Alameda County Sheriff s Office

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1 Alameda County Sheriff s Office 21 st Century Policing in Urban Unincorporated Alameda County Captain Martin Neideffer

2 Alameda County Sheriff s Office On December 18, 2014, President Barack Obama issued and Executive Order appointing an 11-member taskforce on 21 st century policing to respond to a number of serious incidents between law enforcement and the communities they serve and protect. The President wanted a quick but thorough response that would begin the process of healing and restore community trust. The mission of the Executive Order was clear: The Task Force shall, consistent with applicable law, identify best practices and otherwise make recommendations to the President on how policing practices can promote effective crime reduction while building public trust.

3 Alameda County Sheriff s Office In 90 days, the task force facilitated seven hearings with 140 witnesses and reviewed volumes of written testimony submitted online by additional witnesses and the general public. The testimony and hearings were organized around the following six pillars: 1. Building Trust and Legitimacy 2. Policy and Oversight 3. Technology and Social Media 4. Community Policing and Crime Reduction 5. Training and Education 6. Officer Wellness and Safety

4 Alameda County Sheriff s Office The task force generated 59 recommendations and 92 action items. Each recommendation was developed, vetted, and approved by the task force by consensus. The task force comprised leaders from law enforcement, police unions, academia, and civil rights organizations as well as community leaders. The task force insisted that the recommendations be anchored in measurable and behavioral change and not in abstract theory around policing. The report that was submitted to the President in May 2015 Final Report of the President s Task Force on 21 st Century Policing created a road map for the future of policing and provides clear direction on how to build trust with the public.

5 Alameda County Sheriff s Office UNDERLYING THEMES 1. Change the culture of policing: Guardians vs. warriors. The final report calls for law enforcement to protect the dignity and human rights of all, to be protectors and champions of the Constitution. This rethinking of the role of police in a democracy requires leadership an d commitment across law enforcement organizations to ensure internal and external policies, practices, and procedures that guide individual officers and make organizations more accountable to the communities they serve 1. Embrace Community Policing: Community policing is a philosophy as well as a way of doing business. The commitment to work with communities to tackle the immediate and longer-term causes or crime through join problem solving reduces crime and improves quality of life. It also makes officers safer and increases the likelihood of individuals to abide by the law.

6 Alameda County Sheriff s Office 3. Ensure fair and impartial policing: Procedural justice is based on four principles: (1) treating people with dignity and respect, (2) giving individuals voice during the encounters, (3) being neutral and transparent in decision making, and (4) conveying trustworthy motives. In additional to practicing procedural justice, understanding the negative impact of explicit and implicit bias on police-community relations and then taking construction actions to train officers and the community on how to recognize and mitigate are key factors. 3. Building community capital: Trust and legitimacy grow from positive interactions based on more than just enforcement interactions. Law enforcement agencies can achieve trust and legitimacy by establishing a positive presence and community activities and events, participating in proactive problem solving, and ensuring that communities have a voice and a seat at the table working with others.

7 Alameda County Sheriff s Office 5. Pay attention to officer wellness and safety: law enforcement officers face all kinds of threats and stresses that have a direct impact on their safety and well-being. Ensure that officers have access to the tools that will keep them safe, such as bulletproof vests and tactical first aid kits and training. Promote officer wellness through physical, social, and mental health support. 5. Technology: New and emerging technology is changing the way we police. It improves efficiency and transparency but also raises privacy concerns and has a significant price tag. Body-worn cameras, less than lethal use of force technologies, communications, and social media all require a legal and pragmatic review of policies, practices, and procedures. These policies, practices, and procedures should be developed with input from the community and constitutional scholars.

8 Alameda County Sheriff s Office MOVING FROM RECOMMENDATIONS TO ACTIONS Local elected and appointed government officials, law enforcement agencies, and the communities they serve are a three-legged stool in the effort to implement the task force recommendations from the final report. Each leg must be in place to support a comprehensive approach to reduce crime and build trust and legitimacy. Success in a community will require collaboration and partnership among these three groups.

9 Alameda County Sheriff s Office The Alameda County Sheriff s Office began its transformation into a 21 st Century public safety agency in 2005, nearly 10 years before President Obama commissioned his 21 st Century Policing Task Force. DSAL Recognizing how poverty and disenfranchisement in its many forms tends to drive crime and recidivism, the Sheriff s Office in 2005 established the Deputy Sheriffs Activities League, Inc. (DSAL). DSAL is a non-profit organization independent from the Sheriff s Office that works closely with the Sheriff s Office to create programs and direct resources into neighborhood building and crime reduction enterprises. The DSAL started with a $25,000 annual budget, now operates with a $3 million annual budget and provides recreational programming serving thousands of youth and adults annually, operates a food systems social enterprise, and recently is venturing into community and economic development.

10 Alameda County Sheriff s Office YFSB The Youth and Family Services Bureau began its existence in 1998 with three Marriage and Family Therapists handling a handful of youth diversion cases. YFSB expanded operations in 2008 when it established contracts with Behavioral Health Care Services and became a Medi-Cal provider. In 2011, The Sheriff s Office was awarded its first United States Department of Justice Second Chance Act grant. With it, YFSB hired four additional clinicians and created the evidence-based reentry model known as Operation My Home Town (OMHT. (The Sheriff s Office was awarded its third Second Chance Act grant in support of OMHT in It is one of only two agencies in the country to have won three Second Chance Act grants). YFSB now has 13 clinical and support staff, with an additional five clinical positions waiting to be filled. YFSB serves hundreds of clients a year through OMHT, including case management of seriously mentally ill clients reentry clients at the Parents and Children Together (PACT) family reunification facility in Oakland, and through an out-patient clinic in Ashland.

11 Alameda County Sheriff s Office REORGANIZATION In 2016, Sheriff Ahern reorganized agency operations, establishing the Eden Township Substation as a Division of the Sheriff s Office under a Commander (currently Kelly Miles) and two Captains. One Captain (currently Dave Blanchard) oversees patrol and investigations, the second Captain (currently Martin Neideffer) oversees the YFSB with an expanded role, scope, and staffing levels. YFSB currently consists of three elements: SWORN: There are 23 sworn staff, with an additional four more deputies to be added through the 2017 COPS Hiring Grant. BEHAVIORAL HEALTH: There are 13 Behavioral Health professionals, with five additional clinical positions still be filled. CIVILAIN: There is one Program Specialist, who also serves as the director of the non-profit DSAL. The DSAL employs 17 full- and part-time employees, and also facilitates more than 100 volunteer staff and coaches. When YFSB is at full staff, he Sheriff s Office deploys 63 staff nearly exclusively to community policing and neighborhood building programs and projects.

12 Alameda County Sheriff s Office FUNDERS/PARTNERS Funding sources since 2005 include: Medi-Cal/Medi-Cal Administrative Activities Alameda County Social Services Agency Alameda County Probation Department Four Community Policing Hiring Grants Three Second Chance Act Grants Byrne Criminal Justice Innovation Grant ArtPlace America (economic development/placemaking) Kresge Foundation (economic development/placemaking) Local Initiative Support Corporation (LISC) San Francisco Foundation Aramark Corporation Oakland Builders Alliance BSCC Strengthening Law Enforcement Community Relations One Mentally Ill Offender Crime Reduction Grant Three Community Development Block Grants U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Dignity Grant California Department of Agriculture Specialty Crop Grant Kaiser Permanente Eden Healthcare District Measure A Cal Works Castro Valley Rotary Hayward Rotary United States Soccer Federation Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame American Recovery and Reinvestment Act

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98 Alameda County Sheriff s Office Just Believe VIDEO HERE