the Division near ST.J. I.IE.2f EGLISE, '..t 'the' close: of the day, the Division was-in the ' 1st of srevere fighting. 'It had capt'ured..st2, LEMRE EGLISE and held a geniral.line'.alng the M.tii.MIT Eiver ftom. LIA PIME' (31.i996:) south to incltde. the eastern end of the causeway over the MERRET rlvez a"' auarters headquarters Company, 82d A4irborne Division Parachute, elements, parto ofa Foice I"AI,.droea at 0214 hours near th'e e4st bank of the IT M.D3EIT P.iver, ;.and glider elements, leading cchelon. of 'Forco.'' landed at 0204 hotrs,.- he - Fonce ' 'Co: &i9ost'' W.m.s" s-ev,,'up i:.it:itly- at 3C,59 5~ wesit of tbh.-m.dfep.,et3.;" River,' but at' 0730 th.e.'ouq p waded across the ' i-rer to' t.. eas:t banl and"-assimbled at LA.I;;E ( h new Forcb ThiA,rln tu - established at 'a rai.'road cro'6sing at The Division Commander, who jumped with the'5th aiachut6 ni'rintry,, eost'blished. hi Coma.d Po.st in a hedjfero'a west' of.i STE 4t. EGLISE ; at 5265E,e. ments of 1:6ardquarte:es 'nd of the.i efense Patoori moved s6idlh to scure the brig;e. west of CHEF DU fpo1 (3'1930) ywhere it: emcbuntered. sevet'e enemy fire,.this groap returned to he Command' Yost -at.1700, but pait of the, Defense Pletoon: moveod to a neow 0brce ' i.0i'"'command "Post at a rhilroad pass at The Di-ision Eeadquartert ihitial gt&der serial. which landed in the dark. %t approximately hours, Wa, 'scattered, and the: G2 and. G-3 did not reach the command post until late afternooho The Chief of Staff was inj'ured in a glidor ":ash and lateai evacuated, The 0-1 did not reach the command post 'for two days., 505th'P,.rachute Infantry Reiment he, fitst element, the 2dDBattalion, dropped at 0151 hours and the entire regiment L'anded -by 0202 hours. 'Most of the troops landed on or near the drop zone~ b' a ' few were widely dispers.dover the countryside. The 3d B3attalionr entered 'STE4 '=E EGLISE. at 0200 hours, and thet'.im4. was securely held.ad ovti;oste. within an hour. The- American Flag was raised' over ite{ MP.E EG'MJS3: th.e first F-onch town to' be li.erated by the.llies. After assembling the 2d attaalior. - started to move out to tiake ieuvilie R.U.. u orders.were received. f:rcio the regiment to stand by. At 0600 hours 'the 2d. 3attalior. move[-n3; 'posiion north:n o0 STM. I.liP EGLI'SE and assisted the 3d Battalion in holding the to'i, The ].st Daft.:: linn moved toward its, objective, the bri'dgq,pohr, averth4e,d-et River '(314956) a. LA FIERE at 0630 hours and by 0830 hold the.eastern end 6of.this bridge again.st heavy enemy fire from. the western approaches.' 507th Parachute Infantry Reg.' -t. The first elem'ent, the 1st Battalion,. jumped at hours, and by hour'. the entire regiment was on the ground generally east of the: MlRDET R! iver and was fairly dispersed. Snall- groups assembled to form small task forces' until sucl' time as the regiment could assemble.completelyo One such force on the west bank. of the ifwdmeret River attacked A ' IlTEI'.ILI but-.was forced b:ck by overwhelming superiority in.enemy strength to FLAUX ('303955). A patrol was sent. to the western r5 E T 0 EDZ~

12 R E S TR I,! C end of LA FIREB Bridge and contact' was made with elements of the 505th Parachute Infantry on the eastern end at 1430 hours. The enemy recaptured FLAUXS and drove this patrol from the western end af the',la VIERE3 -ridge. Another force of the regiment joined with Force "A" Headquarters and at 1130 attacked to secure the CEEF DU P.ONT Bridge (321930), meeting ext-eiroly severe resistance. Tho'eastern end of the bridge was finally secured by nightfall. Leaving one company to hold the bridge, the remainder of this second force moved to an assembly area at 1715 hours in the vicinity of the railroad overpass, at Still another' goup, led by the regimental conaander, landed on or neer the scheduled drop zone but had no contact with other elements of the Division during the day. 508th Prxachute Infantry Reaiment The 3d Battalion Jumped at 0208 hours antlthe entire regiment was on the ground by 0220 hours. Fourseparate groups were assembled, One group was in the vicinity of LA FIBRE, fought along the railway and attacked the LA FIBSE Bridge. This group was later relieved by the 1st Dattalion, 505th Parachute Infantry and moved to an assembly area in the vicinity of the railroad overpass (323960)' to organize a defensive position. Two other groups joined forces west of the MERDERET River in the vicinity of PICAUVILLE after taking part in heavy fighating around GUETTEVILLE (300948). and.north of PIOCUTILtnE A-n officer of this group shot and killed the coanlandin; general of the Germlan 91st Division. The combined group then seized the high ground west of the MB!ERMET River south'of SUETTEVILLE at during the ni;ght of Juno 6-7. A fourth group dropped in the vicinity of $SE. MIRE EGLISE, fought with the 507th Parachute Infantry to take the C UF DU PONfT Bridge (321930) and later organized a defensive position covering thi s bridge. 25th Gliger InfantrXy Regimqent Company F, 3d Battalion, supporting Company C, 746th Tank Battalion, landed on Utah Red Beach at 1400, de-waterproofed vehicles and moved inland at 1600 to make contact with the Division. Heavy artillery, mortar and small arms fire held up this task force at crossroads Two tanks were knocked out. The remainder of the regiment prepared to take off frcm airports in England. 82d Airborne Division Artillery Parachute elements jumped at 0210 hours, joined a group from the 508th Parachute Infentry and assisted in the attack on the LA FIERE Bridge. At 1330 hours this element Joined the glider element at the Division CP at Glider elements landed at 0500 hours and moved directly to the Division CP. At 2305 hours Headquarters and Headquarters Battery of Division Artillery, the 319th Glider Field Artillery Battalion and the 320th Glider Field Artillery Battalion glided into lolii&,idy and encountered severe enemy small arms and mortar fire., Reorganization commenced immediately but was handicapped by intense eneny fire. The section of the 456th Parachute Field Artillery 3attalion attached to 505th Parachute Infantry jup-ped with the 3d Battalion, but was able to assemble onlyone on of the towo 75mm pack howltzers which had been dropped. 80th Airborne Aitiaircraft Batt :i.on (AT) Batteries A and B landed by glider at 0405 hours. Six 57mm antitank guns had been recovered and were in post-ion by 1730 hours. Battery C glided into the area at 2100 hours and began assemibly and reopganization. The remainder of the Battalion sailed from 3RiSTOL, ;!GLATID, at 6645 hours. 307th Airborne Eni.neer Battal on Company B '(loss one platoon attached to the 505th Parachute Infantry). I-6 B S m P I C T B D

13 R E S T R I C T E Jumped with the 50,th Parachute Infantry at 0210 hours. Some Engineer personnel took up defensive positions at Lr. PIiRE in su!pport of one ji:oup of the 508th,, and other perso:'oel joined the 508th.grovp wrest of the MMDMT River. one "stickl, which included the Battaliun COmmandur, was dropped over ST. SAUVBE. LB VICOMlITE, and only' a few:.eseaped, Part of'headqua.rters 'and Company A landed by,.glidor at 2300 hour's and started to assemble under heavy,enei.y artillery, and small arms fire.-' Th'e remrainder of the battalion" prep'ared. to take off from airports in NGL;TD. 307th Airborne Medical :Comany r.'ements of 'the company landed by 'glider about 2100 and i mpiediately began assembly, recovering by use of life rafts much equipment from gliders that had,. landed in shallow water near the bailks of the I4MID)ET River, A clearing station, was seb up at -a'crossroad north of MIOS7ILLE, ' P2d Airborne Sa Oopan Parachute and glider elementsof the companyn which landed -prior to 'I-Hour: were scattered and assemiblea with difficulty. IMuch equipment. was lost. Only one of the threo SOR 193 radios landed guring D-Day was operative, and i.t was not until the night of June 6-7 'that radio contact was established with the 4th Infan. try Division and wi.th the Division -base in.egld,. -.D PLUS 1, 7 JQTle.S1, The Division continued to assemble, reorganize, and secure its area against extremely soevere enemy resistance which included'armor..ene my. troops, identified as the 91st.Infantry Divi~sion, woere hold along the MDOPE?1T.River to: the.west. and :were driven back to the. north and northwest:/. Contact was established 'with. the 4th",Infantry Divi'sion during, the day, and--the VII Corps Commander'visited the'division Command Post late in the day,.he 325th Glider Infantry -arrived by glider, during the morning. Additional personnel which had been.scattered in the o'rigi'inal landinges cdntinued to report back to their units. DuTring the afternoon garbled radio messages signed 'CO 507" were received at the :Division Command Post,' and it 'was finally determined-that they. originated with the. ebimental Commander.who was. isolated with a group.of about 300 men west of XEFPMVILLE.. '325th Gtider Infantr'Reiet '... Tihe. ' -first' glider elements began landing at.,0700 hours about 2,500 :yards southeast' of. SITE. MliE G;ISEf. There were many. caas.h landings, and casualties totalled approximately 7.5 per' cent, Assembly. was rapid, however, and by 1015 hours' all battalions -were reported, The 3d Dattalion moved out toward C2QUiD.UT at l&15 hours,nd reached. L PORT' (328918) without encountering opposition. The remainder of the regimentt proceeded to move into 'an assembly area northeast'of C0P' DU P1OT,, It hours: th 2d 3Battalion was ordered to move, into an assem.- bly area east of Lt..FI in the vicinity of and:later was at.tached.t6 the 505th Parachute Tnfantry at 2100 hours, The 1st and 3d Battalions were ordered to move into and to outpost the regimental assemrbly area. Company,, 3d Battslion in support of.vo rpany C, 746th' Tank.attalion, and the 1st Platbon, attack towards STE. IDfwl igiis73 E from the west at 0630 hours and made contact with 4ider borne elements-of the 325th by 'The '325thts regimental strength at the clos, of the day was approximately 85 per cent. 505th Parachute Inf.ntry 2egiment The 2d.and 3d Battallons continued'tco hold STE. l,!ie EGLISE e gainst severe

14 RESTRICT ED attaeks fomrn the north and south. The 2d Bittalion patrols contaiced elemaieonts of- the 8th Ifeantry RJ.i. ent of th.. 4th I4rtry DiviLion at S'-.. MIARTINE (384973) lt ~.OO'hours and attacked north to- cl-?ar tho. outskirts of STE. IME- - EGLIS. TiT,? ~lst B,:tUlion 'wit. stood- svers31 coun.terattck s an' push?d the en.n my back to thel eactern bank of the.:ier. L.t.ETT Ri:;va, in th..vicinityr of tho, LA FI PE Brid3e,. They were supoprted lkte in thb day by one plitoc.cn of ' tanks from Company: C, 74t6ii T.:.nLk B.tt.,io:'. At the clos;. oi: tlhe poriod, of 2d and 3d BattalionTs prepared t atttack north toward NEU~ILLE AU PLA.iT i-n. conjunction with the 4th Infantry D-ii-iion''- drive on the righllt. T.e 2d B7,ttalion, 325th Glider Iof intry, was attached at.2100 to assist in. this,tjack. 507th Pracilutr- IThntry P,!e.iy.Lt Thb :te,inr:.nt i;ooved into ran are-a of,rest ST7..'LSS :ie i icinity of , rest,., aend reor-;aized. At 1600 hours tihe-re-m.ciment moved into positions south of tihe Ti FIER? - STE. MEIGPT CLISE Road a. st of th].: reilroa(i to assist the 1st wttali.r!, 505;;- P.achute : I:rtr against a threaten~'e.c counterattack at th, LAi FIEREl Br~id~g.,A 1i00 hours the 507th, at appro ;:itely 25 per cent strength, succcssfull.y pushe)d th'.e enemiy;i back to ttle v;iost bank of tkh.be- M1EPD" ET R',v_. in its snector. 508th Pa'rzachute Iiif~;try Re,:iment One- trotp near the railroad' ov.re;ase,( (;U29)60 ) ;:evod. into positions in the vicinitv of th3 road. junction.33497,'- to protect -the Div ri.,'s iu2orth %fl.nk a..uinst enemy penetration. Thiv 1,.rcu, V:is in,,csitioi, b' 0630 hours, but it later m.oed to join anotlher.ro..p of. t.be regiment in position d;fe:onding the C3IF DU PONT B'id..e. 'It.'.pod up nunmerous qnemy stronhi points surrounding CH.i7F DU FONT ind e.stablished patrol contact with,:.le-.3nrts of the r;gim-nt we.st or the MRB)lrl:T Riv.'r QoI tlt x,,i,r ound in the. vicinity of 3' T ::.- l'oup oni. thhih aground, now i-eco.,mized as the 2d B-rttii.on, hirn co;npltet,-d orr-anriz-tion of its position by 13:0 hours, wipin,- out a nunmbe.r of eiicmy mortar aizd,.:rt:ill::rypositi ons. A road block was s :t up on th'e western apiroach..s to the C.i..: D E PONT Brij-, arnd coltact was esta'bli;..hed. ith...orces in C.',-,P~ DU PO,.:1, Rped~!.aqto strenjth.at t.: clos' 'of the da.y w,-.s 2e:.ro.i.mately 25 per cent.. 82d. Aircrn:; Division A:.ti:;.lry Various groups of- the artill3ry -Wee' involved in individual skirmishes with the enemy as they found. their way bick to their p-;rent nnits. Th',lAti, O (A-r. Field Artill.ery B..tt:.iion asse,,mbled east of $.'.i. Ml.-'E E(LISE ln the vicinity of g71974 with si. 75mm lackl owitzers. The 3P3jtC Glidir '!icld irtillory obltt4l.nwas placed in direct sup-!ort of the 505th Parachlute Infarntry. After salv-i.riing two 105mm MI3 howitzersi knd tak;inf, ovw:r the 75mrm pacl:. howitzer bf th)e 1,56th Parachute Field Art'tii or, Battalion de.tachment.wi.th the 505th, 'the.:320th.;c.nt into 4 position 400, y.lrds west of ST.... Eri EGLISE. The first rouw:!d Vwas r'ired.at 0911 hours. The, seaborne.,ohelon of. tio 456th Parachute Fi.ld,Artill;r.y Battalion arrived o:ff Utah B'.;,.: i'b.ut did not la ;d.. 80th Aih!'orne.ABi&ercraft BPttalion' Batterie-s A, B, id C cpntinu.d to reorganize uand by l100 hours six 57,"m.m antitank guns,of BAttery: C. an, threoo,uns ach from.. ti.:'is -. nd B.:a in position coveringi then two bridges over the il RD.E:tFi.ia-vr. The remainder of the Battalion :rerained nn board Sli$ps preppring to driser.ebark on Utah Beach. 307th Ai.,ncrn En.ii,;(;r. B:t. io~ ' - Tns. remaindo., of.ompany A b;"glid'r.l;:ded at hours and moved to join the 325th Infantry in the viciniity. of CE.'. DU PONT at 0930 hours, EB.ci;jes and culverts southi, of LE PORT (328918) and :near LIES'v'ILLz (b.l5) we.e hlown. R 2 S T I C T E D

15 R ES.T R I C T E D Aerial Resupply An aer-ial resupply missio;,, iancludinri 148 of the planes which had taken off,, arrived, over the.area.'at.0620.' Theyr dioppe'd tons'of ordnance, ouartermaster and medical supliei.s," ':741.of 'the'ori.inall. scheduled load. The drop pattern was.oor.aid bund.les we.e scattered, nanrv of them f-:llinpg into enemy hands1 or"' 1ein` covered y e7enly. lre. Limited recovery wvas affected initially... D PLUS 2,' 8J M 1944 The.Division continued to attack ailng its north flank, maintained its positions along the IERDEP..T Fiver,' and clea.red t':e sb!ijthbrn flank area to est,.blish contact li'th 'th.e lol].t A'i-orne 'Div sion. During_ the nirht of 7-8 JIne, a m.m'ssenger from the isdlasted group east 'df AUFREVI.LIT creased the 1vE O;ZtDT Rii-r on a suken brid-e north west of LA FIERE -.nrd rej.orted to t hre Di 'i'sion CornmCnd! Pac;t. It wae? now evident that ' there were three isolated groups west of. th ėe I;Th,.,R2.T Riyer, as' follov;s: a. A stron{' force of 2d Bt"t' lion, 50'th P..:rcbute Ii,'fantry, oa hih 3i in the vicinity of south.of C'G.-UErTVILLE (300948). round b.' The 2d Batta:Lion, 507th P 'rachute Ixfuntry, located north of FLAUX in the vicinity of e,' A force: of approximately 425 men, most of.,them from the'5b7th P:rzichute Ifiarnt'ry, located west of AVF'REVILLE. As the above situation became clear, the Division Con3Tnde r developed a plan to relieve the isolated groups..vwest of the IiERD'. ET and also establish a clearcut bridgehead over the River.. The 1st TBttalion, 325th Glider In';?atry, was to. cross the /RDERPB;T River oni t.;' sunken bridi; northi wvst of LA FIERE,-est~ablish contact with the '2d EB-.talion, 507th-Parachut'e I.fan.try, and swin.: south to cap. ture the west6rn approaches to. the LA FIERE-Bride..Th;-. 507th for-ce. west of Pd,'t FREV.ILLE vras 'to attack to.th.e east to' contact 2the 1st B.t't2ion 325th,' and 2d Battalion, 507th. The 2d Th.tt,.lio n-, 50Sth. Parachute'Infantry, was 'to remain in place. 325th Glidier"Infantry Req.iment At 2330 the 1st Bct.._li!.n crossed the MERDERST Ri'yer nortiwest.'of LA FIRE. byr means tf a sunken road and. a railroad embt.nkment a.a'inst l'ittle enemy opposition to establish a bridgehead, and contact the iso.lated f'orcr.--s of theo 507th Parachute Infantry. At. the close "'of'the period the. 1st Battalion hx;i. crdss..:d the river' succe-sasfully and. was'.marchini f towards the western anproaches 'to' the LA FIERE Bridge. 505th Ptrachute Infantry Regiment Tri. 'lst P;..'atlion initially rbmained. in position north of LA FIERE.,.stin n the 507th P.archute Ii. i' Y`trD;. _,uardirl:.-the. REPD,ET Rii-vae crossin,, at that.point. T.o. 2d. and 3d Battalions attacked( abr:ast to the north arnd seized NEUVILLE AU PIAIN by 0430 hours a ainst slignht opposition. SLA,.ort-d b; the 2d P1.W..on, Co.-,,nmy C., 746th Tar,k Battalion, these two battalions continued their attack to the no'.th and' sei.zed GRI:INVtLLE 'by hours. T.,e 1st Battalion relieved the 3d Battalion, the 3d th.en taeking up.a reserve position.' southi,.est of GRAINVILLE in the viciniti of' 30899:3. 'Attached to.th:.505th, the 2d Battalion, 3S25th Glider Il!',fatry,'assumed adefensiv,-. position's ;Fest of the' towh and prepared to attack to the nor,th toward' FR.E'SVILLE., on the Division's'.orth flank at. the close of the period. R'E S T 'R'I CT E B., ~~7

16 R S T R I C T E D 507th Parachute Infantry Regimxent Ono force of 175 men isolated since D-Day 'on thz we':sti bank of the,ie~t'w... River nort'h of FLAUX in the vicfinity of 3.L5968 was still intact but suffered from heoavy enei;y artil'lery, rgrtar, and srall arms fire. It jittc',nptted unsuccessfully to cross th6'river to the east to re.joint the reegimint, Part of the 507th force west of i,,ifr':ivill, succeeded.-i.j.oining the go,.up. ast O i th;e town, but another portion of th:! group, including the regimental ea mmander, was ambushed nd tand kn prisoner. The.ortion 8f the 507th east ot thb hierdp'.'bt cojiti,,uod to L.old a linre between anhd 13978,- maintaining contact -iith' adj.i'cent regimeilts. 503th:Parachute Infantry -R.ginent Attnaking with two r.oinforced 'companies, the reii;i.ent cleared the area on. the Division.'s south flan.k to' include the townss of LE FORT, CChRQEB';T, and ETT'R- VILLE by hours.and '0stablished contact with the Alelt Airborne Division at Road Junction ' north of BLOVILLE, Resistance was severe, but 160 prisoners were taken. The '2d Battalion on tio west bank of the ierd7.e-it River repulsed several Sharp enemy t.ank coun'terattcliks diret;ed at t:he western causeway to the CHEDF DfU FONT Brid,,e,. -C.tac with tho fiment on thhe' ast bank could ort be maintained becaiuse of,acs'sive : e. ony activity ahd observation. 82d Aiirborne Division 'krtiilery The,. 319th Glider' Ficld A, ti.~ery B.Ettalion moved srven 75mm pack howitzers into ',position east of' Ci/2 D..r PONDT in support of the 507th and 508th Parachute Inrfntry Rf;jimerntsV -'The '320th Glider F.Lcld i i-illsr; PBattalion moved eight 105mm M3 howitzers intd position west of ST, k..r',.g:lse in direct support of the 505th ParadhaUte and 325th Olider' I:zr.yt R'Ri.mronts." Th.. 87th Ficld Bltil:leiy' Battalion was relieved pf attaci'bment t8 the Divisigrn b.:,for' -t was' in:position t o fire a shb't in' sup.ort of our operations, Seaboren Echelon '' "'o' Th.: s..ahorne 3ch.lon, Force C",? be,,::an ar..ding at 1500 hours and moved. into a bivouac. aiea prpa'ratory to Joining the rest o the Divisiorn. Troops included the 456th Parachute Field Artillerr B.:ttalion, Batteries :') E and F of the 80th zairborne A':tiaircra:'t Battalion, Headquarters Company of the 307th Airborne -~g~neer Batt'alion, sobme attached troops and seaborne eiemrents.,f hnitts that.: 'had arriyed b 'parach'ute and glider. ' D FPUS 3-9' JU\T 1944 Thei Divisi;ti,nined a ciear-ct: boridgieheaed over the MEPRD:!.r5T River, relieved two of the thr'e. isolated. groups and- sonm. rr.,:em.brs of t,'l:e- third,' and continued its ntt ck to the..northwe.st in the TLEB HJ.i1 sector ;.. 325th Glider Infant;ry Regimont IL.e 1't s B,..-..Aion continued 'to ;reoss forward to reach the-western approa, ches of the L'A. FLE PM,ri-.o but at '04b0 hou'rs.,mas %pinned down by heavy fire of all types in th.e vicinity o'f C.;' JI'UaY (309959'). 1'ollovin, a' 15 minute artil.lery preparatio.i, the 3d Battalion attacked acro-s' the jla FIEl,, BridCe at 1050 hours wit'h two.orn)manies of the P: cute I507t!nfa'ntry nd. su.:ported.' C,::.l; T-.:;...:!th PBattaizion., bridfgehead' was' c.stabilisbr.'.d 'espiae i::.vy lossesvy.lty was s:.- cure'j by,.5 30.'hour s an'd th.:3d d Bn -. in w,s linked up with the 1st B,,ttalion, 325t'h. oil t:j.. lf.t anl ':ith the 2V d B :ttllion, 507ta.. on the ri ht, Only a smfall'>, portion of the group, west of 2 D... L,. suc-e..r.:.. in r_,eac..ing our lines, An I nemy counteriattackf lasting 'from' ido0 to O! as 'rpu'sd' 10 suc :,eseiv'el'u by th 3d Batt.alion and the 507th Palraciute '.t.ftyu... -'T, R~ t S} Z I (it;, ' : v

17 b0oit..-parachute Infantry Reg*iment: R E. T R I C T E D GRL.JIrVl,,l, and the bridge ove\' the i, RD3E-RET River at the town were seized by ~10. -:The regiment :atta{sceda.again at 0530 with 2d Battalion on the left, 2d Bat.talion, S325th. Glider I(,axitrr,- attached., on. the -right,.and lst.bt',~iionr follo'fin'g. Tl", rbt.minent reached" a: li' y.ards south of t.e 'canal, to ,,y 1I200,.The 2d Bt:..iion' th'nn.nmoytd. thirou hlposi'tioni 'of 2d B:tt.lie'on,,.3,25th nd.continued the attack itw'lth' lt'.h Battalion. 507th Para:hute Inftr Re iment Tv.o nompanies'.abtackead acros. -th-.lai ~FIMR.' Brid;.e with the 325th bglid.r Ir. f.,ntry at' 1030 to 'stablisl: a.fiirmtri.'.headc1, in a fierce and savage attack. These two comnanils 'captur.d..leb0i OTY :('.9962;. d.s.ituc h~lsvy ''1]. fire odf ty'es. Cont.c't w,:as-l mde. with the 2d' "Bjtt : io, 507: i ' and the tvo companies moved into a res.rve position 500 yarcs east of-le, I,:0TEY.- TUh: regiment again assistel t.. 325th,.et.:2000,-hours'i:''in'..repolliig a' strong enemy counterattack, the repulse of which assured. a firm hold on the M'3...T Bri. 4.. head. 508th. Pa rithte J; fi I t. R-,Li ict:s T:'e:3d B..tt'lion' crossea.ove LA;F: BI r4 headt-, lb'o hoou'r, and.-attacked - south to c.lear t'te arear b'.,tw.e..'n:,gulftt:.iville (~.,.094,.a ) '!.. hih. r : ound at :. Cont cet.vrsa. stblished.,witith-- tv > on,.andr tlhe isdet. ead. hd Was. 'thus.ete ; t...o in-hlud',b;,.bt, t th. :';".,,causev,,s s- t LA, FIt'iE. and -southweet of CHFF.:,jU. PONT. A-.shrp` 'enm-y 'o, nt,,erattack from. tie.'irectioi jf otf,!, RF,,VIoLEL was t. pulsod: succe'ssfuly :betweeo i930..nd. ag 100 houbrs.th5 iaemainder- 6ofte. :.regiment maint'ine8d position holdin'.- tb"" CihF fdu PONT Pridge. It r:vceiv$d sptsmodic irt'iliery fire [during :te evenl'g. 82d Airborne Division Artiller,y The 456th Parachute Field.Artillery Battalion and saaborne elements of the remainder 'of Division Artillery units arrived. 'GrouBmert was,~mde"a. th. 456tlh Parachute rind 320th Glidex'Field I,'oille. y B;a'ttalions.- in direc.:'support of the.. 325,th.'lider and' 505th.Parachute Infantry Regiments. athe 456tti.wb'nt'.into.posi-...: 'tions West' obfp.al:t'"ill..au PLAIIN.l'ith s,'van'75mm pack howitzers. and.fire:r its' first rounds'-a't 2130 hours.. The 90th DiVision Artillery -and. one battulion of the 4th Division tirtilleory were in r-onen.- al support'. 307th.i:Airborn6e Rnfineer Battalion The 1st Platoon, Compan;, A, c'rosse.d the.ei;k,.'-7. T Rivel witb 1st Battalion,,25th Glier' Infantry,north of LA, FI.'lRE. The.rem.ain.de.r of 'Comp. ny A. support,<-ed the ;att'-.ck across L.A FI-ERE Bridj o.' The'.reminai'rer bf the Batt'ilion s.alv.iid eouipm nt arid resupply bw.le. ;'set up w ter po'ints a dassem.hle, one mil.'west of'st V'TB, ';, GT,. 2. Se.ab.rne.Eci' bioi- 'c( IC" f o' ~ Force.'.l'C",."'nd'er 'mmn'f `;`:fowt:;ll,-l 'i T ; d i r neai' - -. GLOR4:. 'the ST2-. p.r "BL,:l: ":,, e:a :330.l : -closed into- IRe snt'iy' Twro CG-4A gl.iders. landed'':ar.,.i;.:. vee E '!LIS',' ca-rryin. greatly -ne:deld signial a! u.pmnt;. T his 'constitute;'j'lho:,s;:6eoii : air r-suruply. mission f'oi"0,n. * DPLUt 4t-,:l0J'U~lP WaS;.,he D ivisi~on irjev.bed> -ia p, withimn t..bi~c.hed.across %th iv.der'et River' by R. :'S T R I C T E D

18 tho 90th. Infg,.try D3ivision, wrhich pn~as.iihrough the 82d rnd- continued the attack to t1e,s.. e,st. Despite, the scattered p ;ra e dronc and. i- sila.'o. of 501.1'! l.io,,ns..,the,vio l.ii...,' U-. i,,... :,,,,,r,, River om.i i. t s:6.: i:u. [~* 9 ~ e; 3'3 o *..~.'i i -;.~'.t ',y, :: '- ;e $ 00 yar ds nor'bh o. :o ' ci had '.. ' Le 'cbo,? sl r lc:hugih it suffered hoavy.a ; osset. ii "'"'ttft".s e'; ;.:..!,-i.m.4, :vi 'f-)o. ':.ii'.1ti ' Ly I'T d.stroyod the Gmi.-.,9Ls.t Inf.n r -..Din-fi'":i/ :iia' prverentted it i'io L;ontlac':;.ng the be Ach assault forqes:zof.tk.'f.ffsi Tjo.S, AZ,`Y Lyhou lieved in the M52D I T 3r'i:.dgehead.' Divisioi n troops continued the attack' in t'he north< 325th _ Glidr iinfrn~ty Rio-ent.The 357th 'Inantry, 90;hDfvisio n, passd,'.th~u.'gi' :.;325th front.in'.%.at hurs; 'Th1'lst and 3d. Dataliions rexai:ed. ~n:positio'n:throu ;hout the day' and, nl~t-..s a roseyrveo. 50o 4. achs'ute Infantry.e'i:_n. - Si!orzted'. y' artillery., the. lst. tand 2 d atarisns t; jumped off across the cana3 at 140C0 itours to ct ; Fo- IN.( j) 'mci MCA 17T',,TfG STA&OIT (289024,.VWDe 1st Biatt-'.ipn by.-passed LE 'I4M gid s5,izod the ftti4o bync 1800 hu-us in uh.oface of s.tiff. e'sistnco., throutiiut thoe advc.s.,enents of' the 2d. B.atn.i.lon were forced tp- wi-t~4- aw frorl the outskir.ts of ;-'I0 -iat 2310 horurs., ^'tmnps o retukt- the, to'wn,uring tihe niht' W'. obtested s Tho '" D.Btli;n rimpi uodtc in 're:- serve, Iid.the t 2d 3d at iion,: 325th, Gii'r Infantiry: ttabhel.. rotrec..ed the regiment's southaestern flank. 507 th-nparchuteo Infantry Rileinent The 357th Inf.ntry,..90th Division 3 bassed throurh the 507th lines at 05C4 bue..the re. ent. 1 d as. of.t ME i,' r ":in the vi'cin'iy.':qf L. ki'ill' and reot igized and rested.. _5Cth.PaLrachute Infantr.y 2eLi4entt,.'The 3:58th Infatn-ry~ 90.th Division,, passed through the 50'th lines at 0510 hours.s T1'e.:regibenb: less onb company.still' at PORT., nassembied on high ground west of,t e.,merd x,:21ver' in the Vicinity of 3109,10 an'd r.eorfanized.,he. ~2Oth.,Glttider and' 45th P'arachute.' o.d.artillery Dattalions, reinforced by the 9i5th.:ield Artillery.t.:3'atalion ',90th}.ivision,' continued to fir'e harassing and. iinterdicticn missions in. spport of:.the 50.th Parachute Infntry. Re supply; -Two CG-4A 1,''iders n1d;e'd :at" S'TELI. : M& L oir'vin. sigina equipment. F PLSU5 'MID D JIUS 6.*ll - l' JU 2 Thdo "fiv'isio"si:osecure.d-the ar"a north of SMo. 14BE2 EGLISE after fierce fighting or'. the plhrt of the.505tti'pnrd-ch-ute Infrntry'. with 2d.?3attalion, 335th Glider Infantry, attachled.:'.s~eized. Th:i amnd. drove the enemy north and northwest. Dy this action tho 82.d'Airbbrho` bivision dtayed' oniderably..the. Gornm, 843 Infantry Divis. p fron. cotnct~ing.. t.eiobacl,escault.t. fo'c '~ o tise.i..rst. Uv S. rs'y R ST 2 ISJ D

19 325th Glider: Infantry Reinment?' R..S T 2R I C T E D 'ft or, being passed through by the 359'th Infantry, 90th Infantry Division, the regiment closed in an assembly area'in the vicinity of GUETTEVILLE (303940), and tested ancd reorganized. The 2d Battalion remained attached to the 505th Par chute -Infantry. 505th Par-achutto Infrnntry Re'imnent The'2d 3attalion with the 2d 3attalion, 325th Glider Infantry'. at'tached, oi the left, attacked at hours to capture LE HAM.' Over'coming'severe oppos.- tionh in. weban&d difficuit terrain,- the 2dBattalioA, 325th, seized LE H.'.I at 2025' hours. 3y 2300 hours positions were consolidated along the entire M~.UJi:'. River: up to'.'and including the MIOITTE3URS railroad station at Contact writ': the 6th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division, was made by the 1st 3Battalion at MONTEa- 3URG station. The bridge over the MERDERBT River at was blown by our troops at The regiment remained in position, patrolling west across the' 'river until relieved by the 357th Infantry, 90th Infantry IMvision, during the niitt o'f June. 507th Parachute Infantry Re'inc ehnt The regimneit continued to reat and reorggnize in the vicinity of LA FIERE. 50_th' Paricahuto Infantrv Re:inent - The regimsnt continued to rest,and reorganize in the vicinity of the hi4g 'ground west of.the M=ZBET River at Contact was: maintained with the 101st,irborne Division. on the left. Preparations were cnompleted on 12 j!une for an.attack to establish a bridgehead over the OWUVE River at 3BUZEVILLE LA BASTILL on the night of Juneo-.. 8?A irborne. -Ilyision Artillery The 456th Parachute Field Artillery Dattali n remained in direct support of 'the 505th Parachute., Infantry. The 320th Glider Field Artillery 3attalion prepare to reinforce fires of the 319th Glider Field Artillery Batt:alion ian d ovedc south of PICAUVIILE. The.319th, in direct suppo.rt of."the 508th Para ci't6 Infantry, moved west' across the DOUVE. River. into-poesitionis north of' tuzevilij LA DASTILLE. The 915th Field Artillery. B.Bttalion, attached from 90th Infantry Division, wasl relieved at' The lg.th Field Artillery Battalion (105rnm howitzer) was attached at end moved' into po.sitieons to reinforce the fires of the 319th. 3Q7tth tborne Eninaeer.attalion The Battalion continued to salvage resupply bundles and operate water points in the area. 'Eitensive surveys of the DOJVE River were conducted during this period, ;nd bridging'material, assaul.t.boats aid othor :river. crossing equ.ipment were obtained ' At-tached Units Comnpany G, 746th Tanlk Battalion; was relieved from attachment to the Division.at une. ".. - 'TPUS JUMNE :- 'The Divsio, uing the 508th Parachute Infantry, extended, its rig:lht flank b'by establishing a bridgehea'd apross: the DOUVE. River at JEUZEWILLE LA -A'STILLE and -contacted tha ll 3 lst.aib6.ne 'Division again at DAIPT'S. Other eouenite of tho

20 Iivision continured to reop'anzis anc. ragroup prqparatory to passing thuzough the 90th Innt. y Ii'sion,a.: n:t-taci r.g to ;the.,west in conj unction wri th the gth Infantry DivSisiont : '.I... Dl;.viaio~.'or.and. Post.mov-ed to a point'-noear PIC5 AJVILL,.dat coordi.nateps :,.325th Glidor Inf.an1vy RnOir.enat) The 2d rdattalion rejoined the, rei.ent. at: 1000 hours., Tkh,'reginent closed 'in. new assembly. aroa soukh of PIC.AUVILLE at 1630 hourso Preparations wore mrade to attack to the west the fol:loling dayo 505th cparachilut Infantrye,.-i, "ecnt : ' The 2d latta1ion: 325th. Infanr ry, was relieved. fron attachuent., The regimenit noved from. the.l A area.t-:. i O.blSu i-a :% v.e' cst of PICAUVILLS, rested and reorganized, 507th Parachuto Inf'antry Reir~ient T...he regimnnt: moved from the LA.FIfE ar'ea. to an.ssembly. areoa north of PIO-. AUWILE,'.Proparations' wore made to &ttgclk to.the :west the. following dayi I th Parachute' Infontry te:ir.ent,a combat team oropo sed bf tho. regient, the 319th GLAder Field Artillery Eattialion, Dattery A, 80th Airborne Antiaircraft 3attalion, a detachment fron the 307th Airborne Engineer Battnaion and one platoon of Troop B, 4th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squndron, attacked south across the IOUVE River. Company Y crossed.the DOUVE by assault:.boaa s at 0001 hours and soized DEUZEVILLE LA DASTILLEo The remaindor of the troops crossed the river on 'a footbridgeop, nstructed by engineeors beginning, at 0400 lours..the. 1st :attalion 'cleared CRiETTTVILL by 0745 hour.s, dostroyod considerabl.e enemy.quipuiicnt:' inciluaing 12 light tanks, and occupieod defensiveo posi:i.ons at.00ignyt - The 2d 3c-ttJ.ion met determined resis.tace outs.deo of ;i'uatte but occupi. ed the town by 1800 and established. contact with the 101st.Airborno Division to the soulth, The '3d Dattalion soeiur6d' the area between.pont. AVUNY,and TOTT; Dicng.tho oentire acticn 14 liight.taxrks wero knocked out aind sizeable quanr'ities of enemy' equipment: captured or destroyed. Q8.d Airborne Division Artllery The 319th and 320th Glider. and 188th 'Field Artillery Battalions fired in support oa..thc 508th' ParacIuto ~Infa-itry s crassing of the: DOLTE River at DEUZE- VILLE' I&L.'.ASTILLE. These three battalions expended 'l,880 rounds in 50 miinutes, and tl.eir'. -ircos werre.reinforce.d as well by the 90.th Division iartillery. The 319th GlideorF iidd Artillery 'Dattalion displaced south. o.f the "UVWE' River at hour' - The.456th Parachut'e Fiel.d.Artillery Dattalion moved from. the LZ iawm. se'tor :into positions. north. of PICAUVILLE at 1800.hours. 80th Airbornb -Aitiaircrat 3atta'ibn 2.;tt cry A knockod out fiv.o enemy :..iiht tanks in oonjunetion with the let 3attalion,.508th Parktchute.Ixif hntryt s attack: south of the DOUVW River, 307th Ai'bobo rno En ineer Dattalion Company A operated assault boats across the DOUVE. River at 3EUZEVILLE. L!IASTIIDLE" bergimning at 0001 hours in support of the 506th Parachute Infnntry. A footbrid,:o was constructed first, nnd,' with the assistance of VII Corps Engineers a Dai.le3 bridge was ccrmpleted.by' 0830.; h'- urs,. Te.:.3d.?Platoon of Company 2 was attached. to the '608.th,Pradhiita Infantry and prepa.red the bridge' south, of Z'WUPT:E for demolition a'.xj o.' '!,?,.

21 T R I.m.' C T'D' Attached., roops. Cop-.any At 746th Tank.Datta.lion,- wag v hours.- att'ached to the Division at 1l700 YIesuplpIy Eleven gliders -carrying ordnance and sigmnal equipment landed. at STE. MERE -GL SM.' -D. Tt.: JUNTE 1944 The Division continued to mop. ulp in the 3AtPTE arca and also passed throu. the 90th Division to attack west toward ST.-' SAUVUR LE VICOMTE. The attack, with the 32d Airborne Division on the left and the 9th Infantry Division on the ri;ht, orii-inally was scheduled to begin shortiy after dawn but was. delayed until 1000 to permit, units being;; relievod addltional opportunity to seize the coitrt.piated line of departureo The -attack'began at even thqu._t the' line of departure trad not been. seized. The fi,;htifig was bitter. hed~g:erow-to hec4-,:erow onslaught, but sconsiderable.progress.was madei 325th Glider Infmntry_ Reyimont The regiment attacked at 1000 hccibclu.mn. 6±f bettalions with the 3d Jattalion leading. '-Tho.50'7thn Parachutg Infan'try tthey wrs to regiment' S ritght. As the sche.duloed line.of.d p.r.ture had no t..een seiz'ed,.the 325th attacked to the --''i't -of -the 358th Infantry, S90th-.n- s';i instec-' of through imt, but.-late.r... swun.g in front of that' regiment. ' Tho- --nai hi.,hwny due west of hti"vilt:i 'was 'stronrly 'defended by the enemy, but he was driven off the road by 1830 hours ffter-. Pxceptionrall. hrxd fig?,z-ting and ropeatod thrusts. by by both the d and 1st Battalions supported by one pl:atoon o f Compnny Ar ' 746th' Tank.. attalion. The 1st 3attalion continued to.:ttack. and advanced west 400 'nards. The regiment consolidated its positions at 2100 h,'urs, established firm contact. with the _,.:h Infantry. on the rig;ht- and prepared to continue the attack to the west, The rcegime.ont rrermined in Divicsinnreserve. Company I ioved' toi secureowc' bridg,;e south of EBTIVILIE (LPOJT Ll' j.:ke), holding postiions at the north ond ': of-.the bridge. Company H was attached' to the 325th Glider Infantry Reginent.at'1400 hours,to act as Infantry escort for a pl'atoon of Company A, 746th Tank ia.ttalion. through, and beyond TII.MVIILE, but the company' roverted to regirienta] corntrl. at 1940-hours., The, ro:imnent waps o^rdeo'dat-2100 hours to move'ito--- '. p9itti. ;,Q000, y.ard.s'north. of EBTI1VILL.,o. Copaby I -rem.ained at the ETI\T'VILLT 3ridgeo and "eosttnblished phtrol contact with the 50Pteh Parachute Infantry in thie DEUZMVILL.' LA DASTIILE Brrig:ehead,..' - ',' 50 7tth Prachut o I nfantr-y '.e:imt: -. ' :-.Attacking: in'.colurm of btt'alions, with the 3d. Dattalion leading:, the regi nment cros'sed the-'creek 'betwc.en 4l'tind d E m I.MTVIiAt l!00q hours, passing t?.ough the 90th Division.. Tie o325th.'. :2 :.rnitiry- I was on the, left and the-.. 60th Infanrtry - 9th': Division, was'.:c-n th'er:i. ht,:. icomtterin-g heavy pouiu.d;ing o-f en6ry' r'tillbry, 'the-. 3d:D,..att alion -turned north' to blo ck.r-sto anid protect the o.thflank.of. '-th. Divi hil _,ht..iy.sio Asion,.spent the bett or. part'o fth *day seizing the o.ton. Encmy,resistn',ne' -Was sev-ere.:.;counter-attacks in.the"v- c ing'r were repuls.ed with the assistanoc of one platoon.of ta.ks from Co7ip'ny A, 746t5h'Tnck Dhttalion-. The '2d,-nd 1st ' tbttejisns 'in that order, followed the 3d Batt alion end continued th' attacek to the west, reachiln the. outskirts. of LA 2D0iN2,I=E-.by 2200 hoursa,..,fter cons.ol' d.tin; position s and reorgiizing, 'all Battal'ions prepared, to continue the attack the next, 'day,. a.... Z..

22 R ; S T R I C T.' D 508th Par.cbute Infantry R, im-nt The ].st TB-!:t:!1lirn moved from thc: vi.:c-init of COIf1Y to a.esist the 2 Battalion clear BIUPT. ::it 0130 hourm, The 3d Battelion repelle:d a sh!.rp count'..-,!ttec.k et 0700 hours in the; vicinity of HOTOT. Th,e enemy attemptel to break throui], the 3d Battalion po:.itions ca...in at l[q5 hours, but the a.ttack.ailed eafter th:. enemny sustaiied heavy. c:sur'ltiaes....airnd The h.i-ghwy re.ilroad.bril..e southws-st of. HOTOT were blownm by 'eltmhnnts.tt:.:.chl,'. of t he 307th. Airborne Fn;oin-er Battalion Olo, az from B3,:,UPTR; to the northil.ist t at 13C nd att..cke.l FPT,ATlTY to dislo:.-e an enemy concentration 'buill1ing.up i in' '! t -re, r.t' iaft;:.r a shaarp firc fifght tlhe 1st Bat:talion bro]ke contact at 16,60 hours :nd.. :ithdrlu,: toward BRLUPFTE, as3e.blii' in a reserve. position ini' the vicinity O FI'EC!UIi1..2Te 2C7. lft.tt:.lion Cqepatny at BAUPTE r'jrn mioved.-it '.300' hiours to ' position in th.. Viciiity of COIUY.' 821a irborh(:. Division irtillry.. The 319ti. (lic : Fi'.id,:r Arti.3.*>ry B.:ttaiin r.. :.in!. ill Jir::ct support of tb3 508th P.-.rtchute; Infartry and fire 600 roundj.s: against iner,:y huildups in the IIOTOT arrea,?'the: 320th Clider. nd 456t1'i Pr:c:r-uter 'Artillery Field B:ttalions..:ra pl.,ced. in direct,.support of the..t.ackim' 'n. 5th ''li.<r 507t'r Plr-cbta Irlan.tryHegiments,. respectively,. The l188th Fi'i:tl,.rtill.-.,ry tdir.'ct bt:,ttalion w?:s in:. suppo:rt. More thn '2,200 roundis,,;.ee fiirn:c[i in.urport of tiex, attack tow:a-'rd the -w:st. The 87th,'rmaorid Fi-ld artililr'y.b..t:iion,,-.::.i!tac.imd ti the Division.t 0900 hours and roved into position ti.:tt'. ot ' ::', I.:i,,Ia.L:.. 80th jiirborne - nti irdcrcft Buttalion Batteries &.n.' B.remainred attacheds to the 508th- Prachute Infantr`? i-be~iment. Battery C wls s.tteobecd tin the; 50Q7th Pairac ut Inf.antry.-... The rearn.in:e.or of th.e B.ttalion reeaine:d in rs:..rve '.. 307th Aii:rborne.'nineer B. tt lion One Dlatoorn of omppany B, waes,:ttach:.'edi to "the 508th P,.r:chuto Infi.ntry a,, nd blew the culv't:rt,ndt the rilroad, bri'dge sou.t ohwts of E0TOTy't Tt 00 noi.rs. The. bri~dge.:at Ci-..;lh.':'.VI.r'L, ;'i zis blown by 508th P.r.chut Infarty. ;.The Pl:.toon rev.rto'd tb. Company' col)trol st 2300' hours..cdmplny A c.orntinlued to.rovide s. curity for bri'i3 ;.-s a(t.u:-5'..,ili..:- LA.3ATSTILI and performe-d racomneais'snice wiork a.lone ther. 508th P.srrc.C ute.. mand 32Ft:n Glder' InfPihtry fronts.-. 'ttacd'trops -.. Comp.;njy A, 716th Tank Bnttallion suolported. the.division.'s :attck to'.tie w st, with 'bne pl-.t,- on ;ach ':ttached to th. 325th.Gli;d!r,,n!d 507.t.i Parac :ute Infantry Regimllt;3. 'Tr'anks ;,ra:re withdrawnl-at nir:tfill in!to an asser: iy area r.ort}h of PIC,,UVII.l..'. Resup... '.Four 75i;m pi,lck liowit'zbrs we.ro :Clo.lwn by. C-G:6 to Si..r.... ii.,.:,bj , ' '..:..'. D..PLU ' 9 '-- 1.5' :JUX± ' '. The Divisiorn 'cbontinue.i.d the h1ie./o': ero' h, od, erq" a-o : t:back:., -but shortly ater ni:-htfall. ift' b:-cme :..l.pp.aront :th.th.. ct cst of tih-.ny : s.is ::n.ce ;est. bf the DOTVE Riv:..r h b:oenbroken. '.:.ar -Te 505t,. P i.ara;cchute- In.L'i:itry relie. 'ed the 507th ; Para'cute 'Ii;nihtry 1.'-It t.ti. er st' rof' Oniery countcratt::ck in thb.e fl'nki, support -: by tanks, halted the 507th' ad v-n..lce.., he, Division Cormrlend' Post movewd 'tp coprdintztes 256'934' west' of i:,tt:j L ;... ' '1,. '4- R T- R I C T. ED,:...

23 RESTRIC T ED' 325th Glider Infantry Regiment' In the order sty,, 2d and 3d Ba3ttaliions,; the.regiment att.acked at 0500 hours and reached the creek southwest of LA BOMI0N-EVILLS by hours, meeting only mod.grate resistance. Tanks from Company A, 746th Tank Battalion, supported the attec th Parachute Infuntry Regiment 'The regiment attacked to the west, passing throug. the 507th Parachuto Infantry in the l:.tter's. zone at 15QO. Battery C, 80th' irborne Antiairrcraft Battalion n.d. o.,ne Platoon -of Comp'ny.A, 746th Tank Battalion, were., att.ached1. Moierately strong enemy opn.position w encountered -as and by nightfb.l.l the rc:,im :nnt h-id advanced to the creek lin,: north of CROSVI-ILE ( ). Company I, guarding the bridyge t.ti., wtasl, was relieved by the 507th Pa.r.chute Infantry and reverted to regimrental control,. 507th Parachute Infantry Regiment. The regiment attacked at 0500 hours and advanc ;d 600 yards, me.eting little opposition up.to 0630 hours. One Platoon of Company A, 746th Tanic Battalion, moved up to forward. positions at 0615 to support th' rigiment. A hea-:vy. counteratt.ec supported by tel,.ks, launched by the. enemy t 0930 hours from the ri,.ht flank, halt.ed the advance of the regi.m-,int. Eowe,:er, the 507th, recoverin.- from the heavy.a.rtillary a:n.d mortar fir'-, ejc.te-... the 'ene'my force which had penetrated its; lines and' r.establishedltsv front by 1500 h1ours, ;t -which timne the 505th Parachute Infantry passed t; rough the 507th. The re.liment :then assemi'bled, moved to ETI',JVILLE, and later crossed the DOUVE River into the CRP.;',TVILL,, - BAUPTE are. ;. prep.ratory to relieving the. 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment. Company. B, 'reie.- ved Conmpny I-I, 505th Pracliute Infantry, at the brid,-e -- :t.t'i.vtille. 508th P:!r:.chute Infanitry: Rearimont The re..:im.nt continued, active defense of the CrE'TEVITLL -.AUPT7 sector, repulsing:.neamy atioempts to break throu.hi in vicinity of HOTOT.nd,UPT.F'. Thie 2d Battalion rel'ived th.l; 3d B.:;ttalion nahr PCONT -JYr;. The 3.. Battalion eeseonibled and moved n:o.rth of the DOUVE River into Division res.erve one-h.alf milie west of LA BOIIN7EVILLE. The remainider of th.e rei.iment pr--pr3qed to join the 3d Bett3.i'ioh upon complation of relief by the ~ 5:7th Par.clhute Infantry durinj the nipght of Jun. 82d rairborne Division Artillery The 319th Clid,:r Field.rtil.lary B-ttlion remained in position and prepared to'support the 507th Prachute Inf'a.ntry moving,: into the B', IJT.Z: VILLE LA.,''TIT.. Brid3ehead. The 456th Para.chute Fiel.. ;.rtillert, Battalion chan,,e3d to support the. -505th Parachute Infa'ntry when the lastter reieved the 507th, and with the 320th Glider Ficld Artillery Battalion displ.ced to positions noi-th send vnest of mtti'- VILL.. Division irtillery, with the 87th Armored Fielr'. Artillery Battalion (105mm hqfwitze,:,s) and the. 188th Fiaeld '.rtillery a1trtalion (155rm howitzers), in general surpport of the Division's ettnac. to the ;'est,. fired more.than 4,800 rounds in cll types of mis.sions. Company B, ;7th Che icf.l,i;ortor Battalion (4.-2 inch mortars) was attaclied in the vicinity of I:IVi'ILLE at 1130 hours'.' 80th Airborne Antiaircraft Batt..tlion.. Battery A:.was rvlievd'frn,ttachl;ent, to.le 508th Parachute Infantry. Batt-ries. B'pnd C were attached to th. 507th andl508th Parachute Infantry Regiments, respectively..., _ 17 I:.R' E c $T PR I :CT. D

24 R ES T I C T E D Attached Troops In the attack to the west the.followern; troops were attached to the Div-.ision and assisted materiailiy in the accomplishment of the mission: * mpany A, 74'6th Tank 3attailion.' (One.platoon was a.ttached.to the 525th 'lider 'Infantry Roge.L.nt, and one was attached fir:st to. the 507t'h and.latrer to the 505th Parachute Inf,?try.- Troop D, 4th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron 87th Armored Fi:eld Artillery,,attalir.n:. 108th Fie l Artilloryj ::attalion Company 0, 899th Tdnk De.strr.yer Dattalion i(in Division reserve).. - 'Co4riany. 1, 87th Chemical Miortar, attalicn- (Attached to Division,Artillery)... D PLUS' A- 16 'JU!_TE' The' Division, at tackin:'- to. the west, t. nd-prtect'in the southern flank of VII Corps: during the iorpl's-cperati:.:ns to seize CI~.,0TURG,; forged ahead -aainst t.he German. 77th Infantry Division.. The- Division routed the. ennemy. n its sector drove acro ss the.douve River and established a firm.bridgbhead:-around ST. I'..:. -SAUVEUR LE VI COMITE. The ordurs from. Corp.s were. to nseize the'.,linoeof -the OU1VTE and prepare to continue the attatclk to the west", however, upon arriving.on the 'east bd.,c. of the DOUTJE it was quite obvious that the German fcrces were in a state of corm pletc' donfusinn. The Divisi-on Commander irmmediately reqoucsted Corps for- author. ity to cross, but because of difficulties in cormunmication, ran imnediatoe a.swer Wlas not.obtained. Seizing. the initiative, after 'personnal reconnaissance, General RIDGWAY ordered the;.d Datt alien,.505th.parachute Infantry to cross without delay. Dy the tire clearance had been obtained from Corps two 13attar lions;lid crossed the. river annd"had established a secure bridgehead'for further operations. :In three days..of- fierce.hedgeorowto '-hedgerow fighting the Division pushed the enbny steadily westwards and':made.'it possible for the 9th Infrntry IDivision to.drive to the sea and cut the C0EROU.iG Peninsula in two.. forward DI)vision Corm.lid. Post was' established-:in a chateau.just east of ST. SATiYUI T '1 VICOMTE :and the DOUVE River. A now Force ""'l was formed to include the 505th and 508th :Parachut' Infantry ieiinments and established its.'headqaters iri-st.. SAUVEUR LE *.ICOaTry _,,*' *d th lider.'infantry Reginmont Tho-325th continued the attack and reached its assigned obj.ect:ves,on the east bank of the DOUVE River overlooking ST..SiAUVhJR LE VICOMTE at 0950 hours. The re-,;imbnrt consolidated positions and patrolled aggressively. across the DOUVE River. 505th Parachute Inuntry Re,-iment The roeiorent continued to attack to the west e.nd reached its o:bjctivos on hi.;h,r.ound cast of the' 30IJE River, overlo.oking ST. SAIWUVEU LE VICOMTE, by 1130 hours. Finding the enemy in a hig,:h state of confusion, ' the Zd 3Battalion.crossed the river and seized, ST. SAUVETUR LE VICOMTE; The 1st D3-,ttalicn followed and pressed on to secure an area 2,000 yards in depth. The 3A Battalion was relieved by the '3d Dattalion, 508th P.arachute 'Infantry at 1540 of its mission to protect the rij-ht flank of the Division.. This B3attalion then crossed the river and attacked to then-torth a.t ST. SALEULR LE VIC0iT'E1 to. seize and hold the crossroads.t 1` Dy 2230 the bridg-;ehead was secure and approxinately 2,000 -to' 3,000 yards in depth _ ' oe T IC B

25 *~ P n I T B-2,507th Parachute Infantry Ilegimient The reinont completed releof 'the 508th Parachute Infantry at 0415 in the ORBTTEVILLE - AUVETE area, The 2d 3attalion took up positions between BAUPTE uad C0OG:1f; and the 3d Dattalion dofe nrdel a line from OIG7l1Y to.yra0ce- QU=IC,T. The lst.battallion was- in reserve,, in. FR..OC',3,~IOWT.' hne entire. area was subjected to lea"y: onemy artillery and mortar fir.e. 508th Parachute 'Infan.t ' egient, After reli ef by the- 5C7th 'Par,rochte Infantry. the r.egirment clp'sod into reserve posl tio s. nortib.west. -cf '.;!'VJI, LE at 0900 hours,. The '3d 3attalion.re-. lievod- the 3.d 3att al.on, 505t..hPa. a:?zalu Inif an'try: in the viciiity of.crosville with the mi.ssion cf prctein.g; i.he :Div:ison.i s. north flank, The lst.-and 2d-..Dttalicns moved into positi:.rn nor-:th of :RAUVIL' aild at 2200 hours 'moved into 'the.st, ST. UVEU. LE:'V'iCDOMTi."3ridgo-eald d dtook up Dositi ns south of the town an d along the ST, SAUVEUR L, VICOMTE- LA IL'Y: DU PUITS Highway. 82d Airborne Division Artillery.. :.-...: Until troops:, cro.ssed:.the DOUlrE i'iver fires were massod on routed eno:my columns and sonvoys in. and ar-und. ST, SAUVLTJ LE VTCOMTE. All batt.lions except the-319th. Glider FieI'd:"Artll.ery Dattalion in the C0FTTEVILLE - DAUP'TE sector displaced forwar-ds At 1030 hours the 172'd Field Irtillery.3attalion (4.5 inch..unsm) was attached and went into position. immodiately to.the east of ST;- SAUVEU L, VICOiZTE.,%. Artillery liaison:planes arrived from :baseo in -EGLA2I-D t0th Airborne Antiaircraft Dattalion. :.. 3mtt cry A remained' i[iriisgf. :3att ory '3 was at.tached to theo 507.th:tParachute Infantry, and. jat,tery, supported the attack of the 505th Parachute Infantry. The remainder of the Dattalion:;was in reserve. 307th irborn En ineer Jattalion.,'....."......The 3attcAion. continued extensive r6connaissance of the MUVM,,supported. the attack against ST.- SAUVY$UR LE VICOMTe. ' River and.tt ached Troops. : : Company- Al. 746th Tank Jattalion, supp~orted the attack of the Division, attaching one platoon..to: each o.f the two. assault re:%irents.. Tanks crossed the -DOUVE River into the ST. SAUVWUf LE VICOMTE 3ridgehead. One. platoon from company 0, 899th Tank.-Destroyer :'attalion, was attached to the 3d 3attalion, 508t. Parachute Infantry andu ancther to the.505th Parachute Infantrye CopanyfD, 07- th' heni'cal iviortar.3attai-on.whas relieved from support of the 325th Glider Infantry-and was placed. in support of-the 505th Parachute InfanMtry, It remainod, lcwever;' attached. to Division- rtillory. :. - D PLUS: 1I -AND' J.MUTE 1944 During this period the Division, secured the bridgehead at ST. SAUTV,.LE VICOOTiC,. reoorganized and prepared. to attack : south, of.ti.vill to6 eztend its southern boundar.y. The 9th InfantrY Division passed through the bridgehead and attacked to..the west coast :of. tho. penis-sula. 325th _Glider Infantry Reogment The regilent mqved to an assenbly.aroa scutheast,-of ETIZVILLE on 17 June.and madc.plans to cross the-!tbe -River s6uth of ETIIVILL E,.,.,.z....

26 R'E S T R I C E D 505th Pairchute Infantry Regime:~nt The 505tb cle:7!red the ST.- S-.,UV-MlR. L.VIC0IviTE Brid:ehelad to a c; pth of 3,000 yar'ds of 1ll enamy pockets of resistance, consoli'-ted defensive positions north and weot of' ST. S$.UTVEUP LE VICOTrITE. ;and sffoctcid pas.agc,- of th.i 47th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division, throulla-its lines to continue the etttfck to the west, The regimnnt putroll.-eid extet-sively, ru-st -d and ri..orvln zed.iz d 507th P'ir,,ichut Inant:ry Rir,.ont The regiment continued to hold Linsiva positions in t'.o CR..'T:VI..U. -P.T9TT, are,.. :ncd pt:<t:iolled oatensivelv concentrnting its <~fforts?.long the vstern, front. Centact 'ws Int-iined, with adii.ocel.t units, 50Sth Par-:chute Infantry Rerim.:Lnt The 1st 'and 2d,'lttallions cl,.;:;-*,' the i:rid;:. -l, e! op all ilermy '.'-sist :.c:l south :r.l; w;.-,st ofm 1'. S... Co!T pan, y C oestrlhlishi..: ta road block and blew the bridgre on "the ST. SAUT.'iUf L-L; VICOIT:` - L;, H,Y..E LDU EUITS Ilithway. across the Pb-IRITi Ii::R.C.ICSUoS-;3S. Colnmpl-n.a re inforced Coeipany C on 18 JTuie. 'The 3d RBt talion remenim-1d in. onosition por;t.: tir.7. ti.h, no 't'ri :: rk of t.i:. Division until 18 Junv w'nq;?'l it m'.ve:- 1 "to thie b.. l.k ofc th: DOWTV' Ri. r wt. ::t of' ETIENVILLE.. 82d -irborrne Division -iartil lerry The 456th '.ar,:.cliuto Fiild A:rtilloer Blr.tt lion, xreinforc;,d!'yv the. 1772d Fi-ld '.rtillery Batttiliol,, continued to sup!:o:rt th..e 505th 'r.. nd 508th. Purachlut- Infsntry Rerrinonts in th'- ST..s.UVEUI L.' VICO'.;i'I riic,.:;he.,. The remaindor of' Division lrtill:ry, less the 319th Oli:;or Fi-ld.irtillery'B&:tta:lion which supported the 507th Parao ut,3 Infanitry in the Cr.'mrTTl'-Il' - ibaupti. areoa, moved baek inrto \posit'ion norti; of ETI'ITVI.LL, and m-de preptrations to supfjport ther rttack south of: 1ETTIVILLE ac ;.ross the DOUVE River.. 80th Airborne i,:tti.lirorrft aettalion Dattery A was att.<acl:hed: to t.he 3d. 508th,Battlion, P.r-chute Inf'-ntry, and Battfery D (.50 caliber LIG) moved into position prot.-cting the bri'd.e:..at 3T. '$AU- VEUP3 LE.IC'-:T. Battery E m"3e' prepara!tions to support te rt it!cl of. the Division south of ET'I2i":VTLL.E across the DOUI''E River. 307th Airborne Engioeer Battal ion -. Comp.any.A procured river cross'in: m.teri.' ^.:nd pr3pared 'to assist thl, crossing of,the DOUVE River south of ETII1.VILLE. The Battalion continue:? to recou-. noiter the DOUIVE River. Attached Troops Tanks 'f Company A, 746th Taink B:ttalionr, aed armore; cars of Comnpany C, 899th Tank Destroyer' Lattalion, movedv into reserve positions and prepared to revert to purent units. Troop B, Ith Cavalry Ro-conrn::is.s.nce Squadron, patrolled extensively to the wost and noth.'i,and south, repo-:tirn3) valuabl. information on ene.:ny movements and cij.spositions. Ro su, The: last air resupply mi:sion wa.s flown.on.18 Junir when 5,000 Gamn1on Gren-::id were landed by C-417 at STE'..iE l K;E-]::,. BR S T. R I C T D

27 RE S T '' I C T E D D PLUS-43-7JUNT.' 1944 The Division cro.ssed the DOU-'1] River south of E'TIL_ _VI:I:,LE and( established a firm bridgehead' externd"ing south to Pi'hi TOT Contact was mniade, with the troops in. the. CRETTEVILLE - LJ-AUPTE area and the entire Division arla south of the DOUVE was cleared of enemy. The 90th In fa'ntry Di-ision It. i.:.:"' the 82d of th.e responsibility of guacrding ST. SALUV-EURJ I.' VICO0IT. The Divi.sion w-:- s attached to VIII Corps which'hkd the mission of pro.tecting the south fl-ink of VII Corps in the VII Corps assault to the northl on CHiTh'IOURG. 325th Glider Infantry Re".irn"nt The 2d Battalion crossed the DOUV, River southe st. of ETIENVILLE and west of MONiTE.SSY by assault boats at 2350 hours the night of June, The crossinm was accomplishe0d without incident.,.a feint by one squ:d,listracted the enomy's att'ention to thei area west of.3'ri..'vill.o Supported by an artillery barrage, the 1st Battalion, follo-,wed. by th.' 5 Ett'lioe, crossied over -n angineer foot-bridoe beginning at 0215 hours and attacked-',:-inst sli'zht opposition to the south to Join forces with the 2d Battalion whtich w;s ett::,cking from the rear the enemy force d efending -ttal.i bridg.ehead or.- b B;r 0730 hours th-3 Pd Battalion had been passed through by the 'l.st sa.n 3d :3att-lions and t... reagim;n..t held an area extending from IE ih,'u 1)I I,:-UT (242920) aloniz. th.:j ed-ao of the BOIS DE LIMIAORS, thence north of LA Di'JTGUERRIE TO 'VI\DiDEFONTA!.IlEo The 3c B-. :tttalion, 503t' P'a.nchute Infantry, was.attt-ched to the 3S.5th and crossed at the saeile point is the 2,d Bettalion. It attacked on the regiment t s left fllrnk to pass through the 1st B:att?1ion 507th Parachute Infantry, in VI,.D::'O.:...II:E andr to seize TR';TOT, Enemy re sist.nr!.c increeaseid but the regiment iral.aly broke through enid e.xtended its lines securely to a depth of 3,000 yards south of the DO1VE_ Rivar by 2000 hours, The en[.eineers completed a br.idga south of ETIEVILLE by 1730, pormittin,: supportinc artillery and vehicles to join thlei ragimreni~ - ' th P-!.achute Infantry Re ;-,irent Late in the evenin,q the regiment moved by truck from t.he ST.,,S-DTviJEUR UL VIC OUTE aroa3 to an assembly area south of -LES -ioitid':".s :.-'. 131.U'-TOIS (269920) in the bridig.ehead esta:blishod duriing te.: day by the 325th Glider In-'intry, 507th Parachute Infantry Raeim-ant The 1st Barttalion attacked across tle' bridge west of C:,'iTTVILTE at 0015 hours to seize VI;D:.~,0JiT.-.TI in conjunction with the attack by -tlhe 325th Glider Infantry to establish a bridgehea.d south of ETI-'IN'VILT.JE After bitter fighting and considcer.ble snipincg the Battalion reeched its objective by 0740 hours and'l spent the r,;:-ainder of the day claring the town of snipers 'and peckets of enemy resistance. At 1405 hours the 3rl Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry, passed throurh the 3d Battalion lines. Thle rem,, inder of the 5.7th. stayod in position in the CrET ''V{.LLE - BAU'TdL sector. 508th Piar-chute Infe.ntiry Rei-:iment-... The regimiint was relieved of responsibi.lity of s?u-;rdingr the, ST. -',TJV'DIJ? LE VICOIITE a:rea at.1140 end assem.bled prior.to movirnicto join the r.ar.nminder of the DOUVE River in assault boats southeast of LTTIIT.T'VIL:L_. and :west of IMOGNT'SS ~ Y at at 0700 hours. The, crossirn. was masrie without incid,1nt an/' t1: b?'ttalion proceeded so..:th, meetirn ; increasini, resistan.cei. At 1405 hours this batt-lion passed througih the 507th Parachute Infantry positions at VrThDEFOLi'T,'ITF'. a.nd-pushed on to the odtskirts of PFrETOT.. Her.r an enemy-strong point h..ld up the advance temporarily. R E S T R I C, T '. I

28 R E S. T 1? I C T E D 82d Airborne Division Artillery The 320th Glider', 87th Armored and 188th Field Artillery Dattalions, supported the attack of the 325th Glider Infantry and crossed the river into the bridgehead area durin C the late afternoc!n rmcl. nif4t, The 172d Fiidld Artil.lery ':attalion was relieved frcn attac6/irent to the Divilsion. The 31lth Glider Fiel Artillery anttttli'on moved into the.brid area and was placed 'ehead in direct support of the 325th Glider.Infa-ntry. The 320th Glider Field Artillery Dattalion -was piaced in direct support of.the 505th Po.rac~hute Intflntry. 60th Airborne' Antiaircraft Dattalion Dattery :. supported the attack of the 3st Battalion, 507th Parachutoe Infantry. Two 57nim,uns were ferried across the river rwith the 2d Dattalion, 325th Glidt.r Infantry,. At least three enery light t:a-nmks were knocked out in the action in the-bridgehead-. "attery C crossed into -the brid:;ehead late in the afternoon. e:,tterics D and E went' into position to peorvide antiaircraft protection to the. ETILEVILB Jrid, ;e th Airborne Znrineer ::attlinn Conpany A used 25 assault boats tc, ferry attacking troops across the IDUY R.iver southeast of ETIVI'J2 an.d. Wiest of MOITTESSY at 2809'15. orompnjy 3 erected footbridges at NTIPBEiTVIELL and VI,:D'03>TT;I,' te for the infantrjy and later, under enermy shollfire, erected a vehicular brid;;e at VI!TDEu±TTAI. by hours and a class 4,0 bridg-;e by 2210 hours. Assist.nTce was given to Corps engineers in ropairin- the bridge and causeway sruth.of 'TI;NIL L. Attached Troops CompnrLy C, 399th Ta'.x Destroyer Battalion, was relieved from attacdment to the Division at.1400 hours, and Cop=?any A, 607 Tank Destroyer Battalion was attached at 1800 hours. Compia.iny B, 87th Chemr.ical Mortar att-alion, sup- -7 por.ted the 325th Glider Infantry frnm positions in the vicinity of the 2cl Battalion crossing. Coi;pany.A, 746th Tanlk 3attalion, was att:ached to the 325 th Glider Infantry. Troop D,.4th 'Cavalry Reccnnaissance Squadron, continued patrollinx., activities. Tie 87th r:miored and Field Artillery Dattalions reo:iained attatched to the. Division, but the 172d Field Artillery Battalison was relieved t 1100.hours's. D. PLUS TUhlrT 194-?. The Divisionii Com:and Post rloved south of BTPIEVILLE.. and south of the DOUVE River and was established at coordinates , -325th Gl.id er Infia'ltrJy Roei.Iont The regi.ient consolidated positions, str'mngtlhonod the defenses of the bridg;cehead mnd patrolled into enemy ]lines. 505th Para.dcuto Infantr;jy Riei:ient Thoe.3d Jattalion. moved into the jois DELI40:.S aind occupied -positions along the western edge after encoinnterinf :--nly slig-ht enemy oppositinn i1>. itially. Later it came under intense mortar and artillery fire. The rest of the rc.iment rem:lained in an assembly, area south of LES hcitii-s EI DAJIPTOI having closed into the area at 0150 hours. 507th Parachute Infantry ;Re; ii.-ent The 1st Datt.alion remained in position around VIiDBF0iTTAIITE.uuntil 2330 hoars, when it relieved the 3d Dattalion. Other elements of the regiment re- %,;z.,~ elr-.l R E S T R I C T B D

29 reained in the CRETTIEVILEl - Infantry Division. 3BAUPTE sector,' preparing to be relieved by the 90th 50Q8.th Parachute Infan:tr y_29 P,,ment The.oegient was passed thirourh by 90th' Infantry Division troops west of ST. SAUVEt' LE JVICOM2iT arid novod scn.th.of the DIYJVE. River, 'closing into an assoembly aroea southwest"' o f ErS i.ioitieirs ';',,AT01s by 13S0 hours, The -3d Battalion launched a deterrilnied attack,,t.a)in-st PL'O T at 0600 hours and seized-the' town and took 'uip.def,&isi. pns.ti'ons:'after a sharp, short battle.: The Batt.alion was subje.cted to heavy r.rtill eryj and mortar 'shelling throutghout the day..at 1600 hours the Battealion iroved to positiodns west of P2TOIT and was relieved in place at 2330 hours.-by the lst,.3attalion, 507th Parachute Infantry. 'FPLOS 15 t0 PLUS 24.W21-30 TJTi Duling this period," Vrhi':c -as.ma1'ked- by sharop local' actio s6.. thb Division Becured and held ;its 'area -with a frornt gbnerally that of D plus 14o a, VtII Corps' attack had. been plained 'or larte on '22-'june in awhich the Division :ws to seize the high ground ov.elo6oking:la I{HA DU PLUiTS while the 90th Infantry Division, thrusting from both fl.unks, would pinch the Dlvision out and seize the town, This' attack was 'pst'pone'dr:watil 3 July 'oecause of a wery'severe storn in the English' Charmll which interrupted lines of.cormunicition and supply and necessitated:'restriction of nemunition and&'rdnance lines. The First TU S, Ar'my placed priority on its nttadž to seize the vital port of OC-T3BOURG,' which fell to VII Corps on.:26 June, Meanwhile, the Division roorganized, regrouped and patrolled' aggressively.nd ext'onsively': On 26 June tho. Division part'icipated ifr a simulated Corps attack,' firing all possible' weapons between 070 and 0800e 325th _aidor Infantry ReGir.ent' Tho 2d B3attailion. 'ws relieved on 24 J~.e by 3d Battalion, 508th' Parachlute Infant'ry,. and the rogihent then'hold: a line betwenn the 508th Parachute Infantry on the ri,;t rnnd thp 507tnh Parachute Infantry pn the le'ft.,' The' ls.t Dattalion was on. the' rirh-it of tho6 regimnon1 sect-or, 2d 3attalion on the left and 3d Battalion in resorvos Luring the' entire period the rieoiment 'renmained in position, patrolled extensively and Mlade preparations' f'r. attack to the west.' 505th P'arachute Infantry fl.+ent : The 3d Dattalion remaindd inpo'sition in the western sector. of the.ois DE LtMOIS until relieved by 1st Battalion on 22 Vlane, The 26 Battalion took ov'r defense'of the eastern sector at the aame tine, 'On 26 Juno the 3d 3attalion relieved' 2d.. attalion, ''nd, in':turn, the.3d 3Btt.lion was relieved by the lst Battalion 508th Pxaadchute Infantry; at.tachod, on'29,june. During the entire period it oocupied the 30IS DE LIMORS the regin.ent 'sffored losses from heavy enemy mortar and artillery concentr.a:ations, Extensive ptatrolling was' carried out contact with adjacont units iias established firmly. ' and firingt was held to a mininu.l in order that friendly positions would not be 'disclosed, 507th P,'rachut e Infantry Rei iment 'The 1st battalion. relained. inoiposition on the high ground west of PRETOT, The 2d and 3d Battalions in the' CDREEVILLE - BAUPTE sector were relieved by the 359th' Infantry, 90th Infantry Division,.at Juno. and movod into reserve posei-l.e:.s b;5clcin'g' p' the: lst'.attdi6n to the n.rth of PR3.TOT The'. 2d Battalion relieved the.3d Ba.ttlion, '50$h p,rxaclhute Infantry, -in: the latter' s sector on 30 Juwio tand.bec.une attached to the: 508th'P.arachuto Infuantry. -During the 'eatire period the.rginent patrollod aggressi'ely into 'enemy linoes ~"",..~','.~'m, ~

30 RE 3 TR IC T-D 508th Parachute Infantry Regimint The 1'st Battalion occupied defensive positions nqrthabst of 7IITDEFONTAIINE on 22 Juno and rem>arined: there until relieved by the 507th Parachute Infantry on 24 June.- On 'the same day the 3d Btt :lion relieved. the Zd Battalion,.;25th Glider Infantry southeast of the BOIS D 'ELII0R1 and establishe6. conta'ct with tiha 565th Parachute Infantry on the rii;ht and 325thi Glider Inf.antry on the left. Th.- d. Battalion l!ov e.w into re3erve positionrs bohin.. the i Battalion, :..hd the lst Battal.ion took up positions be:!ilnd the 3d Battlion, 5C-th Parnachute Infantry. The 1st Buttalion tooi: up positions in the roar of' t]?e,d. On 29 June Thb 1st Battalion relieved the 3d.Bttalion. 505th Parachute Infrilmtry.nd became attached to the 505th. The 3d. Battalion was relieved by ths 23 B.;ttalion, 507th Parachute " - lnfa.;atry:v,.tlt,'che!il ind imove into the. 1st ;,attolion's former rosition on 30 July. The regiment patrol.led actively along the front during the entire period. 82d Airborne Division Art iller-.tihe vl9th Glier FilIjArtillery Bn..ttalion was in direct supplort of the 507th Par:.chute Infantry, 320th Glide. r Field Artiller-y B-tt'jlion in direct support of the 325th Glid Infantry, 456th Parachute -Field Artillery 'Batt'lion in direct support of the 505th and 5083th Para.chute Infantry Regi. ents. The 37th Ar..,orred and 188th Field Artillery ' tal.ons, attached, were in ::eneral support. The 319th Gli-er Field 1A3tierli o,:, tlicn vl.;s placed in direct support of' the 508th Parachute Infantry on 24 June and.the 456th Parachute Field A':til.lery Battalion was placed in.direct support of the 505th Parachute Infantry. Durin<- the remainder of the period support missions of the battalions 'are not changed and Division Artillery continu;ed to harass and intardic t enemy troops and lines of oonmmunicat i on. 80th Airborne Alitiaircroaft B lion 13attery A ;..s -laced in support o:l th:i 505th p'arachute I,.at,-ty. BEtt_~.ry B support-id. the. 5Q7th Parachute I;lfatr;y'. and,-?l/;' C su;'ortoc- the 508th Para- Ichute Infantry. Tre, iic'ine,,un batteries, D, E, and F, provided antiaircraft protoection.for t;ao stiehtille anrl V!N'D.,F'O01TA~'ih; Brid.:es, 307th Airborne Enineer ';T.italion Ti ; Blt.tlion durin. this period built roads t'.rough the BOIS DE LIMOR.3, checked the Division -area for mines and booby traps, operated water points, made ground en.gin'eer reconnaiss:.lnco, and screene'd thei! :-T IIII,'L, - 3T..TC..RE: Road to guard against observation from Hill 131 (1 5E75). TLe brid aes at FT1'TIEZTJThLLTr and VTIND}G.'T'0?r;AI.'\ 3 a,?rc.,uarded by. Squed S fromi Co,.n;iy A. Attac.led Trco s The 37th Ar,,cnrd and 138th FiL,'d Artillery Baettalions remained attached to Division A..ttllry.-' Troop. B, 4th C:3vlr R:.y onaissanc Slrcn, was reli:ved from attached to the Division at Junr.. Company A, 7L46th T,:k Ba.ttalion, was relieved from attachment on 21 June.. The. ois4t. Tank Ds:-tro;-er B.ttanioa was attached on 30. Julnc, and Co;,t,;,ny A, 607th Ti.,k Destro, er D.rtt. ion, remained attached during the perio.fd. Co,...any E, 7t.'; Chemical Muttr B,.ttalion, was relieved in the early part of thea period.. *D PL3. 25 TO D PLUJS 3, JULY 1944 The Division continued' to maintain positions in the E-TIN T 'jvili Bridgehead with a fron gena.ally along the line as of D pius 14. P-;;parations were completed., reorganization affected, and new troops attached for th.e attack to-the west on 3 July. The Divioion was firmly in cpntact with the 79th Ihf ;.try Di,;ision on the ri.ht and the'; 90th Ir,f.ntryj' Division. on the l.eft. Ai,; v'1c e DiViojil Colv :ima, R.ES T R:I C/T r ED.

31 R S TR I 0T D Post was opened at at hours. 325th Glider Infantryl.:Reg.iment The regiment.continued to,'hold pbsiti.ons. southwest of LA!.T0GU RIE (257875), maintaining.contact with. the 508th?arachute Ir.fantry on the right ~and 507th Parachute Infantry on the loft, The' st Battalion remained on the right, 2nd.Battalion on the left -and.3d Battalion in reserve. ' 505th Parachute Iifi.ntrY -R e ' Lent i ' The-regiment continued-to hold positions in the BOIS DO LIMIORS, wi'th the.lst Dattalion; 508th 3Parachute Infantry, attached, on-the left, the 1st 3attalion on the r.lght, Patrolling continued. Contact was maintained with. the 7..th Infantry.Ivision on the 'right end the 508.th Parachute Infantry on. the left...507th Par, chute "DfetrYf Rei:ientrn The regim.ent continued to hold positions in the vicinity of PR20OT, maintaiing:.6contact with the...90th Infantry Division on the left and the 325th Glider Infantry on the right. Tho 1st Dattalion held front line positions with the 3d Dattalion in r.eser.vo The 2nd. Dattalion remained attached to the 508th Parachute Infantry, 8.2d Airborne Division Artillery Preparations were made to displace and sulpport the attack of the Division inf'3jury,.'the'-319th Glider Field Artillery Battalion remained. in direct support of the 508Cth Parachute Inf.untry, the 320th Glider Field Aritllery Battalion in direct 'support of the 325th Glider adld,507th Par.chute Infantry Regiments, the 456th Parachute Field. Artillery PBattalion.in diirect- supioort of the.505th Parachute Infantry. The 87th Armoredv-.Field itillery r BaJl'lalion, less Battery 2., were,.in general support. Company D2, 86th. Chemical Mortar Battalion (4,2 inch mortars), was placed under Division Artillery control and attachod. to the 505th P"ar-cl'utb IHefailtry',at JuIly, 80th Airborne h;7tiaircraft 3attalion Datteries A.:and E were attached to the 505th Parachute Infantry, Dattery 3 to.the 507-th P:.rachute Infauitry trn.d :attery ;C to the :508th Parachute Inf.ntry for.the 3 July attck, th Airborne Bnagineoer Dattalion - Two platoons -of Company A were attached-to the 325th Glider, Infantry. One squad -of Company. was attachod to the 507th Parachute Infantry, ad two squads from Compn,-y D were..attached.to.each of the 505 and 508 larachute Infantry Regiments, Squads of Coimpany A guarding tho bridges at BTIi6VILLE and VIiUhDE)E0TAITE wore relieved by Corps.enigineers on 2 July.,.Attached Troops Coompay -A, 712th. Tank,3attalion, attached to the Division July, moved.into the bridgehead area late on-2 July. The 1st Platoon. ras attached to the 507th Parachute Infuantry ar.d the 2d Platoon.to the 325th Glider Infrntry. The 801st Taink Destroyer Vattalion was' rolioved fro.. nttachment on i July, and the. 803d Tank Destroyer 3attalion was attached oil July. Company A, 607th Tank Destroyer 3attalion, rel.iained.attacled, Coompnyy D, 8Gth Chemical Mortar. attalion was attached at July, placed under control of 82nd Division Artillery and later attaqced. tp t.e 505th-.Parachute Infantry, R_~ ik B ~ BI c T _ D

32 -R E. T r I C B D D PLUT JULY 1944 The Division' attacked despilteo.heavy. rnfrfall at hours after days of waiting,.reorganization and preparation'. The Division s mission was to,attack, seize and secure Hills 131 (195875) and 95 (188855) and the. high ground northeast of LA HAYE DU PUITS known as the LA POTUTIE IlIDGE. Flanked by the 79th Infantry Division on the right and the 90th Infantry Divisic.n.on the left, the 82d was-to be pinched out' of the' VIII Corps attack.and was to :aspemble and await further; orders.- The Division.attacked according to plan, with the 505th Parachute Infantry on the right, 508th Parachute Infantry, i the Iccnt'or' end:325th Glider Infantry on the left. The 2d. attalion 507th parachute I'nfantry, initially covered a siall draw between the 325th and 508the Stubborn resistance was offered initially by the 265th and 353d German Infantry Divisions reinforced by 0MT Battalions. The enemy had made good use of 'the 11 day delay to.organize an elaborate defense. However, by aggressive action the Division moved ahead to.seize Hill i31 by noon and to secure the eastern edge of the LA POTE.IE Ridge,- exclusive of the towl- of LA PTOEIE (221857) by darko Fighting was sharm and severe and enemy defensive positions were heavily mined and booby trapped, Many casualties were inflicted on the onery. The forward Division Coimmand Post moved to AUVRAIIIEB (209887). 325th Glider Infantr y Reginent With the lst Battalion on the left and the 2d Battalion. or.the right, the regiment. jumped off at 0630 hours, meetin:, considerable small arms and mortar fire,. In. the vicinity of LIA'L.IM,?IZUIE, the 3d Battalion was. committed temporarily to close a gap that had developed between the 2d and 1st Battalions at 1000 hours. The 90th Infantry Division on' the left-fiank was held up, leaving the flank exposed and under pressure, By 1600 hours.tho 325th had reached the town'of FAUDIEE '(240868). At 1550 'hours the. regimental objective was channged fro:m Hill 95 to the east.ern edge of the LA POTEPJE. Ridge to.include the town of LA POTEIJ.E, The 2d and 1st' attalions continued to attack towards the town, but increasing enemy opposition prevented the capture of 'the townm by nightfall. The 'd Battalion -" was. again placed in the line, and the regiment dug. in preparatory to attacking and seizing LA POTERIE the' following day.. 505th Parachute. nfantry Reimn'nt The regiment attacked at 0630 hours initially with the 1st and 2d Battalions in column, the 2d Battalion leading. Passing the creek line at VArENGUEECo the 2d Ba.vtalion seized DUPINERIE Iidgo (north of Hill 131) by 033Q hours and resumed the attack at 1015 hours 'with the 1st Battalion abreast and on the right. These two battalions by bold advances,- secured the north slope of Hill'.131 and the ST. SVEEIUP. LE VI CMTE'- LA HAYB DU PUITS Highway by 1225 hours despite heavy enemy artillory'fire, nines, and booby traps. The 3d Battalion followed. the 'assault battalionrs to nop up by-passed pockets of resistjnce. The roinmental zone. wn.s enlarged at 1550 hours to include all of Hill 131, Thae d latt.blion moved into position through the 2d and into the 508th Parachute Infantry's area on the southern slope of Hill 131. The regiment dug in by the end of the day along a line from LA Sa1GSURIERi south to LES POULAND. and then to a $.unction with the 508th Parachute Infantry at 3BLATCHELAIIDS. Preparations were made to continue the attack on 4 July. 507th Parachute Infantry Rein't. -. The 2d6 Battalion, under re'i:l:ental control, attacked at 0630 hours, flanked on.the left.ad right by the 2 5th Glidor and 508th Parachute Infanitry Regiments, respectively, "The Battalion cleared. a llenery from its area and -reached its' obtjective, LA FAUVELIE'(22'3869),'b.'1700, Preparations wore then made to attack. to t.he. south 'thepnoxt., dy,. Other units of the regiment remained in Division reserve south of VINbDEti TaIiBt 1 'and prepared to follow the advance of the 325th Glider Infantry.on.Division order 4 The reioment moved to the vicinity of IA DRITGUERIE at _.26:- -.1 t m R. I ' a TT a D

33 The 1st Dattailion followed and raintaind contact with the 325th Glider Infantry, cnd the 3d Dattalion protected the Division left flank to the left rear of the 1st 3attalion, ;-: th P'iaChute ' InfanttryRgient 'Wth the 2d Battalion on the. rig-,ht and the 3d Battalion on the left, the regiment attacked at 0630 hours, passing throughj the 1st Battaliont's positions. The high' around between VVAiE'iGU=-KbC and LA DAUDHRII was secured by 0900 hours, and the lst' Dattalion moved into reserve in the vicinity of LA COTELL'LE. lthe 2d Battalion reached the southern slope of Hi by 11'-5 hours and was joined by the 3d Battalion by 1600 hours. The regiment moved south at 2000 hours to occupy a zon in the vicinity of e DE du in d prepared to at'ack south. towards the LA POTBRIE Ridge. Enemny opposition was moderate heavy during, the action, Dxtensive minefields weore encountered. 82d Airborne'Difision Artillery All battalions fired. a preparation to precede the Divisionls attack, and during the entire action the.battalions fired harassing, interdiction and counterbattery fires with telling effect despite inclement weather which precluded aocurate observation. Reconnaissance was made to disp=en, battalions into more favorable positions closer to the ddvancing; infantry. A- total 7,727 rounds were fired durin:g the period. Att ached troops One Platoon of Company A, 712th Toanr Battalion, supported the 325th Glider Infantry during its attack near LA 1iUB'.UE.U.IEB and. another Platoon sup.oorted the 2d. Battalion, 507th Parachute Infantry in cle'aring ibs zenoiand- thbn we-nt'.into':.. positions near LA FA3TViZE.!IE conmanding observation of the LA POTM;IE - Pi-~mOT Highway; At 1315 one Platoon of- Company A, 803d Tank Destroyer 3attalionj mrovel to support the 2d Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry.. Company D, 86th Chemlical Mortar 'attalion, was relieved frord. attachmrent :;to the 505th Parachute Infantry at 1920 hours and was attached to the 325th Glider Infantry. D PLUS 'JULTY The Division resumied its attack 'at 0800 and by the end- of the 'day hald secured Hill 95 and the LA I-OTMRIE Riidge' against a determined enemy. Many severe counterattacks were driven back and any ;round iost as' a result of the counter thrusts was retaken. More than 500 eney. killed and more than 700 taken prisoner in the. bit ter fi;,htin;g. 325th Glider Infnlxtry iregiment The 1st and 3d 'Battalions resumed the attack a~gainst, the. town of LA POTEB?:I at 0800 hours and secured it by 1250 hours. The 2d Battalion remained in reserve. After passing tllrough A1 IO?0TIIE- the re-irment occupied.defnnsive positions' within its sector and established contact with the 90th.Infantry Division on the 82d' jtrborne Division t s left flank.' 505th' Parachute Infantry Reoiment The Ist and 3d Battalions attacked at 0800 to seize the northern slope of Hil' 95 and secured this objective by 1150 hours, Firm contact was imade with adjacent units. Contact with the 3d Battalion,. 314th Infantry, 79thn Infa.ntry Division, on the right, was madie at 2100 hours. 507 th Parachute Infantry rreirnmnt The 2d Battalion reverted to regai'ental control and moved at'noon to the -/27 -, B S T'2 I C T B D

34 breakthrough pos.ticn in the..vicinity of BLIAITCiELA3ID. The 3d 3Battalion moved into,an asscr.bly area north..ofi A?OT2.;E and attacked att2015 hours thrrough the 508th Parachute.infantry:'to soize. the western''hill nags at on LA POTIIE.' Ridge. lie 3d -3attalion" r'ached:, the hill" and was 'consolidating positions and establishing. contact 'with adj'acent units' by : 2400 hours. The 2d 3attalion attacked at 2200 hours between.the,.2d, and 3d Dattalions. S38th Par.aciute Infantry, and pushed up to the. center hill mas.s of LA POTE3RIE M Idge directly east of Hill 95. This 3attalion,cirole'% the hill in the'" drkness against considerable small anms and artillery fire and prepared- to s6izo it completely before daylight, The 1st.'attalion, meanwhile, remained in p6sition to the rear of the 325th Glider Infantry.loni, the Divisionls ri!,ht flanke 598th Parachute Infantry Regiment At 0800 the.re:imeont attacked south against Hill 95 and the LA POTIEE Ridge, The 2d Dattalion, pasding through elermeonts of the 505th Parachute Infantry, seized Hill 95 at Eno.- rosistache was particularly strong and 3.eosses wore heavy on both sides. An eneny counterattack at 1400 hours foroed.thd. 2d Datta; lion back but it retook the position by 2400 hours despite considerable 'artillery and small arm-s fire. The 3d rnd 1st Dtartalions attacked at 0800 cn't.tho left of' tho reimnent]. zone. Heavy concentrations of rortar, artillery nndsma-ll arms fire pinned the units down along the {;enera l line running due west from the town of LA POTMRIE and all atter.mpts to reach the objective were repulsed during the day. The 2d 3attalion, 507th Parachute Infantry, moved into position between the 2d and 3d Dattalions and launched an attack against the 3d -attal'ioni s objective at The 3d 3att alion, 507th, passed through elements of the 1st and 3d Battalions in its attack at 2015 hours on the eastern edge and northern slopes of LA- POTMIE Riidgo, 82d Airborne Division Artiilery Reinforcod by ei;ht battalions of VIII Corps artillery, the battalions of Division Jrtillery fired numerous concentrations in support of'the infantry ad- "vvance and succeeded in breaking, up oneny counterattacks in the vicinity of Hill 95 and along the LA POTBRI3 Ridi:e., Attachod Troops CooMnpony D, 86th Chemical Iviortar'3attalion, was relieved from attachment to :the Division at 2300 hours. Com--,any A, 607th Tank Destroyer.3attalion, was reo- 'lievod at 1115 hours. Ono platoon of tanks from Cor.pany,, 712th Tank Dattalion, wasrelieved. from the 325th Glider Infantry and suipported the 506th Parachute Infantry in repulsing counterattacks in that sector. Guns from the 803d Tank -Do's- troyer-.drtta.lhon were placbd on the south slope of Hill 131 to maintain fire on the woods south and west of the 508th Parachute Infantry front.. PLUS JULY The Division 'seoured all of the area within its zone of action, nopjping up all ronainin{l. pockots of enamy resistance, consolidating defensive positions and maintaining,.contact with the adjacent units in their advance to pinch off the Division. Corps orders restrained the Division from further advances. Defensive positions were. ost.blished alon, the general line from Hill 131 south along the ST. SAUVEUR LE VICOMiTE- LA DU UYE PUITS Highway to the southern slopes of Hill 95 and thenco along, the southern slope of'the LA POT.lIE Ridge. 325th Glider Inrfantry Ro.gillent The rogiment established a* defensive line on the forward slopes of the LA POT-MIEĒ2idge with the 3d Dattalion, 507th Parachute Infantry. attached, on the regimentls right flm.nk, Contact was maintained with the advancing 90th Infantry '" S R I _ T A D

35 R E S T I 0 T B D Division on the left. 505th Parachute I f-atr - Re The regiment n.aintained defezs;ive? posfiions on the reverse slope of Eill 95 and from that point nor-th to the base of HXill.l3, Cont.aci; was rnain:'..ained with the 79th Infantry Division on the right aond tihe 50 ' 8 bh ParachLte Infant;y. 507th Parachute Infantry: Rgiyz.ort The 2d Dattalion continued fighting to secure the westernriost hill of the LL POT'IE Rid.ge due east frozm HLM- 95 'This ridge was under control at 0700 hours:, During thoe rcmainder of the day this' ]satt4-lion killed or destroyed all ene,my within its area, 'cstablishd' contact with adjacent units cnd stren,thened positions. The 3d Battalion secured. tl'e easter-nost hill of the LA.-P:T 1S Ridge mad was attached to the 325thl C-lider Irnfamtry after having established contact. lte 1st Dattalion rerairied in reserve. 508th Parachute _infra. Rogifnt The 1st Dattalion moved into reserve positions in the vicinity of 3LiTCB-T LAT'. The 2d Battalion cleared enem.y from the fo'rward slopes of H'ill 131 _nd maintained contact with the 50(5th Parac'hutd Infantry. 'The 3d Dattalion, in the, center of LA?0PTlIIER i!hid;e, esta. -blished defensive positions between the 2d Dattaliont, 507th,.nd. the 2d 3attalion on Fill 131. The regiment suffered from eney'cy ncccentrations of artillery fire. All enemiy were cleared fror: the regimenal.sector, 82d A.rbrrno Division,irtil.lers A'll battalions assisted in bre.king up enemy 'c6unterattacks, particular4y~i_ the 5C07th Parachute Infantry areat he 456th Parachute Field 'Artillery.Dattalion was ordered to reinforce fires of the 319th Glider Field Artillery Dattalion which was still in direct support of the 508th Parachute Infetntry. ir-miunition expended during the day totalled 2,733 rounds. D PLUS 30 T D PLUS JTJLY 194 The Division maintained and strengthened defensive positions, drove out all attermpts by the enemy to infiltrate patrols through the Sector, and maintained contact with the 79th Infantry Division on the ri.ht,end the 90th Infantry Divisi'n c.n the l eft. The 2d Dattalion, 325th Glider Inf.atry, mocved into position between the 2d and.3d :Lsttalicns, 507th'P'arachute Inf.antry. The 505th Parachute Infantry sector was enlarged to include 'the eastern slopes of Hill 95, and, with 2d' Dactalion, 508th?arachute Infantry, attached; 'cleared the area of Infiltrae tin'g enemy patrols. At July the Division regr-u'ped its forces, placing 325th Glider xand 508th Pai.rachute Infantry Regiments in reserve uand makling 505th and 507t(h Parachute Infantry egiment.s' responsible for the right and left portion] respectively, of the Division'!s front lines. D PLUS 32 TO D PLUS JULY 194z4 The Division reverted to Corps reserve and was rblieved of -all attachments. The 8th Infantry Division passed throu-h the Divisionts positio'ns to continue the attacl to the south on 8 July, D plus. 32'.. The Division.assembled and on 11 July withdrew into First jliny reserve. It then moved :to Utahl :-3ach preparatory to 'i ts return to base cmups in 2-GLUMD. Upon returnin(g to base CaLmps the 'division ir.-iiediaty bgan a intensive training programr. The division h'd not rec.iived reinforcer.ents 'in Fra.nce and the In'f~Etry losses wore particularly. heavy, one.cc.-pany. cor.inai out of the lines with a strength of only sixteen officers nd' erlisted men, S a I C T 3.D

36 lofitting also occupied nuch of the tire; however, by nid-au.ust this phase had boon accomplishod end d training dominated the activities. Ono phase of the training included tests to dotermino the possibilities of ermloying heavy bomnbers in air landing operations. Doth the 3-17 arnd D-241 were used in these tests. Major General MAfTT1? 3D. RIDGWAY loft the Divisicn to become CoI.mIr, ndin Generil of XVIII Corps (Airborne), and r7rigadier General. JA;ES M. GA ar assused co!lmand of the 82d Airborne Division. As the month of August ended the Division was Loving to takeoff airfields in the 3ritish lidlands in preparation for a mission in.elgium that was cnncolled less than 24 hours pricr to schoduled takeoff tine. The Divisionls next mission bogan 17 Soptenmbr when it jumpecd and glided into the ijil3~g7-mvea-ggroesd MIX area of the ieteuil~mds RB~ELS~a CT

37 RESTRI d TED 82D AIPBPO'NE DIVfL3ION Af P; Tr I i-,,-.^' T.l;G3 htl}t S.,Ti0ON LII P..STRIlBUTION Airborno Hoadqunrters Offi.ces Within Division FAA 2 CG 1 11th Abn Div - 1 A:;st CG 1 13th Abn Div 1 C- S Abn Div 1 GCl 1 17th Abn Div (?)' 1 G-2 1 Prcht School 2 G-3 1 Abn Board 2 G-4 1 G'5 i' 1 Higjer Headquartors A.G File 1 Sp Tra 0's Club 1 Ad of S C-2, MID XIG 1 GSiD 1.S 1 l 0 l iusa 1 Chom 0 1 VII Corps 1 F- F 0 1 VIII Co'ps 1 J A 1 C:i;v Surg 1 Lower Headqguartrs_ Or th Gli Inf 50 SS0C 5'4':h Troh'b Inf 50 EnL.r 1 5.' 5 (:h PrchT - Tnf. 50 rp-ro I 8t.,E..h ~h.,; in.± 50 Di. Jsn 2 HEq & Hiq o'yry,. Div Div Historian 2 Al..ty l) Hq CGma rt 1 3l..'::h G li. FA Bn ','.k Gi.!. P'' 2i.'3 Courtesy Copies 1T' , P i F.j BEn 10 Genc Eisenhower 1 8,! -lh A1..' Ab'I. Bfi 10 ',' Br tdley 1 30r h.'au E. :,:' Bn 10 Infcntiy School 2 407'.?h b.,a 'i Co 5 0 & G7.School 2 30)7'th Amn }oel Go 5 Supt, USVIA 1 782d, Aib1a Ord aigint Gon, Ridrg!ay 1 Co 5 Ven. Gavin 5 82d Abn Sig.o 5 Gen LYarch 1 Div Hq Co 2 Gen, Eaton 1 Sp ''Xz 2 -Col, Tucker 1 82d Prcht Ylaint Co!, Eknman 1 Co 2 Col. Wienecke i 82d iabn Rtcn Pl.t 2 Col, P a`.iinpgslea 1 82d Abn MP Plat ' 2 Col. Griffith 1 Field O's with Dlv at time, one each 60 (est) R E S T R I C T E D

38 R E S T R I C E D 82D icrb ORNE DIVISION ACTION IN NODI~,~Y F%',EtRE JUPJE - J.rLY SCT:It 'IV -- ienexes. 1, Persoeiol *Y Command and Staff b Trcop List (2) Attached c. Consolidated list of Aircraft, Personnel and Vohiclos of Forces "A"n, "B" and "C", d, Cusualties (1) Casu-lties reculting from Plrachute drops and B lider landings. (2) Consolidated casualty reports by units. (3) Analysis ofo.bf'.asrceanr-._-.ties. (4) Analysis of c'asualties by branch. 2. Air Resupply 3. Air.'iovemnent Table a. Chart: Departuro Airfielids 4. Drop ;nd Landing Patterns a. ParachutB tr6ps b. Glider Landings 5. Statistical Study of Glider Landings 6. Chart: D-Day to D/2 7. Chaart: D/3 to Dr (MLERDEhET River Crossing) s. Ch!art: Dr7 (CIRETTEVILLZ-BAUFTE) 9. Chart: D./8 to D1l2 (ST. S.u,YUR LE VICO 1FTE) 10. Chart:, D/13 to D/18 (ETISEVILL,BRIDGEHEAD) ll.. Chart: Df25 to Df33 (Hills 131 and 95 - LA POTIRIE RID(E) REST R - I - CTE _ - D- -

39 R.;S C D AI;\TEX ITO.. CCOOZIAi'Y E~TARATIVE 1 A TO II SHTORI CAL FOR2 NtOEiL0 l,-1-d v CI~~A}D aid STf:- DU--2IG TE 82D AIBORE P`RTIC IPATIOJi- IiT TH YO-TiATIDY Cd:,'2IG D!VISION' j Comr,.unding General Assistant CoLmnanding General Assistant Conr3anding General Major General I4ATTHET D3. R :DGWAY Drigadier General JAdIiS I. GAVI!, Drigadier General GEI2ORGE?, HO.;-L 226 Glider Infantry Regiment Colonel HZR.Y L. LEWIS 504 Parachute Infmantry Regiment Colonel RPY.-Ji. H. TrJCKEI 505 Parachute Infantry Regilent Colonel willii. [... V. 2,2,- i 507 Parachute Infantry Regiment (Colonel G02GE V7. MILLET ( aptured by enemy c tr about 8 June 194 (Lieutenant Colonel ARTHUR L. MALON1EY (From o/ 8 June (Colonel EDSOIT D 3 RAF (From 15 June 19414) 508 Parachute Infantry ReCinent Colonel ROY E LI1TDQUIST 82nd Airborno 'Division Artillery Colonel FRANCIS,. MARCH 319 Glider Field Artillery 3attalion Lieutenant Colonel JAI.ES '* TODD 320 Glider Sield Artillery 3attalion Lieutenant Colonel PLUL E IIGHT 376 Parachute Field Artillery Battalion Lieutenant Colonel fwildu-r!!. GRIPITIq 456 Parachute Field Artillery. Dattalion Lieutenant Colonel WtAGTi"-..1 DI ALESSIO 80 Airborne Antiaircraft Battalion Lieutenant Colonel EYH{OlDITE. SI;:Gi2.TON 307 Airborne Enineieor Battalion (Lieutenant Colonel ROlFIT ;. PAIi'ER (Captured (Loss C Cormplny)* by eneny on or ;Lbout 5 June 1944) (IMajor BEuTI A, 3EDELL (Frol! 8 Jmeo 1944) 307 Airborne iodical Cor.pnny (Zrjor Wti. Jg HE. HOUSTCi: (W:illed 6 Juno L944) (sivjor JMfYl J. M3L)Dr (Froii 6 June 1944) 407 Airborne Quatermlaster Co-piny Captain SAiUEL H. i.ays 782 Airborne Ordnance Maintenance Company Captain JmZF.DAVI S, JR. 82nd Airborne Division Headquarters :*... - Company Captain. GEORGE J. OLAUSSMI' 82d Airborne Si,:al Corpany ' First Lieutenant' RODRT D. 1NfI 82d Airborne Reconnaissance Platoon First Lieu.tenant JOSEH V. fdmiasi 82d Airborne.oilitary Police Platoon Major nzede&i-ic G. MC COL0 IiU 82d, Parachute Ivkaintenance Comp.imy Captain JALBS E. GRIFFIIT (Provi sional) STAFF. Chi.efof 'Staff (Colonel RALH P. &iitoft (:injured in gllider c 86 5Juno 1944) (colonel "EDSOi D. -RAFF (A,.ting 8-15 June) (Lioutenant Colonel R03S'.T H. 'I.,. CKBE. * f 5, G-l ( Lieutenan(,Aoting 15 Jine -1 July)..a;rcf' S, G-i ( Lieutenant. Colonol ED:. " RI K M. SCz-ELHA1,,E' a fi R' st i R~iou Oft esx onel -71X Jr. (Lieutenant Colonel T WaL "~. Fn, WI5Oi\ (ct ng (Lieutenant Colonel 2iMERT D.,DM.iS (Acting ] AC. of S.. G4 Junze - 5 July) (Lieute'nant Colon'el D3\rI3,. ZI,7.1 (Wounded 7, June 1944,) (Lieutenant Colonel FiRlK W. MO1Ci2iLT (From 7 June 1944) R E S T.E: T D

40 RE S TRI C T E D Inspector?General Lieutenant Colonel CHARLES M. DARRET'T Signal Officer (Lioutenmont Colonel--iANK W. MCOO4iAIT (Captain RODJT E. FUPiW (Acting Frorm 7 June) Adjutant General Iieut nant Colonel PY'iIO'ID MI. 3RI' TTON Judge Advocato Ii;u.rtnlj ea Colonel CASIiIR D. MO SS Sur geon. (i i;otten l. l Colonel WJL'OWT T L, ET'i=E ( '?.uded 6 Jrz.oe 1944) (.4ajor JiLIiAM GO I,IiNDSRIM Abt.lng from 7 Jt~i: e144) Finanioe Ofickc r Lieutenant Colonel 1tIIdIAMY EBo. tgii( f ichaplain li eutcnanr; (;olonel GEORGE L. MI-DDLE Ordnanco Officor (jieutenrw3t Colonel JOSMUA A. FINKLE (Wounlde. 7 Juvne.9,4,) (Captain WILLIA; 3 D. MC GUI.R (Acting fron 7 June 1944) Quartermaster Officer L.;ieuttenant Colonel JO50 M. MOi'iAiN Headquarters Commandant.14joi Oi CL AITI Provost Marshall. -.. *ajot-.fpat7hžr 'C G, MO COLLUM Special Service Officer 0C: p in-]) GK ir OTT Military Government Offi-cer..Ct;.ain Pi~l S;eOUVALOF teotes: *During NTOR1l4ALDY Operation rc.iained in base car.-ps in the United Kindon. R ES RI ED

41 R E ST RI C T E D ANNEX NO. 1 B TO ACCOClPANY HISTORICAL NARRATIVE FOR NORIAN5DY TROOP LIST ORG;ANIC* Headquarters and.headqu.rters Company, ed Airborne Division Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Airborne Brigade Headquarters and IIeadquarters Battery, 82d Airborne Division Artille 325tGlider Infantry Regiment 504 Parachute Infantry Regiment* 505 P-.rachute Infantry Regiment 507 Parachute Infantry Regiment 505 Parachute Infantry Regiment 319 Glider Field Artillery Battalion 320 Glider Field Artillery Battalion 376.Parachuto Field Artillery Battalion* 456 Parachute Field Artillery Battalion 80 -irberne Anti-aircraft Battalion 307 Airborne Engineer Battalion 307 Airborne Medical Company -407.Airborne. Quartermaster Company 782 Airborne Ordnance 'Maintenance Cormpany 82 Airborne Sisal Company 82 Airborne I-ilitary Police Platoon 82 Airborne Reconnaissance Platoon (Provisional) 82 Airborne Parachute,a-intenance Company (Provisional) UNIT, I'.TCrI-D DATES C Company, 746 Tank Battalion I Junre --11 June A Company, 746 Tank Battalion 13 June June A Company, 712 Tank Battalion 1 July -- 8 July C Company, 889 Tank Destroyer Battalion 1 June --19 June A Company, 607 Tank Destroyer Battalion 19 June -- 4 July 801 Tank Destroyer Battalion 30 June - 1 July 603 Tank Destroyer.Battalion. - 1 July -- 8 July B Troop, 4 Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron 1 June --23-June 87 Armored Field Artillery Battalion 1 June -- 8.June, 14 June Field Artillory Battalion 12 June July B-July 172 Field Artillery Battalion 16 June.--19 June D Company, 86 Chemical Mortar Battalion T. July -- 4 July B Company,-87 Chemical Mortar Battalion 15 June $-21 June Quartermaster Truck Comapny 3810 Quartermaster Truck Company 1-Platoon, 464 Ambulance Company, 31 EMdical Group 493 Collecting Company, 179 Mledical Battalion 374 Collecting Company, 50 Medical Buttaliowi 429 Litter Bearer Platoon 591 Collecting Colipany 1st Platoon, 603 Quartermaster Graves Registration Company NOTE: *504 Parachute Iiufantry Regiment, 376 Parachute Fiold Artillery Battalion, and C 0ojpany, 307 Airborne Ear,ineer Battalion remained in base camps, Usited.iun,dom after returing from -AN240, ITALY. RE S.TRI C T E D

42 RESTRI CTED ANNEX 1 C-TO- ACCGILiP97Y hftorica,. NARRATIVE FOR NORYiNY CONTSOLIDATD LIST. OF -AIRCRAFT, PERSONNEL AND MIJOR E'QI!'P}T OF FORCES "A", "I"..- AD "C" -FORCE nau (PFOAHTM) tili T >L/C P:ESO32TEL GU1:s Div Hq, "82d Abn th Prcht Inf th Prchlt Inf th Prcht Inf , Pr ack How 307th Abn Eiar:T 3n 9 1%-A 82d Abn P/F G.rps TO AL FORCE 1 3" (&GLIDI) UIT A/ C MSi7li-a GUIS TfXS 114T TIrS KŽ/L Div-Hq, 82d Abn Div d,bn en. Plat d Abn -riv Arty d Albn Sig Co th Abn AA Dn r ,24 57riAzT th Abn Med Co' th bn hgr 'nt th G1 FA in m XIow. 32! th G1 PA Dn ' 105r-m How th G1 Inf n AT d.n, 4 01st G1 Inf Cond Vohs, 505,' 507, 508 Prcht Infs : 2 TO~L 428 ' R. E S TR, RI. I C-. : t ~~~~~ _,t''"

43 FY0RCE " C0( SABQ.0R:T UTIT. PERS-. 2T T T 3/4T 2T 75mm 3/4T 1/4T 1/4T oritt T TR.K IRF -. DU/' OT. W IA1B4 _, TRL 8 d Abn Div Hq '.' 505th Prcht Inf th Prcht Inf th Prcht Inf ih G1 I!rf Hq & Hq Btry, 82d Abn Div Arty th G1 FA Bn 47 : th G1 FA:3 n -50 ' th Prcht FA Bn 471' th Abn A. Bn, Bn Hq & IMed Det (36 50-cal.AA mg) th Abn Engr Bn ' 82d Abn Sig Co ' th IAbn Med Coc 26. 1(H2by) 5 8 8:d Abn Ord Mairnt Co th Abn QI Co d Abn i4p.plat Iji T-rk Co Q Q.., Trk Co TOTAL S FORCE "B" ' 3871 FORCE ";Al " TOTA TL 11,979 *Remained attached during operation. P., ST. '?

44 ANhTEX i D TO ACCOMPA1Y HI STORI CAL NARRATIVE FOR TORBM.AI'DY CASUALTI ES.1 82D AIRBORNE DIVISION G0.SUALTIES: a, Recapittlation - t Cbmmitted Strength 11,770 oo100, Total Casualties 5,436 46,18 Killed in action or died cf wounds 1,142 9,70 Wounded 2,37'3 20,1G issing or known captured 840 7,13 Evacuated Sick 377 3,20 Evacuated Injured 704 5,98 *Organic Troops Only 1 (1). 1b. COsualties fromnparachute drops and glider land.iigs: See Annex.c, Consolidated casualty reports by units: See Aanex No. 1 D (2). d. Analysis of Officer Casualties: See Annex io. 1 D (3). NOTE: The tabulation shown in this annex was prepared on in'formation available as 26 July 1944 and therefore is somewhat incomplete in respect to final' adjusted figures. It does, however, give a reliable indication of casualties amorg officers of th Division. e. na lysis of casulties by branch: See Annex ito. 1 D (4). NOTE: The'tabulation shown in this.mnnex was prepared on infprmation available as of 26 July 1944 and therefore is-somewhat incomplete, in respect to finsll adjusted figures. It does, however, give a reliable indication of casualties by branch of service, 2. XrZE Y CA.SUALTIES: a. Personnel -- (1) Estimated killed in Major battles only - 1,500 (2) Captured - 2,156 (3) During its cnpaign in NT0'AANDY the 82d Atrborne Divistio was engaged with all or mhjor portions of five different enemy divisions, including the 91st, 243d, 77th,?65th and-353d. It is estimated that the 91st and 265th Divisions were virtually destroyod as effective fighting unit's. b. Materiel: The return of the Division to the' United Kingdom prepm. ed a tharough search of territory gained during the period 3-8 July e a summary of enemy materiol known cpturod or,destioyed by the 82d Airborne ii in NIORMATDY is as follows: Tanksi all types. 62 Light Reco-nnaissance Vehicles 2 ~E~sC~L9 ~ T

45 AMtiU-tank gusi (ail alibers) 24 A3tit-aircraft guns (Jall calibers) 14 Sel-f-propell.ed gis (all calibers) 3 Artillery field pieces (all' typeg) 3 EC~r :SI T R P. I C T 1B DEW

46 ANtITX NO 1D (1) TO0 L-CC0 TiY IS ST0o. CAL L-.LMRVTIVE FOR to. I,O-hDY R. S T R 1- -T. ASUALTIES I:,STTTI: G POi p '2nA DROPS,ID G:OT' I';: '. I2: "DSiC:S Following is a report of an official investigation conducted by the Division Inspector General and submitted. to the Division Commander 2:5 July 1 9,44: is In compliance with your directive dated 13 July 1944 the followring data submitted for your information: a... Dispersion:. See.anexes 4 anld 5 b, Landings: 6296 paratroopers- dropped. (1) Casualties: ido. Dnown drored as a result of the drop Paratroopers abandoned to the enemy :s a result of jumnp i-njuries Injured in jumping iand evacuated by friendly forces (2) One complete os-ticl< from--to-5;7th is still missing. (3) }o sticks were destroyed completely by loss of aircraft before jumping. (4) Out of 237 CG-4A's nrd 187 Forsras used, five (5) CG-4A's are still unaccounted for. These five-(5) G-4A'.s were cut loose shortly after makin'g a landfall on the west coast of.the peninsula and are all from the 0Oth.A Battulion. TIwo.are reported to havo been the result of tow ropes severed by AA fire.. (5) Casualties in glider serials: DIAYTI C+HT D.12 EjSS Total carried o. -0. $. KIA !IhA KIIA O (6).ihe percentage chance of becomirg a c.aswulty:. 'ESS D-AI _ T DIATI, Horsos % 0 V- 4 5.e, 10.7O (7) The following.~q. lupm'nt_ was unserviceable due to landings: Day2Lli. E_ S TR-_TRIT T=1,S rtlr S ]-*0. 9RID.C.. 0ARRIE i:. -o /0.P i io. ;,: 70,CL.IED -ht Horsas I CG-4A *~ :RIE S R I' C T D D

47 -R E S - R :I"C T E D Darkness ' _,: _JE,-S..IL3RS _ G TTS j::'o..-. 1JO: - z0..- '.. R'ED -TO. CA.RPIDu"O - '. -. o. C. RRIID Horsas G : CG-4A 11 ` (8) 'There:. was. one known case.occurred of tow rope brediing during 'flight. This was.a CQG-4A. - ' (9) There are-no known ca;ses of gliders-pulling-loose in flight during or. after- teke-off-...s/t/ C.F. n-31'i-,i~' JR., ~..', mlt. ~~~~- Col., IGD,: Inspector General. 7OTE: There 're minor discrepancies between this report and.ianex6s 1 0 and.3 in respect..to number of gliders ond number of vehicles;

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50 '~- ~ 'M ~i o ' <I ~o~.e V I I-~ ~ ~~ tj i~ 'd! ~,! Ij ~ --] -n rq 0! =, ~~~~~~~.... i i... -.!!~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~n I 0 ~ ~ ~'"~ I~ IX,),!0::~ t-! " ~ I i IN)- ji tj! -il~~~~~~~~" F-'~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~i7'" I -' " I 3-' :'Tnt I.-. 'x tu O J CO 0 - J\ ru ~~~ ~ iv :1 t3 t-3 1 ' ij in '"t "* "'\ c CC) o'.; co ro I p '~~~~~~~~~.,- i-- ~. ~ h f', Irc.. ' '' c o5,! P.. i--3 I1. r ' :\ 'r!0 I ' -i o, ~ -- " s :"; -..) '~.0'..J~ '0 ~)!.?.( ~ r~~~~~ '-7 :~ ~ too l ~ ~~~ :.-, l' i H,;, I ; ~o. t~ H I',? ' w '- - tr' -4 -ru 1 r1- E~ ~~' _Aj -0 1 l~i ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~i[ ii..... ;tc IY 2+.- i Wr t.ruc. 7~ I,~~~~~~~~N! "~, I-A I'%)C I.J1 r'o.0% w. ]-J ' i~u ig'j I I l ;D~~~~~~~~~.A -13 D p/ P r ~~~~~~O...~,....,.,.J H.- <~. 'n ~ P '- 'r -:~ -13 FJ " 0 I \ CC) 0a C) ii i i~j Ct3 ~.I o ", r I J O.'N),!.~ ~ r el ee ee ee ee e ~ le e el eee. e ~ "~.J!' t.' - I- ix) ',! ~'3 r'o,v -:. n,. o o,--, i~~~r t., P ~~~~~~~~~, 0", l

51 RE S T R I C T E D AVITEX iwio. 2 TO ACC OOIPAN Y ;-I STORI CAIT FN-JRR.TIVE, KOR iocrmaidy AIR RSIP PLY Following is a ieport submitted by the Assistant Chief of Staff, G-4 on 25 July Resupply during Operation -Ti YR breaks down.into tro phases. plus 1. Phase I. 'Automatic resupply dropped by parachute the morning of D Phase II. Resupply on call delivered by glider at various times after break through occurred.mnd beachead was sufficiently organized to permit gliders to land on the beach or large fields without opposition. 2. Phase I. This was a pro-rr.ranged delivery of about 250 tons of all types of expendable supplies -- mainly ammunition. 'Of the 250 tons, only about 200 tons left the UK due to non-availability of equipment in UK. This was dropped in and around the Division area. About 50: was picked up at once -- some items reaching small groups who were still isolated west of the i;erd~ert River. Some undoubtedly fell in German ha-mds. A continuing search was made for these bundles and it is believed that we eventually found about. 70, or 140 tons of this equipment. 3. Phase II. Deliveries during this period were in response to our requests for signal equipment; crew-served weapons, includirg artillery pieces, and GldkDiiO- grenades. all of this equipment arrived safely :and reached this Division except for 6000 'GAi[;UiOI grenades lost due to our not sending a representative to follow this property through,to this Division. a list-of major items of these 'shipments follows 4-57mm, AT guns 3-105mm, Y3 Hows 19-81mm 11,000 - G&i,;4l01 grenades 20-60mm 4 - SCR LG 4 - SCR EiG 3 - SCR ATRI - 45 miles wire, '.F m1, 'Pack shows 1 ton batteries

52 R-E S T R I C T E D) AiTEX TO. 3 TO ACCO1iS'2AWiY "I STORICL TA2P4,TI E FOR POM.3A1TDY AIRP MOV53 i't TABL5S Extracted from official air movement tables nublished in Field Orders 'of the 82d Airborne Division and the 52d.-nd 53d Troop CGrrier WTrings. Code names were those assigned by Siuprome Jei.dquartors, Allied Expeditionary Force. AII hio v:1.i:t T/QBLE - P -i.jt= Ser- Airborne Unit USTCC ro. -Takeoff DZ DZ itujl Unit A/C ' -Airfield Tine 4; 82d Pathfinders 1st P/F 3 1. '"ithnm d Pathfinders 1st P/F 3 1. %ithmn, d Pathfinders 1st P/F 3 7. it, ham T 0202 iii SSfTiT "B0 STCo"- 17'. 2 ]n 505 Prcht Inf 316 Gp 36 ottes.o'0re Bn 505 Prcht Inf 316 Gp 36 Cottesmnore Bn 505 Prcht Inf 315 Gp 36). -Hq& Hq Co 505-9)48 Spgnihoe Plat 307 Abn Enigr Bn 3) Dot. HEq 82.bn piv 20 2 Bn 508 Prcht Inf 314'Gp 36 Scliby it Fq & Hq Co i4 Gp 9) Co B ('-) 307 Ergr 6) 24 Saltby it 0214 Force "A" Hq 9) 22 1 Bn 508 Prcht Inf 313 Gp 36 Folkinghimu it n 508 Pr-cht Inf 313 l.p 36 Folkinghm i Bn 507 Pr-cht Inf 61 Gp. 36 Barkston T 0232 Heath 25 3 Bn 507 Prcht Inf 61 GP 36 3arkston T 0238 Heath >26 1 Bn 507 Prcht Inf --zi Gp 36) 45 ulbock T ) I;I SSIO1' "'-?.IEPORT" (. PIJS 01) - (.R=.oUPP, 38 Resupply.61 Gp Xirkston Heath R E S T R I C E D

53 R _ST R I _T ED Ser- -Airborne Unit USTCC Tkeo ff DZ DZ al - Uni t A/C Airfield Time.39 Resuppl y 313 Gp 46 Folkingham ResuppI' 314 p 46 Sal tby Iesupply. 316 Gp 46 _Cottesmore '- Ti'O. Tf, T;I~G~1237-,7 4IT..juo7DI~ TXTIJZ. - OID. j Ser- Ai.rborne Unit- USr I..Gliders -Takeoff LZ LZ *ia% Unit A/C- OCG Hor- Airfield Time -- _._i n--.:1_ i.[i SSiif 1-." 1DE.O IT" 28- Btrys A & B Gp Ramsbury Abn AA Bn- Hq 82 Abn Div (-) 6 ASP (Glider) Abn Div firty 1 82 Abn- ig' CO 2 i,;i SSIC-i: "~",.i'ira" (D- D_~ ) 30 Btry C 80 Abnr -137 Gp R1amsburyz 2110 Eq.82 Abn Div- 4 Cid Velh, -Div Eq Abn 'Sig: Co 1 ASP (Glider) ' Abn iv Arty 1 1 Eq80 Abn ia Bn Abn!ied Co 438 Gp Greenham -W Rcn Plat C- omons l 82 Abn. SigCo ' ', 9 E. 82 i-bn Div 9.ASP Vehicles' (Prcht) Gli:., 'n 43:6-'G p Memibury W, Gli FIA Bn Abn ' -Di r Arty 1 Z.307.-Abna.Med. Co 1 Co' A307 Abn -: - 1 -Engr Bn (-): Gli Ft 'Bn p '' Welford ' I SSIO0.C " G YJiVES TO]'" "-~~- ' D_%O PLUS.OiTE) n 325 Gli Inf 437 Gp Reaisbury W 0700 Co A 307 Abn 4 3 Engr En R E S-T RI C T E.D

54 R zstr I C T E D Ser- Airborne Unit USTCC. o. Gliders Tnkeoff LZ LZ ial Unit A/C CG FoT- Airfield. Time - 4A sa 35 Hq & Hqq Co Qp Aldermaston W 0710 Gli tnf, 8~ Abrn Div Arty 5 Co A 307 Abn Dngr Bn 2 82 Abn Rcn Pl-at Cmd Veh 508 Prcht Inf Bn 325 Glit' Inf 439 Cp Uppotery. r Bn 401,Gli Inf i3n 3S5 Gli Inf Sply 41i Gp Bn 401 G i Ina Sply 18 Sdrv Co 325 Gli Tnf- 3 COmd Veh 5d5,. 507i Prcht Ihfs otoils T0f0TE:i Figures for Hq., 82 ibn Div Hlq includce Div HIq Co and 82 Abn Ii Plat.

55 3FULBECK : FOR~~i~~~~l~~~~s~~~ ' ~~n~rbarkston HEATH * PRCHT -~-g TAKE~~~~OFF F~~I~~ELDS.~~ *SALFOLKIWGHAM 0SALTBY Scale' Al0Te. MiS to O e Inh EOCOTTESMORE 2 LECES ER SMNHOE?~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~:,6e : ; :_ii~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~li?~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~--~-~a 1 ::/ ::I::::, 'v_# L a~~~~a~mmor,s:~~~~~~~ :)R ENAMa -- :-~~~~II~ f.:~~~~~~~~ ~~~~:: :::~(:)i:)otteryi:: (~MERRYFELD ~F~~ ~:: :~:~~_,;BL III ~ : ~ d ::~ ~ ~~ ~~~~ ; I:...: :i: i:~: i [I I I I I II I I I f ] ' J I I I [ I I I I I II Y#M~~~~~~le ~ M Me1# ~ ~m. 'g~ u ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ PO~PO ~;_::_: : : ::-_:~ ' : ' ~ :,-_ ~ ::::;I-: - ) EL S~R A~ o41-oee :: ~ ~ T ~~~~TAN A eln OlPOT51':-~: ilt:: toe~at

56 822 AIRBORNE DIVISION ANNEX NO. 4b TO ACCOMPANY HISTORICAL NARRATIVE FOR NORMANDY GLIDER LANDING F~TTERNS CHERBOURG 6-7 JUNE 1944 (See also Annex 3) LEGEND: = (any color)- CG 4A or Horsa Glider. BLUE = Serial 28. BLACK z Serials RED = Serials 32 a 33. BROWN = Serials 34 a 35. GREEN =Serials P BRICQUEBEC NOTES: GENERAL: 5 Gliders landed from 24 to 33 miles from LZ's. SERIAL 28-3 Gliders MIA, no exact location know on 3 Glides. SERIALS 30 a 31 i-thes serials wer briefed for LZ "W". A SERIALS ) message was sent from Hq 822 A/B DIVISION, NORMANDY, requesting that these serials be directed to LZ "0". This message sent was not received by IX TCC. A panel was displayed at from the reconnaisance plane for the D Day Dusk serial indicati that the Eureka and panels would be placed in vicinity of LZ 0. This plane never saw the panel. The Eureka and the panel landing T Were set up in the vicinity of LZ "0" and the resulting pull"of the Eureka versus the briefing of the pilots, both glider and tug 4 VALOGNES may account for the general dispersion between UQI & W!' 4 MO NTEBOURGSCL SERIALS 34 a 35- One LAND; no exact locati SERIALS 36 a 37- ider landed at PORTLAND BILL, ENGon 2 Gliders. location known for 2 Gliders. I SSAUVEUR Le VICOMTE QPONT LABBE La w'e Du PUITS ATILAXTA*.t*. ge.j.* La CARENTAN OIsIGNY

57 CHE R BOURG 822 AIRBORNE DIVISION ANNEX NO. 4a TO ACCOMPANY HISTORICAL NARRATIVE FOR NORM ANDY FARACHUTE DROP PATTERNS 6 June 1944 (see also Annex 30) LEGEND 0= Stick or Planeload of Parachutists. ~BRICQUEBEC x= Pathfinders. COLORS: RED Serials 17 ls and 19. GREEN Serials 26,21 and 22. CO VALOGNES BLACK a Serials 23,24and25. STICKS NOT SHOWN ON CHART: a. RED- One stick destroyed on runway, one returned to ENG- ~M NTEBOU RG LAND. b. GREEN- One stick missing In action, no location known on six sticks. c. BLACK- One stick 25 miles south of Drop Zone, ten sticks 20 miles south of Drop Zon no location known on two sticks. I 0 I SCALE 3 4 Miles SteMiRE EGLISE ~St. SAUVEUR Le V COMT. CARENTAN 9 ISIGNY

58 " ~ J' I --~ [" I W-'* l le~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ x~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~- le~~~~~~~~ W-W l' to. - A.,, " 4!, t. ~J~ 82- AIRBORNE DMSION ANNEX NO.5 TO ae Q DIVSO ACCOMPANY HISTORICAL NARRATIVE APO q U.S. ARMY FOR 29 Jt~t~v I" NORMANDY Tj, O QPT OFr~stAA O 6DIVISON P~:O PLDtI: WL, OF,~ LANDItNG46 OF,8_ A/B DIVlSION T N OPRTON.1101Ž~NEpTuNW I 6- JUN. HORSAYPU *~IAS 7T~OtA 9IO t,7jju id.wa Coft MAHDUN lld. At4SpJR'UR LZ'W ROUt * G~ouP #4 4't7 ZvEIFR ZW UR QA. P4 i ut 0lC-7Pll I 4 P. *x, -6 # 4t so - r ". 01. Mr. I V... AL a. ~lln-isl~~ --,, _ Sao -.,,xa G... q~ " ' tp-l l~ PlI L [. II,L r. X x - r X II M I C A ", L% I I x f r.=~---1u 6.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ x.ex w a I f 1~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ LH, i t i =~_c' 'AIn x 6 to ~~~~~~~~x A.12 _ Y.' X Px1-0_I X 4 ",.- -t~ Li,.0~X X V Mt. :: ' " " X H I' ~+iit- I 'X 1' 79~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~1~""--""o ' ' '... ~tl _K i1\ _ I ~ -.4 K 'I It 0" _ *A141 AI_ AT #4_ TD x - - t * ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ _ lx * rr -lbp~~~a4 ~1-~~131 I 71 I I I # ' 6.G-_(_ ~ I 4 ~ ~ M WAS. rtn,96 1 x L, 6. X I I -. -o S Y. X?! X ATLAISTA Oils~ * ip OT.*2O.IO- f l 6P~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~wT~~ -T~C1~ s 7 A,&~ U' y 1_ 1.O t Ll*v 7 X X I2 ml _ I X _agr I C A0,_ a 4iLcMn7_TO 't-1 ',I 1 -l..., ~f1p iwi I7 I~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 'AGIn 11.. _ x 111hl -'~.. M R. HG n-1b i7' Div J ~ kxy ~'. DP-" X In Xn1 I I I i` F ' P- -2j 1~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~7 Is A 1. -3V~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~T -A P :,-ru ii-~rj~ IX I Xj 1-B76-~ 1-CL 1- I r I I : 6 xri_ a~~~~~~~~ I tm ll rll 7; L ",ZC~s~~t-l; ~ 5 lr 1 I I Lo X )(- X ~ *~~~~~~? I IO. Ld~. xr ' ~liii I - ~ LAT. ' DP-dI I X. X I M it.. - I A'. " a.7l =-ii~~~t~t~t-tf~~t-: X~ -al~s x X I r:slco C, t ZIN "atl: X L991-41W7~l- (so 1 I ml -co S. u :_I ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ JO1. :f Io.. -?'"'" 4 a :, I~--G'-6Jl 6' :-.. ' X,.. I. LH-~, X '2 K to '76 dllj j i-::- --- e x? i.--~~--~ -- 9_;.I,I.r r~ae 1 r a 4* UO-B~r C.6e 16, 0"^. MAT 1A IKA *04 VIAL~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ LA x * LJ-164~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~64 It ol..._ K0-_?0,iX CoC.Si a X7,,~~~~~~~~~~~~,'7 XG-4400,W M,,, P-A', A 1, 11, ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~A 1 VA*$, IVA^,. 4 " 1,m I M0I It ' ".._. - -n,-.. '~v l ;_. P ', ' Hq- ]'ar-- " [ ~_ ' # _. ~b~~~~~~~~~r.,~) x 1~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~,to~l( a H x ], X Ift" '*.~ o--',,.u a :. 1 1~~~1~1 a~~~~~~~ -1~~_~-1_1' :,. 6' i ---- ~~ 1 ~? I..- It. Co B. 9~.6..LH~-924., :I :. L+ i ~IN.&1, 'Zl I~7 t,74..j, r t[ JIAa -" ea_~.,_, -I In ~ ~ _ ~ x. ~ 119 ~ t1 ~ toi ~ L ~ If I ~ ~ ~ ~ W at t y X~~~~l~~~lr ' ~~~~~'1 I. 71 I~n 1... :: :)1I r z ' ~- x IL it ' X~~~~~~~ A v - [ =.~to "a -)..C,b~ X '. i# " le~ -- IIIII'I*. I.,-Co -,. 3-, le.?i I~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~. to I.,m' ~ ~~~~~r _. W-Zs ] _K ~~ ~ ~ ~ ;~!.. ATLANTA 11-1~~~...,... AMEN~~,i-t

59 S""Tr ON ~, STATISTICAL STUDY CG4A ~o~~do oinrf t 0 WILa 9rSk ftbuo ; Lz.: C0 wwivm4 C1 we 4-?' LEWIAL t.*2 as $"ei oar coop: Z$L'y-,*. T~i L o0io.l A,. L SI~e al CRE.lL Jr J:E Nri.: L- JEBmP j L._. CwIJMCE 1AT'. 1..JLOW, RVN rili il(. CIF_#31060pL NJIujt _ JE2I w-.a a'.my i l~~o t.j9~ HU IA. EVAC ML5. 5Ern. S~LIRS SER j~() 5faic,&su,i I Ne.)~i~ C(ld*~.* ~0~j~~~ mi I.a y r'~~1m _ ~ Ž fmi a L C~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~3 I,-15) I* 4?-4b SS*,,;-T- - '-- '~- ~r U,1 I ----.!.g ( n I.r l, 1~, I~ i I 1 I I I '-'-~f.- _ PWT 42,- 7ml A 'I7*s, ;.,,,4~. 2,-*'b 11,4-5 4 x Zoo, 43.74CLA,A ~~~~_~ ~ a4-25 ~1K* o 4z I k~~l I T I r r3-4 r r s. '3 -Sb04 3" '4~~2~0~~t~~ 3 ~~~~~~ II.A.TY *, 300 N~-!'o~ T TA,,... 2±.6 I I IX Pa.Now, - A A.4.U 7 -,,,S o S-aw,, 42-" -~ P~~~~~~ ~ P xl _1ooA. 2, da'.a. 0?,, 1.iz4'-~ *1~ ~ 4-,~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ I 1 rr :Is 0..iL~ on - _ I 7aI I 1 - a z X*~~~~~~~~~~~ *~~~ a X. ro 4b- 4l19 x I : Li.1I27-, I o IIL la 4 I E' V 4I-0X4Z * fx. Y.6. r I in. C'4 I, J1 EP' -. mu IJ. 2 0lrc 0-- C 1 4j- 4R.S b- v. Or r "I - I(s 5' ~I* w I A-II IM., ItT,~s I a I A. Mi.,,S lg r K 8, I* P4r - R -L 31S i LZ. TION 4 TA'-1,b- Sv * b Uft - I4 L I' 7~o 4S ~ xli~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ r I I *-I rs~42-4 I - - i-n9f N X i. SO. 42 * Rwsrrl I "2Z.b01~bj S IX -3 4z -414o x X I '4 o ^t mv X 41~.~1~ ~, ~19. ~ 1 2 ~.~~osoo Irlo! ~o I I I I Je.~,..~0 _i~,o. I 4xb X ' Y 4 r i-.al (...me ' 0 42' ".,,(. m, o _ [4o.Y '.,, Z3- I 4ItLeI I I 2. t,,.-,l-,,4' 7.. o,.,~... :, "44bL's ~.! fl I I. a.a Scott ipome OF comaqe: L, Nq 3.10 "il' l. 9w6f"Sougtr' L: ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ -:. -. :4, ' M.-.. t-w w:43. I_, 2 I I im 1 Lw I I CI I 4..'! 'c.. I -41q0 I 1 x I ON Lm XTA ' le. lz ol I' I I i02 Iry 'r"hft... OCOL IPs... I 'OLS ', I sl MU8-osot '"I Des I" " ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~..t ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~oy, _.4s IP-IM '42 s" "1 I 1 I I' t I ' i 14UM4~ff..- a.,, a1x, os IA UVA1 M I S IYfo " i i.i L7. l I43, * 1 A k,4.* A3 vgy_ ~ ~T.~.~ '~N._,%k~~~~~~~roo.4 o~~~~~~~~~~~~lc.~ '.,KI~~~~~~e I..~i -1-o~-.t. i 1 z I 6. 1 I I l~,~,.i~~~~~~t~-~!m,-"$e I -I I ;~; IX t1 / t t 1'- I -. II ;; I -J.,..t91s~< I r ~.m'~~ I ~z I H~. I b Y)i..,I I / i~ I_ I~ IH I z,..i_ I. ri! I.1~I I tiii" It-/ :-:'"""~ -'' 1 ' lt " I' I 1 -"' /'1,~. I*aX Az.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~o I f.-~ I I f s T, I T *.ol- ri, I~-?x:, D, v s -. - I.- I I - I ' X i [ IN I -, A' _,,I, i x..l - *, 4,- v 1 X I $, 6w...AIXk'rI.0 I L I4qL 7 I ~ - a P t IX4 I I r^/we'io.. o,0 " XC,a NI p MI= X1 %I 'toal&. 2 lo/t I i 2 I j I' IK I " -- -T4I-~T~, r I ' 8. I. l, I ' I I oor~~~~~~~~~~c.4l' r 141 '6e)0 31 f I I I 8 4,,' CO.- 12 ".6 e, r A -- W i X1 *, I 7 ix ~n,~ _ ' I -7".. I I [5.I O 6 i ~"~l I'1 I t-ir t [v IIso ' I :.'QL:" T41~ a :: C_~ l~erl I.. I f I PIESt~SO~L ' JFP X IT'II~,~H.-IIe [ GUN O~lb.X'ACt] Lt ~~ 1 'L Ir, II..._I 4D- 51 %~'9, W 4ej7 be"a X I... 1 Y I I -, I -I, :I r 1a 7 IIo ima. ~ ~. - 4~ -.'1.:-tLAUTI W".!aCZ, ~.P-.o,.0 1 : II - Isa I, r x x.*1... "l a~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~3. ". 1413, I 4_ [... n ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~~~~~~~~~ L1~- -:c..e8s t ' 414~S I~ I ~Yl~1tw ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~,'Iv rc~ a~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ],.,, "'.01111,6111' 4-.9* n I I X 2...<., I I Y Ur16 wltflt D~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ toan oi-,1,.. ~~(A &F EW. : 5eS V I Sea _ 1 Eaon : rv : '4 H 4. " Ib--f14Z~ *73.r- '4i99s s C. 4,,,-..,,,aJ0ma coiilo.' M I.,..... mlw,li., 1X,I - -, -L~ C-4 [~0' L.7-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~II'.~. lea~ 'x I to 1 I _I.... ' 2 n~l IIPcctc~ r I i m. 4 j1 =a, Am ~ -rcx~. ~10~ _ ~r I~A- 614 '_ 1~1_ I* L1,, '. f-.. -P4. ' 0 ] x ~* 1 ' I on L T. YAIL,. -~;D~. 7 r rfl~lorhp L I B~p, 1TPPIILp ), ". 0 0 a AI * 1 -v _ ]K 1C AS - 409"rv -1 1:7::3 1 L X I _ 1 xl _~~_._ I i I I f r~l 4 I, X same Aa,~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~p. 414P4.,q, all -~ ~ ~~. ' l?-ii~l An, 4 7 XI 9~~~~~~~~~~000 C.r~ Z W-*P&. _ 407 o, 11_ (1 la5 : r I 1X - ' K - o - 7~ ~~~~~~~~~~~ 4 I A I T~~~~~~~~ 1 I : I Ilw I ~ 1 1-"; I I 1 I I I r II 3-92 * :. X2 4 " V- * 14 S. ~1,5 1 J_. I i _ I I, ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~..., 1.,)- a 2 4 w YO, I I,''' ON~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ N a W ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~1 t Y L~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~A-44of jk"*~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ V 4~.v,4 A 2.* X~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ #.. rc~z O -T-7 1oX 2 Il 00 4 A X C I I: r * LG Acamp , C i 5hZ >4 a~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~i Ra-fw 7-4 Cwwp. 4,,.z. '- 4r?.. ~"J1 I a ~=' 1 ~ $ ':1 e, s,..,.t -,~~. oo wq:iw. 14 mil.a.. r 42' 4 "0'31 ~L. a~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~^ i ' -- 0 "' ---- I - u 4 U~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~121 s- *TL'AwTA ATLANTK tx ra;i f I-I.l4lt It 40%

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