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1 operationsmanual 2015 version

2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter 1: Chapter 2: Chapter 3: INTRODUCTION... iii MISSION COMMAND CYS Services Core Programs Standards of Conduct and Accountability SOP Caregivers' Creed Customer Service Admission and Release of Children/Youth. 13 Notification to Parents 15 Installation Required Annual Inspections Monthly/Bi-weekly Walkthrough of all CYSS Facilities 16 RISK MANAGEMENT Fire/Facility/Safety Facility Construction/Renovations/Alterations Fire Facility Safety Health Food and Nutrition Access Control Background Check Process Program Review Board (PRB). 103 Child Abuse Prevention, Guidance, Discipline and Accountability Video Surveillance System (VSS) Field Trips and High Risk Activities Accreditation and Reporting Procedures PROGRAM MANAGEMENT Operations Patron Eligibility and Priority CYS Services Registration Procedures Waiting List Parent and Outreach Services Parent Handbook School Support Services

3 Chapter 4: Chapter 5: RESOURCE and PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT Financial Fee Policy EFMP Respite Care Funding/Child Care Cost. 162 Community Based Programs Fee Assistance Personnel Personnel Policies Program Oversight Youth Tech Lab & VSS Management Functions & Responsibilities 173 Ratios. 175 Bus Transportation Employee Handbook Labor Relations Collective Bargaining CYS Services-Branded Apparel Training CURRICULUM AND PROGRAMMING Child Development Family Child Care School Age Care Middle School / Teens Child and Youth Sports and Fitness GLOSSARY: REFERENCES: ANNEXES Annex A: Standards of Conduct and Accountability Standing Operating Procedures Annex B: CYS Services Monthly/Bi-Weekly Facility Walkthrough Tool and Instructions Annex C: G9 CYS Services Installation Report Suspense List v15 Annex D: Fire Evacuation Plan Template Annex E: More About the Topic: Conducting Fire Drills in Child Development Centers Annex F: More About the Topic: Choking Hazards Annex G: School Support Self-Inspection Checklist Annex H: FCC RIMP Request Form Annex I: Army Fee Assistance Family Handbook Annex J: Program Review Board (PRB) TAB A Annex K: Decision Matrix, Training Guide and Handouts It is mandatory to follow the guidance contained in this manual to ensure the success of installation CYS Services programs and to be in compliance with Army regulations and Department of Defense Instructions. All previous versions (2013 and 2014) of the Operations Manual are rescinded. Updated info is in RED version

4 INTRODUCTION MISSION Statement: Army Child, Youth and School (CYS) Services programs support military readiness by reducing the conflict between Soldiers parental responsibilities and mission requirements. Simply stated, CYS Services programs provide quality child care, youth out of school options, and school support services so that Soldiers and Department of Defense (DoD) civilians can focus on their job, knowing their children are well cared for by professional staff in state of the art facilities. Taking care of our Soldiers and their Families with consistent, effective and safe programs builds and enhances not only military readiness and retention, but also Family resilience. The foundation of CYS Services rests on four cornerstones: Quality, Availability, Affordability and Accountability. All four cornerstones are equally important, and all four must be in balance for CYS Services programs to run effectively and efficiently. Quality: All CYS Services programs operating on federal property are DoD certified. Community-based programs are licensed by the state. This means they are frequently inspected to ensure the safety, health and well-being of children and youth in our programs. In addition, Child Development Center and School Age Care programs are required to be accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting body to validate that quality standards are maintained. Availability: We strive to ensure that sufficient numbers of spaces and support services are available to meet the needs of the installation, while keeping in mind the programs we offer are a service and not an entitlement. This means that while we make every effort to provide the right number of spaces in the right settings and in the right age groups, we may be unable (and it is not a requirement), to meet the total demand. Affordability: CYS Services operates on a shared cost responsibility philosophy that ensures fees are affordable for both the Family and the Army. This means fees are based on a Family s ability to pay, and not by the age of the child, typical in civilian programs. By public law, there is a minimum of a 50/50 match between parent fees and Army provided funding. Accountability: Our managers are well trained and competent in safeguarding the Army s resources by providing efficient management oversight, good fiscal stewardship to reduce waste and protect assets. CYS Services programs are not meant to produce a profit, but are expected to break even. All four of these cornerstones must work in harmony a program can have sufficient availability, but if low quality, no one will use the spaces; a program may be meeting 100% of the demand, but perhaps at a cost the Army cannot sustain. This Operations Manual (OM) serves as a tool for CYS Services staff members to achieve the intent of the four cornerstones and to provide consistent and predictable delivery of child and youth programs in Army operated installation programs. The manual outlines a systemic approach to implementing an effective CYS Services program by prescribing how to information on routine operations and procedures. Although each installation experiences unique factors that impact the way of doing business, this document provides a framework to ensure CYS Services programs are standardized. The manual includes five sections: Mission Command, Risk Management, Program Management, Resource & Personnel Management, and Curriculum and Programming. A comprehensive resource list and glossary with more in-depth information on specific, more complex topics such as standardized position descriptions can be found in the Annexes and weblinks for documents in AKO. The manual is a living document and will be updated at least annually as the Army works to revise and publish updated regulatory guidance. It is mandatory to follow the guidance contained in this manual to ensure the success of installation CYS Services programs, compliance with Army regulations and Department of Defense Instructions, and, most importantly, to provide consistent, effective, and safe programs that build and enhance Soldier and Family readiness, retention and resilience. iii

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6 Chapter 1 MISSION COMMAND CHILD, YOUTH and SCHOOL SERVICES CORE PROGRAMS 1-0. CYS Services Child Development, School Age Care and Youth Centers: a. Child Development Centers (CDCs): (Ages 6 weeks-5 years) Offers on-post full-day, part-day, hourly child care, extended duty day care, 24/7 care and Army Strong Beginnings Pre-K program to prepare children to be successful upon entering a traditional school setting. These facilities may also include stand alone CDC annexes and satellite sites. Care is provided by trained staff and operations are subject to Department of Defense (DoD) Certification. Current guidance has kindergarten children attending the program that is the best fit for the Garrison. b. School Age Care (SAC) Centers (formerly known as CDC 6-10): (Grades 1-5) Offers before and after school programs, 24/7 care, weekend activities during the school year, full day care during school out days, summer camps/care and camps during school vacations. Care is provided by trained staff and operations are subject to DoD Certification. If kindergarten is in SAC a ratio of 1:12 must be maintained. c. Youth Centers (YCs): (Grades 6-12) Offers Middle School and Teen (MST) Programs (MST and Youth Programs are one and the same in this OM) before and after school, weekends, evenings and school-out periods to include: life skills; citizenship and leadership opportunities; arts; recreation and leisure activities; academic support; mentoring and intervention services in facilities designed for this purpose. These facilities may also include stand-alone Teen Centers. Supervision and programming is provided by trained staff and operations are subject to DoD Certification CYS Services Home Based Program: a. Family Child Care (FCC) homes: (Ages 4 weeks-12 years) Offers full-day, part-day, and hourly child care to include extended duty day, weekend care, 24- hour care as needed in a home environment. Care for up to six children (depending on mix of ages) is provided by trained, certified and monitored Child Care providers in their own homes (private, leased, government quarters and homes off post). b. Child Development (CD) Homes: (6 wks 12 years) CD Homes can provide full day, hourly, shift work and weekend care. CD Homes can also be a source of emergency child care. Care can be offered 23 hours per day by CYS Services employees and generally established in an unoccupied set of quarters or in RCI housing (where negotiated). CD Homes serve up to 12 children at any given time (up to 36 children during three (3) shifts). Chapter 1 1

7 1-2. CYS Services Parent & Outreach Programs a. Parent and Outreach Services (P&OS) extend system wide support and direct care and supervision options for families residing both on post and within the local communities. Parent and Outreach Services is referred to as the Gateway to CYS Services. b. System wide support: 1) CYS Liaison Services: a) Parent Central Services (PCS) is a one stop shop for registration, enrollment, records transfer, parent education classes, and babysitter and referral services for Families. b) Provides program information and coordinates special events, c) Sends enews publications and messages, and contributes to web sites of interest to parents. d) The Installation Child and Youth Operations Plan (ICOP) is your fiveyear business plan for CYS Services. i) The ICOP is a cyclical process that creates and updates the installation's blueprint for providing child care options, supervised out-ofschool activities for children and youth ages 4 weeks to 18 years, Sports and Fitness, School Support Services and Parent and Outreach Services. ii) The intent is to strive to meet projected customer demand during the five year timeframe. e) The Mobilization and Contingency (MAC) Plan identifies how CYS Services needs will be met during... i) Mobilization and deployment ii) Natural disasters iii) Emergency situations iv) Other contingencies and v) addresses projected care demands and youth supervision needs; outlines potential care and supervision options and support services; identifies facilities, personnel, and transportation issues; and addresses linkages with schools. 2 MISSION COMMAND 2015

8 vi) The MAC Plan is a commander's assurance there is a plan in place to ensure adequate child care and youth supervision options will be available to support mission readiness during mobilization and contingency situations. For more information go to AKO at: f) Mobile CYS Programs: i) Kids on Site (KOS): provides short-term alternative childcare to parents attending on-post meetings or function in the same or adjacent building. KOS sites must meet health and safety inspection for approval. CYS Services staff provide developmental and age appropriate activities using the same ratio requirements followed in other CYS programs. ii) KOS partners with Soldier and Family Assistance Center (SFAC) to provide short-term hourly child care services for Wounded and Injured Soldiers and their Families at the SFAC. Operational guidance for SFAC Childcare can be found on CYS Services Professional Website at iii) KOS partners with Family Readiness Groups (FRG) to provide care for official FRG meetings, for units that are in the deployed status. Deployed unit FRGs may receive up to three hours of free group child care per month for official meetings. Operational guidance for FRG Childcare is found on the CYS Services Professional Website at iv) Kids At Home: Offers non-traditional outreach services to support Families with children/youth whose primary care/educational setting is in their own home. Includes imalone classes for enrolled children (11-15 years) whose parents have determined that they can be home alone during out of school hours and Home School Services, e.g., use of CYS Services tech labs, multipurpose rooms, homework centers, instructional programs for educational purposes during school hours (when facilities are not in use) by children/youth who are home schooled. v) CYSitters: Offers formal training for teens and adults who provide short term childcare. Training covers skills needed to safely and appropriately care for children and includes First Aid and CPR, program activities, and the business of babysitting. Trained CYSitters receive a certificate of completion and wallet card and may be placed on the CYS Services babysitter referral list available at PCS. Parents must sign for the referral list per AR , 7-30.e, so number of referrals can be tracked. Youth age 12 can attend the babysitter training but will not be included on the CYS Services babysitter referral list until age 13. Chapter 1 3

9 vi) Schools of Knowledge, Inspiration, Exploration and Skills (SKIESUnlimited): is the framework for the Army s CYS Services Instructional Program and has been designed as a four-school delivery system. The four schools are: (a) School of Academic Skills, Mentoring and Intervention; (b) School of Arts, Recreation and Leisure; (c) School of Life Skills, Citizenship and Leadership; and (d) School of Sports, Fitness and Health. vii) The required number of SKIESUnlimited classes can be offered over the course of weeks or months or in as little as one session. A minimum of one class in all four SKIESUnlimited schools throughout the year (48 weeks) is required to retain the program. 2) Parent Liaison Services: a) includes CYS Services Parent Advisory Board, non-traditional outreach services, Parents On Site volunteer program, and Parent Involvement opportunities. b) Parent education classes are offered throughout the year on various child and Family topics to include health, child/youth development, behavioral management techniques and strategies for effective parenting. All classes are taught by subject matter experts in the programs or child related fields. c) Parents on Site: Offers support services for the operation and management of parent co-ops that exchange babysitting services, infant/toddler playgroups, short term care in unit settings by Family members in one unit or organization for similar services at a future agreed upon time with Family members in another unit or organization. Care is provided by parents with CYS Services staff assistance. d) Multi-disciplinary Inclusion Action Team (MIAT) (formerly known as Special Needs Accommodation Process): i) The MIAT is a subcommittee of the Installation Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) committee. ii) The MIAT is responsible for exploring Installation child care and youth supervision options for children and youth with medical diagnoses that 4 MISSION COMMAND 2015

10 reflect life threatening conditions, functional limitations and diagnosed behavioral/psychological conditions. iii) The MIAT recommends child care and youth supervision placement and determines reasonable accommodations and availability of services to support a child/youth s special needs. When reasonable accommodations cannot be met, Installation CYS Services and EFMP will notify HQ, IMCOM-G9. iv) The MIAT represents a Installation-wide partnership that is working toward the inclusion of all children/youth accessing CYS Services. Inclusion is an attitude and a philosophy that welcomes and supports all children, with the goal of facilitating and maximizing participation in CYS Services child care, youth supervision and educational programs. v) For more information on MIAT please see Operational Guidance for Multi-disciplinary Inclusion Action Team on AKO at e) EFMP Respite Care Program in CYS Services Programs: i) EFMP respite care provides a temporary rest period for Family members responsible for regular care of children with disabilities. It is time limited based on the exceptional Family member (EFM) medical condition and availability of funding. ii) Army CDCs, SAC centers, certified FCC providers, and YCs may be used when children/youth are eligible for CYS Services Programs. All CYS Services regulatory requirements and procedures apply. EFMP Respite Care Families wishing to use CYS Services must attend an MIAT meeting to determine placement, reasonable accommodations and availability of services to support their child. iii) EFMP Respite Care funding may not be used to reduce/eliminate full day child care fees in Army operated CYS Services programs to include FCC providers. iv) Any or all rates/costs for the CYS Services programs, including hourly care are the responsibility of the sponsor. 3) School Support Services Programs a) School Liaison Officers with educational backgrounds and experience are located on each Army Installation. b) School Liaison Officers provide support to Garrison Commanders and Army Families through partnerships with local school districts. Chapter 1 5

11 c) School Liaison Officers: i) advise Garrison Command staff on matters relating to schools; ii) assist Army Families with school issues; iii) communicate information and support services to Army Families and schools; iv) support Army Families during school transitions; v) collaborate with school districts to build positive relationships and address issues that impact Army students; vi) facilitate training for parents, schools, and Installations; vii) foster reciprocal transition practices among school districts and viii) increase school transition predictability for Army Families. d. Home School Support: Provided to CYS Services registered Families who choose to home school their children. School Liaison Officers gather and share policies and resources to help these families overcome unique challenges and barriers. e. School Youth Sponsorship Programs: Ease school transitions for children and youth who change schools frequently. The school youth sponsorship programs are either grass root efforts that have a variety of names or part of the Army contracted Student to Student/Jr. Student to Student programs described below. f. Parent to Parent Cadres : (K- 12 grades) Offers teams of trained parent coaches at 13 high impact Installations to help parents understand the academic, social and emotional implications of school moves and become effective advocates for their children. The program is managed by the Military Child Education Coalition through a centrally funded Army enterprise contract. g. Army funded professional development opportunities: For Families, school districts and community members to build student resilience, awareness of education issues unique to military-connected students, and skill in responding to military-connected student and Family needs. Key programs prepare educators to address the school transition concerns of mobile students and teach educators, community professionals and Family members how to support military children during times of uncertainty, trauma and grief. 6 MISSION COMMAND 2015

12 h. Research-based afterschool academic and mentoring programs: Offered at selected schools. These programs are designed to increase the number of Army youth who successfully achieve proficiency on required state assessments and to increase students academic grades. Also included are credit recovery programs at selected schools that allow students to earn academic credits toward graduation. i. Tutor.Com: (K-1 st Yr College) free, online tutoring services to all Army affiliated youth. Tutoring services are accessible 24/7 through the CYS Services Public Site on Army OneSource at CYS Services Community Based Child Care & Youth Programs a. Army Affiliated CYS Services Programs: (Ages 4 weeks-18 years) 1) Buys down the cost of child care and youth programs for Army Families living off-post in Installation catchment areas when no space is available on post or it is not feasible for children to access on post care after school. Includes: a) Army Child Care in Your Neighborhood (ACCYN) for children 4 weeks - 5 years, b) Army School Age Programs in Your Neighborhood (ASPYN) for children ages 6-12 years, and c) Army Youth Programs in Your Neighborhood (AYPYN) for youth ages years. 2) Programs are centrally funded and managed through an Army enterprise contract that locates providers, provides technical assistance and administers the fee assistance program for parents using these services. 3) ACCYN programs are also supported by Installation Community Based Program Managers who provide technical assistance. 4) Participating programs are available at selected Installations. 5) These programs supplement and do not replace Army operated on post Child and Youth Programs. 6) Community Based Programs are configured to meet the needs of the installation. Chapter 1 7

13 b. Army Sponsored CYS Services Child Care Programs: (Ages 4 weeks-12 years) 1) Offers child care at reduced rates for geographically dispersed Families where they reside. Includes: a) Military Child Care in Your Neighborhood (MCCYN) for Active Component Families and Operation Military Child Care (OMCC) for Reserve Component Families throughout the Army Force Generation (ARFORGEN) cycle. b) Also serves geographically dispersed Families of recruiters, Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC), Military Entrance Processing Command (MEPCOM), and Corps of Engineers that live beyond reasonable commuting distance of military bases. 2) Programs are centrally funded and managed through an Army enterprise contract that locates providers and administers the fee assistance program for parents using these services. 3) Participating programs are available in 50 states, Puerto Rico and Guam. These programs supplement and do not replace Army operated on post Child and Youth Programs. c. Army Sponsored CYS Services Youth Programs: (Ages 6-18 years) Offers youth outreach services for geographically dispersed Families. 1) Connects youth with resources and support systems where they reside. Includes: a) Operation: Military Kids (a collaborative effort with America's communities to support children and youth impacted by the deployment cycle) and b) Mission: Youth Outreach (access to community Boys & Girls Clubs) for Active Component Families and Reserve Component Families throughout the ARFORGEN cycle. 2) Serves geographically dispersed Families of recruiters, ROTC, MEPCOM, and Corps of Engineers that live beyond reasonable commuting distance of military bases. 3) Programs are centrally funded and managed as an Army enterprise initiative. Programs are available in 50 states. These programs supplement and do not replace Army operated on post Child and Youth Programs. 8 MISSION COMMAND 2015

14 1-4. Kids on Site-Strong Bonds and Special Event Openings: KOS supports Army Families through Deployment Support by providing assistance for the Army Chaplain's Strong Bond Program. A KOS Guidebook for Off-Post Special Events Child Care was developed in 2012 to provide Operational Procedures and guidelines for supporting special events child care in off post locations. In addition to the guidebook, there is a CD which contains the KOS Registration Packet and all standardized forms and tools required for complete program implementation. NOTE: Installation CYS Services can provide child care support to Strong Bonds events if additional staff is available and can provide the staff without comprising the safety and well being of children in CYS Services programs. Link for KOS Guidebook and Resource materials is: Child and Youth Sports and Fitness Program (CYSFP) a. The CYSFP is designed to promote health & fitness and battle child obesity. b. The CYSFP is defined as programs and services that address the physical, cognitive, social and emotional needs of Army children and youth ranging from 18 months to 18 years of age. c. The CYSFP Delivery System consists of a comprehensive framework comprised of four Service Areas: Team Sports, Individual Sports, Fitness & Health, and Outreach. d. Through formal partnership agreements with several nationally recognized youth-serving organizations, such as the National Alliance for Youth Sports (NAYS), the United States Department of Agriculture s 4-H program, and Boys & Girls Clubs of America, children and youth have access both on and off post to curricula and initiatives selected for implementation in the CYSFP, to include special events, camps, classes and clinics CYS Services Partnerships with National Youth Serving Organizations a. 4-H Clubs: (Ages 5-18 years) offers 4H club experiences to an organized group of at least five youth from three different families who meet regularly with adult volunteers or staff for a long-term, progressive series of educational experiences. Offers experiences in a variety of 4-H projects i.e. nutrition, fitness, gardening, science, technology, fine arts and community service on and off post. Youth can participate in local, county, state and national 4-H opportunities after being enrolled in a 4-H club. Training and materials are available through an enterprise relationship with the US Department of Agriculture National 4-H Headquarters/Council and local county extension services. The training and materials are available from National 4-H Council or National 4-H Center. Chapter 1 9

15 b. Boys & Girls Clubs (BGCA): (Ages 6-18 years) Offers BGCA programs and experiences as part of core programming in Army School Age and Youth Programs through an enterprise relationship with the National Headquarters of Boys & Girls Clubs of America. Youth participate in programs promoting success in school, healthy living, skill development, creative arts, sports and fitness, and exploring vocational choices. c. National Alliance for Youth Sports (NAYS): Through a formal partnership with NAYS, CYS Services Sports & Fitness Directors are Certified Youth Sports Administrators (CYSA s) and volunteer coaches are trained and certified. The Start Smart Sports Development program offers children ages 3 and up opportunities to develop their motor skills through a fun approach CYS Services Enterprise Initiatives a. Military Family Life Consultants: Provides on-site counselors in child and youth programs to offer non-medical, short term, situational, problem-solving counseling services to staff, parents, and children within CYS Services facilities, Installation schools, and summer camps. Funded and operated by Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD). b. Kids Included Together (KIT) is a DoD Initiative for all Services. All programs have access to Kids Included Together (KIT). This contracted program allows for training and inclusion support for all children. Services include monthly webinars, Inclusion Support Call in center, online training and scheduled Site Visits. STANDARDS OF CONDUCT AND ACCOUNTABILITY STANDING OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOP) 1-8. The Standards include staff roles and responsibilities, procedures for guidance and discipline, touch policy and the accountability of children. a. The contents of the Standards of Conduct and Accountability SOP will be incorporated in the New Employee Orientation training and annual Family Advocacy Program (FAP) Child Abuse Awareness, Identification and Reporting Training; and will be recorded on the employee s/provider s Individual Developmental Plan (IDP). b. All CYS Services employees, to include managers, trainers, cooks, custodial, clerical and CYPAs, in addition to FCC/HOP providers, contract employees and volunteers, will sign and comply to the CYS Services Statement of Understanding and Acknowledgement (SOU/A) of Touch/Discipline/Child and Youth Accountability Policy. This SOU/A will be signed during the New Employee Orientation and annually thereafter during the performance appraisal. The signed SOU/A will be kept in the employee s, FCC/HOP provider s, and volunteer s on-site personnel file. 10 MISSION COMMAND 2015

16 Contract employee s copy will be sent to the non-appropriated fund (NAF) Contracting Officer (KO) to be placed in the contract folder. c. Revised Standards of Conduct and Accountability SOP is found at Annex A in the Risk Management folder on the CYS Services Professional website at CAREGIVERS CREED 1-9. All CDC/SAC/MST Child and Youth Program Assistants (CYPAs), FCC/HOP providers, contractors, and volunteers are key members of the Army Team who perform a vital role in support of the Army mission. Directors will provide all CYPAs, FCC/HOP providers and contractors the Caregivers Creed for their understanding and signature upon completion of initial orientation training and during the annual performance appraisal thereafter. Caregivers Creed has also been added to the Standards of Conduct and Accountability Statement of Understanding and Acknowledgement for CYS Services employees, Family Child Care (FCC) /Homes Off Post (HOP) providers, contract employees and volunteers. Directors will post a copy of the Caregivers Creed in every classroom, and prominently display it in lobbies, break rooms and common areas I am an Army Caregiver, a professional trained in my duties. I serve Department of Defense Families who protect the nation by protecting their children/youth. I will always provide a safe, nurturing, enriching environment and ensure accountability for children/youth in my care. Never will I put children/youth in harm s way or allow others to do so. I will build trust with parents so they can concentrate on their mission. I will always treat Families with the dignity and respect they deserve. Army Caregivers are key members of the Army Team. I am an Army Caregiver. CUSTOMER SERVICE The Installation Management Command (IMCOM) is committed to providing quality, through service excellence, to our Soldiers and Families commensurate with the quality of their service to our Nation. We understand that we create value for our customers through predictable, consistent, efficient and customer-focused service; therefore, all personnel employed with CYS Services will become familiar with and enforce the customer service techniques and procedures outlined in this Operations Manual Every employee is expected to treat customers with respect. Employees will promptly greet customers in a friendly, professional and courteous manner Facility Directors will ensure parents and visitors to CYS Services Programs experience aesthetically-pleasing facilities; receive timely, accurate and helpful information and always have an opportunity to provide feedback. CYS Services staff will promote the use of the Interactive Customer Evaluation (ICE) system. Chapter 1 11

17 1-14. Overarching C-U-S-T-O-M-E-R Service Standards. Cheerful greetings for every customer. Use positive communication, in person, on the phone and in . Show a positive image and attitude. Teamwork Support the Team. Own your job Take responsibility for the role you play in service delivery. Make every effort to resolve customer requests with respect and professional courtesy. Extra mile Go the extra mile to exceed customer expectations. Remember to thank every customer CYS Services Facility Directors will ensure staff members always provide accurate and prompt assistance to the customer. If, while attending to a customer in person the telephone rings and there is no one else available to answer the telephone: a. Tell the customer you are assisting, Excuse me while I answer the telephone. b. Answer the telephone, ask the customer on the telephone to please hold, and then finish assisting the customer (in person) before assisting the customer on the telephone. c. If your assistance to the customer you are with takes longer than one minute, again, excuse yourself from the customer that you are assisting (in person) and ask the customer on the telephone for a phone number and let them know you will call them back as soon as possible. d. If the situation is reversed, ask the customer on the telephone to please excuse you for a second, either cover the telephone or place the customer on hold while you inform the customer, who is there in person, that you will assist them as soon as you finish the telephone conversation and then resume assisting the customer on the telephone Telephone Courtesy. a. Employees will always answer promptly (by the third ring) and answer by saying, Thank you for calling the Name of Facility. This is State your Name speaking, how may I help you? b. Speak at a moderate rate and tone, always speak clearly and distinctly. 12 MISSION COMMAND 2015

18 c. Listen carefully and try to assist the caller. If you are unable to assist the caller, transfer the call to someone who is able to assist or put the caller on hold and promptly find someone who can assist. If no one is readily available, ask the customer/parent for his/her contact information and have someone contact him/her as soon as possible Techniques for dealing with a dissatisfied customer. a. Listen to the customer/parent and allow him/her time to say everything he/she has to say before you interject. Do not argue with customer. b. Acknowledge his/her viewpoint or inconvenience. c. Get right to a solution; do not dwell on the problem. d. Refer to SOPs, regulations and policies in a positive manner. e. Look for ways to turn things into a win/win solution; prevent win/lose situations. f. If you are unsure of a solution or a customer/parent is not satisfied, refer him/her to your supervisor. g. Use the B.E.S.T. (Be Calm, Empathize, Solve and Thank) strategy to successfully resolve challenging customer situations Management techniques for improving customer service. CYS Services Coordinator and CYS Services Facility Directors will take an active role to improve customer service by observing, coaching and modeling appropriate and effective customer service techniques. a. Observe, listen and provide written/oral feedback on customer service skills. b. Provide customer service scripts for new employees to use during first 30 days of employment. c. Review and update program website information quarterly or as needed d. Utilize components of the IMCOM Academy Customer Service Modules into the CYS Services Personnel/Management IDP. ADMISSION AND RELEASE OF CHILDREN/YOUTH CYS Services Facility Directors will prepare written instructions for the admission and release of child/youth to CYS Services programs. Under no circumstance will a child/youth be released to any person who is not authorized to pick up the child/youth. Chapter 1 13

19 Release designee must be 13 years old or older (verification of age is required). A written verification is acceptable. If parent cannot provide written verification due to an emergency situation, in the field, etc., the front desk staff could ask the sibling for verification by asking what the sponsor s last four of their social security number or ask a security question. This guidance should be developed by your facility and notify parents of this. The front desk staff and the CYPAs present in the classroom have the responsibility to ensure the proper release of child/youth. If a CYPA does not recognize an individual picking up a child from the classroom, they must verify by checking with the front desk the identity of the individual and ensure the individual has authority to pick up the child. Staff may never leave the child alone with an unidentified individual Upon entering a: a. Child Development Center, parents/designee will swipe into Child and Youth management System (CYMS) their child(ren) using their Child Pass card at the front desk before proceeding to their child(ren) s classroom. Under no circumstance will the parent/designee move beyond the front desk without first swiping in. Upon entering the classroom, the parent/ designee will sign the child(ren) in, annotating his/her name, date, time and signature. b. School Age Care (SAC) Center, parents/designee will swipe their child into CYMS using their SA Pass card at the front desk (or the child(ren) may key in their PIN themselves while monitored by the parent) before proceeding to their child(ren) s activity room. Under no circumstance will the parent/designee move beyond the front desk without first swiping in. The child(ren) may sign themselves in the activity room (as age appropriate), using the established method of the program (in some cases, annotating his/her name, date, time and signature, in others annotating on the Locator/Accountability Board that the child(ren) is In ). The CYPA present will ensure that all children are properly signed into the classroom before the parent/designee departs the room/area. c. Youth Center, Middle School/Teens (MST) youth participate in an open recreation program, which means they are allowed to enter and depart the facility without a parent/designee. MSTs will swipe in or enter their PIN and sign in before they may participate in the CYS Services program. YCs must accommodate the needs of parents of 11 and 12 year-old middle school youth who require Reserved Care after school or on school-out days, by providing services starting at 1300 hours. (Army Fee Guidance applies before 1300 hours) For pick up of child(ren) in: a. CDC Programs, upon entering the classroom/activity area, the parent/designated representative will sign the child(ren) out before they are allowed to depart with the child(ren). The parent/designated representative will swipe the child(ren) out using their Child Pass card at the front desk after they have picked up their child(ren) and signed out of the classroom/activity area. 14 MISSION COMMAND 2015

20 b. SAC programs, children must be swiped out of CYMS and signed out according to the program practice (i.e., removing the child s name from the Choice Board or another method that designates the child(ren) has departed for the day or gone to sports, etc). c. The MST will swipe/sign out to indicate they are departing the building. NOTIFICATIONS TO PARENTS The CYS Services Coordinator will ensure parents receive pertinent and timely information relating to any eventuality or condition related to the care of their children or youth. CYS Services Program and Facility Directors will utilize any means available (e.g., phone, sms text message, flyers) based on the circumstances, to communicate with parents in a timely and accurate manner CYS Services management personnel will supply parents with appropriate information related to the following circumstances: a. Notification of medical emergency. CYS Services management personnel will notify parents immediately of any emergency that requires, or appears to require, medical attention. b. Notification of communicable diseases. CYS Services management will attempt to notify all parents of susceptible children as soon as possible whenever a communicable disease (e.g., chicken pox, conjunctivitis, etc) has been introduced into the facility. c. Notification of acute illness. CYS Services management will notify parents to come and pick up their child who becomes ill while at the facility. d. Notification of unusual occurrence. CYS Services management will notify parents on a daily basis of any occurrence such as minor injury, biting, extreme behavior changes, and major developmental milestones the child may be accomplishing soon. NOTE: If a child accomplishes a major milestone for the first time while in care (such as a child taking their first step) it is best to tell the parent to be on the lookout rather than spoil the event for the parents. e. Notification of field trips. CYS Services employees will inform parents and obtain parental permission for participation before any planned field trips (on or off the installation) or occasions when the children will be taken off the CYS Services premises. This will be done regardless of the general permission for excursions granted prior to a child s admission to care. f. Availability of information about care. Directors will make available to parents information requested concerning the care of their child within the facility. Chapter 1 15

21 g. Notification of change in personnel. CYS Services management will notify parents of major changes in caregiving employees, management personnel, and programming staff particularly those involving the child s primary caregiver. (Directors should strive to give parents a two week notice pending departure of their children s caregiver/provider). h. Notification of procedural changes. CYS Services management will notify parents of upcoming major procedural changes (e.g., fees, operating hours) at least 30 days prior to implementing change. INSTALLATION REQUIRED ANNUAL INSPECTIONS Installation CYS Services programs are inspected periodically throughout each year; all inspections are unannounced. Inspections include at least one Comprehensive Health and Sanitation Inspection, one Comprehensive Fire, Facility and Safety Inspection, one Installation Multi-Disciplinary Team Inspection (MDTI) and one Army Higher Headquarters Inspection (AHHI). All inspections must be 30 days apart. If reinspections are required for AHHI, they are completed by Higher Headquarters in accordance with Army and DoD Directives. The Garrison Commander is responsible for the MDTI and two required Comprehensive Inspections. For more information go to on AKO. MONTHLY / BI-WEEKLY WALKTHROUGH OF ALL CYS SERVICES FACILITIES Monthly / Bi-Weekly Walkthroughs of all CYS Services Facilities and Activities. In accordance with Headquarters, Department of the Army (HQDA) Executive Order (EXORD) Calendar Year 2015 (CY15) CYS Services DoD Certification Inspections and Annex S (Reports) Appendix 01 to OPORD : Annual Command Guidance. a. Garrison Commanders (GCs) or Deputy Garrison Commander (DGCs) and Garrison Command Sergeants Major (CSMs) will conduct a monthly walkthrough of all CYS Services facilities and activities to ensure compliance with DoD and Army standards. This is not to be an inspection, but a validation of corrective actions on findings and deficiencies. The GC or DGCs will validate successful resolution of all findings and deficiencies regardless of how the deficiency is identified, including but not limited to: Army Higher Headquarters Inspections; Installation Multi-Disciplinary Team Inspections (MDTI); Comprehensive Fire/Facility/Safety Inspections; and Comprehensive Health/Sanitation Inspections. No finding or deficiency will be reported as complete without the GC s personal Eyes On validation. b. GCs or DGCs will prioritize and respond to all CYS Services Demand Maintenance Orders (DMO) at a higher priority over any other DMO. DMO priority one (1) are those considered as emergency/life health and safety threatening to 16 MISSION COMMAND 2015

22 individuals; DMO priority 2 (Urgent) and DMO priority 3 (Routine or Normal). Project Work Orders (PWO) in support of accreditation/certification requirements will also obtain a higher priority and should be executed using Installation available funds. Funding shortfalls which may hinder services related DMO/PWO execution will be identified to the Region Headquarters and addressed to IMCOM Headquarters for immediate resolution. Any facility deficiency not corrected that will have a direct impact on meeting the accreditation requirements will be reported as a Commander s Critical Incident Report (CCIR). c. GCs will direct Garrison Directors of Family, Morale, Welfare and Recreation (DFMWR) to conduct a monthly walkthrough and CYS Services Coordinators to conduct a bi-weekly walkthrough of all CYS Services facilities and activities to monitor ongoing compliance with inspection standards. CYS Services Coordinators may have their Program Operations Specialist (POS) or CYS Administrator conduct one of the bi-weekly walkthroughs. During the walkthroughs, CYS Services Coordinators, POS or CYS Administrator will validate successful resolution of all deficiencies regardless of how they are identified, including but not limited, to AHHI; Installation MDTI; Comprehensive Fire/Facility/Safety Inspections; and Comprehensive Health/Sanitation Inspections. No finding or deficiency will be reported as complete without the CYS Services Coordinator s in conjunction with the GC personal Eyes On validation. d. The DFMWR will participate with the FCC Director on monthly walkthroughs of at least 20% of FCC homes. The DFMWR will visit 100% of FCC homes over any five-month period. These requirements are a core performance standard for the DFMWR and CYS Services Coordinator. e. The log of walkthroughs must be maintained by the CYS Services Coordinator and will be reviewed by AHHI Team. f. The walkthroughs will continue to be uploaded monthly into the designated IMCOM SharePoint site aspx by 1200 Central Standard Time on the last day of the month. Instructions and guidance for Monthly/Bi-Weekly Walkthroughs of CYS Services and Reporting Tool are provided at the above web link. g. Monthly/Bi-Weekly Facility Walkthrough Guidance, Tool and Q & A can be found at Annex B Garrison Commander s review of All CYS Services Installation Inspections: a. Monthly GCs or DGCs and Garrison CSMs will: 1) Review the CYS Services Installation Inspection standards with the CYS Services Coordinator and report the completion of the GC or DGC and Garrison Chapter 1 17

23 CSM review of the Installation CYS Services operations, to include the Top Five (5) CYS Services focus areas: Fire and Safety Inspections, Health and Sanitation Inspections, Preventive Maintenance, Accountability of Children, Background Check Issues, and then document deficiencies. 2) Require CYS Services Coordinators and other Installation staff to develop corrective action plans and milestones for any documented deficiencies Recommended Items to Check when Garrison Commander visits CYS Services Programs: a. Sign in/out sheets to ensure positive access control b. Financials to ensure timely payment of fees, run CYMS report, and review them with managers on a monthly basis. Key reports include Global Household Trial Balance, Activity Trial Balance, Bill Code/Transaction Code Review Report, and Household Audit Report c. Eligibility Checks to ensure the right people are using the facility as prescribed by regulation d. Training Records to ensure required training is taking place e. Carefully monitor accreditation status to ensure no lapses occur f. Installation Multi-Disciplinary Team Inspection (MDTI) results g. IMCOM HQs Child Youth School Inspection Results h. Ratio Checks i. Who is under Line-of-Sight Supervision (LOSS) j. Accreditation status/timelines and certificate posted and DoD Certificate to Operate posted k. Work orders completed and still pending l. Adequacy of custodial services performed A listing of CYS Services monthly, quarterly and annual reports required to upload to AKO is in Annex C: G9 CYS Services Installation Report Suspense List v MISSION COMMAND 2015

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25 Chapter 2 RISK MANAGEMENT FIRE/FACILITY/SAFETY 2.0. Existing Child, Youth and School (CYS) Services facilities for all age groups will continue to reach their life cycle and require renovation to ensure facilities are safe, support the needs of the occupants and create an environment that is conducive to accreditation and DoD certification. In some cases, an addition to an existing facility may be the most cost effective and efficient method to meet the child care needs of the Installation. The Fire/Facility/Safety section provides basic guidelines for maintaining existing facilities; provides guidance for renovations and new construction standards. All existing buildings are defined as those built prior to March 2008 (CDC); prior to October 2004 (SAC); prior to January 2008 (YC), that comply with the standards in effect at the time of construction. Portions of existing buildings that have been renovated or remodeled shall comply with 2-1.d. All renovations that make constructive changes (such as movement of walls changes in age groups) to existing CYS Facilities or changes in occupancy (such as business to daycare) require review of plans and designs by IMCOM G9 CYS Services. Standard designs are maintained & available for all users at the Centers of Standardizations (COS) website link below: Construction, renovation and alteration. The current CYS Services Standard Designs will be used, which reflect DoD and Army construction standards in order to allow flexible programming to meet changing child demographics, accommodate assessed local needs for child age groups, support cost effective business management practices, minimize short and long-term maintenance costs, and reduce the risk of institutional child abuse. a. Standard designs will be used for all CDC construction projects approved after 2008; SAC 2004; YC b. Standard modules will be used for all joint-use construction projects approved after CDC 2008; SAC 2004; YC c. Additions shall comply with requirements for new construction after CDC 2008; SAC 2004; YC d. During the annual inspections on facilities, buildings constructed before these dates do not have to comply with standard design. e. Renovations, alterations and remodeling shall comply with standard designs to the fullest extent possible. f. Information on facilities will be accurately documented in Integrated Online Reporting (IRO) 30 days before opening of facility. 20 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

26 g. Requests for any waivers to the standard designs will be forwarded through the Region to the IMCOM G-9 CYS Services to forward to the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management (OACSIM). h. All facility renovations and new construction plans will be reviewed and approved by IMCOM G-9 CYS Services in accordance with AR , para Pre-occupancy inspection by IMCOM G-9 is required. i. CYS Services facilities will not open prior to video surveillance equipment installation. RENOVATION DECISION MATRIX 2-2. Devices used for heating. Heating appliances, open fire places, portable space heaters and electric heaters are prohibited heating sources in CYS Services Noise Levels. Peak noise levels within the mechanical room will be limited to 85 Decibels (dba) over average of the day and vibration transmission from the mechanical room is minimized to reduce noise levels. Peak noise levels within child/youth activity rooms/modules will not exceed 85 dba over the average of the day; background noise levels will be no greater than 45 dba over the average of the day. Child/youth activity rooms/modules will be equipped with fire-proof sound absorbing materials on walls, floors and ceilings, as necessary. If dba noise levels exceed required levels, sound absorbing materials are increased to achieve acceptable levels. Annual inspection of facility noise levels is maintained and available for review. Acceptable documentation for review noting facility noise levels are copies of signed Installation Multi-Disciplinary Chapter 2 21

27 Team Inspection (MDTI) reports or other signed documentation by a trained/certified inspector Lighting Fixtures. Light fixtures will meet the following criteria: a. Are in good repair and replaced as needed. b. Due to child protection regulations, automatic motion light switches are allowed only in the Mechanical, Electrical, and Communication Rooms (rooms that are not accessible to users and staff of the CDC). c. Light fixture operations will not conflict with child abuse-prevention measures. Facilities with lights in rooms and closets with existing automatic motion light switches are required to be in override mode during hours of operation when children/youth are in the facility. Rooms will not be darkened to the extent activity is not visible on the video surveillance system. If unused rooms cannot be locked, lights will be left on. d. Lighting will be in accordance with the design criteria in Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) Lighting Handbook Reference and Applications. Directorate of Public Works (DPW) has this reference material. Lighting shall be maintained at the following minimum levels: 1) Activity Areas, such as reading, drawing, shape and color discrimination: 50 foot-candles. 2) Lobby, office, and other staff areas: 30 foot-candles. 3) Corridors: 30 foot-candles. 4) toilet areas: 30 foot-candles. 5) Multi-purpose rooms/gymnasiums: 20 foot-candles. e. CDC facilities with less than 135 capacity where the small multipurpose room/gym is used for classroom space, foot candles need to be evaluated and lighting levels adjusted prior to use as a classroom space. f. Facilities will have a mixture of natural and artificial light which can be adjusted to changing outside light levels by the staff. Lighting fixtures do not oscillate visibly at low intensities. Ceiling baffles, roof overhangs and shades/window treatments control the natural light-brightness ratios and lateral differences in illumination. Sufficient controls exist over natural and artificial light to allow for lighting flexibility. To meet this requirement, multi-ballast switches, dimmer switches, track lighting, movable lights, etc., will be used. Overhead lights are required in child/youth activity areas. 22 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

28 g. Sidewalks and parking areas will have 1/2 foot-candle lighting. Night-security lighting within lobby and/or cash areas will be visible from the outside Heating, Ventilation, and Cooling System. Temperatures in child activity rooms/modules and youth activity rooms will be maintained by tamper-proof temperature and air-quality measurement/monitoring devices at no less than 68 degrees and not higher than 78 degrees Fahrenheit. Measure at 12 above finished floor (AFF) with a hand held thermometer or set it on a piece of furniture at that height. Then adjust the wall thermostat until the temperature on the thermometer reads in the desired range. Do not use sensors mounted on the wall at 12 AFF as these become nuisance attractions for the children. Coordinate with environmental health when temperatures are not within standard to determine when rooms/modules should be closed. Relative humidity will be maintained at 30% - 50%. Acceptable documentation for review noting facility relative humidity levels are copies of signed Installation Multi- Disciplinary Team Inspection (MDTI) reports or other signed documentation by a trained/certified inspector. Humidifying equipment (if present) will be monitored by health proponent to prevent microbial contamination. Unsafe areas/rooms will be closed until repaired. Work orders and/or MDTI reports that document facility repairs are maintained. Areas will be free of urea formaldehyde insulation unless area has been tested and found free of gassing area urea formaldehyde. The heating, ventilation, and cooling system will be safe and responsive to operational needs Plumbing Requirements. Water supply will be from an approved source and monitored per AR Hot water temperatures in child-accessible sinks will be between 60 and 110 degrees Fahrenheit. There will be an appropriate number and type of plumbing fixtures to support the building occupants' needs. A maximum of eight children 18 months 3 years will be allowed to use one flush toilet and lavatory with hot and cold water. A maximum of 15 children 3 5 years and a maximum of 18 children 6 12 years will be allowed to use one flush toilet and lavatory with hot and cold water. Staff toilets shall be provided to service staff at the rate of 18 staff to each flush toilet and lavatory with hot and cold water. Floor drains are present in all toilets, laundry rooms, janitor closets, arts & crafts rooms, and kitchens in new facilities. Floor drains are not required in existing facilities. Existing facilities are defined in Drinking Fountains. Drinking fountains and electric water coolers, if provided, will be at child height with guarded stream drinking head. The maximum allowable temperature of the drinking water will be room temperature. If an outside drinking fountain is not available or inoperative, a water jug filled from an indoor sink and disposable paper cups will be provided during outdoor play. Use ice to maintain water at room temperature as needed outside Floor Coverings. Area rugs will comply with sanitation requirements. Area rugs will be bound (binding can be underneath), slip-resistant, fire retardant, clean and free of stains with no deterioration and commercial grade in order to withstand frequent cleaning (see Section 2-51). In CDCs, the floors of child care rooms will be of sheet Chapter 2 23

29 vinyl with welded seams. Replacement of non-standard floor type coverings at the end of their life cycle will be made with standard flooring Maintenance. Maintenance will be provided on a continuing basis to ensure facilities, installed equipment, grounds and playground equipment are maintained in a safe, operational and orderly manner. a. Facility penetrations, openings and cracks will be sealed to prevent insect and rodent infestation. Sealants used in CDC s shall be National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) or US Department of Agriculture (USDA) approved. b. Plantings will be free from thorns or sharp branches and will be non-toxic. c. Pest-control is conducted according to the Installation pest-management plan. Treatment will be performed when children are not in the facility. Only herbicides and pesticides approved by the Armed Forces Pest Management Board (AFPMB) for use in CYS Services facilities will be utilized and applied in the prescribed manner A DPW custodial contract will be in place to ensure cleanliness of CYS Services facilities. Custodial housekeeping services will be provided as specified to ensure a safe, sanitary facility. The hiring of Non-appropriated Fund (NAF) custodial employees with CYS Services funds does not meet the INTENT of this requirement. The following custodial cleaning contract CYS Services task chart is an excerpt from IMCOM OPORD , Annex A: Enterprise Municipal Services Contract Performance Standards. OPORD can be found at TASK Clean/Supply Kitchens & Break rooms Clean/Supply Restrooms Disinfect Toilets/Urinals 1A Clean Drinking Fountains Remove Trash Remove Recycle Vacuum Cleaning Carpet Cleaning Spot Clean Sweep Floors Wet Mop Dry Buff or Spray/Buff Stripping/Finishing Tile Regular Dusting Child Care/ Youth (Ref: AR ) D D D D D 1W D 1Y A/R D D M 2Y D 24 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

30 High Dusting Clean Furniture Wash Interior Glass Wash Exterior Glass Clean Window Treatments 1B Highchairs, Cribs, Playpens Food Service Areas Clean Doors, Doorframes Scrub Walls, Woodwork Dust Ledges, Window Sills Clean Upholstered Furniture 1W 1Y D 2Y 2Y D 2,BO D 2,BP D 3,BQ 1W 4,BQ 1W 5,BR 2Y 6,BS Applicable for CDCs SACs and Youth Services Facilities ONLY LEGEND: A/R - As Required/Requested D Daily 1W - Once a Week 2W - Twice a Week 3W - Times a Week 1M Once a Month 2M Twice a Month Child Development Services Notes: Caliber of the cleaning service for CYS Services facilities will be specified as hospital-grade quality, as per AR , Ch 5-37, a. 1Y 1 Time a Year 2Y - 2 Times a Year 4Y - 4 Times a Year 5Y - 5 Times a Year 6Y 6 times a Year BO - Applicable only to CYS Services facilities. BP - Applicable only to CYS Services facilities - for all other facilities; see "Clean/Supply Kitchens & Restrooms." BQ - Covered under "Spot Cleaning" for all facilities except CYS Services facilities. BR - Covered under "Regular Dusting" for all facilities except CYS Services facilities. BS - Applicable only to CYS Services facilities - for all other facilities; see "Clean Furniture." 1A. Includes partitions and walls behind toilets 1B. Window Treatments = window coverings such as blinds, drapes, interior shutters, etc. 1. Per AR , g. (1) this service will be provided as needed, but at least semi-annually. 2. Includes all cleaning tasks described in AR , Ch 5-37, e. (4) 3. Includes all cleaning tasks described in AR , Ch 5-37, e. (7) 4. Includes all cleaning tasks described in AR , f. (1) 5. Includes all cleaning tasks described in AR , f. (2) 6. Includes all cleaning tasks described in AR , g. (4); these services will be provided as needed, but at least semi-annually. FIRE Facility fire inspection requirements. Facility fire inspections will be conducted in accordance with regulatory guidance and in coordination with the Director of Emergency Services (DES). Monthly CDC and quarterly SAC/MST indoor and outdoor inspections will be conducted by fire protection professionals to include a walk through to identify fire hazards. DES will ensure all fire inspection deficiencies are corrected within the prescribed timeframes Facility Fire Occupancy. Chapter 2 25

31 a. CYS Services facility fire occupancy will be determined in accordance with NFPA 101, Life Safety Code (LSC), except when Army guidance has more stringent fire protection requirements to offset suggested National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 101 child/youth/adult ratios. The allowable occupant load is based on the capacity of the exit components, not on floor area (square footage). The LSC establishes minimum exit capacity, based on an assumed maximum probable number of occupants. The determining factor for occupant load, with respect to safety, is the clear width of the exits and exit access. Based on the vast difference between the program capacity and the exit width calculation for the room, the number of children and staff should never exceed the classroom exit capacities. b. Fire capacity for the entire facility will be posted in the lobby area, not in individual rooms. c. Facilities that house more than one age group will meet the most stringent fire protection requirements throughout or shall meet the specific requirements of each age group in areas that are separated by minimum 2 hour rated fire construction. d. School-Age and Youth facilities will be classified as Educational and Assembly Occupancies with the Multi-Purpose Room being the Assembly Occupancy portion of the building and being separated by one hour fire rated construction in accordance with United Facility Criteria (UFC) e. CDC s are classified as Day Care Occupancies IAW NFPA 101, Chapter 6, para Facility-Based Sprinkler System. a. All sprinkler systems will be maintained, inspected, and rated operational in accordance with UFC and in coordination with the Installation DES. b. Sprinkler heads will not be obstructed or painted over. Storage will not be within 18 inches of the bottom of the sprinkler head. c. Items cannot be hung from sprinkler heads. d. Unobstructed fire department Siamese connections for hose outlets are provided to support fully-sprinkled facilities Doors. a. Doors in hazardous areas (kitchen, storage rooms, janitor closets, mechanical rooms, etc.) will be smoke-resistant and self-closing. EXCEPTION: Janitor closets protected in accordance with NFPA 101, (1) (d), shall be permitted to have 26 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

32 doors fitted with ventilating louvers where the space is protected by automatic sprinklers. b. In existing buildings, doors opening to the interior of the building (i.e. corridor or basement) must have a 1 hour fire resistant rating and be equipped with a self locking latch and automatic door closer. c. All fire rated doors are operational, have not been altered and that fire rating tags on the doors and frame have not been painted over or removed. d. Nothing will be hung from self-closing devices. All doors opening into a corridor or atrium will have self-closing devices and will not be propped open. e. Laundry rooms will have a one hour fire-rated enclosure with a 45-minute firerated door. In older facilities laundry rooms are required to have the fire rated separation regardless of when built. f. Kitchen doors located in buildings protected throughout with an automatic sprinkler system do not have to be rated and the same goes for the walls of the kitchen separating it from the rest of the building. If building is not protected with a sprinkler system, then kitchen must be separated by one-hour fire protection with a 45 minute (3/4 hour) fire-rated door Kitchen Hoods. a. Commercial-grade kitchen hoods equipped with fire-suppression systems (wet chemical) will be installed in accordance with NFPA 96 and NFPA 17A and inspection/maintenance is provided in accordance with UFC (every six months). b. Kitchen hoods will be maintained IAW UFC , which covers inspection and maintenance requirements. Kitchen hoods will be inspected every six months with inspection documentation affixed to the hood. Required documentation is a card with inspection dates the contractor attaches to the container bottle location or is attached to the manual pull station (for commercial systems only) for the suppression system. c. A residential hood and fire-suppression system will be provided in facilities with domestic cook tops for the demonstration kitchen/snack bar. The fire-suppression system is inspected every 6 months in accordance with UFC Facility-Based Fire Alarm and Detection System (FADS), Fire Annunciator Panels and Pull Stations. a. The Mass Notification Systems (MNS) will be operational as required by UFC Chapter 2 27

33 b. If the fire alarm and MNS system are a combined system using voice activation, the MNS system will override the fire alarm system during a MNS announcement and will reactivate the fire alarm system once the message is over in accordance with UFC c. Test and inspect the FADS in accordance with UFC to ensure that the systems are operational at all times and maintain documentation. The main frequency is at a minimum annually, however there are other frequencies that need to be identified by the Department of Public Works (DPW) contractor or Installation maintenance personnel and not the CYS Services facility staff. Facility Directors will maintain documentation of the annual inspection/test of the FADS. d. FADS will have capability to operate both manually and automatically in accordance with NFPA 72. FADS will be used during all facility fire drills and will automatically transmit a signal to the Fire Alarm Control Center or a 24-hour operated dispatch center. e. Strobes will be synchronized when more than one can be seen at a time. f. The fire alarm will be audible (at least 15db over ambient noise level) where children/youth are located. g. Fire alarm notification devices, annunciator panel, and fire alarm manual pull stations will be installed in accordance with NFPA 72 and located in the lobby or vestibule area. h. Manual fire alarm pull stations will be installed at all required exit doors that discharge directly to the outside. i. Smoke detectors will be operational in all facilities where required Fire Exits. a. Activity rooms will have at least two (2) exits, exterior and corridor exit, neither of which requires travel through any other room. CDC s dating 1998 (per TI ) to present require a direct exit to the outside and one into the corridor. CDC's constructed before 1998 may not have exterior exits to the outside from all activity rooms. b. All infant, toddler and hourly care rooms in existing facilities built prior to 1997 (per AR ) and all child activity rooms (not including gross-motor rooms) in new or renovated facilities will have at least one exterior exit that leads directly to the outside. Exits for infant areas will be wide enough to accommodate a crib (minimum clear width of 34 inches). The minimum width may be reduced to RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

34 inches (813 mm) if evacuation cribs are no wider than 29 inches (737 mm) including all projections. c. Emergency exit requirements for SAC and MST: SAC facilities built after 2004 and MST facilities built after 2006 require both a direct exit to the outside from each activity room and one into a corridor or atrium. Large multipurpose room exit requirements are based on the occupancy of the area IAW NFPA 101, Chapter 12, Assembly Occupancies. d. Emergency exit requirements for SKIESUnlimited classes are the same as the occupancy of the building they are located in. e. Corridors used as fire evacuation paths will be at a minimum of 6 feet in clear width. Adjacent rooms are not used for egress from dead-end corridors. Corridors will not be obstructed. f. Dead-end corridors may not to exceed 20 feet in length. g. If the building is not fully sprinkled, travel distances to exits will not exceed 150 feet from any point in the building and 100 feet from any corridor room door. h. In a fully-sprinkled building, travel distances to exits will not exceed 200 feet from any point in the building and 150 feet from any corridor room door Fire exit doors. a. All facilities constructed in 2008 or later will have exterior fire exit doors with flush-type panic hardware (older existing facilities may have bar-type panic hardware). b. Flush-type panic hardware with a recessed strike will be used in exterior exit doors in infant areas. c. Doors from activity rooms and outside exit doors will swing in direction of exit travel. d. If interior child gates are used, they also will swing in the direction of exit travel and provide easy access for cribs to pass through without having to lift crib. e. All exterior exit doors will be equipped with operable interior illuminated exit signs in accordance with NFPA 101. Exit signs over interior activity room corridor doors are not required. f. All occupied areas and corridors will have operable emergency lighting in accordance with NFPA 101. Chapter 2 29

35 g. Rescue Windows will meet standards in NFPA 101, Chapter 16, Section , with clear opening NLT 5.7 sq ft, width NLT 20, height NLT 24, bottom of opening not more than 44 above the floor. h. Fire evacuation plans will be posted by the doors IAW Fire extinguishers. a. Portable Class-ABC fire extinguishers will be located in accordance with NFPA 10. b. In new facilities built after 2006, where present, portable Class-ABC fire extinguishers will be located in recessed cabinets. In older facilities, the extinguishers may be wall mounted or in a cabinet. c. Class-K fire extinguishers are required in all kitchens, except for Demo Kitchens and FCC Homes. d. Due to the size and location of the K type portable fire extinguishers they are allowed to be hung on hangers and not in a cabinet. e. Fire extinguishers will be operational and inspected annually by fire department or contractor in accordance with NFPA 10. f. Fire extinguishers will be inspected monthly by facility manager or fire warden and documented on tag. Fire extinguisher tags are only kept for one year to show monthly inspections and replaced annually. There is no requirement to maintain the old tags. Coordinate with Installation DES for replacement. g. The DPW staff are the only ones that should have a key to the facility mechanical rooms. The facility Director should have a key or master key to the fire extinguisher cabinets Facility Interior finishes insulation, corridor construction materials, carpets, area rugs and curtains. a. Interior finishing materials in new construction/major renovation projects will conform to UFC , Chapter 2, Section 2.6. b. Carpets used in a vertical position are considered an interior finishing material. c. Carpeting and area rugs will meet the minimum flame-spread and smoke ratings specified in UFC , Chapter 2, Section 2-6.2, and NFPA 101, Chapter 10, Section Documentation that carpets and area rugs meet this requirement will be kept on file at the facility. If required fire-resistant rating documentation for all floor wall-to-wall carpeting or area rugs is not available due to 30 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

36 age the deficiency should be identified in your Corrective Action Report (CAR) and sent through the Region to IMCOM G-9 for review and recommendations. d. Curtain materials will be commercially manufactured and meet fire-resistance requirements of NFPA 101, Chapter 10 and Section Documentation must be kept on file. e. Any wood material such as wainscoting or paneling shall meet the appropriate fire-resistant rating; however, wooden furniture and frames for items on the wall are not included in this requirement. f. Percentage of wall covered by paper artwork and posters, etc., will not exceed 20% of total wall space for facilities not fully covered by a sprinkler system or 50% of fully-sprinklered facilities Fire drills and evacuation/contingency plan procedures. The evacuation routes are posted at the primary and secondary evacuation doors and clearly visible in each room/module, activity area, office, home, corridor, lobby, assembly areas, etc. a. Plans will show a diagram of the entire facility and will include the most direct route (primary) to the outside, the secondary escape route, the assembly point located a minimum of 50 feet away from the facility for each room and area. b. Evacuation plans will be consistent throughout CYS Services (i.e. different colors are used for primary and secondary route and the use of those colors is consistent throughout all rooms in all facilities). See Annex D: Fire Evacuation Plan Template. c. Program materials and furniture will not be arranged or stored to impede egress (i.e. arrangement of sleeping children, etc) or block exits. d. Evacuation contingency plans should be posted in a space clearly marked Evacuation Contingency Plans in the room/module, activity areas, offices, home, corridors, lobby, assembly areas, etc, and includes, at a minimum, written evacuation procedures or instructions for the following situations: natural disasters, installation facility lockdowns, and lost child. e. The distance between the primary and secondary evacuation exits will be no more than ½ the distance of the diagonal of the room for partially-sprinklered facilities in accordance with NFPA 101. f. The distance between the primary and secondary evacuation exits are no more than 1/3 the distance of the diagonal of the room for sprinklered facilities in accordance with NFPA 101. Chapter 2 31

37 g. Fire drills involving all children/youth and adults will be conducted monthly by fire protection professionals. Coordinate with Installation DES. All staff/providers will demonstrate competence in fire-evacuation procedures during a fire drill. h. Fire drills will be conducted during varying hours of operation, to include mealtimes, naptimes and early morning/evening hours when children/youth are present. i. Documentation of fire drill results to include, number of children and adults (includes staff, parents, workers, etc.) present, time of day, total time to evacuate, and corrective actions required will be on file at each facility. j. Staff/providers will conduct a name to face check to account for all children/youth during and after fire drills. k. The total evacuation of the building will be less than two (2) minutes for last individual out of the door. The two minute evacuation time is a benchmark. If the time is not being met during a fire drill, the fire inspector will determine the cause and provide guidance to improve the time. l. All cribs used for evacuation purposes will meet American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. Sturdy evacuation cribs with oversized wheels (4 in diameter or greater and which easily roll over different indoor/outdoor surfaces) will be provided. Designated evacuation cribs cannot be used for storage, either in or under the cribs, and are labeled in writing for this purpose. Evacuation cribs can be used for an infant to sleep in. Blankets/coverings and other supplies needed during evacuations will be readily available. m. See Annex E: More about the Topic: Conducting Fire Drills in CDCs Facility Smoking Guidance. Smoking is not permitted within 50 feet of the building. The designated smoking area will not be within view of children/youth. A safe disposal area/receptacle for smoking paraphernalia will be provided in the designated smoking area and will be policed regularly Storage. a. CYS Services facilities will not store flammable, explosive or highly caustic materials. Bleach, dish and laundry detergents are not considered highly caustic materials and storage will be kept to a minimum in the facility. b. Closed activity rooms will not be used as storage areas Fire Requirements for Group Day-Care Homes (CD Homes). a. Must meet NFPA 101, Chapter 16 requirements for Group Homes. 32 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

38 b. A group day-care home is one in which not less than seven (7), but not more than 12, children receive care, maintenance, and supervision by other than their relative(s), or legal guardian(s) for less than 24 hours per day, generally within a dwelling unit. c. Occupant Load: 1) The minimum staff-to-client ratio shall be not less than two staff for up to12 children. 2) There shall be not more than three children incapable of self-preservation. 3) Additional children incapable of self-preservation may exceed the three by one or two (maximum of five), provided that one additional staff person is added and the maximum of 12 children is not exceeded. 4) Adequate adult staff shall be on duty, alert, awake, and in the facility at all times where children are present. d. A story used above or below the level of exit discharge shall be in accordance with paragraphs and (Both require exits discharging directly to the outside from that level). e. Domestic stoves shall be provided with a residential fire suppression system in the domestic hood in accordance with UFC f. Where there are flame producing appliances and/or attached garages, carbon monoxide detectors shall be required in the facility. g. There is no fire alarm or MNS requirement in CD Homes, only smoke detector systems to include carbon monoxide detectors if required Fire Requirements for Group Day Care Homes (CD Homes) Providing Care for 24 Hours or More. a. CD Homes operating 24 hours will meet the requirements of NFPA 101, New Residential Board and Care Occupancies, Chapter 32, Section 32.3 Large Facilities. 1) Which will include the following: a) Fully sprinklered facility (residential sprinkler system). b) FADS. Chapter 2 33

39 c) Emergency lights. d) Exits lights. e) Domestic stove shall be provided with a residential fire suppression system in the domestic hood in accordance with UFC b. In addition to the above CD Homes operating 24 hrs will meet the requirements of paragraph 2-24.c, f, g Fire Requirement for CD Homes with More Than 12 Children Providing Care for 24 Hours or More. a. Must meet NFPA 101, Chapter 32, New Residential Board and Care Occupancies, Section 32.3 Large Facilities. 1) This will include the following: a) Fully sprinklered facility. Sprinkler systems in accordance with NFPA 13R shall be permitted. All habitable areas and closets shall be sprinklered. b) FADS. c) Emergency lights. d) Exits lights. b. Where there are flame producing appliances and/or attached garages, Carbon Monoxide detectors will be required in the facility. c. The staffing of this occupancy shall meet the staffing requirements as outlined in NFPA 101, Chapter 16, New Day-Care Occupancies, Staff to Client (Child) Ratio Table A located in NFPA 101 Annex A and identified below. d. Adequate adult staff shall be on duty, alert, awake, and in the facility at all times where children are present. STAFF-TO-CLIENT (Child) RATIO AGE (mo.) 1: : : : :12 >97 1:3 Client incapable of self-preservation 34 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

40 FACILITY All proposed structural changes to facilities must be coordinated with Region and approved by IMCOM G9 prior to initiating renovation/minor construction of facilities Facility Size. CYS Services management will comply with the CDC facility authorized capacity of not less than 30 or more than 338 children; SAC facility authorized capacity of not less than 60 or more than 225 children and Youth Facility authorized capacity of not less than 60 or more than 180 youth. Any non-compliance of the facility authorized capacities as previously stated; an Exception to Policy through the Region to IMCOM-G9, CYS Services must be submitted. Link to the Exception to Policy template can be found at Roof. The roof will be inspected by Department of Public Works (DPW) in accordance with AR 420-1, 5-28, Section IV (Roofing System Management). Based on the type of roof, the latest roof inspection will be on file in the facility and will include the date the roof must be re-inspected. Refer to TM and Roofer to determine who is qualified to inspect and depending on the type how often roof inspection is required. The previous requirement for yearly inspections for all roofs has been superseded by this operational guidance. Roof inspection is driven by type of material, composition and style of the roof Building entrance. a. The main entrance to the facility will be identified per the Installation Design Guide (IDG). b. The building entrance will be designed to provide a controlled access point for patrons. c. Front desk personnel will monitor the entrance at all times. d. A system will be in place to ensure child safety and still allow parents access to their children. Facilities used after hours and weekends will have a doorbell buzzer and/or intercom system for use when the door is locked. e. With the exception of the front entrance, kitchen doors, doors leading into fenced playground areas, all other exterior doors that open to outside unfenced areas will be equipped with intrusion/escape alarms Mechanical Room. a. The mechanical room is off limits to all CYS Services staff. Only DPW staff will have key access. Chapter 2 35

41 b. Mechanical rooms will open directly to the exterior of the building with no access to the interior space or direct access to the outdoor activity area. c. If no exterior equipment is present and mechanical rooms are 20 square feet or less, then fencing is required around the entrance of the mechanical room if it opens out into a playground or activity space for children. d. The mechanical room outdoor air supply and exhaust openings will be adequately screened to prevent access by birds and animals and will be out of the reach of children/youth. e. Sensors and controllers to monitor climate control and operation of mechanical equipment will be connected to the base master control room equipment, if applicable. f. A system will be in place to override the system by the CYS Services staff for non-traditional hours when facilities are needed on an on-demand basis. g. In existing buildings, doors opening to the interior of the building, i.e. corridor or basement will have a one-hour fire-resistant rating and be equipped with a selflocking latch and automatic door closer. h. In existing buildings, doors opening to the playground must have a one hour fire resistant rating, be equipped with a self locking latch and automatic door closer. i. Mechanical rooms will not be used for storage Electrical. Electrical distribution (main power) panels will be properly located and secured (circuit breaker panels need only be secured with a key lock) Heating, ventilation and cooling system. The structure will be assessed to determine presence of asbestos and risk of exposure. a. In older buildings, asbestos can be present on the hot water/steam supply and return lines to the radiators in the rooms. It can also be present on the interior and exterior of air handling ducts. b. Since it is also present in plaster and was used as an acoustical treatment in larger rooms, asbestos needs to be in both the Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) section and the architectural section of the manual. c. Just like lead based paint, current management practices do not require that it be removed, just managed to reduce risk of exposure. 36 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

42 d. If asbestos is present, CYS Services facilities will be included in the Installation Asbestos Management Program Electrical wiring and fixtures. Appropriate power needs will be provided for lobby/reception, computer lab, staff and kitchen areas to support work equipment (i.e. appliances, office machines, computer, fire notification panel, intercom, telephones and camera systems). There will be adequate receptacles for office, staff, and general support space. NOTE: If extension cords are in use other than surge protectors for computers, additional outlets are needed. a. 120V convenience outlets or equivalent OCONUS voltage, as required, will be installed in the perimeter walls in each child/youth activity space. 120V and 240V electrical outlets will be in the kitchen and laundry areas. All receptacles will be the grounding type. Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCI) will be provided for all receptacles located in areas near water outlets where required by the National Electric Code (NEC). b. Outlets in child activity rooms/modules and other areas accessible to children will be child-proof. Child-proof outlets will be (1) those with internal switching or barriers to prevent the flow of current to items other than electrical plugs or outlets with permanently-fixed devices (rotary gates, etc.) to resist the insertion of foreign objects, (2) GFCI or (3) positioned in such a manner as to be inaccessible to children. Outlets will be 54 inches above finished floor and measurement may be done from top of face plate. Press-in outlet caps do not meet the intent of this requirement. NOTE: Press-in outlet caps are not allowed because they damage the internal switching or barriers. c. No operational outlets will be installed along walls where cribs are located. Existing outlets will be permanently blanked. d. Multiple outlet electrical extension cords will not be permitted. NOTE: Additional outlets should be installed if needed rather than using extension cords. e. Electrical wiring will be installed and maintained as required by the National Electrical Code (NEC). f. Surge protectors will be used only to protect computer equipment and will not be used in areas accessible to children. g. A functioning internal communication system which allows for communication (i.e. intercoms, telephones, walkie-talkies) between reception area and individual rooms/areas is installed at adult height (exterior intercom stations are not required) Doors and Windows. Chapter 2 37

43 a. Doors and windows will be child/youth safe and will provide natural lighting and ventilation. b. Exterior window sills in 0-10 facilities will be low enough to allow children/youth to see out. c. CDCs for 0-5 years designed/constructed after March 2008 are required to have view windows (so the children can see out) in exterior walls and vision panels (so adults can see in) in interior walls. d. New construction/renovations (funded after 2008 for CDC 0-5 years; 2004 for SAC and 2006 for MST facilities) have Anti-Terrorism/Force Protection (AT/FP) windows in accordance with UFC , Appendix B-1.1; Change 1, 1 Oct e. In new construction or renovations (funded after 2008 for CDC 0-5 years; 2004 for SAC and 2006 for MST facilities), single-hung top-operable sash windows or double-hung windows will have fixed bottom sash to prevent finger, arm and head injuries. f. All windows will be operable and counter-balanced Vision Panels. a. Unobstructed vision panels will be present in all doors and/or adjacent walls leading to child classroom or SAC/YS activity spaces except adult/sac/mst toilets, mechanical and electrical rooms (accessed from the exterior of the facility only) and the isolation room toilet. Nothing will obstruct or be posted on vision panels. There must be a clear view into the classroom/activity areas. b. Outside storage buildings on playgrounds installed after 1 April 2015 will have vision panels. Outdoor storage installed before 1 April 2015 with no vision panels will be kept locked. A key control system should be in place for accessibility to playground storage buildings. c. Video Surveillance System (VSS) room combined with any of the above will have vision panels and strict key control. d. Mechanical, electrical, and communication rooms with access to interior of CYS Service facilities are required to have vision panels Closets, storerooms, etc are not completely darkened and are kept locked during the hours of operation and will have vision panels Evening and weekend care will be offered in child activity rooms near the front of the facility to the extent possible. 38 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

44 2-39. Hardware and fixtures. a. Cabinet hardware in child activity rooms (to include gates) and non-child activity room doors will be operable from either side, free from dangerous protrusions, and non-locking except for adult-controlled access storage. NOTE: This is in the standard design. Pertains to children not being locked in storage units from the inside. The storage room doors in activity doors must open from the inside out when locked from the outside. Is in most new construction after b. For 0-5 CDC facilities only: Finger guards will be present on the child accessible side of all doors, to include gates in child-activity rooms. For older facilities that are not fully sprinkled, finger guards are not required on entrance doors to the facility nor are they required on the doors in the corridors entering the activity rooms. NOTE: When installing finger guards, the integrity of the fire rated door cannot be compromised. c. Exit door hardware will be installed per manufacturer s recommendation. d. Unbreakable safety mirrors will be provided and are at child/youth height at child/youth sinks in all CYS Services facilities. e. Child bathroom stall doors/partitions: 1) Stall doors are not allowed for infant, pre-toddler and toddler toilet areas. Toilet partitions will be easy to clean and maintain, and shall be durable. Top of toilet partitions shall be no higher than 42 tall with 12 clear opening at bottom. Floor mounted partitions are preferred. Partitions shall be color-through phenolic. If ceiling hung partitions are requested, partitions shall be colorthrough phenolic or solid plastic. 2) Stall doors are allowed for preschool, pre-kindergarten and kindergarten toilet areas. Toilet partitions will be easy to clean and maintain, and shall be durable. Top of toilet partitions shall be no higher than 48 tall with 12 clear opening at bottom. Floor mounted partitions are preferred. Partitions shall be color-through phenolic. If ceiling hung partitions are requested, partitions shall be color-through phenolic or solid plastic. 3) Renovations and modifications to childcare facilities for children will follow the latest applicable design criteria contained in room by room descriptions. f. Faucet and toilet paper dispensers will be easily operated by children/youth and meet American with Disabilities Act (ADA)/Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) where applicable. Paper towel dispenser in child/youth toilet will be located at child/youth height away from toilet. Chapter 2 39

45 g. Facilities include an adult restroom, a space for staff to take a break, a place for staff belongings and an area for planning and training. h. Child/youth sinks will be equipped with faucets that automatically shut off with a minimum of 20-second run-time. Sensor operated faucets and toilets are not authorized for child fixtures. Existing sensor operated faucets and toilets, as well as faucets which do not automatically shut-off should be replaced with an appropriate mechanical shut-off fixture when replaced for any maintenance reason. i. In SAC and YC there are separate male and female bathrooms for children/youth. j. In SAC and YC there are separate multi-unit restrooms for staff and visitors or a system to ensure that adults do not use the bathrooms at the same time as children/youth. k. Individual space is provided for each child s/youth s belongings Wall treatments, interior walls, window treatments and floor coverings. a. Floors and walls will be free of protrusions, holes and splinters. b. Walls will be soil resistant and easily cleaned. c. Vinyl wall coverings and other impervious wall coverings are not allowed. Wall surfaces: will be easy to clean, repairable, easy to maintain, and durable. Wall surface shall be able to withstand tape peeling. Where drinking fountains and/or lavatories are provided within the Activity Room space, a minimum 48 tall wainscot that is impervious to water and able to withstand daily sanitizing is required. This material shall extend to the floor and at least 18 horizontally in both directions from the centerline of the equipment. Walls finishes are epoxy painted gypboard. d. Installed carpeting will not be allowed except for computer labs and office areas. e. Existing facilities will replace outdated or prohibited surface materials during renovation. f. Any wood material must meet the appropriate fire-resistant rating. g. Using lead based paint is prohibited. h. Chipped, cracked, or loosened lead based paint will be managed through the Installation policy on lead based paint. Testing of sample is either by direct reach, instrumentation or by chemical analysis. 40 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

46 i. Special attention will be given to vulnerable areas including accessible chewable lead based paint surfaces, e.g., wood trim, window sills, baseboards, and wall surfaces which children can pick off during idle moments, e.g. rest time Outdoor porches, patios and decks: The minimum dimensions of a deck will be six feet clear width. Flooring will be easily drained and will have a quick-drying surface. Decks and porches higher than 30 inches above the adjacent grade will be protected by child-safe railings or barriers General requirements for CDC 0-5 years Outdoor play areas. Facilities designed or built under the Army Standard designs will have outdoor activity areas as prescribed by those documents. a. Hose bibs, 18 above finished grade, are required in each age group play space and must be frost/freeze protective type with removable cut off handles with integral vacuum breakers. b. Drinking water is available to children/youth outside, such as a jug with cups. c. Outdoor shade will be provided in all separate outdoor activity areas and as close to the standard design specifications as possible. Shade structure coverings may be removed where there are long periods of inclement weather. d. Outdoor, weather tight, vandal proof storage will be accessible to each outdoor activity area. Storage area will be configured to allow easy access to contents and visibility by adults. e. All playground equipment and use areas comply with Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and appropriate American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. f. The outdoor activity area will have a minimum of 100 square feet per child and is capable of supporting all of the children in centers of 100 or less or the area is capable of supporting a minimum of 50% of the children at any given period in centers with a capacity of 100 or more children. g. All outdoor activity areas will meet the Architectural Barriers Act (ABA). Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements for access and use. ABA standards are found in the ABA Accessibility Standard for Department of Defense Facilities adopted October 31, Renovation projects must be built to ABA/ADA standards. h. The exterior grounds will be used for designed purpose (i.e. no storage of broken toys, equipment in playground corner) and will be free from graffiti. i. New construction and renovation projects (funded after 2008 for CDC 0-5 years and 2006 for MST; 2004 for SAC facility) will provide direct exterior access from Chapter 2 41

47 interior activity room/module to appropriate age group outdoor activity area. Older existing facilities may have access to outdoor activity areas through minimal corridor travel. Due to current Installation demographics a temporary deviation from the standard outdoor activity area may exist where playground immediately outside a classroom door does not match the age group. In any case, the outdoor play area must be visible preferably from the same age group classroom in the facility. j. All sand boxes and portable sand containers must be covered at the end of the day. Maintain sandboxes and not less than every six months replace the sand for facilities built before Sandboxes are not allowed for new facilities. Recommend removal of current installed sandboxes Outdoor activity area for children six weeks to 3 years required standards will: a. Contain a variety of play surfaces to include; soft, multi-textured crawling surfaces, and play spaces scaled for infants and young toddlers. b. Include open grassy areas for running and crawling; hard-surfaced areas for use of strollers, wagons and wheeled toys; and surfaces suitable for skill-oriented equipment (e.g., swings, climbing structures). c. Possess easy access for strollers between indoor activity room and infant/toddler playground. Strolling path and hard-surface area for strollers and wheeled toys will be of a different material than the use zone (under swings and climbing structures). d. Include hard surface that dual functions for fire evacuations. e. Have Infant areas with level doorways or inclined ramps which lead directly outside. Infant room exits will lead directly to hard-level surface which will extend a minimum of 50 feet from building. The earth (dirt, grass) does not qualify as a hard surface, as its texture and density may vary due to climate conditions Outdoor activity area for children ages 3-5 years required standards will: a. Contain a variety of play surfaces to include; open grassy areas for running and games, hard-surface riding area for wheeled toys and tricycles, and areas to extend the indoor environment outdoors, e.g. table activities, easels, and outdoor block-building, swings and climbing structures. b. Hard-surface areas for wheeled toys will be constructed of a different material than the use zone (under swings and climbing structures). The hard-surface will extend a minimum of 50 feet from building. The earth (dirt, grass) does not qualify as a hard surface, as its texture and density may vary due to climate conditions. 42 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

48 2-45. General requirements for SAC Outdoor Activity Areas: a. A water source will be provided in each age group play area. b. Drinking water is available to children/youth outside, such as a jug with cups. c. Outdoor shade will be provided as close to the standard design specifications as possible. d. All playground equipment and use areas comply with Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and appropriate American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. e. All outdoor activity areas will meet the ABA/ADA requirements for access and use. ABA standards are found in the ABA Accessibility Standard for Department of Defense Facilities adopted October 31, Renovation projects must be built to ABA/ADA standards. f. The exterior grounds will be used for designed purpose (i.e. no storage of broken toys, equipment in playground corner) and will be free from graffiti. g. New construction and renovation projects (funded after 2004 for SAC facility) will provide direct exterior access from interior activity room/module to appropriate age group outdoor activity area. Older existing facilities may have access to outdoor activity areas through minimal corridor travel. In any case, the outdoor play area must be visible from a classroom in the facility General requirements for FCC Outdoor Activity Areas: a. Children enrolled in FCC homes will have access to hazard free outdoor play space. Where such play space is not available on the premises, parks, or playgrounds, other easily accessible outdoor spaces may be used with approval of the FCC director. b. Children under 5 years will not be permitted outdoors unless accompanied by the FCC provider. c. Portable/removable fencing to enclose small play areas for young children may be provided as part of the FCC toy/resource lending library. d. Children enrolled in an FCC home should spend part of each day, weather permitting, outside. e. Drinking water is provided only from kitchen sinks or fountains Playground fencing. Chapter 2 43

49 a. Ages 0-5 CDC and SAC outdoor activity area will be enclosed with a minimum of four foot-high vinyl-coated chain-link fencing (unless there is a hazard requiring higher fencing protection) which provides some visual access by children. b. Existing fencing should be replaced with vinyl-coated chain-link when existing fencing wears out or outdoor activity area is renovated. c. In instances where adjacent hazards (e.g. pool, heavy traffic areas) pose a threat to children, height of perimeter fence is adjusted upward to ensure adequate protection. d. Exit gate(s) is/are provided with adult controlled securing device to allow access for maintenance, emergency vehicles/equipment and permits staff/child egress from building area to safe open area. An adult controlled device does not imply a padlock, but a device that would open from either side. Padlocks may be used to lock gates at end of day closure of the facility Ages for YC has no playground equipment requirement. The following outdoor areas are recommended: a. Hard surface patio area with optional shade structure b. Open field area for games and physical activities. c. Hard surface for basketball d. Hose bibs and outdoor electrical outs required Exterior walkways, parking and roadways: a. Exterior walkways, parking, and roadways will be provided and meet ABA/ADA requirements. b. Walkway and parking lighting will be provided at 1/2 foot-candles. General lighting is not provided for the playgrounds, but exterior lighting must include 1/2 foot-candles to support the camera systems. c. Drives and walkways will preserve and utilize the natural landscape. d. Directorate of Public Works will provide all maintenance including grounds keeping and snow removal around walks, entrances, and parking lots as part of base operations Parking areas will meet required criteria: 44 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

50 a. Parking lots will be designed to minimize foot traffic in vehicle pathways. Safe walkways will be provided for patron facility access and will be separate from automobile circulation. Parking and drop-off areas must be available so that children and parents can enter and leave the building without crossing a thoroughfare or walking through large parking lots. Parking for CDCs 0-5 years is not shared with any other facility (exception is when a CDC itself is physically shared within one facility). CYS Services parking lots do not allow through traffic access nor are they used as access ways to other facilities. b. Parking will be separate from the play area. Vehicular access close to the facility entrance is provided for patrons and traffic approaches will be properly signed and have appropriate speed limits. c. Parking spaces will be provided using the formula of one (1) space for every four (4) patrons and one (1) space for every Full Time Equivalent (FTE) staff Service access will be provided (not through outdoor child activity areas) and physical barriers separate service areas from child activity areas. Personnel and maintenance gates are provided. Due to playground equipment and other dividing fences emergency vehicles would not be able to get the apparatus in most of the activity areas. However; the fire department does have access to these areas by way of the gates which will be used to carry needed equipment and hose lines into the back of the building without having to climb the fence. The wide gates were mainly for the DPW to get in and cut grass where needed and could be used for smaller vehicles like an ambulance if needed Stairways and ramps: Stairways and ramps will have anti-slip surfaces, handrails at both adult and child height and protective barriers as required. All room exits with ramps will meet slope and width requirements per ABA/ADA. Ramps and stairways will be constructed of substantial material Maintenance of facilities, installed equipment, grounds and playground equipment: a. Maintenance of facilities is a Department of Public Works (DPW) responsibility and will be funded in accordance with AR and AR Facility maintenance will be provided on a continuing basis to ensure installed equipment, grounds, and playground equipment are maintained in a safe, operational and orderly manner. b. Initially, outdoor activity areas will be inspected by a Certified Playground Safety Inspector (CPSI) with a valid current certification for compliance in accordance with Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) and appropriate ASTM standards. Documentation will be kept on site. Chapter 2 45

51 SAFETY c. As part of the annual Safety Comprehensive Inspection, a maintenance inspection will be conducted on installed playground equipment to see if it is in safe working condition in accordance with CPSC and appropriate ASTM standard. d. Upkeep of playground surfaces to include replacement of loose material surfaces under equipment is maintained to meet CPSC guidelines and appropriate ASTM standard. e. DPW will provide required routine mowing of grassy areas, weed removal, and regular trimming/pruning of hedges and trees. NOTE: Grass should be mowed when over 3" and include trimming inside and outside the fenced area at least 10 feet. f. Garbage service includes provisions of CPSC approved receptacles and frequent trash removal. g. Pest control operations will be implemented according to Installation pest - management plan. Treatment is not applied when children are in the facility Facility Safety Requirements. On-site inspections will be conducted by safety professionals in accordance with AR , 6-12, to include a walk through to ensure standards are met. Inspections will include the MDTI and one additional inspection annually at a minimum to: a. Identify safety hazards. b. Review the general safety procedures. c. Spot check of related administrative procedures. d. Review of maintenance agreements/contracts. e. Review of daily safety checks. f. Spot check of staff knowledge of emergency procedures g. Inspection of facility/site. h. Address accident-prevention responsibilities including vehicle accidents. i. CYS Services vehicle safety/routine maintenance documentation as required by the Installation. j. A quarterly review of incidents/accidents is conducted to determine trends. 46 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

52 2-55. A daily safety inspection will be conducted and documentation maintained by trained CYS Services personnel i.e. facility-safety designee for overall building as well as CYPA for individual room safety to identify and eliminate safety hazards to include daily inspection of all facility grounds, child-use areas, and equipment includes: a. Indoor and outdoor program equipment, toys, and materials are safe, durable and in working order. Safety can be assured by assigning a staff member to check all play equipment to make certain that it is safe for children. Observations should be made while the children are playing, too, to spot any maintenance problems and correct them as soon as possible. b. Children are protected from potential heating and electrical hazards. c. Potential head entrapments and prohibited toys as listed by the CPSC are not present. d. Toys and materials used for children under age three (3) do not present a choking/strangulation hazard. NOTE: Cords, ribbons, wires and strings will not be longer than 12" and items not smaller than 1-5/8" in diameter. This does not refer to crayons and paint brushes made for use by toddlers. e. Children/youth will be protected from hazardous substances and equipment. NOTE: This excludes substances such as shaving cream and bleach solution which may be present and used in classrooms when under adult supervision. If contents of container are not the original substance, the container must be labeled with contents and hazardous substances identified. f. Electrical wiring and electrical fixtures will be installed to support functional and operational requirements and ensure safety of children, patrons, and staff. g. Plumbing requirements support special needs of children/youth, safety, health, and sanitation practices. NOTE: this includes sinks at the correct height, water temperatures less than 110 degrees, water fountains at correct height, pediatric height toilets in CDC rooms. h. Current instructions are posted at each telephone to facilitate calling for ambulance, fire and military police services. i. Children s hand-washing sink or a child-height dispenser with disposable cups provided. j. Large freestanding storage units will be anchored to prevent them from falling on children and are loaded with the heaviest supplies on the bottom shelves. Permanently placed cabinets (without wheels) greater than four (4) feet in height should be anchored to the wall. Chapter 2 47

53 HEALTH k. Child-height furnishings will have rounded edges. NOTE: Corner protectors can be used in lieu of rounded edges CYS Services/FCC providers Health Requirements Procedures. a. CYS Services management and support staff and CYPAs/providers must be in good physical and mental health. Each individual must have a satisfactory health assessment and all required immunizations. The completed DA Form 3437 will be kept on file at the local Civilian Personnel Advisory Center (CPAC). b. The physical requirements for staff who must possess and maintain the ability to lift and carry up to 40 pounds (30 pounds for FCC providers), walk, bend, and stoop and stand on a routine basis are identified in position descriptions. Duties may involve working both indoors and outdoors. In addition, the employee/provider must be free of communicable diseases and all immunizations must be up to date (per AR and Center for Disease Control (CDC)/Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendations). These requirements must be assessed upon initial hiring and annually thereafter as part of the employee s health assessment conducted by Occupational Health personnel or a licensed independent practitioner. Evidence of the initial/annual screening in the form of a letter or memo must be kept in the employee/fcc provider s file. c. The Secretary of the Army Directive, Subject: Army Directive (Tuberculosis (TB) Screening and Testing Procedures for Child, Youth and School (CYS) Services Personnel), dated 21 Apr 2015, revises the TB testing requirement found in AR Both the CDC and the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs) recommend changing TB testing policy to target individuals at high risk and discourage the testing of those at low risk. Effective immediately, all CYS Services personnel will have a pre-employment medical evaluation. CYS Services personnel are not considered at high risk for TB; therefore, routine TB skin testing and/or a chest x-ray are not recommended. Targeted TB testing will only be performed for those CYS Services personnel known to have been exposed to the disease as identified during the preemployment evaluation. The pre-employment evaluation for those applicants with a known TB exposure will include a tuberculin skin test or chest x-ray and other tests the occupational health service deems appropriate. d. Installations should request authority to solicit services from private practitioners when long wait times for pre-employment physical examinations at occupational health or military treatment facilities (MTFs) result in critical delays i n onboarding NAF employees. The examinations will be at no cost to the individuals until wait times meet established metrics (30 days). In these cases, NAF employees must provide copies of the completed TB assessment 48 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

54 and proof of any needed diagnostic tests to the MTF's occupational health services. e. Staff/FCC providers must remain in good physical and mental health in order to continue working in CYS Services. In the event of serious illness or injury, the individual must meet the aforementioned health requirements and may be requested to have an additional medical evaluation before returning to work. f. Staff/FCC providers who are ill with fever, rashes, sore throat, colds or other communicable diseases, or who are on medication that may impair their ability to function in a safe manner, will not be permitted to work. All personnel/fcc providers must be cleared by Occupational Health and/or their Primary Healthcare provider prior to returning to work if they have been absent more than three (3) days due to illness. g. Manager s will coordinate with Preventive Medicine to clear food service workers for return to duty when they have been out due to illness. h. Per AR , para 4-25 a and b, communicable disease risk assessment (a risk analysis of communicability) will be done by Primary Healthcare provider when considering personnel action. The risk assessment will consider how the disease is transmitted, the duration of the risk, the severity of the risk and the probability of the transmission of the disease-causing harm. i. Temporary inability to meet these standards must be medically documented. Permanent inability to meet these standards with CYPA and cooks will be coordinated through CPAC to follow process for official reassignment/ dismissal/medical retirement Child Health Registration Requirements: a. The CYS Services Registration Forms will be filled out, signed and dated by parent. The form includes consent for CYS Services representatives to act on behalf of the parent(s) in a medical emergency or dental care situation. b. CYS Services Health Assessment/Sport s Physical Statement (HASPS) will be completed by parents and a licensed independent practitioner within the past calendar year or within 30 days following an initial registration. c. Children enrolling in or currently enrolled in CYS Services must provide written documentation of immunizations appropriate for the child s age per AR immunizations recommended by the ACIP are required (DoDI , Table 1, Health and Sanitation,5 Aug 14). d. Children/youth will be screened for special needs at initial registration and annually thereafter by use of the current Army CYS Services Screening Tool. Chapter 2 49

55 2-58. Immunizations: a. Immunizations are a proactive health measure to protect children who have an increased risk for communicable disease while in a group-care setting. To provide maximum protection, immunizations are required at the earliest recommended interval. Immunization is particularly important for children in child care because preschool-aged children have the highest age-specific incidence or are at high risk of complications from many vaccine-preventable diseases. b. CYS Services personnel are to review and annotate dates of immunizations for each child in CDC, FCC and SAC programs as designated in the Child and Youth Management System (CYMS). A hard copy of the immunization record may be kept in the child s file on site or electronically in CYMS. c. The only allowable exceptions to this requirement are for health care providerdocumented medical reasons or for religious objections. Philosophical exemptions are not permitted. d. A request for a waiver based on a medical condition must be accompanied by a signed, stamped, and dated statement from a credentialed medical provider documenting why the child is exempt. A request for a waiver based on a religious objection must be accompanied by a signed statement of the parent specifying the religious objection. e. The CYS Services Coordinator is the approval authority for all medical and religious exemption requests. The CYS Services Coordinator may seek advisement from the supporting Army Public Health Nurse (APHN)/Health Consultant or their Staff Judge Advocate Office on any particular waiver requests. The APHN will be apprised of all approved waivers. f. In the event of an immunization-preventable disease outbreak, the CYS Services Coordinator will take appropriate action to exclude from CYS Services programs, children who have been granted immunization waivers. Chief, Preventive Medicine and/or APHN Health Consultant must be consulted when assessing re-admission to CYS Services programs. g. Immunizations that are annotated in CYMS as having been waived must have supporting documentation by CYS Services Coordinator in the child s file or scanned into CYMS. This annotation includes completing the shot comment in CYMS for the applicable vaccination(s). h. CYMS is set up to provide a 30 day advance notice that immunizations are due. In addition, designated CYS Services personnel will run an Immunization Report at a minimum monthly to identify those children that have immunizations coming due in the next 30 days. For those children with pending immunizations, the parent should be notified in writing what is required and by what date. 50 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

56 CYS Services Health Assessment and Immunization Requirements CYS Services Program Age Health Assessment Sports Physical Examination Proof of Immunization CDC and FCC 4 weeks thru 5 Within 30 days NA At registration regularly scheduled daycare (part and full time) years Kindergarten, SAC, and summer 5 thru 10 years Within 30 days NA At registration camps Hourly care, Kids on Site childcare for more than 5 hours per week Contingency and emergency care Middle school or teen 4 weeks thru 10 years SKIES 4 weeks thru 18 years Within 30 days NA At registration 4 weeks thru 5 years Within 60 days NA Within 60 days 11 thru 18 years No NA No (unless requested by MIAT) No NA No (unless requested (unless requested by MIAT or by MIAT or deemed necessary deemed necessary by instructor by instructor personnel) personnel) Sports (individual or team) 3 thru 18 years Before the first practice or team event Before the first practice or team event Health Assessments/Sports Physical Statement (HASPS): a. A current HASPS, within one (1) year of registration is required for children 12 years old and under. If a current health assessment is not available at initial registration it is to be completed within 30 days of registration. b. Health Assessment are good for three (3) years, as long as the child does not have any major health status change. Parents are to sign and date the health assessment annually, confirming that the child has not had any major health changes in the past year. A new health assessment is required at the fourth year (i.e. required year 1, 4,) and whenever the child s health changes. c. A school, state well baby or other health assessment form is acceptable and will be attached to the CYS Services HASPS. In lieu of the doctor filling out section B, Parent Central Services may line through section B and the Health Care Professional signature block and write see attached. Regardless of which form is used for section B, the parent must complete Part A and Part C with their signature and date. Chapter 2 51

57 d. A Health Assessment Report will be run once a month to identify those children that have a health assessment due in the next 30 days. Parents will be notified in writing of the required health assessment documentation needed (i.e. physician or parent update) and the suspense date. e. HASPS placed into CYMS: 1) Upon receipt of a Health Assessment, input the date the document was signed by the physician into the Health Assessment Form Date field on the CYMS Family Member Special Needs screen. This date will remain unchanged until a new physician-signed Health Assessment is received. As soon as the physician s date is recorded on the Special Needs screen, go to the CYMS Family Member Shot screen and set up the suspense dates for the next three update years: X-HA1 Health Assessment (Patron Update 1) [Set Due Date 1 year from the physician s signature date] X-HA2 Health Assessment (Patron Update 2) [Set Due Date 2 years from the physician s signature date] X-HA3 Health Assessment (Full HA Due) [Set Due Date 3 years from the physician s signature date] 2) When the patron signs the interim Updates 1 and 2, fill in the appropriate Shot Date field with the patron signature date to complete that year s requirement. 3) When a new physician-signed Health Assessment is received (at the end of the three (3) years or whenever in the cycle the patron brings in a new physician-signed Health Assessment), replace the Health Assessment Form Date on the Special Needs screen with the new physician signature date. Go to the Shot screen and delete the three old codes. Then reload the three codes and enter the new Due Dates. This method is safer than trying to overwrite old data. To work correctly, there cannot be a completed date on the same line as the due date; starting a new cycle with fresh, clean codes ensures this doesn t happen. 4) By using this system, CYMS will automatically generate tickler notifications for Health Assessment updates (just like it does for upcoming shots). By selecting the three special X-HA codes, the CYMS reports currently used to show completed shots or shots coming due/overdue can be used to identify the specific Health Assessment update requirements. 52 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

58 2-60. Child and Youth Sports and Fitness Program (CYSFP) a. Children of all ages enrolled in CYS Services sports and fitness team and individual sports programs must have a CYS Services Sports Physical completed by parents and licensed practitioner. The HASP (Part B & C) must be completed for sports. The licensed practitioner will check All Sports -yes or sports applicable under Part B, Participation Recommendation. The HASPS must be current through the date of the last game of the sports season. b. If there is no current HASPS, the child/youth may be allowed to register, receive uniforms and observe practices/games. A current HASPS will be provided prior to the first practice or the child/youth will not participate in practice or games until it is provided Special Needs a. Parents will complete the Army CYS Services Screening Tool for special needs at initial registration and annually thereafter. Annual screening for Middle School / Teens is not required unless there is an identified special need. b. Upon identification of a special need the following documentation may be required: 1) Food Allergy requires a Special Diet Statement (SDS) and Allergy Medical Action Plan (MAP) (if rescue medications are required) both signed by a credentialed medical provider outlining the specific food allergy and nutrient equivalent foods that may be substituted. Chapter 2 53

59 2) Food Intolerance requires a SDS signed by a credentialed medical provider. 3) SDS for Religious preference requires a signature of a representative of a religious institution and completion of the CYS Services SDS including substitutions. 4) Intolerance of foods does not include food preferences such as vegan meals or organic food. CYS Services programs do not have capability to provide or prepare food based on preference. 5) Respiratory Diagnosis (Asthma or Reactive Airway Disease) requires Respiratory Medical Action Plan signed by physician. 6) Seizure Disorder (Epilepsy, Seizures or Febrile Seizure) requires Seizure Medical Action Plan signed by physician. 7) Diabetes requires Diabetes Medical Action Plan signed by physician. 8) All other conditions requiring accommodation require relevant medical documentation. c. Medical Action Plans (MAPs) are valid for one year (based on the date signed by physician) or until notified of health status changes. d. All CYPAs, FCC providers, coaches, and instructors must receive all pertinent special needs documentation and health forms and be trained regarding the special need and any required accommodations prior to the child entering the program. e. Children/Youth with special needs will be placed on teams based on the recommendation of the MIAT. The CYSFP director and coach will be part of the MIAT. f. Special Needs training requirements will be identified during the MIAT and scheduled and overseen by the APHN. g. Kids Included Together (KIT) is a DoD Initiative for all services. All programs have access to KIT. This contracted program allows for training and inclusion support for all children. Services include monthly webinars, inclusion support call in center, online training and scheduled site visits. h. For more information see Operational Guidance for MIAT in CYS Services and KIT Resources on the CYS Services Professional Website at Child Illness. 54 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

60 a. Daily Health Screening and Evaluation. CYS Services personnel and FCC providers will screen each child before admission. This will be done by personnel who have been trained by APHN or CYS Nurse. Screening will be done immediately upon child s arrival and prior to parent s departure. b. CYS Services personnel will inquire whether the child has had: 1) Nausea, vomiting or severe diarrhea (three (3) or more episodes within previous 24 hours). 2) Consultation with their primary health care provider regarding child health concerns. 3) Fever-axillary temperature greater than 100.5º F for infants three (3) months and younger) or greater than 101º F axillary or oral in all other children. 4) Inability to participate in daily activities. c. If any of the above symptoms are noted or reported, and the care provider determines that the child needs to be temporarily denied service, parents will be advised to: 1) Care for the child at home until symptoms have subsided and the child is able to participate in daily activities: or 2) Consult their primary source of medical care for further instructions. d. Exclusionary Criteria. Children who appear ill or show visible signs of fever are excluded based on the following symptoms: 1) Temperature greater than 100.5º F axillary (armpit) for children under three months and greater than 101º F axillary or oral for children over three months of age. Exclusion criteria for children/youth and adults who become ill during the influenza season (1 October 31 May) include: having a fever (100 F axillary or oral) and at least one (1) respiratory symptom such as runny nose, cough, congestion, sore throat, intestinal upset, and diarrhea, NOTE: Individuals may be infected with the flu and have respiratory symptoms without a fever. 2) Inability to participate comfortably in daily activities. This can include, but is not limited to: acute change in behavior this could include lethargy/lack of responsiveness, irritability, persistent crying, difficult breathing, or having a quickly spreading rash. 3) Obvious illness such as: Chapter 2 55

61 a) Impetigo Red, oozing erosion capped with golden yellow crust that appears stuck on skin. b) Scabies Crusty, wavy ridges and tunnels in the webs of fingers, hands, wrist and trunk. c) Ringworm Flat spreading ring-shaped lesions. d) Diarrhea defined by watery stools or decreased form of stool that is not associated with changes of diet. Exclusion is required for all diapered children whose stool is not contained in the diaper and toilet-trained children if the diarrhea is causing soiled pants or clothing. In addition, diapered children with diarrhea should be excluded if the stool frequency exceeds two (2) or more stool above normal for that child; or loose or watery stools associated with fever; or if the child s ability to participate in program activities is affected. NOTE: Breast-fed infants may have loose stools that may not always be contained in the diaper; they are not to be excluded unless there is a significant change in their normal stool pattern. Children that are on antibiotics will sometimes have loose stools; they should not be excluded unless they meet the criteria above. e) Chickenpox- crops of small blisters on a red base that becomes cloudy and crusted in 2-4 days. f) Head lice Small insects or white egg sheaths (nits) in hair. g) Culture proven Strep infections that have not been under treatment for at least 24 hours. h) Conjunctivitis (pink eye) red, watery eyes with thick yellow discharge. i) Symptoms of other contagious diseases such as measles, mumps, and hepatitis. j) Pinworm infestation. k) Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease cause sores in or on the mouth, hands, feet, and sometimes the buttocks / legs. The virus spreads easily through coughing and sneezing. 4) If a child becomes ill while in care, he/she will be immediately placed in the isolation area until the parent arrives. 56 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

62 5) Emergency numbers for ambulance, poison control, military policy and fire department will be posted by every phone in the CYS Services programs or FCC home. 6) In cases of sudden, serious illness or injury staff will simultaneously call emergency services and parent. If the parents cannot be reached immediately, the child will be taken to the designated Medical Treatment Facility by ambulance. A representative from CYS Services will accompany the child to the medical treatment facility and continue to make efforts to contact the parents. Conditions that require immediate medical care include, but are not limited to the following: a) Convulsions b) Marked difficulty breathing c) Unconsciousness d) Laceration (either significant in size or amount of bleeding). e) Injury to an extremity with obvious deformity. f) Head trauma associated with vomiting or altered consciousness. g) Medication errors such as giving medication to the wrong child. e. CYS Services personnel/fcc providers are authorized to administer first aid ONLY as prescribed in the First Aid training course. A first aid kit will be kept in each CYS Services program/fcc home and out of reach of children. Only those supplies identified in the First Aid Supply List below will be kept in the First Aid Kit. 1) First Aid Kit Contents: Nonporous disposable gloves Small scissors Non-glass thermometer (to be used under the arm) Clean cloth Liquid soap 2 oz size of Hand sanitizer is allowed when there is no access to water Sterile gauze squares (2" and 3") Adhesive band-aids of various sizes Flexible roller gauze (1" and 2" widths) Bandage or adhesive tape Pencil and notepad Cold pack or plastic bags for ice cubes Sealable plastic bags for soiled materials Plastic bags Chapter 2 57

63 First aid instruction manual 2) Emergency contact information for parents and Poison Control Center should be close at hand. f. Reportable Communicable Diseases Reportable communicable disease requirements may differ slightly within the Army and individual states. All requirements (Army and State) must be followed. Reportable communicable diseases include, but are not limited to: viral hepatitis A; giardiasis; shigella; salmonella; chicken pox; measles and meningitis. 1) Exposure notices will be posted to inform parents when communicable diseases are present in a facility or FCC home. 2) In the CDCs, upon notification of a diagnosis or suspicion of communicable or vaccine preventable disease, the CDC Director/designee will contact APHN, as well as the CYS Services Coordinator. 3) In the FCC home, within 24 hours of a communicable or preventable disease being diagnosed or suspected, the FCC provider will contact the FCC Director/designee. The FCC Director/designee will contact APHN, as well as the CYS Services Coordinator. 4) The APHN will be notified when two or more children show symptoms of a communicable disease (i.e. diarrhea) in the same CDC room or FCC home. 5) Communicable Disease Chart (under Health Issues on the CYS Services Professional website at will be available in each CYS Services programs, to include each CDC room and FCC home. 6) CYS Services Director/designee will contact APHN for additional resources/written information that is not available on exposure notice and as needed. The availability of exposure notices does not eliminate the need to notify APHN within 24 hours of suspected or confirmed case of communicable disease. g. Re-admission after Illness Procedure 1) If the child was evaluated and treated by a medical provider for any condition (including those listed above), the parent/guardian must provide CYS Services staff with a signed, stamped note that states the child is cleared to return to care. A note is especially necessary if there is any question that the child is still communicable or is not well enough to return for care. In addition, any specific recommendations for limited activity or observations should be specified on the medical clearance note. 58 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

64 2) In addition, CYS Services staff must ensure that the following criteria are met: a) The child is well enough to participate in normal activities for their developmental and cognitive ability. b) The child s presence will not endanger the health of other children. c) The readmission criteria specific to child s condition as listed on the Communicable Disease Chart is met. Communicable Disease Chart is found at d) Fever has been absent for 24 hours without the use of a fever-reducing agent or the parent provides a note from the child s healthcare provider clearing them to return to CYS Services care. e) If an antibiotic was prescribed for a bacterial infection, the appropriate number of doses for antibiotics has been given over a 24 hour period. f) Certification from a provider that the child may return to the program is required when the following diseases are diagnosed (list is not all inclusive): 1. Giardia Lamblia 2. Shigella 3. Salmonella 4. Hepatitis A 5. Haemophilus Influenza B (HIB) 6. Tuberculosis 7. Pertussis (whooping cough) 8. Polio 9. Diphtheria 10. Rashes (unknown origin) 11. Conjunctivitis 12. Impetigo Chapter 2 59

65 13. Scabies 14. Scarlet Fever 15. Strep Throat 16. Ringworm 17. Measles 18. Rubella 19. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) h. Children wearing casts, slings, have concussions/head injuries, or that have stitches must have a written statement from a healthcare provider with the level of participation allowed upon return to care Medication Administration. All of the information in AR , 4-32 applies. The administration of medication incurs a significant potential for liability and is resource intensive. Medication administration will be confined to situations where no other reasonable alternative exists (e.g. meds given three or more times a day or with specific hourly increments, such as every 8 hours). a. For all medications, verify the following: 1) The right child. 2) The right medication. 3) The right dose. 4) The right time. 5) The right route. (How the medication is given, i.e. oral, topical) 6) The right documentation. b. Routine/Short term Medication 1) Only medications on the pre-approved medication list, prescribed by a health care provider and with a pharmacy label will be administered. 2) Exception to Policy (ETP) requests are generated through IMCOM G9 for approval and APHN is a reviewing consulting entity. ETP must have 60 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

66 accompanying documentation of APHN review and concurrence. Link to the ETP template can be found at 3) When directions to give medication is once a day, the parents should administer the one dose and only at home unless the medication time on the label is indicated for a time when the child is in full day care. 4) Medications and care giving health practices will be administered only within full day, part day care, and school age programs. Medications and care giving health practices required by special needs children attending hourly programs and part day pre-school will be administered on a case-by-case basis. 5) Written, signed permission from a parent/guardian on the Medication Dispensation Record, must be obtained before administering medication. The start and stop date will be completed by the parent. 6) All medication will be: a) In the original container with a child-proof cap. b) Dated with the health care provider s name and instructions for use. c) Labeled with child s name, name of medication, dosage strength, route of administration. d) Medication will be stored at the appropriate temperature and secured out of the reach of children. 7) The physician or parent will administer the first dose of any medication. 8) Children will be on oral medication at least 24-hours before dosage is given by CYS Services personnel. 9) CYS Services personnel/fcc provider that administers medication will have received the Medication Administration training by APHN and follow the CYS Services process for medication administration. NOTE: It is not a requirement to train all CYPAs to administer routine medications, only those who will actually administer it. Programs should limit the number of individuals administering routine medications (not everyone in the classroom, for example) as there is evidence that medications errors are more likely to occur when everyone can administer. 10) Over-the-counter medications will not be given by CYS Services personnel/fcc provider unless they are ordered by a Primary Healthcare provider and meet all criteria as previously specified. Chapter 2 61

67 11) All medication administered will be properly recorded on the Medication Dispensation Record, by the person dispensing the medication. 12) All Medication Dispensation Records must be retained in the child file after completion. c. Rescue Medication. 1) Rescue medications are given to prevent or lessen potential life threatening reactions of a medical condition. 2) Rescue medications will be secured out of the reach of children, but not pad locked. Medication should be stored in a secure cabinet or backpack with a reusable child-proof lock or device, easily accessible in the event of an emergency. 3) Rescue medications will be stored in child s classroom in a CDC. SAC/MST programs may store rescue medications in a central location to ensure immediate access and administration of the medication within 2 minutes. Rescue medication drills should be conducted monthly and documented. 4) Staff take emergency medications on outings, on the playground, etc so medication is easily accessible when needed. Rescue medications hanging close to the outside door to the playground meet intent. 5) Children/youth that require rescue medication are not allowed to participate in program without their rescue medication and MAP being on site. 6) All medication will be: a) In the original container with a child-proof cap. b) Dated with the health care provider s name and instructions for use (i.e. Inhale two (2) puffs every four (4) hours for wheezing or shortness of breath ). c) Labeled with child s name, name of medication, dosage strength, route of administration. d) Medication will be stored in a secure cabinet or backpack, out of the reach of children but easily accessible in the event of an emergency. e) MAPS will be stored with each rescue medication. f) Expiration dates on rescue medications will be checked weekly. 62 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

68 7) Rescue medications will only be administered as per prescription label and as directed by the Medical Action Plan. 8) All CYS Services personnel/fcc providers will have received the Rescue Medication Administration training by APHN/CHN and follow the CYS Services process for medication administration. 9) SAC/MST facilities must have an established written process to monitor and track youth who self carry/administer. 10) SAC/MST may carry and administer their own rescue medicines (inhalers and auto-injectors) as follows: a) With permission from their physician and parents. b) Documentation that they accept the responsibilities as per the MAP. c) Youth must notify staff when they are in possession of any prescribed or over-the-counter medication. d) Medication will only be taken in the presence of CYS Services staff. e) CYS Services staff will document the self-administration on a Medication Dispensation Card. 11) Over-the-counter medications will not be given by CYS Services personnel/fcc provider unless these are ordered by prescription and meet all criteria as previously specified. 12) All rescue medication administered will be properly recorded on the Medication Dispensation Record, by the person dispensing the medication. 13) All Medication Dispensation Records must be retained in the child s file after completion. d. Medication Disposal. 1) Medication will be returned to the parent when no longer needed or upon termination of the child s attendance in the CYS Services program/fcc home. 2) If programs cannot send these medications home with parents, the CYS Services Program Director will follow Installation/Medical treatment Facility take back procedures to properly dispose of medications. 3) Documentation of return or disposal of the medicine should be written on the Medication Dispensation Record. Chapter 2 63

69 e. Basic Care Items. 1) Acceptable basic care items are limited to topical items used for the prevention of sunburn, diaper rash, teething irritation, lip balm, insect repellants and lotions. 2) In accordance with Food and Drug Administration guidance, benzocaine (found in teething gel) products should not be used on children younger than two years of age. 3) The child s parents/guardian will provide the basic care item with a written, dated, and signed Basic Care Item Consent Form stating reason for use; frequency, amount, and location of application. The Basic Care Item Consent Form is good for 90 days. 4) Basic care items will be in their original container and stored out of reach of children. Each item should have the child s first and last name legibly written on it, as well as on the outside of the bag. 5) Only the approved Basic Care items can be noted on the Basic Care Item Consent Form. 6) Parents cannot cross out or add additional items that they would like used for their child. If the item they are requesting is not approved, the parent will need to provide a signed, stamped health care provider s note requesting the item; which will then be forwarded to APHN for review. 7) CYS Services personnel/fcc providers are to document on the CYS Services Basic Care Item Treatment Form with each application of approved basic care item for each child. For items that are applied numerous times throughout the day (e.g. diaper cream applied with each diaper change a single notation for the day is acceptable.) 8) Expiration dates on basic care items must be monitored on a monthly basis. 9) If the child leaves the program make sure the basic care items and forms are removed from the classroom Tooth brushing. a. Toothbrushing is not mandatory. It is meant for teaching and education. NAEYC requires tooth brushing as an educational experience. b. All children must be supervised during brushing. 64 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

70 c. Center-based tooth-brushing must be done in the rooms at the sink. Tooth brushing done in an FCC program must be done at the bathroom sink. d. The use of toothpaste in CDC programs is optional. If child specific toothpaste is used it must be supplied by the parent and labeled with the child s first and last name. If one tube of toothpaste is used for a group, place small segments with a space between each segment on a paper towel, wax paper, or paper plate. CYPAs will help children place toothbrushes with the bristle-side down to pick up a segment of toothpaste. e. CYPAs will teach and encourage proper brushing techniques as follows: 1) Direct the bristles at a 45-degree angle where the teeth and gums meet. 2) Brush the outside and inside surfaces of the teeth. 3) Move the brush in a short, circular motion, back and forth, and up and down. 4) Brush the gums and tongue. 5) Rinse the mouth. f. Toothbrush Storage. 1) Each child s toothbrush should be clearly marked with his or her first and last name. 2) Store toothbrushes in a way that ensures they stay clean, open to the air, with bristles not touching, and out of the reach of children. 3) Brushes may be stored in individual containers that adequately separate them and allow them to air dry. If a toothbrush should become contaminated through contact with another toothbrush or child, it should be thrown away. 4) Toothbrush holders must be replaced (if disposable) or sanitized with bleach solution at least once a month. 5) Toothbrushes must be replaced every 3 months or when bristles have become frayed Hand washing. Preventing the spread of disease requires good personal hygiene. a. Both adults and children are required to use the following practices: Chapter 2 65

71 1) Adult hand washing facilities will be located in infant and toddler care areas within center-based programs. Disposable towels or forced air hand dyers with protective screens (in adult area only) must be provided in all CYS Services settings for staff and child use. 2) Children s hands will be washed with soap and water before and after eating, after going to the toilet, before participating in water play, cooking activities, after outdoor play, and diaper changes. 3) After diapering, if an infant or child is too young to wash his/her own hands, a caregiver will either assist the infant/child in washing their hands or wash the infant/child s hands for them. 4) All hand washing will be in accordance with The Stop Disease Method of Hand Washing poster which will be in full view at each hand washing station at CYS Services settings. Signs should be posted at child s eye level. Hand washing procedures will be maintained for a minimum of 20 seconds by all staff and children in the CYS Services programs. Songs can be helpful to ensure proper length of time is achieved. Such as Scrub Your Hands (Sing to the tune of "Row, Row, Row Your Boat") Scrub, scrub, scrub your hands Scrub them nice and clean Scrub the bottom Scrub the top And fingers in between (REPEAT) 5) When accidently exposed to blood or blood-contaminated fluids, hands must be washed thoroughly using the procedures noted above. 6) All personnel should follow the procedure for hand hygiene, which includes washing hands a minimum of 20 seconds, at the following times: upon arrival for the day, after breaks, or when moving from one child care group to another; between assisting with teeth brushing; before and after: preparing food or beverages; eating, handling food, or feeding a child; giving medication or applying a medical ointment or cream in which a break in the skin (e.g., sores, cuts, or scrapes) may be encountered; playing in water (including swimming) that is used by more than one person; after diapering or using the toilet or helping a child use a toilet; handling bodily fluid (mucus, blood, vomit), from sneezing, wiping and blowing noses, from mouths, or from sores; handling animals or cleaning up animal waste; playing in sand, on wooden play sets, and outdoors; cleaning or handling the garbage. Hand washing signs are posted at children's level for children's sinks. Hand washing posters for all CYS Services 66 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

72 programs can be found on the Professional website at b. The following procedures must be used when handling blood and other bodily fluids: 1) Wear protective gloves when handling blood or blood-contaminated fluids, and when hands have open lesions or cuts. This will prevent the contamination from body fluids. 2) Wash the surface with soap and water and disinfect the area with bleach solution. 3) Wash hands in accordance with above guidelines. 4) Bloodborne Pathogens Training includes how to clean up blood spills and return blood stained clothing to parents. c. Waterless hand sanitizers with an alcohol base may be used in EXTREME short term situations when there is no water available for hand washing (e.g. outside first aid, field trips). They may not be used in CYS Services programs as a substitute for hand washing with running water (e.g. in lieu of getting the plumbing repaired and NEVER in food preparation areas) Diapering and Toileting. See Caring For Our Children (CFOC): National Health and Safety Standards (CFOC ). Diapering, Toileting and Hygiene procedures will be posted in each module/classroom with children who require diapering. NOTE: Updated CYS Services diapering posters located on the CYS Services Professional website will be displayed above/near all diaper-changing stations. a. CYPA/provider or adult will keep bodily contact with the child during diapering at all times to ensure safety of child. b. Disposable diapers will be used exclusively except for medically-validated exception. c. Diapering surface is used only for diapering. Children may not be changed in cribs or on the floor. d. Hot and cold running water is immediately adjacent to the diapering area. e. Diapering area is not adjacent to food preparation and serving areas. f. Diaper bags, sanitizing solution etc., are stored out of reach of children. Chapter 2 67

73 g. Soiled diapers will be stored in covered containers with plastic liners. Containers will be emptied, cleaned, and sanitized daily using bleach solution. h. Diaper changing surfaces will be sanitized after each use with bleach solution. i. Soiled diapers and clothing will be changed promptly. Soiled clothing will be placed in a secured plastic bag, stored separately from clean clothing, and out of reach of children until returned to parent. Soiled diapers will be disposed of in a foot-operated, covered container with plastic liners. Containers will be emptied as needed and cleaned and sanitized daily using bleach solution. j. Latex or vinyl disposable gloves will have a smooth surface with no rough seams on the outside. These gloves will be available for any staff/provider who wishes to use them. CYPAs have the choice to use gloves for diaper changing as required by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). If CYPAs choose to use gloves, both hands must be gloved. k. If gloves are used for diapering, proper hand washing and gloving procedures will be used in accordance with DoDI (ref: Caring for Our Children: National Health and Safety Standards guidelines). 68 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

74 2-67. Cleaning, sanitizing, and disinfecting surfaces are key steps in the prevention, reduction, and control of communicable diseases within a child care setting. Cleaning, sanitizing, and disinfecting within a child care setting have different meanings: CLEANING SANITIZING DISINFECTING Uses a solution made of Uses a solution made of soap and water. bleach and water. Physically removes any dirt or debris from surfaces. Reduces the amount of germs on surfaces. Used on food contact surfaces and on items that children may place in their mouths. Uses a solution made of bleach and water, that is stronger than the sanitizing solution. Destroys germs on surfaces. Used on diaper changing tables and surfaces contaminated with blood or blood containing body fluids. a. It is important to use the right solution for the right purpose and apply it in the right way. Bleach is a chemical and can be irritating, the recommended bleach to water solutions ensure that they are effective while limiting potential harmful effects to children and childcare providers when mixed and used the right way. Appropriate personal protective equipment and measures should be used when using bleach solutions. b. Sodium Hypochlorite is the active ingredient in commercial bleach. The percentage of sodium hypochlorite in the commercial bleach product used is important as it controls the amount of bleach to mix with water which affects how long the solution needs to have contact with the surface. c. Commercial bleach products to water mixtures should be mixed to result in appropriate chlorine parts per million (PPM) residuals. Residual PPM affects contact time and drying recommendations based on the frequency of use, purpose, and the reason the surface is being sanitized and/or disinfected. d. Soft or porous surfaces contaminated with blood or body fluids should be blotted or wiped to absorb with an appropriate disposable agent or material. The disposable item used should be placed in a plastic bag to be discarded. Carpeted/ upholstered furniture or areas may need to be steam cleaned at 158ºF for at least five minutes or at 212ºF for one minute. Contaminated cloth toys or linens may be washed with water temperatures of ºF and then completely dried on the highest dryer setting. Severely contaminated cloth toys or linens should be discarded in a plastic bag. Preventive Medicine should be consulted for instances Chapter 2 69

75 of porous surface blood and body fluid contamination to ensure appropriate disinfecting procedures are conducted. e. The following steps correlate to non-porous (hard) contaminated surfaces (diaper changing tables, table tops, high chairs, non-cloth toys, non-carpeted flooring, etc.). 1) Identify the bleach concentration, below a mixture ratio are provided for 8.25% and % sodium hypochlorite commercial bleach products. Note: only use unscented, liquid-type bleach. 2) Clean the surface with soap and water. Surfaces should be cleaned to remove any visible debris, dirt, and other contamination before using the appropriate bleach solution. 3) Choose the right bleach solution mixture. Bleach solutions, except for blood and body fluid disinfection preparations, should be made fresh daily for sanitizing and disinfecting. Blood and body fluid disinfecting solution should be made on an as needed basis. Bleach should be added to cool water and not mixed with any other cleaning products. 4) Sanitize, disinfect, or conduct blood and body fluid disinfecting procedures by wetting the entire surface, allowing the solution to remain on the surface for at least two minutes, and then dry with a disposable paper towel or allowing to air dry as directed. Note, food contact surfaces must be air dried only. f. Generally solutions should be used in accordance with prescribed established guidance for childcare provider use. g. Below is a table of general bleach product to water mixtures and use guidance based on the percentage of sodium hypochlorite in the bleach concentration. The use of chlorine test strips is recommended to verify PPM concentration. Sanitize Disinfect Blood and Body Fluid Disinfectant After Each Use: After Each Use: Use Only As Needed For: Mouthed Toys Diaper Changing Vomit Food Surface Areas Tables Diarrhea Activity Tables 70 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

76 8.25% Sodium Hypochlorite (Bleach Concentration) Sanitize 100PPM 1/8 teaspoon of bleach to a pint of water ¼ teaspoon of bleach to a quart of water 1 teaspoon of bleach to a gallon of water Disinfect 600PPM ¾ teaspoon bleach to a pint of water 1 ½ teaspoon of bleach to a quart of water 2 tablespoons of bleach to a gallon of water Blood and Body Fluid Disinfectant 5000PPM 2 tablespoons of bleach to a pint of water 4 tablespoons of bleach to a quart of water 1 cup of bleach to a gallon of water % Sodium Hypochlorite (Bleach Concentration) Sanitize 100PPM Disinfect 600PPM Blood and Body Fluid Disinfectant 5000PPM 3 tablespoons of bleach to a pint of water 6 tablespoons of bleach to 1/8 teaspoon of bleach to a pint of water 1 ½ teaspoon bleach to a pint of water ¼ teaspoon of bleach to a 1 tablespoon of bleach to a quart of water quart of water a quart of water ½ tablespoon of bleach to a ¼ cup of bleach to a gallon 1 ½ cup of bleach to a gallon of water of water gallon of water **Sanitizing solutions (100ppm) should be used to soak toys (such as mouthed toys after each use). Toys should be submerged for a period of 5 minutes, rinsed with water, and then allowed to air dry. Cleaning, Sanitizing, and Disinfecting references : 1. Caring For Our Children (COFC) National Health and Safety Performance Standards Guidelines for Early Care and Education Programs 3 rd Edition; 2. US Environmental Protection Agency; 3. US Food and Drug Administration; 4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 5. US Army Public Health Command Tip Sheet Preparing and Measuring High Chlorine Concentration Solutions for Disinfection h. Standard Bleach Solution. 1) The solution after mixture, will be maintained in an opaque plastic spray container of 16 ounces or smaller, and will be utilized to clean non-absorbent surfaces after each diaper change, toys, receptacles, sleeping surfaces, etc. 2) A label will be affixed to the container with contents name and preparation date. 3) Disinfecting and sanitizing solutions will not be placed in an area of direct sun-light. The disinfecting and sanitizing solutions and disposable paper towels Chapter 2 71

77 shall be stored at a readily accessible location to the caregiver to ensure use, but placed on a high shelf to ensure no child access. 4) The disinfecting and sanitation solutions shall be disposed of at the end of the day. i. Surface Disinfecting. 1) Wash and disinfect for non-porous surfaces (tabletops, cabinets, shelves, and diaper changing tables) as follows: a) Wash all surfaces with soapy water to remove particulate matter (i.e. food debris, saliva). b) Spray the bleach solution on the surfaces. c) Allow surfaces to air-dry for two minutes. 2) Mats/Cribs/Cots. Individual cots and mattresses will be disinfected at a minimum of weekly. 3) Cribs will be disinfected daily or more often if obviously soiled. All sleeping apparatus will be cleaned and disinfected in accordance with AR , para Cribs used for fire evacuation are cleaned after each fire drill to include changing the sheets. 4) Crib sheets will be laundered daily, after soiling, and after use by child when a crib is shared. 5) Each child s bedding is stored separately from other children s bedding, either on the cot/mat or in individually labeled cubbies. 6) Mats/cots and bedding (sheets and blankets) are cleaned and sanitized weekly or immediately when soiled, or after use by child when a cot/mat is shared. 7) Dirty linen will be separated and inaccessible to children/youth. 8) Clothing. Clothing utilized for costumes/dress-up will be laundered at least weekly or more often if obviously soiled. Hats and bicycle helmets used for play will be cleaned daily at the end of the day or after every use if head lice are present. Eyewear (including goggles used in construction activities) will be sanitized after every use. Shoes (including shoes loaned out in Middle School/Teen (MST) for sports activities) will be sprayed with a shoe sanitizer, in an area away from children/adolescents, after every use. 72 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

78 j. Adult booties will NOT be used in infant rooms. NOTE: Observations in Army infant programs have determined that the use of "booties" has led to non-hygienic floor conditions and accidents/injuries caused by the practice of wearing booties. However, Infants need to have "tummy time" to meet growth and development milestones. Infant programs will designate contained play surfaces for infant play on which no one walks with shoes. Staff can wear shoes, slippers or socks that are worn only in the designated protected infant crawl space. When documented evidence exists of hazardous materials in soils at munitions plants, chemical plants, depots and arsenals, then single-use, disposable "booties" may be used. k. Personal items (e.g. toothbrushes, towels and similar items) will be labeled with the child s first and last name and will not be stored or used in common. l. Table tops should be sanitized before and after meals. School-aged children may sanitize their own tables with spray bottles. m. Toilet rooms and fixtures. 1) Toilet rooms and fixtures will be sanitary and odor free. 2) Toilets will be caulked to floor. 3) Sinks will be located in infant and toddler child activity rooms/modules. n. Toy Sanitation. When an infant or toddler finishes playing with a toy, put the toy in a bin reserved for dirty toys. The contents of the bin must be out of the reach of the children. Toys can be cleaned and sanitized when there is a convenient time and then placed in areas to air dry. Wash and sanitize toys as follows: 1) Toys used by children younger than three (3) years must be cleaned and sanitized daily and after the child has placed the toy in his/her mouth. 2) Toys used by children three (3) years and older must be cleaned and sanitized weekly (including dramatic play clothes). 3) All toys must be free of obvious dirt or debris and in good repair. 4) When not washed by dishwasher the following procedure should be used: a) Wash toys in mild detergent and water. b) Rinse toys with clean water. c) Immerse toys (that can be immersed-some toys could be ruined if immersed) in bleach solution for at least two (2) minutes. Chapter 2 73

79 d) All the toys will air dry on a clean surface. 5) A dishwasher can be used as a viable option for toys that cannot be immersed. Toys will be placed in a mesh bag and secured in dishwasher. Complete dishwasher cycle will be used. Toys will be washed separately from dishes. Ensure toys are compatible with the heat drying cycle. If toys are not compatible with the heat drying cycle, they need to be removed from the dishwashing rack and spread out to air dry. This will prevent a build-up of mold and mildew Sleep and Rest Periods. a. Infants: There will be cribs available for all infants 12 months and younger (FCC and KOS a portable crib is acceptable) and meet the following criteria: 1) Each infant in care more than four (4) hours per day on a regular basis has an individually dedicated crib. 2) Cribs are placed at least two (2) feet apart. Cribs with solid headboards can be placed back to back until child is nine (9) months old. 3) Cribs must be arranged so that infants are placed to sleep head to toe. 4) Cribs surfaces must be smooth, free from splinters, sturdy and easily cleaned. 5) Sides of infants cribs must be in the locked position when cribs are occupied. 6) No more than one mattress per crib may be used. 7) The surface of the crib mattress must be at least 20 inches from the top of the crib rail. 8) Crib mattresses must be firm, tight-fitting and covered by a tight-fitting sheet with elastic corners. Mattresses must have a waterproof cover. 9) Pillows, soft or loose bedding or other items which could interfere with breathing are not placed in cribs. Nothing is to hang on the inside of the cribs to include blankets and bibs. 10) Mobiles hanging above the crib are allowed until the child starts to pull up. No toys, blankets, pillows, bibs, pacifiers or equipment are allowed in crib. b. Sleep Position. 74 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

80 1) All infants 12 months and younger will be placed on their backs for sleeping. Children will transition to a mat on their first birthday. Children who pull up and try to climb out of their crib prior to their first birthday will be placed on mats for safety. 2) Infants who roll over unassisted may assume their own sleep position after first being placed on their backs to sleep. CYS Services Back to Sleep crib placards with the child's name, picture, and indication if infant cannot (red placard) or can (green placard) roll over are prominently displayed above or outside each regularly scheduled infant's crib in a clear sleeve. The sleeve will also contain the signed copy of the Parent Infant Sleep Position Agreement. Placard must be positioned to cover the Parent Infant Sleep Position Agreement so it is not visible to the public. NOTE: Pictures are optional for hourly care and Kids on Site (KOS) children but Parent Infant Sleep Position Agreement and placards are still required. Placard information is found at 3) If an alternative sleep position is required, it must be supported by a written statement by a physician indicating the nature of the medical condition and specific sleeping instructions (side, stomach or elevated back sleeping position). Alternate Sleep Position See written statement must be written on the placard of these infants. Statement must be obtained prior to provision of child care services, and must be maintained in child file. 4) If an infant arrives to a CYS Services program asleep in a car safety seat, infant carrier, or infant sling, the parent/guardian or CYS Services staff/fcc provider must remove the infant and place it on its back in the infant s assigned crib. 5) When an infant falls asleep in a place that is not a sleeping environment CYS Services staff/fcc provider will immediately place the infant in their assigned crib. The following are not considered sleeping environments: a car safety seat, bean bag chairs, bouncy seats, infant seats, swings, exersaucers, jumping chairs, highchairs, or on the floor. 6) A child should not sit in a high chair or other equipment that constrains his/her movement indoors or outdoors for longer than fifteen minutes, other than at meals or snack time. 7) Staff will directly observe infants by sight and sound at all times to include when they are going to sleep, are sleeping, or in the process of waking up. 8) FCC providers must be within sight or sound of infants at all times. FCC providers living in two story housing units should nap infants on the ground floor and remain on the same floor while infants are sleeping. FCC providers must observe all children on a regular basis throughout nap/rest periods. Chapter 2 75

81 9) Lighting in the room must be maintained to allow the staff to see each infant s face, view the color of the infant s skin and to check the infant s breathing. Staff also need to ensure the infant s head remains uncovered. Rooms are not completely darkened while infants are present to ensure room is visible on VSS monitor. 10) Swaddling may be used under limited circumstances. Two major national concerns regarding swaddling include hip dysplasia and increased risk of SIDS. Specially designed swaddling Sleep Sacks do not bind the hips as in typical swaddling, reducing the likelihood of hip dysplasia. The increased risk for SIDS occurs when infants first learn to roll over and do not have the strength to roll back and may suffocate. Therefore, children may be swaddled only with the CYS Services sleep sacks until they can roll over, typically beginning at 4 months. Swaddling should begin to phase out at the end of the 3 rd month. OACSIM will include swaddling policy in the next update of AR ) Appropriately sized CYS Services Back to Sleep sacks are used for sleeping infants in lieu of blankets while infants are in cribs. Staff will check to ensure temperature in the room is comfortable for a lightly clothed adult and infants are not overheated or sweaty. Bibs and garments with ties or hoods are removed. NOTE: If conditions permit, children may sleep without a sleep sack to avoid overheating. c. Tummy Time 1) Infants spend up to 15 hours a day on their backs. Tummy time literally gives them a new perspective on the world and helps develop different muscles and new skills needed to successfully navigate their world. It promotes healthy physical and brain development, decreases risk of head flattening and encourages bonding and play between supervising adult and baby. Best practice is to place the child on a thin mat. 2) Tummy Time is for babies who are awake, ALERT and being directly attended to. This means: a) children on their tummies in tummy time are AWAKE and attended to. Staff/Providers are sitting on the floor with the infant within arm radius while maintaining eye contact, b) no more than 3 5 minutes twice per day for a child who cannot roll over, c) increasing to 10 minutes twice per day for a child who can roll over, 76 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

82 d) maximum of 20 minutes twice per day for an infant who is getting ready to pull themselves up. 3) NEVER leave a child in tummy time alone, even if to talk to a parent or to change a diaper. Train new staff on tummy time BEFORE leaving them with an infant. It can take as little as 4 minutes of unattended tummy time for a child to die. If you leave the area, TAKE THE CHILD WITH YOU. Even if you are NOT the individual who placed a child in tummy time, if you see an unattended infant asleep on the floor, SAY SOMETHING and DO SOMETHING. d. Pre-Toddler/Toddler and Preschool. There will be individual mats or cots for each child on their first birthday. By 12 months of age, children must transition from a crib to a mat or cot Pets. 1) Children in care on a regular basis have an individually designated (labeled) mat or cot. 2) Mats/Cots are placed at least two (2) feet apart. Mats/Cots are arranged so that children sleep head to toe (i.e. this head to toe arrangement places the heads of two children as far apart as possible). a. New animals in a CYS facility should be processed through a vet for initial screening to ensure that they are not bringing any ringworm/mange/etc into the centers. b. Center-based settings that maintain pets on the premises will be inspected monthly (annually for FCC) by the Installation Veterinary Services or a qualified designee, with the exception of fish and fish tanks. c. All pets in Center-based settings or FCC homes will be current on their immunizations and have a yearly health certificate stating pet is free from disease. d. Installation Veterinarian determines appropriateness, acceptable temperament of pets in home care environments. e. Parents will be notified at registration if animals are in the facility/home or any time a new animal is added to the facility/home. f. Staff will be responsible for the daily cleaning of cage(s). g. Sanitary conditions of the pets will be monitored by the Environmental Health Staff as part of the monthly inspection for CDC and quarterly inspection for SAC/MST. Chapter 2 77

83 h. Pets will be contained in appropriate cages/enclosures/areas when not included in an activity. i. Pet bowls, cages, holding areas, beds and pens must be kept clean and sanitary, must not be adjacent to dining areas and be inaccessible to crawling children. j. Pets will be handled humanely and under direct supervision of care giving staff. k. Pets bred or trained for attack or those known as dangerous (predators, venomous reptiles, and spiders), as determined by Veterinary Services, are prohibited. l. For health reasons, the following are not permitted in programs: 1) Wolf-dog hybrids 2) Reptiles and amphibians (Tadpoles can be in programs for science observations but once they become frogs, must not remain) 3) Psittacine birds (inclusive of parrots, parakeets, budgies, and cockatiels) 4) Ferrets m. Children and staff are required to wash their hands after handling pets Plants. a. All plants in CDC and SAC and FCC homes must be non-toxic and labeled with the common name and the word NON-TOXIC. Outdoor plants and trees surrounding CYS Services buildings do not require labels. b. Plants that have been identified as poisonous will be removed from the centers, homes and outdoor play areas. This does not preclude garden plants (e.g. tomatoes) that can only be accessed with supervision. The consumption of gardengrown food is permitted for science/developmental activities. c. Plants that are in the centers or homes must appear to be healthy and properly cared for. d. Artificial and live plants must be cleaned monthly to alleviate dust. e. For plant information see in the Health Issues folder on the CYS Services Professional website at FOOD and NUTRITION 78 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

84 2-71. CYS Services Coordinators will document that meals/snacks provided to children/youth meet their nutritious and caloric needs and that parents are provided with that information in accordance with state USDA Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) requirements Menus will be approved as required: a. All CYS Services Facilities: four (4) six (6) week cycle menus (for children 12 mo and above) will be approved by a nutritionist or registered dietician and reviewed annually to ensure compliance with USDA and Army nutritional guidance. Documentation will be kept on file. Garrison CYS Services should provide local guidance to coordinate approval by a nutritionist or registered dietician with the local MTF. NOTE: The approved designee could be the CYS Services Food Service Manager, if approved by a nutritionist or registered dietician and professionally qualified. b. FCC: Nutritionist or registered dietician will randomly review FCC menus during the MDTI to ensure compliance with USDA and Army nutritional guidance. Or, FCC providers may elect to use approved CDC menus. c. FCC: FCC menus will be reviewed monthly as part of the reimbursement process CYS Services Facility Director/FCC provider will post the current dated menu in the lobby of the facility or on the FCC home Parent Bulletin Board. NOTE: Rooms in shared facilities may hang the menu on/near the classroom door (i.e., SAC program in a public school). The menus will meet the USDA CACFP meal pattern requirements for the age group All menu choices will reflect required standards: a. Some menu choices reflect cultural and Family backgrounds. b. Of 5 weekly afternoon snacks, each component is served twice (i.e., two meat/two fruit/two bread, etc.) during the week. c. Some lunch/supper choices are vegetarian. NOTE: Every week there is a meatless lunch. d. ALL/KOS: All meals and snacks served will include option of water even when other beverages are provided. Children/youth will be offered water at regular intervals, but at a minimum after large-muscle activity, outdoor play, and mid morning when breakfast is provided in lieu of morning snack. Chapter 2 79

85 e. CDC/FCC: CDC/FCC menus will not contain whole hot dogs, whole grapes, popcorn, raw peas, hard pretzels, chunks of raw carrots/meat or nuts larger than can be swallowed whole for children under three years. NOTE: This does not apply to FCC School-age homes. For more information see Annex F: More about the Topic: Food-Related Choking Prevention Changes to approved menus will be kept to a minimum and will meet USDA requirements. Facility Directors/FCC provider will maintain documentation on file for three years Meal Service Kitchen: CYS Services Facility Directors will ensure kitchen staff prepare meals/snacks based on quantifiable measurements, i.e., correct number of servings and portion sizes CYS Services Facility Directors will ensure disposable eating utensils, cups and plates are only used when the dishwasher or three-compartment sink is out of service or unavailable. NOTE: The intention is that if there is a dishwasher, it is always available and operational. Use of paper products is rare FCC providers will prepare all meals in their home CDC Directors will ensure all commercially-packaged food is delivered to classrooms in an appropriate dish. Food will not be served directly from a factorysealed container. In infant/pretoddler rooms, food stored in containers (such as boxes of cereal or jars of baby food) must be transferred to smaller serving bowls CYS Services Coordinator will ensure: a. Cooks can articulate how many servings are placed into each serving bowl/platter. NOTE: Frequent observation indicates that often times, the same amount of food is placed into serving bowls regardless of numbers of children enrolled, i.e., a pretod/toddler room often has the same amount of food as a preschool room. b. Personal staff meals/snacks will not be prepared in the CYS Services kitchen or food supplies, (e.g., CYPAs will not fix themselves breakfast in the facility kitchen). c. Leftover food will not be given to staff, parents, or youth to take home (including the sale of leftover food). d. Kitchen staff prepare food based on actual number of children present and those direct in-ratio staff participating in CDC Family Style Dining (FSD) or SAC buffet service. NOTE: It may be necessary to use historical data to determine the numbers of meals/snacks to prepare. However, kitchen staff must be able to explain how they determine how much food to prepare using documented evidence. 80 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

86 e. MST Program Directors prepare food based on historic documentation of youth attendance/direct in-ratio staff participating in self-service meals and snacks. f. Meal service is used to facilitate socialization among children/youth, to build selfhelp skills in young children and to help older children/youth make healthy eating choices by providing healthy options in vending machines and snack bars. Although older children/youth are able to self serve, CYS Services Facility Directors will ensure supervision to ensure proper portion sizes are provided. NOTE: Meals and snacks are not an employee benefit, and staff will not rely on food prepared for children/youth as their source of food. g. Store bought food brought from parents for special occasions will be allowed, as long as the food is in the original container and still sealed. So celebrate but with food in original containers! Army Food Seconds Guidance. The number of lunches prepared is determined by number of enrolled children over the age of 12 months combined with historical knowledge of average daily attendance PLUS number of CYPAs directly involved in Family Style Dining (FSD). It is assumed that 50% of the children will request seconds of one item. Seconds are routinely provided only on bread, fruit and vegetables (although if there is extra meat/milk available to children, they may eat it). Therefore, use the following chart to determine how much food to prepare. NOTE: numbers of staff lunches are calculated based on the Army metrics of optimum percentages of children (50/50 mix of children under three (3) and children over three (3) and may need to be adjusted based on your configuration). ADA of children over 12 months # CHILD LUNCHES # OF CYPA LUNCHES TOTAL LUNCHES TO PREPARE EXTRA PORTIONS OF FRUIT, VEGETABLE, BREAD FOR SECONDS Fruit: 9 Vegetables: 9 Bread: Fruit: 18 Vegetables: 18 Bread: Fruit: 28 Vegetables: 28 Bread Fruit: 37 Vegetables: 37 Bread Fruit: 46 Vegetables: 46 Bread Fruit: 56/Vegetables:56 Chapter 2 81

87 Bread CYS Services Facility Directors/FCC providers will: a. Ensure no child/youth goes without food for more than three (3) consecutive hours. NOTE: USDA policy states that meals/snacks must be served not less than two and not more than three hours apart. Army policy states the length of time between end of one meal and beginning of the next meal can be no more than three (3) hours. However, if this guidance is contrary to state requirements, Installations should follow state guidance i.e., if the state requires the three hour period is from the beginning of one meal to the beginning of the next, the Installation should follow state policy. Installation should have state requirements for the time between meals available for review. OCONUS Regions will follow Army Policy stated above. b. Ensure breakfast and/or morning snack, lunch and afternoon snack is served as required to children in full-day programs. NOTE: Unless CDC programs open early in support of the military mission, there is no need for a morning snack if breakfast and lunch are served. When a CDC does open early, properly maintained containers of crackers or similar food may be stored in classrooms to ensure no child ever goes hungry (i.e., breakfast is served at 0800 and first child who comes at 0530 is hungry). Children in extended hours care may require an additional supper and/or evening snack. c. Ensure a snack is served to children/youth in part-day (when no other meal service is provided) and after school programs. d. Ensure whole milk is provided to all children drinking milk under the age of 24 months; skim milk or 1% is provided to all children 24 months and above. e. Ensure breakfast is served to children/youth in before-school programs when the program is open more than one hour before the first child leaves for school. f. Ensure supper, evening snack and breakfast are served to children/youth in overnight care. g. Ensure all components of a meal/snack are served at the same time (e.g., dessert or beverage is not saved until after the meal.) Staff may not require children to finish one component in order to receive the next, i.e., children will never be required to finish their vegetables before receiving their protein or beverage. h. Ensure food is not used as a reward, bribe or punishment. i. Ensure food is offered to children/youth. NOTE: Children will not be required to eat all the food on their plate or to eat certain foods. 82 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

88 j. Ensure CYS Services facility staff directly engaged with children/youth during meal/snack times in meal/snack areas are provided with one portion of food based on the age group (e.g., toddler CYPAs consume one toddler portion; MST CYPAs consume one youth portion). Meals and snacks are a pleasant, social learning experience for children/youth. NOTE: Management, support and CYPA staff are not provided with food unless they are actively interacting by sitting at the table with children during Family Style Dining (FSD) or in the eating area with youth at the time of meal/snack service. The number of staff eating with the children should not exceed the staff/child ratio unless management staff or trainers are present as part of official observation/modeling requirements. k. Ensure children are encouraged to serve and feed themselves based on their abilities. NOTE: FSD is not required in infant and pre-toddlers rooms. l. Ensure children assist with table setting and clean up as they are able. m. Ensure CDC/FCC implement FSD practices that are age appropriate, including children serving themselves and assisting in table setting and cleanup. NOTE: The pitchers should be appropriate for the age group, such as little pitchers with a small amount of milk for toddlers. n. Ensure adults in ratio sit and eat with children. o. Ensure child-sized furnishings and equipment related to meal service are provided. NOTE: In FCC, a booster seat could be used to meet this requirement. p. Ensure CDC/FCC/SAC children are not seated for meals/snacks until the food is ready to be served. q. Ensure SAC/MST participate in supervised self-service meal/snack service in order to ensure proper portion control. NOTE: Best practice is to have sample plate with appropriate portion size. r. Ensure the use of proper utensils (such as a quarter cup measuring spoon for 1/4 cup servings) to ensure portion sizes are not exceeded. s. Ensure SAC children do not have access to vending machines during beforeand after-school hours or school-out days. NOTE: If the vending machine is located in Youth Center, it can be covered/unplugged, etc. t. Ensure MST vending machines or snack bars, if any, provide some nutritious items among the selections. NOTE: Vending machines and snack bars are only permitted in Youth Centers. Chapter 2 83

89 u. Ensure adults only consume nutritious meals and snacks provided by the program in the presence of children/youth. NOTE: Vending machine/fast-food sodas and snacks are not appropriate. v. FCC Directors will ensure Food and Nutrition Service is observed/inspected by trained CYS Services personnel a minimum of three (3) times per year or more often if required by USDA CACFP. Documentation of all visits is maintained in provider files Infant Feeding in CDC/FCC is intended to ensure safe, caring feeding of infants. Infants will be fed when they are hungry, rather than on caregiver/provider-imposed schedules. a. Feeding infants in large groups, propping of bottles, and putting older infants to bed holding milk or juice-filled bottles are unsound, non-nurturing practices that may result in middle ear infections, dental problems or choking. Infant feeding practices facilitate interaction with infant and allow for attention to their needs. b. Infants must be held during all bottle feedings. Bottles will not be propped for self-feeding. c. Children are not permitted to walk around with bottles as this exposes them to safety and health risks. d. Parents of infants will be provided with daily communication regarding their child s daily intake of food and a coordinated feeding plan will be developed which outlines the introduction of new foods. This is especially important for infants, where food allergies may develop as new foods are introduced. e. Ensure all baby food provided is USDA-approved. f. Ensure infant baby food will be in unopened jars and stored at appropriate temperatures. g. Ensure infants are allowed to self-feed as soon as they display an interest, including holding spoons and cups. h. Ensure infants are not fed in groups larger than three (3) (this includes both young infants who are held, and those almost ones and older who are transitioning to feeding themselves). i. Ensure that high chairs, if used, have straps and wide bases and are used only for feeding. Ensure children are not left unattended in high chairs. 84 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

90 j. Ensure individual infant feeding plans are coordinated with parent/program lead/cys Services Food and Nutrition Specialist/CYS Services Health Specialist and maintained in the classroom where the child is located. k. Ensure infants under 12 months are not served honey. l. Ensure infants 12 months and under are not provided juice. NOTE: If there is a medical reason for the juice to be introduced earlier than 12 months, then the infant can be served juice as with any other written medical exception CDC/FCC Infant formula is served per requirement: a. Provision of infant food is both an Army and USDA CACFP requirement regardless of enrollment in the program or state guidance. b. Programs provide at least one kind of USDA-approved, iron-fortified infant formula. Infant formula utilized must be one that is commonly used by parents as determined by a parent survey. Providing off-brand infant formula so that parents will decline and provide their own is not acceptable. c. FCC providers purchase their own infant formula and are not given formula by the CYS Services program. d. Parents who decline the Army provided formula may provide their own or breast milk. No reduction in fees are given for parents providing their own formula, and breast feeding parents are not given an equal amount of Army provided formula in exchange. Parent-provided formula must be USDA-approved and provided in single-serve bottles, labeled with child's first and last name and date. Formula provided by parents will be ready to feed or powdered formula made at home. Bottles are returned to the parent at the end of the day. e. Infant formula will not be prepared in any CYS Services Program. NOTE: All infant formula is "ready to feed" unless the state USDA CACFP allows the program to provide powdered formula for parents to mix at home. If this practice is not permitted by your State policy, the only option is ready to feed. f. Ensure signed statements are on file from parents who have declined the provided infant formula/food. g. Crock pots and microwaves will not be used in CYS Services programs for heating infant formula. Research indicates that heating bottles is not necessary for infants; however, should the parent request that formula be heated, the CYPA/Provider can use either bottle warmers which use a small amount of water that evaporates while the bottle heats (about three (3) four (4) minutes) or stand the bottle in a bowl of hot water. Bottle warmers will be operated in accordance Chapter 2 85

91 with manufacturer's recommendations and will be out of reach of children, including power cords Breast milk may be brought in bottles labeled with the child s first and last names and the date. Bottles should contain no more than two (2) to three (3) ounces of breast milk. Breast milk that has been warmed but is not consumed (baby has not sucked from the bottle) may be held for four (4) hours at room temperature. Breast milk from a partially consumed bottle can be held one (1) hour at room temperature before discarding. Breast milk that has not been warmed and served should be returned to the parents at the end of each day. Parents are responsible for ensuring that breast milk sent to the CYS Services program has been stored appropriately while at home (appropriate temperature and time). a. Staff members should consult with parents regarding the frequency and interval of feeding. Breastfed babies typically feed more often than formula-fed babies as breast milk is digested quicker and more completely. Mothers must be told whenever the baby takes more breast milk or formula than expected. The baby may be experiencing a growth spurt and additional milk is required. Every effort should be made by staff members not to waste breast milk. b. Breast milk should be stored, thawed, and warmed according to the following guidance of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: 1) Breast milk will be refrigerated when not in use. 2) Breast milk will be warmed gently in a bowl or cup of tepid water. The milk must never be heated in a microwave or placed in bottle warmers or crockpots. Breast milk contains beneficial living cells that can be destroyed by excessive heat. Breast milk will be gently mixed to ensure even temperature, never shaken. c. Ensure there is a protected area where mothers can breast feed. NOTE: This does not require a "breastfeeding room." Area will not be in the bathroom Food Substitution and Allergies: CYS Services Coordinator will identify and respond to special food requirements by ensuring: a. Child records are screened at time of intake. b. CDC/FCC/SAC: The center/home provides equivalent substitutions for meal components whenever possible. Parents may be asked to provide substitutions when documented requirements cannot be met within the program capabilities. c. For medical and religious exemptions: 86 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

92 1) Food brought from home or commercially packaged for medical or religious exemptions must be labeled and dated with child/youth s full name, type of food and date prepared, and follows the same storage requirements as program provided food. 2) Prepared at home and transported has a higher risk of contamination and spoilage and, therefore, is limited to medical and religious exemptions. 3) Although the parent may have prepared the food, i.e. organic food, which the CDC/SAS/FCC home serves, CYS Services accepts the responsibility for the quality of the food at the time of service. If in doubt that the food is safe do not serve contact parent for advice. d. Programs follow approved practices for children/youth on special diets: 1) Children/youth on special diets due to medical conditions will have written documentation on SDS from medical personnel who specify food allergies or specific medical condition and permissible substitutions. Copies of SDS are maintained in the kitchen and classroom of children/youth on special diets. 2) Children on special diets due to religious practices will have written documentation from a member of the clergy who specifies prohibited food and an acceptable substitution. NOTE: SDS only due to religious reasons do not require APHN review and signature. 3) Special food requirements for medical and religious reasons are posted in the kitchen and in the activity area visible to staff for CDC/SAC. In FCC and MST programs, the statements should be posted in the kitchen or in the serving area in MST when no kitchen is present. The posted list is current and matches the CYMS list. CYMS allergy report is run at a minimum monthly and as required by changes in special diets. All special needs of hourly children are included on the daily roster. 4) Pictures of children with food allergies are posted in the activity area with offending food, permitted substitutions, potential reaction, and prescribed treatment identified. In MST programs, the statements should be posted in the kitchen or in the serving area when no kitchen is present. An acceptable variance for pictures of children in hourly care is to have both the daily CYMS listing of children with Special Diet Statements and a system to identify the special dietary needs for the child such as a name tag or wristband. Posted pictures of children with food allergies do not have to be covered unless it is the parent s or youth s preference. e. Program does not provide special meals or substitutions for parental food choices, such as vegan diets or organic foods. Chapter 2 87

93 f. Staff is aware of children/youth with food allergies or other special diet considerations and work with each child(ren)/youth individually to make sure appropriate snack choices are available Food Preparation, Sanitation and Storage: CYS Services Facility Directors will ensure the prevention of food contamination via the oral/fecal route. a. Food preparation sinks will not be used for diapering. b. Place child tables used for eating away from diapering and toileting areas. c. Eliminate odors from diaper changing that are not conducive to food consumption. d. Prepare, store and serve foods to prevent food-borne illness. e. Identify items that present high risk of contamination. For medical or religious requirements pay special attention to food brought from home. Facilities with inadequate food storage/preparation areas may contract food service operations provided sanitary food service handling is ensured within the program The CYS Services Coordinator will ensure that all kitchen and food-service areas are inspected by preventive medicine personnel or designees and maintained in sanitary conditions. a. CDC kitchen and food-service areas in the CDC will be inspected monthly by preventive medicine personnel or designees and maintained in sanitary conditions. Current inspection results must show compliance with standards. b. SAC/MST kitchen and food service areas in the SAC/YC will be inspected quarterly by preventive medicine personnel or designees and maintained in sanitary conditions. Current inspection results must show compliance with standards. c. FCC homes (on post) kitchen and food-service areas are inspected annually by preventive medicine personnel or designees and maintained in sanitary conditions. Current inspection results must show compliance with standards CYS Services Program Directors will ensure: a. Specified CYS Services hand washing chart is prominently displayed in appropriate areas. b. There is no evidence of rodents or insects and no materials are stored in classrooms that might attract them such as opened food wrappers in drawers. NOTE: In coordination with local health proponents, properly maintained and 88 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

94 covered containers of crackers or similar food may be stored in classrooms to ensure no child ever goes hungry. c. Screens or air curtains are installed in open windows and doors. Screens do not have rips/tears. d. Cleaning products are secure from child areas (i.e., not stored near food carts, FSD equipment, in classroom and not stored with food items). e. All facility kitchen garbage cans will have lids and will be covered. NOTE: At least one garbage can must be foot-operated in order to avoid re-contamination. The garbage cans with a foot device are the most effective in food preparation operations. A covered trash can is required by Tri-Service Food Code (TSFC). f. All kitchen equipment is clean and in working order. g. All cooks and others entering the kitchen wear head coverings and beard coverings (where applicable). h. All cooks use standardized forms/recipes that meet USDA requirements, including the use of food-production records. i. Prior to food leaving the kitchen, staff/providers prepare food not larger than 1/4" square for infants/pre-toddlers (less than 24 months) and 1/2" square for toddlers (24-36 months) to prevent choking hazards. NOTE: Soft finger foods for children who can feed themselves can be served without cutting. j. Refrigerated storage must be properly maintained and monitored as follows: 1) A thermometer must be placed in the warmest section of the refrigerator (normally the front) for temperature control. 2) Food items must be refrigerated immediately after delivery. 3) Prepared food items must be wrapped and labeled with the date and time before being placed in the refrigerator. 4) Fresh fruits and vegetables must be maintained between 40 F and 45 F. 5) All Potentially Hazardous Foods (PHFs) must be stored at 41 F or less. k. Freezer storage must be properly maintained and monitored as follows: 1) A thermometer must be placed in the warmest section of the freezer (normally the front) to control the temperature. 2) Food items must be labeled with the date of freezing. Chapter 2 89

95 3) The temperature must be maintained below 0 F. 4) Food items must be wrapped in moisture-proof materials. 5) Food items that have been thawed must not be refrozen. 6) Cardboard shipping cartons must not be placed in the freezer when the food inside is contained in another storage box or bag. Staff will retain child-nutrition labels from the shipping carton if they are not included on inner storage packaging. l. Temperatures in dry-storage areas, refrigerators, and freezers must be checked three times daily. Temperatures must be recorded on separate log sheets for each piece of equipment The required food handler practices will be followed. a. Cooks use deli tissue, spatulas, tongs, single-use gloves, or dispensing equipment when handling food. NOTE: IAW TSFC, this requirement is for exposed, ready-to-eat food only. b. Raw animal foods, i.e., meats, fish and eggs, will be separated from other foods during storage, preparation, holding and display except when combined as ingredients. c. Containers holding food, such as flour, oils, herbs, salt, spices and sugar will be identified by their common name and expiration date. d. Non-refrigerated food will be protected from contamination by storing it in a clean dry location not to exceed 70 degrees, where it is not exposed to splash, dust or other contamination. All food in opened containers will be labeled with receive date, expiration date, and open date. e. Food will be stored and used on a first-in/first-out basis. Food which has expired or in which are dented will not be served. f. PHF will be thawed in a refrigerator that maintains the food temperature at 41 degrees Fahrenheit, or as part of the cooking process or in a microwave oven and immediately transferred to conventional cooking equipment with no interruption in the process or completely submerged in running DRINKING water at a water temperature of 70 0 F or below. g. PHF, such as eggs, meat, poultry and fish, are cooked and served according to the minimum temperatures and time as outlined in chart from TSFC. 90 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

96 h. Leftovers, that is, items made for immediate consumption on the day of preparation but left over at the end of the food-service period, must not be retained for reuse or a later meal service. i. All cooked food removed from temperature control will be served and discarded within four (4) hours. j. All food will be cooled according to TSFC. k. All condiments will be kept in dispensers designed to provide protection or in the original container. l. Milk or juice that is transferred from bulk milk dispensers or one (1) gallon containers to smaller serving pitchers will be covered and immediately transferred to the classroom/meal area. All milk remaining in the pitchers will be discarded. Serving pitchers will not be used for storage. m. Suitable utensils must be provided and used to minimize handling of food. If disposable plastic gloves are used, they should be discarded and replaced frequently. n. Food items must be prepared as close to serving time as possible. o. Equipment, utensils, and surfaces must be thoroughly cleaned and sanitized after each use. p. Can tops must be washed before opening the can to remove dust and potential contamination. q. To remove dirt and pesticides, all fruits, vegetables, and eggs must be washed and sanitized with a mix of one (1) table spoon of bleach to four (4) gallons of cool water for 30 seconds followed by a rinse in potable water, before cooking or serving. r. Food items must be cooked at the proper temperatures, especially items such as pork, poultry, eggs, and ground meat. According to the TSFC, food must be cooked at temperatures from 145 to165 F. s. Guidelines for holding and serving food are as follows: 1) Hot food must be kept at 135 F or above. 2) Cold food must be kept at 41 F or below. 3) Food must be covered and kept safe from insects and dust. t. Chipped or cracked dishes, glasses, and utensils must be disposed of. Chapter 2 91

97 u. Children must not be allowed to use the same plate when returning to the serving line for seconds. v. Food must never be returned to the kitchen Sanitation a. After each use in the kitchen, all tableware, kitchenware, and food-contact surfaces must be thoroughly cleaned and sanitized with a bleach solution. b. Cooking surfaces of grills, griddles, fryers, and similar cooking devices must be free of encrusted grease deposits and other soil. c. Nonfood-contact surfaces such as cabinets and shelves must be cleaned and sanitized as often as necessary to prevent soil accumulation. d. Floors must be swept and mopped daily and whenever needed throughout the day. e. Food-service personnel will use only disposable cloths for cleaning. Cloths used for wiping food-contact surfaces must not be used for other purposes. The use of sponges, steel wool, and reusable cloths is prohibited. Woven brass or nylon pot scrubbers or green scrub pads may be used if kept in sanitizing solution and disposed of at the end of each workday. f. Use of a dishwashing machine is highly recommended. All utensils must be rinsed to remove heavy soil before being placed in the dishwasher. Dishes must be placed on racks so that no surface is obstructed from the wash water. g. When a dishwasher is not available, utensils and dishes must be washed in the hottest water available, rinsed, and immersed in a sanitizing solution, using the three-sink method as follows: 1) First sink: Soapy water at 110 to 120 F. 2) Second sink: Rinse water at 120 to 140 F. 3) Third sink: Sanitized water consisting of one (1) tablespoon of bleach per gallon of water or ½ cup of bleach per ten (10) gallons of water. h. During temporary circumstances when the methods in subparagraphs f and g above are not available, disposable paper or plastic products may be used. 92 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

98 i. All food-contact surfaces must be air-dried after cleaning. Spoons, knives, forks, and cups will be touched only on the handles. Glasses and bowls will be handled so that fingers and thumbs do not contact the inside of lip-contact surfaces. j. All parts of the food-service facility must be kept clean. The principle of clean as you go must be emphasized. All other cleaning, except for emergency cleaning, must be done between meals to prevent food contamination Food-Service Personnel Health Requirements a. The following health guidelines must be enforced: 1) Food-service workers must meet all adult health requirements established for other CYS Services personnel (2-56). In addition, hepatitis A immunity as substantiated by a completed vaccination series or titer test is required for foodservice personnel. 2) Personnel with communicable diseases, boils, infected wounds, sores, or acute respiratory infections will not work in the food-preparation or food-service area. 3) After returning from sick leave caused by a communicable illness, foodservice staff members must be cleared by a medical professional before resuming food-preparation duties. The supervisor will retain the medical clearance in the staff member s personnel file. b. The following cleanliness and hygiene habits must be enforced: 1) All food-service personnel will wear clean uniforms or light-colored clothing covered by an apron or a clean smock while on duty. Sleeveless tops are not permitted. Personnel must maintain a high degree of personal cleanliness at all times. 2) All personnel must wash their hands thoroughly with soap and water using the stop-disease method (para 2-65a.6) before starting work, after blowing or touching their nose, after returning to the kitchen from other areas of the building or from breaks, after using the toilet, and as often as necessary to remove soil and contamination. A sign explaining the stop-disease hand-washing method and above requirements must be posted in center-based programs. A hand sanitizer is not a replacement for soap and water. 3) With the exception of medical-alert necklaces or plain wedding bands, foodservice personnel will not wear any jewelry (this includes tongue rings and other exposed body piercings). Chapter 2 93

99 4) Personnel will not use tobacco in any form while in the kitchen area, when serving food, or in view of children. If tobacco is used during breaks, hands must be washed before returning to work. 5) All personnel working in or entering food-preparation areas will wear hairnets or hats that contain all hair, including facial hair, at all times (TSFC). 6) The TSFC requires that fingernails be trimmed, filed smooth, clean, and not extend past the fingertip. Artificial fingernails, nail jewelry, and any other nail product such as polish or glitter are prohibited during food preparation and service. 7) For safety reasons, food personnel may not wear open-toed shoes, shorts, or midriff shirts while on duty. c. Only qualified food-service personnel will prepare food, except food prepared as a learning activity with children. d. Food-service personnel will not be asked to perform other duties outside of the kitchen. This includes hauling and moving equipment, cleaning non-kitchen areas, and taking out trash other than that from the kitchen. e. Supervisors may consult the Occupational Health Nurse or preventive-medicine staff for advice on food-service personnel health requirements. f. No unauthorized person will be allowed access to the kitchen area. Signs will be posted to this effect. Kitchen and pantry doors must be locked when the foodservice staff is not present for long periods (for example, lunch breaks) and when leaving for the day. g. While on break or at lunch, food-service employees will eat meals only in the staff lounge. They are not allowed to eat food prepared for children A serious incident report (SIR) must be documented in all instances of child given incorrect food when there is a special diet statement due to allergies. Previous fiscal year documents will be on file. A fillable SIR form can be found at Food Program Management. The CYS Services Coordinator will ensure the maximum number of programs is enrolled in the USDA CACFP to ensure that meals and snacks provided are cost effective as well as healthy. NOTE: Even if a program is not eligible or not enrolled in the USDA CACFP( e.g. OCONUS), all USDA requirements will be met. The only difference in being in the USDA CACFP or not is the actual claim for reimbursement. 94 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

100 a. CDC/SAC/MST: All eligible CDC/SAC/MST programs will be enrolled in, or participate in, or meet the requirements for the USDA Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) and After-School Snack Program (ASSP). All non-eligible CDC/SAC/MST programs will meet the requirements for the USDA CACFP and ASSP. b. FCC: All eligible FCC Programs serve as an Army sponsor of the USDA CACFP where available, (optional for programs where there are fewer than 10 FCC homes). c. FCC: FCC providers are given the opportunity to participate in the USDA CACFP where available. Regardless of enrollment in the CACFP or non-army sponsorship of the program, FCC staff will monitor FCC homes for compliance with Army and USDA Program Standards. d. All programs participating in the USDA CACFP/ASSP will have a current agreement with the appropriate USDA Office and a current Army Memorandum on file authorizing participation in the USDA CACFP/ASSP. e. CDC/SAC/MST programs will use The Prime Vendor Contract to purchase 80% of the food. Request an Exception to Policy as needed. Link to the Exception to Policy template can be found at f. CDC/SAC/MST programs will have proper inventory control in place to ensure sufficient amounts of food are available and are accounted for. g. CDC/SAC/MST programs will meet recordkeeping requirements to ensure compliance with Army and USDA standards (i.e., inventories, menu planner sheets, attendance rosters, Parental Income Statements or equivalent and daily meal count sheets). ACCESS CONTROL Entrance to all CYS Services Facilities will be strictly controlled and limited to facility staff members, parents/designated representatives, children participating in CYS Services programs and other individuals authorized by the CYS Services Management. Parents will have an open door policy for visiting their children All patrons, staff members and visitors will enter and exit CYS Services facilities through the front entrance/reception area, except during emergency evacuation and fire drills. The entrance is monitored at all times during hours of operation Visitor sign in/out logs are at the front desk. Visitors will be identified with a visitor s lanyard or appropriate visitors badge and will be accompanied at all times when in the facility by a CYS Services staff member. Chapter 2 95

101 2-98. All facility keys are maintained by a primary key custodian. Issuing keys is kept to a minimum and only as required to run the facility The facility will have a telephone capable of reaching the medical treatment center, Military Police, fire department, poison control center, off-post residences and parental work sites. Emergency phone numbers posted. BACKGROUND CHECK PROCESS Personnel who regularly interact with children must be of good character, law abiding and fit to have responsibility for children. The Army must ensure the health, safety and well-being of children and reduce the risk for child abuse and neglect in all Army programs and activities Individuals who regularly interact with children under 18 years of age in Armysponsored and sanctioned programs are required to undergo specific initial background checks and periodic re-verification Army programs that provide child care services, as defined in DoDI , will ensure that background check screening and checks are initiated, coordinated and tracked, and results are reviewed to identify whether they contain derogatory information The DoDI defines Child Care Services. DoD personnel and contractors who are involved in any of the following: child protective services (including the investigation of child abuse and neglect reports), social services, health and mental health care, child (day) care, education (whether or not directly involved in teaching), foster care, residential care, recreational or rehabilitative programs and detention, correctional, or treatment services. ) The Installation Management Command Headquarters (IMCOM HQ) provides operational guidance and oversight for the screening, hiring and conduct of Program Review Boards (PRBs) for CYS Services and other child related personnel The Civilian Human Resource Agency (CHRA) Headquarters will provide operational guidance and oversight to local Civilian Personnel Advisory Centers (CPAC) for the screening and hiring of CYS Services employees. CHRA Headquarters is also responsible for coordinating processes and procedures with other commands that are involved in the background check screening process Currently Garrison Commander and functional managers have responsibility for processing Installation Records Checks (IRCs) and Local Civilian Law Enforcement (LCLE) checks through the respective local office for their volunteers, FCC/HOPS providers, and contractors. Security processes Child Care National Agency Check and Inquiries (CNACI) for contractors and Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) fingerprint (FP) checks for volunteers and FCC/HOPS Family members 18 and over. The 96 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

102 Secretary of the Army (SECARMY) Directive on background checks states a single Command Designated Entity (CDE) will be assigned responsibility for processing checks for all categories of personnel. This will be implemented in fall of 2015 and will change these processes For CYS Services personnel and other child related positions as outlined in the DoDI , the background check screening process starts before they are hired. This screening process includes: a. A signed, written application; b. A careful review of the employment record; c. A check of personal and professional references and d. A personal interview Self-disclosures: All potential employees, contractors, and volunteers are required to disclose any previous arrests and charges and indicate if they have ever been convicted of any crime against children, sexual offenses, or drug offenses which would preclude their being hired in a DoD setting where they have regular contact with children The DA or equivalent (for non-naf employees) must be completed and will contain the following questions: Have you ever been arrested for or charged with a crime involving a child, a substance abuse felony, a sexual offense, or a violent crime? Have you ever been asked to resign because of or been decertified for a sexual offense? If so, describe the case disposition All potential employees and volunteers will provide at least two references from previous employers, character references, or parents of children served depending on the category of personnel (e.g. employee vs. volunteer). Program Managers will check these references carefully and document results. Contractor s reference checks will be done by contractor as required by the contract not by the program manager All new employees, contractors, and volunteers are required to complete a supervised, mandatory probationary period After the pre-screening phase, if the applicant is determined to be unsuitable, the hiring or selecting official can choose not to proceed further. If the applicant appears suitable, a tentative offer is made contingent upon completion of initial background checks In addition to the manager s verification of references, the Human Resource office conducts additional reference checks of previous employers IAW AR and ensures those references are on file. Chapter 2 97

103 Background check requirements vary by type of position (employee/contractor, FCC/HOPS provider and Family members, specified volunteers, others) For all positions requiring background checks, preliminary checks (IRCs) must be completed with a favorable interim suitable recommendation before the person may be on boarded or permitted to perform duties under LOSS while pending the receipt of any additional checks required and the final suitability adjudication made Preliminary Investigation checks include Installation Records Check (IRC), LCLE and FBI FP checks. A series of name based records checks conducted through proponent agencies at the Installation of an individual s residence for the preceding two years before the date of the application. The IRC is the first component of the Preliminary checks. It consists of: a. Provost Marshall Office (PMO) check. This check identifies Military Police Record (MPR) linked to individual and identifies if they are a subject, victim or a person related to the report. b. Army Substance Abuse Program (ASAP) check. This check identifies candidates who may have past substance abuse issue. c. Army Central Registration (ACR) check. This checks the selectee against the Army-wide, centralized data bank containing confidential information of victimbased reported spouse and child abuse cases. d. An additional check is done by the Criminal Investigation Division Check (CID)/ Defense Clearance and Investigations Index (DCII). This check identifies Military Police Records, Army CID Reports of Investigation, and US Army Crime Records Center and Defense Central Investigations Index (DCII) cases and is required for all categories of personnel who require child related need background checks LCLE (where legally obtainable) is the second component of the Preliminary checks. This check identifies criminal offenses off post and may include city police, county sheriff, county/ local court, and magistrate records. NOTE: The requirement to pay a fee for this check does not impact the requirement to obtain it if legally obtainable. An FBI FP check is the third component of the preliminary checks. All Preliminary checks must be completed before working with children Once the Preliminary checks are completed with favorable results, the Preliminary checks serve as interim checks and the individual can be brought on board and work under Line of Sight Supervision (LOSS) of a cleared individual (completed CNACI/Preliminary and CID/DCII) while pending additional required checks based on type of position. The one exception is FCC/HOP providers (and their Family members 12 and older) who are required to have a completed Preliminary checks and CNACI check prior to opening the home since they work alone. Volunteers require only preliminary checks. 98 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

104 If derogatory information is received during the Preliminary checks screening phase, the hiring official refers the case to the Installation PRB for review Employees and contractors require a fingerprint based national agency check referred to as the CNACI in order to be considered fully cleared. The CNACI includes a FBI FP check, state criminal history checks, and other investigative elements Line-of-Sight Supervision. LOSS requires continuous visual observation and supervision of an individual while engaged in child-interactive duties or in the presence of children in an Army-sponsored or sanctioned program or activity. The person providing supervision must have undergone Preliminary checks and a CNACI background check, received a favorable suitability determination, be current on the periodic re-verification requirements and not previously exhibited wanton or reckless disregard for an obligation to supervise an employee, contractor or volunteer under LOSS. An individual permitted to work subject to LOSS must continue to function under LOSS until the results of his or her completed background check are received and favorably adjudicated Re-investigation of background checks also varies by category of personnel. While a CNACI is required only once, the Preliminary checks are re-verified every five years for employees and contractors. Volunteers and FCC/HOP Site providers checks are re-verified every three years Background checks for personnel are completed in a timely manner and a tracking system is in place. NOTE: Five (5) days for all IRC except CID/DCII which is 15 days; 75 days for CNACI with State Criminal History Repositories (SCHR) Checks CYMS is used to track background checks to ensure checks meet timeliness requirements. CYMS is up to date and accurate. The CYS Services Coordinator is responsible for assigning responsibility for the maintenance of background check information in the personnel portion of CYMS. Background check information should be accurate and the CYMS management reports should be regularly run to identify status of background check completion and to track timeliness of checks A background check verification checklist indicating background checks are completed is contained in personnel/provider files. The background check verification sheet must be on file before allowing an individual to work as documentation that all required checks are completed. The background check verification checklist is completed by CPAC representatives for NAF/APF employees and is received and signed by management after verifying the accuracy of the information with the source documents provided by the CPAC. Suitability files are maintained IAW established HQ CHRA guidance at the CPAC For other categories of personnel not supported by the CPAC (i.e. providers, volunteers, contractors, and others), the appropriate manager (i.e. Parent & Outreach Services Director for volunteers and contractors, FCC Director for FCC/HOPS homes, etc.) completes the background check verification sheet and establishes suitability files. When personnel are placed in other programs within CYS the manager receives a Chapter 2 99

105 completed and signed copy of the background check verification sheet as documentation that required background checks are complete before allowing the individual to work with children. a. Supervisors of Minors (non-child care services) - APF/NAF employee supervisors will have IRC (less ASAP), NACI, OPF review for disciplinary actions, and review of any reasonably available adverse action files for records regarding past or pending disciplinary actions. (ASA (M&RA) Memo 5 Jun 14) b. Volunteers (Short Term) - Background checks are not required for volunteers who services will be of shorter duration than is required to perform the background checks and who are under line of sight supervision (LOSS) by an individual who has a favorably adjudicated CNACI and IRCs. c. CNACI is not required but Preliminary checks are for a bus driver that provides occasional transportation such as field trips because there will always be cleared CYS Services employees on the bus Identifying Derogatory Information. All background check results received must be reviewed by the responsible office to identify derogatory information. Derogatory information is defined as information which may unfavorably impact suitability adjudication because of the nexus between the issue or conduct and the core duties of the position. In accordance with SECARMY guidance, all derogatory information must be reviewed, no matter how inconsequential or insignificant it may seem with the exception of excluded items specified in Enclosure 6 of Army Directive , dated 10 Sep Documents can be found in AKO at The GC will review all CBC findings and records to determine if they are deemed derogatory. Once the CDE s are established the government Directorate of Plans, Training, Mobilization and Security (DPTMS)/CDE representative will determine minor derogatories with exception of item six (6) will be referred to Garrison Commander. a. The following CBC findings or records may be deemed non-derogatory information provided they are minor, isolated and non-recurring: 1) Administrative (e.g., lost ID or CAC); 2) Parking and/or vehicle maintenance violations (e.g., failure to register vehicle, burnt out tail light); 3) Finding/record where the individual was a victim or witness to a crime with no other criminal involvement; 100 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

106 4) Traffic accidents/offenses where there is no nexus to the position and any drug or alcohol involvement or indication of reckless behavior; 5) Financial debt or credit issues ($10,000 or less) where there is no nexus to the position; 6) Minor, isolated criminal conduct that occurred ten (10) years or more in the past. NOTE: The Office of Personnel Management (OPM s) guidelines for minor A offenses as specified in the OPM Issues Characterization chart can be used as a guideline for defining minor offenses to the extent when the issues don t have a direct nexus to the position. Examples include: minor shoplifting, drunk and disorderly, liquor law violation (use/possession by minor), disorderly conduct, disturbing the peace, making a threat, resisting arrest, abusive language and unlawful assembly, negative attitude, vagrancy, loitering, and trespassing, bad checks, employment issues i.e. negative attitude, personality conflict. This list is not exhaustive and is intended as a guide for commanders to use as a baseline. OPM Issues Characterization chart found on AKO at 7) Minor education/reference/employment checks discrepancy (e.g., minor error in dates of attendance or employment). b. If there is any doubt whether the finding or record falls into one of these categories, the GC should err on the side of caution and forward the case to the HQDA PRB Review Panel for adjudication. Local Installation PRBs will identify those CBC findings that meet this criteria and forward to the Garrison Commander for review Garrison Commanders will review and ensure compliance of credit check findings for evaluating CBCs in CYS Services programs to ensure criminal history background files on individuals who work with children are complete and have been properly adjudicated. a. There is no requirement to adjudicate financial indebtedness or credit issues to include bankruptcy, unless there is a fiduciary nexus to the individual s current position. b. For those positions in which there is a fiduciary nexus, the credit check will be requested as part of the background investigation. Previous and/or current credit issues, financial indebtedness and bankruptcy findings (more than $5000) will be fully adjudicated through the PRB process Adjudication of Derogatory Information. When derogatory information surfaces as during a background check, re-verification or through other means the information must be reviewed through the HQDA PRB process. Chapter 2 101

107 CYS Services will not hire any individual that possesses derogatory information found during a CBC without a PRB recommendation to hire and the approval from the HQDA PRB. a. If an individual has derogatory information uncovered either through a periodic re-verification or some other means, the individual must immediately be placed under line-of-sight supervision (LOSS). When the nature or seriousness of the derogatory information poses a potential risk to children and/or the allegation is one outlined as criteria for automatic disqualification (sexual offense, a drug crime, a violent crime, or a criminal offense involving a child or children) the individual must be reassigned to duties outside CYS Services where there is no contact with children pending the outcome of the PRB process. b. If after the Installation or HQDA PRB, the individual is found unsuitable, the Commander will take immediate action to have the person removed from contact with children and assigned to a non-cys Services position, outside of the CYS Services facility, or placed on administrative leave until personnel/adverse action has been completed Installation Multi-Disciplinary Background Check Coordination Group (BCCG): a. Garrison Commanders will establish a multidisciplinary background check coordination group to ensure synchronization and stakeholder collaboration and resolve issues with the background check screening and hiring processes for individuals working in Army child-related programs and activities. Supervision mechanisms will be established to assess and review Installation s compliance with regulatory and statutory background check screening requirements for individuals working with children in Army-sponsored or sanctioned programs/services. b. BCCG group can be a subcommittee of the Installation PRB and will include the following representatives: (1) Director of Plans Training, Mobilization, and Security; (2) APF/NAF Civilian Personnel Advisory Center (CPAC); (3) Family, Morale Welfare and Recreation Director; (4) CYS Services Coordinator; (5) Chaplain; (6) Army Community Services Director; (7) Functional program managers as applicable (CYS directors, EFMP, Contracting NAF/APF, Recreation branch chief, etc.); (8) Provost Marshal (PM); (9) Criminal Investigation Division (CID); (10) MTF Behavioral Health/Social Work Services; (11) Army Substance Abuse Program (ASAP); (12) Staff Judge Advocate (SJA); (13) Consultants as needed. c. BCCG members will meet at minimum quarterly (and as needed) to review and assess local processes, procedures and supervision mechanisms applicable to background screening processes. Timely completion of background check processes, review of tracking systems/suspense dates, and proper documentation of background check results will be monitored and assessed. Special focus area is the proper vetting of background screening results via the PRB and DA-directed suitability process. Documentation of meetings will be maintained. 102 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

108 d. Each quarter, a 10% audit of randomly-selected personnel files from each category of Chaplain personnel (contractors, volunteers, employees), Army Community Services (employees, volunteers, contractors), CYS Services personnel (employees, Family Child Care/Homes Off Post providers/household members, volunteers, contractors, youth hires, MWR partners, etc.), and other IMCOM activities providing child-related programs/services will be audited for compliance with background check and suitability requirements. Documentation of audit results, corrective action plans, and process-improvement measures will be tracked and be on file. e. In CY15, Inspection Teams are reviewing the BCCG quarterly reviews of background checks and meeting minutes. f. For more information see Background Check 101: A Guide for Commanders on the CYS Services Professional website at PROGRAM REVIEW BOARD (PRB) The PRB is the Army s standardized process to objectively evaluate derogatory information found during the background check, re-verification process, or some other means The HQDA PRB Review Panel process will be used to determine employment suitability for all Army child related positions where the Commander considers the individual may be suitable notwithstanding the existence of derogatory information The Installation Management Command Headquarters (IMCOM HQ) provides operational guidance for the conduct of PRBs for CYS Services and other child related personnel. The PRB process is not intended to replace the employee discipline process. See IMCOM HQ PRB standing operating procedures for detailed instructions and procedures The Garrison Commander (GC) will appoint a PRB Chairperson and board members, who will execute the local PRB process. The GC will make recommendations on suitability to the Headquarters Department of the Army (HQDA) PRB for final suitability determination. The GC will make the final suitability decisions on those he/she finds unsuitable The Installation PRB process is also inclusive of other Installation child-related activities. The management official from that agency would be included on the PRB as a voting member, as applicable, (for example: Chaplain, ACS Director, FMWR Director, etc.) and when their agency personnel are reviewed for decision. The Director of these agencies will inform their personnel of all actions regarding their case submission and packet. Chapter 2 103

109 The PRB will include representatives from the following organizations as voting members: Installation law enforcement, CID, Family Advocacy Program, social work services or behavioral health, ASAP, DPTMS, CYS Services and the applicable functional program manager (such as MWR, chaplain, medical and Army Community Services) based on the case(s) being reviewed. Advisory, nonvoting members will include representatives from the Office of the Staff Judge Advocate and human resources office/civilian Personnel Advisory Center. Representatives from other organizations (such as contracting officer, Child Protective Services, Equal Employment Opportunity) may attend as nonvoting members as needed based on the case(s) under review Voting PRB members will recuse themselves when a conflict of interest occurs. A quorum of five voting members is required to conduct business After deliberate consideration, the PRB will make a suitability recommendation on each individual case to the commander. After consideration of the PRB recommendation and case file, the commander may determine that a person is not suitable for the position When the commander recommends a favorable suitability determination despite the derogatory information, the individual s PRB case file will be to the HQDA PRB Review Panel for consideration. The commander must include a written justification for a favorable suitability determination If the GC recommends the person as suitable, and the background checks contain no mandatory disqualifying information (i.e. conviction for a sexual offence, drug offense, violent crime, criminal offense involving a child or children or any drug related offense) the person can be selected but requires LOSS until all pending background checks are completed (i.e. CNACI) except in FCC/HOPS settings where LOSS is not possible. If additional derogatory information surfaces upon completion of any pending checks the case is referred back to the Installation PRB and Commander for a suitability recommendation When all background checks are completed the case will be forwarded to the HQDA PRB The HQDA PRB Review Panel process will make the final suitability determination for all categories of individuals who have regular, recurring contact with children in Army programs and services when the commander recommends suitability despite derogatory information. This policy has no exceptions After a favorable suitability adjudication by the DA PRB and receipt of the appropriate documentation, the individual can be removed from LOSS PRB Clarification Evidentiary Standard and Dispositions: 104 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

110 a. Conduct vs. Outcomes- Primary emphasis is on the nature of the criminal conduct, which may or may not have resulted in arrests, charges, or convictions. Details and reasons for the dismissal of a charge must be considered; expungement of records and pardons for an offense would not nullify the conduct, unless granted on the basis of the person s innocence. b. Basic suitability determinations/actions are based on a preponderance of evidence evidentiary standard rather than proof beyond a reasonable doubt use for criminal cases. A suitability action is an administrative action, and circumstantial evidence, if found to be more likely true than untrue, can form the basis of an action. c. If facts are disputed, the evidence must establish that the conduct the agency considers to be disqualifying would be found to be more likely true than untrue if all of the facts would be considered by a reasonable person. d. Criminal Conduct. 1) Evidentiary Standard. Preponderance of the evidence is the legal standard of proof that the PRB members must use when evaluating potentially derogatory information. In other words, the degree of relevant evidence that a reasonable person, considering the record as a whole, would accept as sufficient to find that a contested fact is more likely to be true than untrue. When making a determination, PRB members must document the rationale for their determination, and the supporting evidence on which their determination is based. 2) Conviction. A conviction record will usually serve as sufficient evidence that a person engaged in particular conduct. Primary emphasis is on the nature of the conduct that occurred; however, in certain circumstances, the conviction alone may serve as mandatory disqualifying criteria. Vacated convictions or pardons for an offense would not nullify the conduct, unless granted on the basis of the person s innocence. 3) Arrest. The fact of an arrest does not establish that criminal conduct has occurred. However, PRB members may consider other evidence (e.g., witness statements, plea agreements, investigation reports) in evaluating whether the conduct underlying an arrest likely occurred. PRB members may make suitability determinations based on the conduct underlying an arrest if they determine that: (1) the conduct occurred and (2) the conduct makes the individual unfit for the position in question. For criminal charges that are dropped, expunged, or otherwise did not result in conviction, the reason for the dismissal of the offense must be considered when evaluating the underlying conduct. Chapter 2 105

111 4) Diversion Programs. Pre-trial diversion, adjournment in contemplation of dismissal, or deferred prosecution programs are utilized by some jurisdictions to dispose of charges. The fact that a subject is enrolled in a diversion program does not establish that criminal conduct has occurred. However, just like with arrests that did not result in conviction, PRB members may consider other evidence to determine whether the conduct underlying the diversion program likely occurred. NOTE: A diversion is a pending matter for the purpose of determining whether it should be admitted in response to questions about pending charges on the OF 306 or investigative forms. Until the charge is actually dismissed after diversion is complete, the subject should list it on the OF 306 or investigative forms. There often is a period of probation associated with diversion programs and, if so, the subject might have to list the offense in response to the question about serving probation. 5) Pending Charges. Pending charges cannot be adjudicated until the case is disposed of. If the subject agrees to a diversion program, the case is considered disposed of for purposes of adjudication by the PRB CRESR will be the only method to upload Army CYS Services personnel PRB files through Regions/IMCOM to the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management (OACSIM) for adjudication. CRESR will accept files from all categories of personnel (APF/NAF employees, FCC providers/applicable Family members, contractors and volunteers). Packet size should not exceed one (1) personnel file to allow for smooth flow of information. The CRESR site can be accessed at: It is a requirement for Installations to include the PRB Packet Checklist, TAB A in the PRB SOP, in the submission of PRB cases via CRESR. The completed checklist should be the first document in packet located under TAB A PRB Monthly Reporting Requirements. a. PRB monthly files report will be submitted at: on the last Thursday of the month, to be received NLT noon Central Standard Time (CST). b. IMCOM HQ reviewers will complete PRB tracker on IMCOM SharePoint site NLT COB Friday Definitions: a. Adjudication. The evaluation of pertinent data in a background investigation, as well as any other available information that is relevant and reliable, to determine whether a covered individual is suitable for Government employment. 106 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

112 b. Appointee. A person who has entered on duty and is in the first calendar year of an appointment that is subject to an investigation. c. Authorized management official. A management official who is delegated the authority to execute program/personnel management responsibilities. d. Child care services. Child protective services (including the investigation of child abuse and neglect reports), social services, health and mental health care, child (day) care, education (whether or not directly involved in teaching), foster care, residential care, recreational, rehabilitative programs and detention, correctional or treatment services. e. Child National Agency Check with Inquiries (CNACI). The CNACI is an investigation conducted by the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) that combines all the elements of the National Agency Check with Inquiries (NACI) with additional checks of the State Criminal History Repositories (SCHRs). f. CYS Services personnel. Employees, applicants, Family Child Care (FCC)/Homes Off Post (HOP) providers/applicants and their Family members 12 years old and older and other authorized adults residing in the household; sports officials, contractors, regularly scheduled volunteers, coaches, youth hires and other individuals working in CYS Services programs (e.g., MWR partners, interns, trainees, etc.) g. Defense Clearance and Investigations Index (DCII). The central Department of Defense record of investigative files and adjudicative actions such as clearances and access determinations, revocations and denials concerning military, civilian and contract personnel. h. Derogatory information. Information which may unfavorably impact suitability adjudication because of the nexus between the issue or conduct and the core duties of the position. All derogatory information must be reviewed, no matter how inconsequential or insignificant it may seem except for specific exclusions annotated in i. Fitness. The reference to a person s level of character and conduct determined necessary for an individual to perform work for, or on behalf of, a Federal agency as an employee in the competitive service (other than in a position subject to suitability) or as a contract employee. j. Installation Records Check (IRC). An investigation conducted through the records of all Installations of an individual's identified residences for the two years preceding the date of the application. This record check shall include, at a minimum, police (military police), drug and alcohol, Medical Treatment Facility (MTF) Army Central Registry Check, CID/DCII and any other record checks as appropriate, to the extent permitted by law. Chapter 2 107

113 k. Line of Sight Supervision (LOSS). Requires continuous visual observation and supervision of an individual while engaged in child-interactive duties or in the presence of children in an Army-sponsored or sanctioned program or activity. The person providing supervision must have undergone Preliminary checks and a CNACI background check, received a favorable suitability determination and be current on the periodic re-verification requirements. An individual permitted to work subject to LOSS must continue to function under LOSS until the results of his or her completed background check are received and favorably adjudicated. l. NACI. An investigation consisting of a search of records of the following: the Office of Personnel Management s Security/Suitability Investigations Index (SII), a Federal Bureau of Investigations Name Check and National Criminal History fingerprint check, the Department of Defense Clearance and Investigations Index, other record searches covering specific areas of an individual s background plus written inquiries to references, employers, places of education and residence, and other record sources covering specific areas of an individual s background. m. Nexus. A direct or logical connection between a person s character or conduct and the integrity or efficiency of the service. n. Personnel Security Investigation Portal (PSIP). Automated tool operated by the Personnel Security Investigation Center of Excellence (COE) to centralize and streamline the investigative submission process. o. Program Review Board (PRB). A multidisciplinary board convened when derogatory information is received on CYS Services personnel during a employment. The PRB recommends to the commander the employment suitability or continued employment of the personnel. p. Preliminary Checks. These checks include IRC, LCLE and FBI FP and must be completed before working with children. q. Specified Volunteers: Garrison Commanders shall designate those positions that are determined to be Specified. Individuals working in Specified Volunteer positions will have a Preliminary checks (IRC, LCLE, FBI FP) because of the nature of their work in child care services. The opportunity for contact may be extensive, frequent, or over a period of time. They include, but are not limited to, positions involving extensive interaction alone, extended travel, and/or overnight activities with children. Preliminary checks are required for volunteers who are active duty, a Family member, or a DoD Civilian overseas. A volunteer is allowed to work upon completion of favorable Preliminary checks. Background checks are not required for volunteers whose services will be of shorter duration than is required to perform the background checks and who are under line-of-sight supervision by an individual who has successfully completed a background check. The Components are required to provide additional implementing guidance. 108 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

114 r. Suitability. Refers to a person s identifiable character traits and/or conduct that may have an impact on the integrity or efficiency of the service. s. Suitability determination. A decision that a person is suitable or is not suitable for employment in a child care position within the Department of Army. CHILD ABUSE PREVENTION, GUIDANCE, DISCIPLINE AND ACCOUNTABILITY FOR CHILDREN/YOUTH Child Abuse Reporting Procedures: a. The DoD hotline poster is required by the Military Child Care Act (MCCA) and is intended for individuals to report suspected child abuse and safety violations in military child/youth settings. Posters will be modified to include the contact information for the Installation RPOC, Safety Office and Family Advocacy Program Manager (FAPM). b. CYS Services personnel (employees, contractors, FCC providers, volunteers, MWR partners, interns and support/admin staff) will know what they are and where the child abuse reporting procedures are located. c. CYPAs, contractors, FCC providers, volunteers, MWR partners, interns and support/admin staff will be knowledgeable of and follow procedures for reporting suspected cases of abuse/neglect which require: 1) Immediate reporting to the Installation RPOC, 2) Reporting to the appropriate program director immediately after notification of the RPOC, and 3) Direct reporting to State Child Abuse Hotline (if required by state law/host nation agreement). d. CYS Services Coordinator immediately reports all allegations of abuse in out-ofhome settings and violations of child supervision and touch policy allegations using the CYS Services Serious Incident Report (SIR) through the Region to IMCOM G-9 CYS Services within one business day and provide follow-up reports and status as requested. NOTE: A written log should be maintained of all allegations. CYS Services Coordinator notifies the FAPM, Chief, SWS and Chain of Command for all "out-of-home" allegations. e. Records are maintained for allegations that after investigation are determined to be infractions of a regulatory standard (such as a prohibition regarding discipline/corporal punishment). The Chief, SWS will make a written record of the information and send it to the CYS Services Coordinator and advise the Case Chapter 2 109

115 Review Committee (CRC) and the FAPM. Unless the infraction constitutes child abuse, it will neither be referred to the full CRC for consideration nor reported to the Army Central Registry (ACR). The CYS Services Coordinator will take appropriate disciplinary action where necessary to resolve allegations that are considered policy violations. The CYS Services coordinator will submit a plan of corrective or disciplinary actions to the Chief, SWS. f. Reporting procedures are prominently posted in CYS Services programs. 1) Current DoD Hotline poster is prominently displayed in the lobby of the facility and on the FCC provider s Parent Bulletin Board. 2) Hotline information will also be included in the parent handbook and employee handbook. NOTE: Electronic parent handbooks are acceptable. DoD Child Abuse and Safety Violation Hotline Posters are placed in visible and high traffic areas throughout all CYS Services facilities and FCC homes should a parent/guardian need to report incidents of suspected abuse. DoD Child Abuse and Safety Violation Hotline number is: CONUS: or OCONUS: (call collect). 3) Distinct from the DoD Hotline, CYS Services personnel reporting procedures are also posted in staff lounge, management offices in a consistent place in classrooms so easily located by staff (i.e., near corridor exit doors, staff bulletin board, etc.). BEST PRACTICE: Place procedures and phone numbers on the backside of the staff nametag Established procedures in the event of an allegation: a. Safeguard children/youth and staff at a time of program upheaval b. Ensure the CYS Services perspective/pertinent operational information is provided in the course of the investigation c. Make a distinction between confidentially issues in familial child abuse versus institutional child abuse where critical CYS Services management information is needed to protect other children/youth participating in the program. d. Remove staff member from direct contact in a program with parents/children/youth and close the FCC home immediately upon allegation, but not upon the decision to investigate, and do not return employee or reopen FCC home until a determination is made. e. Identify a single 24-hour Installation RPOC designated by the Commander and available to receive reports of alleged child or spouse abuse. NOTE: Including familial abuse and abuse within a DoD-operated or -sanctioned facility. 110 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

116 f. Ensure supervision and accountability of all children and youth at all times. g. Identify actions to be taken in response to an allegation (e.g., re-assignment of staff member, FCC home closure, staffing requirements, use the Child Abuse Risk Assessment Tool (CARAT), formation of Installation strategy team, etc.) (See AR , 2-23). A CARAT must be completed within 48 hours of a child abuse allegation which is found to be credible. h. Review IDPs to ensure child abuse training requirements are in accordance with AR i. Inform parents of child abuse identification, prevention and reporting procedures and requirements and their opportunity to be trained in these topics (may be included in the Parent Handbook). j. Patron notification and public relations efforts will include the ready availability of the CYS Services Coordinator and Center Director to talk to parents in accordance with guidance provided by the Installation Public Affairs Officer and Garrison Commander. k. Consider child abuse safety training for children ages 6-18 years in CYS Services settings and in schools operated on Army-controlled property (See the four service areas of school age curriculum). l. Cases of suspected child abuse will be reported in accordance with AR for all CYS Services programs: 1) Response requires that RPOC notifies reported allegations to military police, Criminal Investigation Division (CID), or other law-enforcement/child-protective agencies, the CRC chairperson, FAPM, and the CYS Services Coordinator. 2) The FAPM notifies the Garrison Commander. 3) The CRC assists with the investigation as appropriate in accordance with AR ) The CRC assessment and determination should proceed and not be suspended or delayed awaiting a CID determination of criminal action. The two systems are cooperative but separate in function. m. An Installation strategy team will be established to guide the Installation s response to the allegation. n. Following an allegation of HQDA reportable child sexual abuse (of sufficient credibility to cause a military or civilian law enforcement investigation to be initiated according to AR ) each child/youth activity room/module, or indoor/outdoor Chapter 2 111

117 play space where children/youth are present must have a minimum of two staff persons at all times. Similarly visual supervision of child/youth toilets will be provided by at least two staff members, so that children/youth are always in the presence of two adults until the allegation is resolved. o. All other allegations that are made, will have two staff members always present only in the activity room where the allegation occurred until resolved. p. The CYS Services staff will provide access to administrative files, attendance sheets, work schedules, VSS, and client lists (for example, parents, children, addresses, and phone numbers) to investigators and others with an official need to know. q. CYS Services management will remain available to talk with parents, maintain a chronological log of events, and keep the staff informed (to the extent it is appropriate) of case development through staff meetings Guidance and Discipline: a. CYS Services personnel working with children (CYS Services staff, contractors, FCC providers, volunteers, MWR partners, interns, and other personnel working in CYS Services programs) will use appropriate guidance techniques: 1) Help children/youth learn to develop self control and express their feelings in acceptable ways (e.g., when appropriate, helping them solve their own problems and soliciting their input in rule making). 2) Model appropriate behavior and conflict-resolution skills and use positive language. 3) Demonstrate realistic, age-appropriate expectations of children's/youths' behavior and interact with children accordingly. (Staff/providers/ volunteers teach/coach children/youth appropriately, according to the child's/youth's abilities. For example, a 6-year-old should not be coached like a high school player). b. CYS Services employees and FCC/HOP providers will discipline in a consistent way, based on an understanding of individual needs and behaviors of children at various developmental levels. Simple, understandable rules will be established so that expectations and limitations are clearly defined. Discipline will be constructive in nature, including such methods as: 1) Separation of the child from the situation by redirection; 2) Praise of appropriate behaviors; 112 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

118 3) Physical restraint will not be used unless it is absolutely necessary to prevent injury to the adult or child; 4) Time Out which requires separation of the child from all activities to help the child recover self-control. Time out is not punishment and will never be used as punishment, nor will it involve separation from the group. Time out requires a staff member to stay close to the child and engage in calm conversation until the child has recovered. c. A child may not be punished by: 1) Spanking, pinching, shaking, or other corporal punishment; 2) Isolation for long periods; 3) Confinement in closets, boxes, or similar places; 4) Binding to restrict the movement of mouth or limbs; 5) Humiliation or verbal abuse; 6) Deprivation of meals, snacks, outdoor play opportunities, or other program components. Restrictions of the use of specific play materials and equipment, or participation in a specific activity should be appropriate to the developmental age of the child. Restrictions are permissible to ensure the safety of others or as part of the strategy to help the child learn self-control Accountability of Children/Youth. CYS Services Coordinator will: 1) Reassure parents that their children/youth are accounted for while in CYS Services programs. 2) Ensure a child/youth cannot be isolated by an adult either indoors or outdoors. 3) Require staff in ratio/fcc providers to maintain supervision of children/youth appropriate to the age/capability of the child/youth. 4) Maintain an accurate daily attendance record in all CYS Services programs. 5) Establish a system to adequately monitor and track the whereabouts of school-age children as they freely move about the facility. NOTE: One example is to have a What is the Count board in which the exact number of children is Chapter 2 113

119 annotated in each room in real time. MST staff should also be aware the location of their youth. 6) Establish and monitor a staff plan for different levels of supervision according to the age of child/youth and level of risk involved in an activity or program. 7) Staff/providers will supervise children by sight and sound at all times. Staff/providers do not need to be directly looking at each child at all times to meet the requirement for sight supervision. All children should be easily seen (if not in the direct line of sight, then by looking up or slightly adjusting one s position) by at least one member of the teaching staff/provider. Each child is under the care of a specific adult and the adult knows where the child is at all times. 8) Establish a system for staff/volunteers to know what children/youth are doing at all times. 9) All on or off post field trips involving walking or vehicular transportation will have at least two adults supervising the children at all times. NOTE: Must follow Army guidance. If need to augment the ratios, do so with volunteers. See ratios on page 179 of this manual. 10) Establish a system to account for children/youth who fail to show up for the program after school as expected. 11) Children are not left unattended in vehicles while signed into Child and Youth programs. 12) Face to name accountability checks will be conducted every transition point during the day Child Abuse Protective Procedures. a. The CYS Services Coordinator will: 1) Reduce the risk for child abuse by ensuring systems are in place and followed to mitigate risk to all children and youth. 2) Ensure procedures are in place and followed to protect children/youth from unauthorized visitors/strangers by implementing a system to identify visitors and limit their movement in the facility. 3) Ensure the Standards of Conduct and Accountability Statement (which includes the Touch policy) and Caregiver Creed are provided in writing and read by all employees, contractors, FCC providers, MWR partners, interns and 114 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

120 volunteers. The Standards of Conduct and Creed are signed by all employees, contractors, FCC providers, MWR partners, interns and volunteers and the signed copy is maintained in their personnel file. (We do not maintain personnel files for contractors Statement and Creed must be given to NAF Contracting Office Contracting Officer (KO) or Contracting Officer s Representative (COR). 4) Ensure Standards of Conduct and Accountability Statement (which includes the Touch policy) will be available to parents (i.e., Parent Handbook, on website, etc.) 5) Implement strategies to reduce the potential for child abuse in CYS Services settings through physical design, placement of staff and monitoring of children/youth. 6) Encourage parents to visit their child's/youth's program at all hours of operation as part of the program s open door policy. 7) Ensure video surveillance system (VSS) cameras are operational and not obstructed. Monitor VSS to identify staff that requires LOSS as part of a holistic effort to prevent child abuse (VSS cannot replace the need for non-cleared employees to always work alongside cleared employees). Each management member will review one hour of video or live feed of VSS weekly to monitor quality of care. 8) Ensure the use of VSS to provide LOSS should only be in an extreme emergency and requires a cleared individual to provide continuous visual observation and supervision of an individual who is under LOSS during the entire period they are interacting or alone with children. The person providing supervision must have undergone a completed background check (CNACI/ Preliminary checks) and received a final favorable suitability or fitness determination and is current on all periodic reinvestigations. 9) Ensure vision panels will not be obstructed and rooms should not be completely darkened with adequate lighting that VSS recordings are visible. 10) Ensure field trip documentation must be maintained for three years as required. NOTE: Many times a cover sheet with information on first four bullets below is kept in field trip file for easy retrieval. a) Participants (child/youth, staff, bus drivers and volunteers). b) Date(s) of field trip. c) Times of field trip. d) Destination of field trip. Chapter 2 115

121 e) Signed parental permission slips for any planned on and off-site excursion. CYS Services program keeps track of the number of Risk Management Program (RIMP) claims filed as a result of inadequate supervision in previous fiscal year. Risk Assessment must be developed for all field trips where children/youth are taken off post and are subject to crowds. Risk Assessment tools are on the Professional website at 11) Ensure all CYS Services personnel are identifiable in accordance with para 4-40 to patrons through the use of nametags with first and last names that are easily visible (at adult eye-level height) and all CDC staff properly sign in/out of the classroom where they are assigned and SAC/MST staff working in ratio properly sign in/out of the facility where they are assigned. 12) Ensure all CYS Services personnel are trained in child abuse identification, prevention and reporting procedures and complete the IMCOM Academy online courses: Reducing the Risk of Child Abuse in Army CYS Services Settings and Accountability and Supervision of Children and on the Accountability Ratio Tool. b. The Child Abuse Risk Assessment Tool (CARAT) will be conducted on Family Child Care homes prior to Full Certification and every three years thereafter. Any scores above low risk will result in an Improvement Plan to ensure all FCC homes are rated low for potential abuse/neglect allegations. The FCC Director will conduct a minimum of 50% of the FCC CARAT evaluations. The other 50% may be conducted by Trainers or other CYS Services management staff. c. The CARAT will be conducted on each CDC room/module a minimum of once every three years or when an allegation of abuse/neglect has been made. The fact that the alleged perpetrator is no longer in ratio with children has no bearing on the requirement to conduct a CARAT. d. The CARAT does not identify child abusers, but rather rates the work climate, child environment, and staff/provider attitudes that could lead to an instance of abuse or neglect. Just having an allegation of abuse in a classroom raises the risk level, hence the requirement to conduct the CARAT. Best practice is to complete 1/3 of CARAT each year. For new CDC facilities, the CARAT must be completed within the first year of opening and every three years thereafter. The CDC Director must conduct at least 50% of classroom assessments. It is not a requirement to conduct a CARAT on SAC programs. For SAC buildings that double function rooms for Strong Beginnings or part day preschool programs, the CARAT should be done on early childhood rooms. e. The CARAT consist of three components: Administration Component, I/T/PS Component and the Caregiver Component. 116 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

122 1) The results from each Component area are used to formulate a plan of action if areas are rated Moderate to High Risk; this includes accountability mechanisms for needed changes. Such changes may include referral to EAP or change in classroom assignments, changes to policy, etc. 2) The Administration Component is an interview of the Facility Director on program management. It includes: Staff Selection, Training, Supervision, Policy Development, Parent Relations, Facility Management and Record- Keeping. 3) The Caregiver Component requires completion of a questionnaire by the staff member. It includes: Staff Relationships, Indicators of Adult Stress and knowledge of Program Policies. 4) The age-group Component is the two-hour observation and completion of rating/scoring sheet on the following program areas: Daily Activities and Routines, Staff Interactions with Children and Parents and Children's Behavior. 5) Upon completion of the CARAT a plan of action is initiated/completed for areas rated Moderate to High Risk. f. Children will be released only to authorized personnel listed as emergency designee unless prior arrangements have been made. 1) Children will be released in accordance with written instructions for arrival and departure in each child's file. NOTE: For Child and Youth Sports and Fitness Program, children are released to parents or designee in writing at Parent and Outreach Services (P&OS) up to home alone age. 2) Only to siblings or others age 13 and over. 3) In accordance with Home Alone/Child Supervision Policy. 4) Ensure systems are in place and followed to mitigate risk to all children and youth. g. CYS Services staff members will not transport children/youth in their own vehicles. In a case where a staff member is hired to care for CYS children after work and has been designated as the emergency release designee, the staff is acting as a friend of the parent, and not as an employee of CYS Services. FCC providers make their own arrangements with parents as to transportation of children in the course of operating an FCC home. Chapter 2 117

123 h. CYS Services Directors will ensure visitor sign-in/out logs are at the front desk and delivery areas in facilities. Facility visitors will be identified with red lanyard and will not be allowed to wander unaccompanied through the building. VIDEO SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM (VSS) The CYS Services VSS is a quality assurance mechanism for the organization, the government and Soldiers/parents. The System is part of a comprehensive child abuse recognition and reporting tool kit that includes background checks, child abuse prevention and identification training, facility control (locked doors and sign in/out procedures), Line of Sight Supervision (LOSS), Child Abuse Risk Assessment Tool (CARAT), parent/legal guardian access, vision panels, etc. The CYS Services VSS is not intended to cover 100% of the facility, but rather supplement the processes already in place to ensure the safety and well-being of children/youth in our programs. VSS can be used to provide temporary oversight for individuals whose background checks have been initiated but not completed provided it is continuously monitored by an individual who has undergone and successfully completed all required background checks (IRC, LCLE, FBI FP, and CNACI). This provision shall meet the intent of a flexible and reasonable alternative for direct sight supervision but should only in extreme situations and for limited periods when staffing challenges preclude a person being assigned within the room to provide LOSS CYS Services VSS is designed to: a. Deter and reduce the risk of child abuse in CYS Services facilities; b. Protect staff from unwarranted allegations of child abuse; c. Provide Soldiers and parents with peace of mind ; and d. Support CYS Service management staff with providing Line of Sight Supervision (LOSS); e. Support CYS Services management staff in the exercise of program oversight: 1) Monitor adult: child/youth ratios; 2) Monitor adult: child/youth interactions; 3) Alert staff to potential unauthorized removal of children/youth or wandering children; and 4) Conduct classroom observations 5) Mandatory viewing of videos one hour per management staff per week. 118 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

124 e. Refer to the Video Surveillance System Guide for additional information at See 4-18 for Roles and Responsibilities. FIELD TRIPS AND HIGH-RISK ACTIVITIES Installation CYS Services Responsibilities Installation CYS Services Coordinators will: a. Provide guidance, enforce policy, and coordinate with the appropriate agencies to ensure children, youths, staff members, contractors, and volunteers participating in garrison field trips are safe and secure. b. Coordinate garrison field trips with the following (as appropriate): (1) APHN. (2) Garrison safety officer. (3) Garrison provost marshal (PM) or military police. (5) Preventive-medicine personnel. c. Ensure that accidents, deaths, serious injuries, and incidents that could result in a claim are documented and reported using DA Form Facility, Center, and FCC directors will; a. Ensure that CYS Services personnel supervise all CYS Services programs, activities, and field trips. b. Ensure that all field trips and other activities (indoors and outdoors) are assessed and monitored before and during the field trip or other activity. Directors must ensure a safety-risk assessment is completed, reviewed by the garrison safety office, and approved by the garrison commander or directorate chief based on the level of risk (paras thru 2-172). Additionally, the director will coordinate a force-protection risk assessment, approved by the force-protection officer. c. Ensure required safety gear meets applicable certification criteria for the activity and use of the safety gear is enforced. d. Ensure there are enough CYS Services staff members for the activity or trip based on the ages of the children and group sizes. Activities must be appropriate to the ages and abilities of the children. Chapter 2 119

125 e. Ensure the MIAT has determined that reasonable accommodations are available in field-trip settings when children with special needs will participate. f. Ensure parents are notified and have given written permission for participation before each field trip when the trip will require children to leave the facility. g. In case of an emergency, notify the 1) Installation CYS Services Coordinator as soon as possible after emergency services have been provided. 2) Safety officer not later than 24 hours after the emergency using DA Form h. Document each field trip with a cover sheet that includes the date and time of the trip, destination, a list of attending children, and a list of participating staff. The cover sheet and the permission slips will be kept on file for 3 years Installation training specialists will: a. Develop guidelines for age-appropriate field trips and activities that promote skill development. b. Assist the directors in completing risk assessments for all field trips and other activities (indoors and outdoors). c. Conduct training and observations to ensure field trips and activities are ageappropriate and promote skill development. Training and observations must be documented in writing Installation CYS Services direct-care staff members will: a. Help the director complete risk assessments for all field trips and other activities (indoors and outdoors). Risk Assessment tools are on the Professional website at b. Be responsible for the safety and security of all children participating in the field trip or activity regardless of their age, program, or location. c. Supervise the entire location of the field trip by positioning themselves near activities, restrooms, exits, major pieces of equipment, and other places where children are present. d. Ensure that appropriate adult child ratios are maintained at all times. At least two CYS Services staff members will be with children at all times. 120 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

126 e. Ensure that stocked first-aid kits, food as needed, water, and sunscreen (when appropriate) are available on field trips. CORE FIELD-TRIP REQUIREMENTS Site Approval. a. Programs may use only Installation-approved field-trip sites. b. Field-trip sites must be coordinated with the garrison safety office and the garrison force-protection office (if applicable) (para 2-158) Parental Permission. A signed parental permission slip is required for each excursion when children or youths will be taken on and off the program premises. Permission slips will include written pickup and drop-off times, trip location, type of transportation, trip-leader contact information, special dress requirement, needs for children or youths to bring special items or money, and other pertinent information Transportation. a. Only U.S. Government vehicles or Host Nation (HN)-contracted vehicles meeting all U.S. and HN laws and safety requirements will be used for field-trip transportation. b. The adult child ratios, including drivers, for specific types of field trips are specified in the Field Trip Adult/Child Ratio Chart. c. Infants and toddlers will not be transported for field trips, but may be taken on walks around the neighborhood. Infants will ride in a Bye-Bye Buggy during walks. Toddlers may walk, but CYS Services personnel should use a rope with handholds tied in for each child as a means of keeping order and discouraging wandering. d. The use of 15-passenger vans to transport children to and from childcare facilities and youth service centers will not be allowed. Contractors providing transportation must comply with HN and local requirements in addition to any contractual requirements imposed by the responsible garrison. e. The need for car seats for preschool children and seatbelt usage must be coordinated and assessed before the event. Contractors must comply with HN and local requirements in addition to any contractual requirements imposed by the applicable garrison. Chapter 2 121

127 f. Children will board and leave the vehicle from the curb side of the street when possible. g. Transportation must be coordinated in advance to ensure that the vehicle and driver will be authorized access to the installation. h. A CYS Services staff member will inspect vehicles for cleanliness and the presence of trash or hazardous materials before allowing children to board. Checks will include floors, seats, seat pockets, overhead racks, and toilets if present. i. Staff will search each seat on the bus at the end of the trip to ensure all children have departed the bus Supervision. a. All field trips, other than neighborhood walks, will be supervised by a qualified management designee (CYS Services director, assistant director, training specialist, or supervisory program lead). An emergency POC who remains at the program site must be appointed in writing for all field trips. Neighborhood walking trips must meet ratio requirements but require a minimum of two staff members. b. Regular CYS Services volunteers must have completed all local background checks. Background checks are not required for volunteers who occasionally chaperone field trips. c. The CYS Services director will determine if an interpreter will be needed for the field trip. d. Supervision in school-age programs for grades 1 through 5 or 6 will be as specified in below table. At least two staff members are required for every field trip. A driving CYS Services staff member counts in the adult child ratio. Adult volunteers may supplement CYS Services employees to further reduce the adult child ratio. 122 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

128 Program Type/ Risk Level Preschool 3-5 years Field-Trip Adult-Child Ratios Kindergarten Low Risk Ratio 1:6 Ratio 1:8 (at least two staff members for the first children-ratio group required) School Age (Grades 1-5/6) Ratio 1:10 (at least two staff members for the first children-ratio group required) Overnight Trip Not Permitted *Not Permitted Ratio 1:10 (at least two staff members for the first children-ratio group required) Occasional Special Event Ratio 1:6 (at least two staff members with additional volunteers for events) Ratio 1:8 (at least two staff members with additional volunteers for events) Ratio 1:10 (at least two staff members with additional volunteers for events) Swimming Not Permitted *Not Permitted Ratio 1:6 (at least two staff members for the first children-ratio group required) Medium Risk Not Permitted *Not Permitted Ratio 1:8 (at least two staff members for the first children-ratio group required) Youth Program (Grades 6-12) Ratio 1:12 Ratio 1:12 Ratio 1:15 (at least two staff members with additional volunteers for events such as dances) Ratio 1:12 (lifeguards required) Ratio 1:12 High Risk Not Permitted Not Permitted *Not Permitted Ratio 1:10 NOTE: Requests for exceptions to reduce adult child ratios or to conduct programs that are not permitted and marked with an asterisk (*) may be sent to your respective IMCOM Region. e. Supervision in the youth program (YP) (middle-school and teenage groups) will be as specified in above table and the following: 1) YP staff members who are drivers on field trips will count in the adult youth ratio. An additional CYS Services staff member is not needed unless another ratio group is started. 2) Supervision of YP field trips does not always require direct line-of-sight supervision of youths. If the maturity level of the youths and experience level of the staff permit, it is permissible to divide a larger group into subgroups using the guidelines listed below. The subgroups may explore a contained setting such as a park, zoo, or museum on their own. Staff members and volunteers are not required to accompany each subgroup but must accompany as many as staffing permits. Chapter 2 123

129 a) Parents must provide written permission authorizing YP personnel to assign youths to an unaccompanied subgroup. b) Individual groups must have at least three youths. c) A communication protocol must be established between staff members, volunteers, and subgroups. Cell phones or walkie-talkie radios may be used. d) A meeting place for regular mandatory accountability checks must be established. All youths must be accounted for at all check-in times. e) All adult staff members or volunteers must be present during all established meeting times. f) One adult staff member or volunteer must be present at the designated meeting place for the duration of the field trip in case of emergency or to provide assistance if needed. f. Lower adult-youth ratios may be necessary and should be determined locally Field Trip Safety. a. At least one CYS Services staff member supervising field trips must be certified in CPR. b. CYS Services staff members will carry first-aid kits, emergency accessories (for example, flashlights, reflective vests), previously tested communication devices (for example, walkie-talkies, radios, cell phones), and emergency cash, or HN currency when appropriate, during all field trips. c. Staff members must be made aware and knowledgeable of safety rules and regulations specific to the type of activities being conducted (for example, rules and regulations posted at the facility). Staff members must be trained in their supervisory roles and responsibilities by the overall supervisor or POC and must be positioned in locations to assist and observe all children. d. A system must be in place to quickly account for all participants in the field trip (for example, colored wrist bands, other readily visible identification). The buddy system will be used to pair up children at regular documented intervals (for example, aquatic activities every 15 minutes). e. An emergency action plan will be established that includes a meeting point for children who get separated from the group, sustain an injury, or have an emergency. The emergency treatment facility that is the closest to the activity location must be identified. 124 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

130 f. A documented safety briefing and review of rules must be completed with children before the field trip. This briefing must include what they will see, what to do if a stranger approaches them, and what to do if they become separated from the group. g. Assessment and monitoring is required for all field trips (indoors and outdoors) before and during the activity or field trip. A safety-risk assessment must be completed by CYS Services personnel, reviewed by the garrison safety office, and approved by the garrison commander or directorate chief based on the level of risk. A force-protection risk assessment must be approved by the force-protection officer. h. Risk assessments must address the following, as applicable: 1) Age, weight, and height requirements for participants. 2) Safety and inspection record of the facility. 3) A pre-ride by the staff. 4) Developmental and physical appropriateness of the activity for the children s age group. 5) Fall hazards and pinch points at the site. 6) Methods to maintain safety distances. 7) Methods to control braking. 8) Language barriers. 9) Realization of supervision requirements. i. CYS Services will ensure that all field-trip participants dress appropriately and use all mandatory safety equipment necessary for the scheduled activity (for example, helmets, pads, long pants, long-sleeved shirts, appropriate footwear such as boots, rubber-soled shoes). j. An inclement-weather plan must be prepared for all field trips. When applicable, transportation must be coordinated to support the inclement-weather plan Meals and Snacks Meals and snacks provided by CYS Services during field trips must comply with USDA guidelines and proper food-storage and transportation requirements during the entire Chapter 2 125

131 trip (hot food kept above 135 F and cold food kept at 41 F or below). Adequate water and snacks must be made available for participants during all field trips. FIELD-TRIP REQUIREMENTS BY RISK LEVEL Low Risk a. Low-risk field trips are trips (full- or part-day) to garrison community playgrounds, parks, theaters, zoos, museums, roller-skating rinks, bowling alleys, and similar sites. b. All core requirements apply to low-risk field trips Medium Risk Medium-risk field trips are those that involve the following and similar activities: a. Swimming, Diving, and Water parks. In addition to the core field-trip requirements, the following must be met for swimming, diving, and water park field trips: 1) At least one lifeguard who is certified for the specific type of water activity being conducted must be available for all swimming, diving, and water park field trips. The lifeguard will observe activities for behaviors or situations that might lead to life-threatening emergencies. Lifeguard certification credentials must be verified and validated before using the facility. The number of required lifeguards will depend on the configuration of the facility and the result of the risk assessment. 2) With thorough garrison coordinator review and approval and a documented plan that includes safety measures for children and staff members, swimming, diving, and water park field trips for a group of six or fewer children may take place with one lifeguard and one staff member. 3) Qualified staff members must evaluate and classify participants swimming ability and assign participants to the appropriate equipment, facilities, and activities. 4) Adult supervision of children is required at all times. 5) All swimming areas must have sufficient lifesaving equipment, communications equipment, first-aid facilities, and protective devices available. 6) Lower adult child ratios may be necessary and should be determined locally. 126 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

132 b. Aquatic activities such as kayaking, snorkeling, scuba diving, water skiing, and fishing. In addition to the core field-trip requirements, the following requirements must be met: 1) Aquatic activities must have appropriately certified instructors to supervise the activities. 2) Aquatic activities must have written documentation stating that every staff member and participant has been instructed on the following: a) The requirement to wear a personal flotation device (PFD) at all times. A documented checkout system for PFDs must be used. b) The safety regulations to be followed. 3) A distress signal that is effective both day and night (for example, whistles, horns, bells, flashlights) must be available and hand signals must be established and explained to all activity participants. 4) Children must demonstrate proper boarding and disembarking procedures, correct use of PFDs, and the proper way to react in emergencies High Risk In addition to the core field-trip requirements, the following apply to high-risk adventure and challenge activities (including climbing of all kinds, rappelling, ropes courses, horseback riding, bicycling, unicycling, skating (other than skating on roller-skating and ice-skating rinks), hiking, camping, tobogganing, go-karting, skiing): a. Adventure and challenge sites must provide an adequate number of qualified instructors or leaders and must use equipment that is appropriately sized and in good repair. The credentials of qualified instructors must be verified and validated before the site is used. b. The overall supervisor for adventure and challenge activities must have certification or documented training and experience in those activities, be at least 21 years old, and have at least 6 weeks of supervising experience in the same or similar types of activities. c. The overall supervisor for adventure and challenge activities must evaluate and classify the participants skills and abilities, and assign appropriate participation levels and equipment. Participants must be strictly monitored until competency with equipment is demonstrated. Chapter 2 127

133 d. Go-karts must be equipped with roll bars and restraint devices. Care must be used when selecting the go-kart establishment to ensure safety precautions are followed. e. Facilities for summer tobogganing and similar activities must be thoroughly assessed before being used. Facilities must be properly certified and properly equipped. Youths must be briefed on or demonstrate necessary skills for such activities (for example, distance intervals to maintain, disembarking procedures, correct use of controls, emergency procedures). ACCREDITATION AND REPORTING PROCEDURES Accreditation is a third party endorsement of quality and is granted to an individual, CDC center or FCC home that meets specific standards defined by the accrediting body. The Military Child Care Act (Public Law ) requires military child development centers meet the standards of a nationally recognized accrediting body. Currently, Army eligible centers serving children 0-5 years of age are accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) and Army eligible centers serving children 6-12 years of age are accredited by the Council On Accreditation (COA) or its predecessor the National After-School Association (NAA). FCC homes are accredited by the National Association of Family Child Care (NAFCC). CDCs wishing to obtain accreditation through another accrediting agency must submit an Exception to Policy outlining the reasons for utilization of another agency which must be approved by OACSIM prior to the start of the accreditation process. In the case of renewal, the CDC must ensure there is time to be reaccredited before a lapse occurs. If granted, the program assumes responsibility for all expenses to obtain and maintain accreditation. SAC Centers currently accredited by NAA must renew accreditation through COA. Link to the Exception to Policy template can be found at Accreditation eligibility. a. Child Development Centers are considered eligible for accreditation by NAEYC after one year of operation and must be accredited within two years of opening, unless documented and approved circumstances warrant a delay. Once accreditation is achieved, it is valid for five years. An Intent to Renew form can be submitted along with, but not before, the fourth anniversary annual report. b. School Age Centers are considered eligible for accreditation by COA after six months of operation and must be accredited within one year of opening unless documented and approved circumstances warrant a delay. Once accreditation is achieved, it is valid for four years. c. CDC/SAC must follow reaccreditation procedures of the appropriate accrediting body to ensure no lapses occur in accreditation status. 128 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

134 Reporting Critical Events to the NAEYC: Installations will review requirements for reporting critical events to the NAEYC in accordance with established time frames. This requirement applies to any NAEYC-accredited center or any center in the process of pursuing accreditation. The purpose of the 72-Hour Notification and Self Report is to ensure continual adherence to ten (10) NAEYC Early Childhood Program Standards and Accreditation Criteria. 72-Hour Notification of critical events includes: a. Suspension or revocation in program s license or regulatory status; b. Any incident that did or could have compromised the essential health or safety of any child such as, but not limited to: the death of any child from any cause, a critical injury to any child that results in the child being admitted to a hospital Emergency Room for treatment, any unusual incident involving a lack of supervision such as a child being left unattended or leaving the facility alone or in the care of an unauthorized individual, or any suspected physical or psychological abuse of a child at a program or by an individual that the child met through the program; c. Any operational disruption that prevents a program from serving children for any period of time. The NAEYC Self Report is required when there is: a change in program name, a change in the designated program administrator, a change in general program information including contact list, a change in location, a change in physical facility, a change in owner/operator, a merger with another program, an addition of a new age category not previously served, an addition of satellite location, a deletion of satellite location, and any legal action or court order. Additional information and forms are available at d. Region and Installation CYS Services personnel will ensure that all NAEYC reportable critical events are submitted to IMCOM G9 CDC Accreditation Program Manager for coordination prior to submission to the accrediting body. Submission and reporting of all NAEYC incidents must still meet timeframe criteria in addition to a new requirement for submission of video footage as part of the incident review process within 12 hours (upon request). Send the video through SAFE Region and Installation POCs will coordinate further reporting of the incident with IMCOM G9 CDC Accreditation Program Manager. The SAFE Getting Started Guide can be found on AKO at e. For further information see CYS Services 72 Hour Notification to the NAEYC Standing Operating Procedures (SOP) on the CYS Services Professional website at COA Self-Reporting Critical Events. COA requires that all accredited centers, or those pursuing accreditation, self-report critical events within time frames related to the seriousness of the event. Notification of critical events includes: Chapter 2 129

135 a. Ten (10) business days of licensing/regulatory notice of revocation b. Twenty (20) business days of notice of initiation of investigation and/or the following actions(s): 1) Suspension of license 2) License change to Provisional, Probationary, or other compromised status 3) Initiation of investigative activities 4) Findings from violation of law/regulation 5) Request for corrective action resulting from investigation or other occurrence due to: a) financial malfeasance b) quality of care c) safety/health d) business ethics/regulatory compliance c. Initiation of investigation or request for corrective action resulting from investigation by licensing/regulatory, other governmental authority, nongovernmental investigate entity, or contractor. d. Closure of the Program or Discontinuation of All or Any COA-Accredited Program. Twenty (20) business days e. Merger/Acquisition. Twenty (20) business days f. Change in Program Administrator/Site Director. Twenty (20) business days g. Judgment. Twenty (20) business days h. Death of a child or youth while directly under the program provider s programming or the death relates to the services/programming being provided, and is unrelated to the natural course of illness or disease. Resulting from and including, but not limited to: suicide, homicide, unexplained or accidental cause, medication error (omission or commission), environmental hazard, isolation, restraint, seclusion, overdoses of non-prescription medications, misuse of prescription medications, use of illicit controlled substances or misuse of alcohol. Ten (10) business days 130 RISK MANAGEMENT 2015

136 i. Child or youth serious injury while directly under the program provider s programming and/or the injury relates to programming resulting in debilitating or permanent loss of function (paralysis, brain trauma,,loss of limb, etc) or serious physical impairment (fracture, concussion, coma, physical disfigurement) or psychological injury (assault, sexual exploitation, rape, etc), or serious impairment of health. Seclusion/restraint resulting in injury requiring treatment beyond first aid and a suicide attempt that results in a medical hospitalization should be reported to COA. Ten (10) business days j. Additional information and forms are available at Region and Installation CYS Services personnel will ensure that all COA reportable critical events are submitted to IMCOM G9 SAC Accreditation Program Manager for coordination prior to submission to the accrediting body. Submission and reporting of all COA incidents must still meet timeframe criteria in addition to a new requirement for submission of video footage as part of the incident review process within 12 hours (upon request). Send the video through SAFE Region and Installation POCs will coordinate further reporting of the incident with IMCOM G9 SAC Accreditation Program Manager NAFCC Accreditation. The Family Child Care system offers quarters based child care provided by authorized military Family members operating as independent contractors from housing located on a military installation or from U.S. Government owned or leased housing off the Installation. Accreditation is optional, but highly encouraged. a. NAFCC Accreditation is awarded to Family Child Care providers who meet the eligibility requirements and the Quality Standards for NAFCC Accreditation. b. Accreditation reflects a high level of quality through a process that examines all aspects of the Family Child Care providers, i.e., relationships, the environment, developmental learning activities, safety and health, professional and business practices. Once Family Child Care providers become accredited, they agree to abide by the standards set forth and to be measured against those standards with periodic integrity and compliance reviews. Additional information and forms are available at Chapter 2 131

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138 Chapter 3 PROGRAM MANAGEMENT OPERATIONS 3-0. Accreditation. Eligible CDC and SAC programs will be those that have been in operation for 24 months or more. Ineligible programs are those that have been in operation for less than 24 months or have been approved by the IMCOM G9 to be in a pause from the accreditation cycle. Permission to be in pause is only granted based on circumstances that are beyond the control of the program such as temporary or permanent building closure. Programs are not granted a pause due to failure to meet established accreditation guidelines or a staff vacancy. a. All eligible CDC and SAC facilities will be accredited by an outside, nationally recognized accrediting body. b. CDCs will be accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC). c. SAC facilities are accredited by the Council on Accreditation (COA) At Installations with an Army Child Care in Your Neighborhood (ACCYN) the community-based program manager will ensure training is done to assist them in achieving and maintaining national accreditation An Environment Rating Scale is used to assess the program. Programs must score a minimum of 5 on each criteria item. If the rating is below 5, an improvement plan is developed and implemented. Results of assessments will be used to improve quality as documented in the Program Improvement Plan. During a re-accreditation year it is not necessary to complete an Environmental Rating Scale. a. CDC Trainers will assist CYPA staff and Program Leads in completing an annual assessment of each activity room utilizing the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Revised (ECERS-R) or Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scale- Revised (ITERS-R). Directors, Assistant Directors and Supervisory Program Specialists (SPS) complete an annual assessment of 100% of activity rooms using the ECERS-R and ITERS-R. The CDC Director conducts a minimum of 50% of these activity room assessments, up to six rooms. An Improvement Action Plan (IAP) will be developed for items rated less than 5. CDC Trainers will follow up and work with activity room staff and Leads on their IAP. The ITERS-R/ECERS-R must be completed by end of year. If a room has been closed for a significant amount of time during the previous year, the ECERS-R or ITERS-R on that room should been done within a year of opening again. NOTE: In facilities with more than 12 rooms, the assessment of additional rooms to meet the management 50% completion requirement can be completed by an Assistant Director, CYS Services Administrator or Coordinator. Exceptions will be considered on a case-by-case basis where extenuating circumstances will only allow Directors to complete a minimum of four room assessments. Chapter 3 133

139 b. SAC Trainers will assist CYPA staff and Program Leads in completing an annual assessment of the SAC facility utilizing the School Age Care Environment Rating Scale (SACERS). Directors, Assistant Directors and Supervisory Program Specialists (SPS) complete an annual assessment of 100% of activity areas using the SACERS. The SAC Director conducts a minimum of 50% of these activity area assessments, so the SAC Director would be part of the assessment team. An IAP is developed for items rated less than 5. SAC Trainers will follow up and work with SAC staff and Leads on their IAP SACERS is done on the facility. c. Middle School/Teen (MST) Trainers will assist CYPA staff and Program Leads in completing an annual assessment of each activity area utilizing the Youth Program Environment Rating Scale (YPERS). Directors, Assistant Directors and SPS will complete an annual assessment of 100% of activity areas using the YPERS. The MST Director will conduct a minimum of 50% of these activity area assessments, so the MST Director would be part of the assessment team. An IAP is developed for items rated less than 5. Training Specialist will follow up and work with MST CYPAs and Leads on their IAP. To access a copy of the YPERS go to the CYS Services Professional Website at The CDC program is composed of four major program types where needs exist: full day, part day, part time and hourly. CDC accommodates children six weeks to kindergarten, unless kindergarten is in the SAC program. CDC may also care for newborns (children under six weeks) of single and dual active duty military parents under extenuating circumstances such as health of the mother when the following conditions are met: a FCC home is not available, a 1:2 ratio is maintained; exposure of multiple CYPAs is limited, newborns are not combined with other children at the beginning and end of the day and are not cared for in multi-age groupings; maximum group size of infants is 7 instead of The SAC program will offer before and after school care, full day care on school out days and vacation periods, summer camps and hourly care The Youth Program will consist of MST programs as outlined in the Youth Program Framework 4 Service Areas Hours of Operation. Hours of Operation may vary by program and reflect customer and Installation needs and structure as documented by surveys or other methods: a. Generally, CDCs are open to accommodate physical training, deployments, exercises and other mission-related requirements. Although a facility may be open more than 12 hours, generally children are not in care for more than 12 hours unless in support of mission related requirements or utilizing Deployment Support 134 PROGRAM MANAGEMENT 2015

140 benefits. Extended hours of operation are per the Installation Child and Youth Operations Plan (ICOP). b. Part day and part time programs will be scheduled to maximize spaces in the facility (i.e., AM and PM part day Preschool). c. Army Strong Beginnings Pre-K operates from or , five days per week unless funded by the state, which requires following state policies. d. Some no-cost or reduced-fee SKIESUnlimited classes are allowed to support CDC programming as required in Strong Beginnings or when a whole class is participating in their classroom or gross motor room in their facility. CDC and FCC children do not attend SKIESUnlimited classes during the normal duty day unless parents transport their children and remain on site during the SKIESUnlimited classes. Children will not be transported from the classroom to a SKIESUnlimited program, nor will one or two children per classroom be taken to other parts of the facility. e. Part day and part time programs will be offered in accordance with the Fee Policy when there is a need for less than full time but more than hourly care. The need for these services is greater than the need for full time care (e.g. spaces dedicated to part time and part day care do not negatively impact on the primary mission for providing child care for working Families). f. Hourly care will be physically separated from full and part day services in CDCs with more than 199 operational spaces. A written customer friendly hourly reservations policy is publicized and implemented. Hourly spaces will NOT be filled by full/part time overflow on a regular basis. Walk-in care is allowed on a space-available basis. Spaces will be available for in-processing Service members/emergency care/volunteers. Hourly care operating hours will balance customer need, space availability and cost effectiveness. g. Generally, SACs are open to accommodate physical training, deployments, exercises and other mission-related requirements. The SAC program will offer some activities on weekends twice per month for four hours unless documented surveys of patrons indicate there is no audience for this service. Extended hours of operation are per the ICOP. h. Youth Center operating hours are outlined in 1-6. If above hours cannot be met, an Exception to Policy must be submitted through the Region and to G9 CYS Services for approval. Before the Exception to Policy is submitted a needs assessment should be conducted and community needs should be addressed. The outcomes of these assessments should be included in the Exception to Policy submittal. In cases of extraordinary contingency situations, inclement weather conditions, or local curfew restrictions, business hours may be adjusted according to your Installation Standing Operating Procedures (SOPs). Link to the Exception Chapter 3 135

141 to Policy template can be found at The YC will operate in the following manner: 1) The YC must operate Monday through Thursday for at least six (6) hours a day, closing no earlier than 2000 hrs. In cases of extraordinary contingency situations, inclement weather conditions, or local curfew restrictions, business hours may be adjusted according to Installation Standing Operating Procedures (SOPs). Any deviation to these operational hours will require an Exception to Policy. Link to the Exception to Policy template can be found at 2) On Fridays, YCs operate for eight (8) hours, (for example, from 1400 to 2200 hrs, or 1430 to 2230 hrs, or from 1500 to 2300 hrs), or as late as the local curfew permits while maintaining the eight-hour requirement. Installations that cannot meet the eight-hour requirement due to school let-out times and local curfew times conflicting will add the missing business hours to either Saturday s or Sunday s business hours. 3) On Saturdays, the YC should operate no less than eight (8) hours, closing no earlier than 2200 hrs. The YC may not operate before noon unless in support of a special event or field trip. Programming may include field trips and does not necessarily have to be offered in the YC. When services are offered in the YC, programming may be limited to certain areas within the YC. It is not required to staff the entire YC. For example, a YC may choose to only provide access to the Homework Center (HC) or the Youth Technology Lab (YTL) on weekends. 4) Sunday YC operations should occur no less than twice a month for four or more hours at a time. Sunday YC operations should not begin before noon and should consist of any of the following, or a combination of the following, depending on need: a) Homework Center services; b) Youth Technology Lab services; c) Game room activities; d) Field trip; e) Special event. 5) Youth Programs may provide services above and beyond the abovementioned business hours. However, fees are charged for the additional hours in accordance with the approved CYS Services Fee Policy. 136 PROGRAM MANAGEMENT 2015

142 6) YCs must accommodate the needs of parents of 11 and 12 year-old middle school youth who require Reserved Care after school or on school-out days, by providing services starting at 1300 hrs (Army Fee Guidance applies before 1300 hrs). i. Parent Central Services (PCS) will be open during normal duty hours Monday through Friday, including being open over lunch, and at least one evening (at least one hour after duty hours) or Saturday per week. j. Parent and Outreach Services (P&OS) programs and services will be available year-round. k. EFMP Respite Care Provision for Care in Army Child, Youth and School Services Programs: 1) Army CDC, SAC, certified FFC providers, and YC may be used when children/youth are eligible for CYS Services Programs. All CYS Services regulatory requirements and procedures apply. 2) CDC s staffed by CYPA provide group care according to child/adult ratios. Specialized one on one care is not provided by CYS Services staff. However, it may be appropriate for EFM Children who require one on one care to use CDC hourly care or part day programs when accompanied by their EFMP Respite Care Provider. Army Community Services staff may also arrange to use, on a space available basis, vacant classrooms or Kids On Site (KOS) sites as group care options using EFMP Respite Care providers. Registration in CYS Services programs is not required when the care provided is strictly under the auspices of the EFMP program. l. EFMP Respite Care Provided outside CYS Facilities or certified Family Child Care Homes: 1) Any individuals providing EFMP respite care in their government owned, leased or privatized housing for more than 10 hours per week on a regular basis MUST be certified as Army FCC providers. This means one child for ten hours per week or two children for five hours per week, etc. Children from the same family count as one child. Example: A family uses their friend or neighbor to provide 10 hours of respite care per week in their neighbor s government owned or leased home, that individual is limited to providing services for that family only. 2) EFMP respite care services can be provided in the EFM child s home when the children present belong to the family or individual providing services is not regulated by CYS Services. However, if children other then the EFM child, siblings, or other children are in care, the 10 hour rule applies. Chapter 3 137

143 3) For the purpose of providing EFMP respite care, FCC providers can provide respite care as part of FCC Extended Hours Home, regardless of the time of day the care is provided. The FCC provider must continue to follow all CYS Services policies and procedures to include providing only those services and medical procedures authorized by CYS Services. EFM children count in the FCC provider s caseload. If FCC provider does care in EFM child s home, these individuals are not considered to be FCC providers, and therefore, may conduct care under the EFMP respite care guidelines. 4) CYS Services CYPA s are only able to provide care during their off hours when the EFMP Respite Care occurs in the EFM child s home per previous guidance. 5) CYS Services CYPA s must be a registered EFMP Provider to provide respite care. m. School Support Services includes school transition and deployment support, Local Action Plan (LAP), Secondary Education Transition Study (SETS) and Partnerships in Education (PIE) The program must be inclusive of all eligible children/youth, including those with identified disabilities and special learning and developmental needs, considering reasonable accommodation that would not fundamentally alter the nature of the program PATRON ELIGIBILITY AND PRIORITY a. Active Duty Military, including Reserve Component military personnel on Active Duty or inactive duty training status, and members of the National Guard on fulltime National Guard duty who are performing Active Guard and Reserve duty, combat related wounded warriors, surviving spouses of military who died from combat related incident, and those acting in loco parentis for dependent child of an otherwise eligible patron. b. DoD Civilian employees paid from either appropriated funds (APF or NAF) are eligible employees of DoD Contractors. c. The National Defense Authority Act (NDAA) of 2000, Title 10 U.S.C, section 1799, children and youth under the age of 19 who are not dependents of members of the armed forces or of employees of DoD, and not otherwise eligible for participation (i.e. dependents of employees of other federal entities, etc), may participate in child and youth services if situations in which participation promotes attainment of the following objectives: 1) Supports the integration of children and youth of military Families into the civilian community, 138 PROGRAM MANAGEMENT 2015

144 2) Makes more efficient use of DoD facilities and resources, or 3) Establish or supports a partnership or consortium arrangement with schools and other youth serving organizations serving children of members of the Armed Forces. Approval to accept these otherwise ineligible users must be first granted in writing from IMCOM and the Families which are approved will be charged the highest Category 9 fees. Currently enrolled, non-ndaa 2000 users will be grandfathered under their current terms until the release of the SY15-16 Army Child and Youth Fee Policy. NOTE: The case of unmarried, legally separated parents with joint custody, or divorced parents with joint custody, children are eligible for child care only when they reside with the Military Service member or eligible civilian sponsor at least 25 percent of the time in a month that the child receives child care through a DoD program. NOTE: Eligible sponsors listed above are NOT in priority order. NOTE: Request written guidance from your local SJA or legal office when there are concerns with patron/child eligibility for CYS Services. State laws vary and this may be challenging when determining eligibility. NOTE: Non-eligible patrons must have an exception to policy waiver approved and signed by IMCOM G9. d. The first priority is child care for active duty military and DoD civilian personnel. e. Each Garrison Commander and Defense Agency Director and/or Commander shall establish a priority system under which access to CDPs shall be determined. In all cases, first priority shall be given to children of active duty military and DoD civilian personnel who are either single parents or whose spouse or same sex domestic partner is employed on a full-time basis outside the home or is a military member on active duty. Garrison Commanders and Defense Agency Directors and/or Commanders shall determine on a case-by-case basis whether a spouse or same sex domestic partner is employed on a full-time basis but working within the home qualifies for first priority treatment. The Garrison Commander or Defense Agency Director and/or Commander shall make a statement of these priorities available to all eligible patrons seeking enrollment of their children in DoD CDPs. f. Foreign Military Service members are on orders, assigned to the Installation and serving the Department of Defense are eligible patrons. The eligibility and priority is the same as any other Active Duty Service member. Fees are based on their Total Family Income (TFI) in accordance with Fee Policy. Foreign Service Civilians are not eligible for our services as they do not support our mission. Chapter 3 139

145 g. Coast Guard when activated are eligible patrons. The eligibility and priority is the same as any other Active Duty Service member. h. Retiree s eligibility is limited to the use of SKIES, YC and Sports and Fitness programs. i. Garrison Commanders are given the authority to permit child and youth from the civilian community to participate in Army-sponsored Youth Services programs on a space available basis when it is in the best interest of the Army, the installation and the community. These patrons would pay in Category 9A + 10%. j. DoDI has changed the priorities for patrons. Upon receipt of implementing guidance from ACSIM a revision to this Operations Manual (OM) will be issued Definition of Parent: a. A parent or legal guardian is defined as the biological mother or father of a child; a person who by order of court of competent jurisdiction has been declared the mother or father of a child by adoption; or the legal guardian of a child or a person in whose household a child resides at least 25% of the time in any month, provided that such person stands in loco parentis to that child and contributes at least one-half of the child s support. b. In Loco Parentis- When an individual acts "in loco parentis" as the parent, this can only exist when the individual undertakes care and control of another (child/ren) in ABSENCE of such supervision by the natural parents and in absence of formal legal approval. When the parent is still in picture no such "in loco parentis" relationship exists. This guidance has been provided by the IMCOM Office of Staff Judge Advocate. CYS SERVICES REGISTRATION PROCEDURES CYS Parent Central Services (PCS) will comply with the following procedures when conducting registration/re-registration of patrons: a. Verify eligibility using the DoD ID Card (Military, Civilian, DoD contractor assigned to the Installation, Reservist/National Guard active duty on orders). b. Determine services patron needs (Waiting list, hourly, part day, full day, SAC, MS/T, SKIES, Sports, etc). c. Explain programs associated with age of patron s children to include policies for waiting list. d. Conduct a search for care in CYMS for immediate openings. 140 PROGRAM MANAGEMENT 2015

146 3-11. WAITING LISTS a. Upon implementation of MilitaryChildCare.com, this guidance will be revised. b. Definition of a Viable Space: A viable space is defined as any opening within the CYS Services delivery system to include Child Development Centers, School Age Centers, Family Child Care homes, Homes Off Post and Community Based Programs. c. The Installation will establish a Waiting List when the spaces for each child age group are filled and there are no additional spaces to offer. d. The Waiting List reflects only patrons who are still actively seeking child care. e. There is one distinct waiting list: The Excess Demand Waiting List. f. The Excess Demand Waiting List includes the number of children whose parents (military and civilian) request child care in any Army CYS Services operated or sponsored program for which no care is available. Children may be receiving care in one program (hourly care, part-day) and still be considered an excess demand for another program type (full-day). Children move from the excess demand waiting list to the preference for care sub-waiting list if they choose to turn down the viable option or accept care in a location or type of care that is not their preferred care option. g. The Preference for Care and Projected Demand are sub-waiting lists and are defined below. h. The Preference for Care Sub-waiting List. This list allows parents to wait for the specific type of care or location they prefer. Children on this list are receiving viable care in one system but prefer care in another system. Children on this list are not reported as excess demand. 1) Because parents on the Preference for Care Sub-Waiting List have already waited for a viable space on the Excess Demand Waiting List, when the next space becomes available that meets the parents preference requirement, they will receive priority placement over the next Family on the Excess Demand List. 2) Projected Demand Sub-waiting List: This list includes unborn children and children transferring to the Installation. a) Unborn children are maintained on a Projected Demand Sub-waiting List by sponsor priority and date of application until born. They are not considered excess demand until birth. Chapter 3 141

147 b) Children transferring to the Installation whose parents have requested care prior to arrival are placed on the Projected Demand Sub-waiting List. This list is maintained by sponsor priority for care and date of request for care. These children are not considered excess demand until arrival at the Installation Waiting List Priorities: a. Priority Level 1 - single military and single DoD civilians, dual military and dual DoD civilians, active duty military with a DoD civilian spouse, active duty military, wounded warriors, surviving spouses and DoD civilian sponsors with non-dod working spouses or same sex domestic partner, mission related geographically single working spouses and siblings of children already enrolled by initial request date for care. b. Priority Level 2 - active duty military who s spouse is a full time student or full time volunteer. Active duty military not assigned to, but working on or living on, the Installation by initial request date for care. c. Priority Level 3 - DoD contractors and local determination by initial request date for care Waiting List Review: a. The waiting list must be reviewed and scrubbed continuously. Patrons with the highest priority must be provided spaces first. b. Parents must update their information every 90 days to remain on the waiting list. c. Waiting List Flow Chart for procedures for filling vacancies is located CYS Services Professional Website at Sibling Priorities: Local Installation policy will determine placement of siblings. Maximum consideration should be given to placing children in the same location whenever feasible In locations where there is no PCS, the CYS Services Coordinator will designate personnel to maintain and manage the waiting list. CYS Services Coordinator will ensure personnel charged with this responsibility become familiar with and enforce the procedures. PARENT AND OUTREACH SERVICES P&OS will offer baseline programs: 142 PROGRAM MANAGEMENT 2015

148 a. Parent Central Services (formerly Central Enrollment) b. Kids at Home (imalone) c. Parents on Site (Co-ops and Volunteer Child Care in Unit Settings (VCCUS)) d. Kids on Site (KOS) e. Schools of Knowledge, Inspiration, Exploration, and Skills (SKIESUnlimited) f. CYSitters (teen and adults) / Sittercity g. Parent Liaison Services classes and meetings h. Community Liaison Services Parent Liaison Services consist of: a. There will be an established overall CYS Services Parent Advisory Board (PAB). The PAB: 1) Provides two-way feedback about CYS Services program operations. 2) Provides input for establishing and changing local procedures to enhance CYS Services operations. 3) Helps solve CYS Services-related problems and issues. 4) Helps identify parent/community CYS Services needs. 5) Meet at least quarterly. 6) Has an elected chairperson. 7) Makes minutes of the meeting available to patrons and staff. Minutes and issues are forwarded by the Board Chair through the program director to the Garrison Commander or designee for review. 8) Garrison Commander (GC) or Command Representative attends at least one PAB meeting each year. If Installation has more than one PAB, GC attends at least one and is notified of concerns of other PABs. b. PAB participants will receive parent participation program points in accordance with IMCOM guidance, which count toward the 10% fee discount. NOTE: Points are carried forward until 10 points are earned. Upon earning 10 points the points must be used during the month earned or the following month. Points cannot be saved or carried forward for future use. Chapter 3 143

149 c. P&OS will coordinate with all CYS Services program directors and other agencies as applicable to establish an annual parent education plan. d. CYS Services parent education classes will be conducted as required. Classes must provide information/training at least quarterly on effective child development and guidance practices, topics requested by parents, and issues related to supporting positive teen development and school support Parents will be provided with information on tangible ways for them to become involved in CYS Services programs Parents have an opportunity to participate on committees/meetings. a. Installation Child and Youth Operations Plan (ICOP) or F&MWR Business Case Five Year Plan. Link to ICOP is at b. CYS Services Mobilization and Contingency (MAC) Plan. MAC Plan information can be found on AKO at c. Multi-disciplinary Inclusion Action Team (MIAT). MIAT information can be found on the CYS Services Professional Website at d. Installation Multi-Disciplinary Team Inspection (MDTI). MDTI information can be found on AKO at An annual CYS Services patron survey is to be conducted and actions are taken to remedy identified problems. Survey was released by IMCOM G9 in March The CYS Services Parent Handbook is distributed or web link provided to every parent during registration. The Parent Handbook provides written information about CYS Services programs. Changes/updates to the current handbook after distribution will be added as an addendum and provided to patrons until a new handbook is published Communication between parents, staff and volunteers is professional, friendly, and respectful Parent involvement will be solicited during registration as an opportunity to recruit volunteers (coaches, assistant coaches, team parents, SKIESUnlimited instructors and volunteer/paid officials) Parent involvement is evident within CYS Services (i.e., written record, CYMS printout, of parent volunteer hours, including child and youth service sports program.) 144 PROGRAM MANAGEMENT 2015

150 3-25. In coordination with the Installation Volunteer Coordinator there will be a system in place to recognize parent participation Parent and Outreach Community Liaison Services. a. The P&OS Director will implement and manage the CYS Services volunteer program. b. P&OS partners with the Installation Volunteer Coordinator to record/maintain children/youth and parent volunteer hours. c. CYS Services partners with Army Community Services (ACS) Family Programs to provide 1) Financial Workshops to assist with financial hardships 2) Child abuse/neglect prevention, identifying and reporting training and personal safety (e.g., dating violence and bullying) and 3) Parenting classes P&OS will partner, where applicable and appropriate, with Head Start, Sure Start, Early Intervention Program and other appropriate agencies to promote school readiness growth and development Community Liaison Services will coordinate with military units and organizations to support CYS Services programs, e.g., adopt a CDC, repairing toys, internal CYS Services logistics and special events Partnerships will be established with other community-based organizations onand off-post to support military children/youth, e.g., Foster Grandparents, Red Cross, Club Beyond, etc P&OS will coordinate development and implementation of a comprehensive annual CYS Services marketing plan according to annual budget guidance P&OS Mobilization and Contingency (MAC) Plan a. MAC Plan meets required standards. 1) The Parent and Outreach Services Director leads the MAC Plan development and execution. 2) MAC Plan data is incorporated into the ICOP. Chapter 3 145

151 3) MAC Plan is current (updated within the last year) and contains all required elements and signed by the Garrison Commander. 4) School Liaison Officer shows evidence of participation in CYS Services MAC Plan development and execution. 5) A written plan provides adequate staff/volunteer coverage for emergency staff/volunteer absences Parent Central Services (PCS) Registration and Enrollment a. PCS provides a centralized system by which patrons can register and pay for all CYS Services programs. b. PCS maintains patron child files. When Parent Central Services and CDCs/SAC programs are co-located, one child file can serve as both Parent Central Services and the CDC/SAC file. c. In the below Child/Youth Files matrix, files that are marked Electronic could also be hard copy, but it is not mandatory. Files that are marked Hard Copy must be hard copy. Child/Youth Files Parent Central Services Hard Copy Electronic CYMS Liability Waiver signed by parent x CYMS Profile Print x Immunization Records (as applicable for CDC/FCC) x Health Screening Tools and Supporting Documents (MAPS, SDS) x Health Assessment/Sports Physical Statement x DoD Fee Application/LES/Pay stubs x Family Care Plan CDC/SAC Hard Copy Electronic CYMS Liability Waiver signed by parent x CYMS Profile Print x Immunization Records (as applicable) Health Screening Tools and Supporting Documents (MAPS, SDS) Health Assessment/Sports Physical Statement SIDS (posted in Infant room) Infant Feeding plan (as applicable, program specific) DA Form 5224-R Child & Family Profile or Equivalent (for ages 0-5 years, program specific) DA Form 5226-R Sponsor/Program Agreement (program specific) x x x x x x x x 146 PROGRAM MANAGEMENT 2015

152 Family Care Plan USDA- Dictated by State as to location of this document x x FCC Hard Copy Electronic CYMS Liability Waiver signed by parent x CYMS Profile Print x Immunization Records (as applicable) Health Screening Tools and Supporting Documents (MAPS, SDS) Health Assessment/Sports Physical Statement SIDS (as applicable) Infant Feeding plan (as applicable) DA Form 5224-R Child & Family Profile (for ages 0-5 years) DA Form 5226-R Sponsor/Program Agreement RIMP Agreement Fee Calculation Family Care Plan USDA- Dictated by State as to location of this document MST Hard Copy Electronic CYMS Liability Waiver signed by parent x CYMS Profile Print Health Screening Tools and Supporting Documents (MAPS, SDS) as applicable Teens- Self Registration Form USDA- Dictated by State as to location of this document Consolidated Parent Central Services and CDC/SAC File Hard Copy Electronic CYMS Liability Waiver signed by parent x CYMS Profile Print x Immunization Records (as applicable) x Health Screening Tools and Supporting Documents (MAPS, SDS) x Health Assessment/Sports Physical x SIDS as applicable x Infant Feeding plan as applicable x DA Form 5224-R Child & Family Profile (for ages 0-5 years) x DA Form 5226-R Sponsor/Program Agreement x DoD Fee Application/LES/Pay stubs (in binder, not in file) x Family Care Plan x USDA- Dictated by State as to location of this document x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x Chapter 3 147

153 d. PCS participates in regularly-scheduled Central Enrollment Registration Placement Team (CERPT) meetings designed to address issues related to enrollment process, e.g., placing children on the waiting list into CYS Services programs, customer service, CYMS, etc. Reference: AR , 4-5d.5. e. PCS maintains the CYS Services waiting list. f. PCS uses WebTrac to facilitate and initiate patron registration, enrollment, payments, etc. g. PCS staff will use CYMS printouts to manage patron records. h. PCS staff provide desk-side registration services. i. Parents are given access to Army FCC Online. j. PCS accurately determines patron fees category IAW the latest fee policy. k. PCS schedules new patrons for orientation at their programs. Orientation times must be convenient for parents. Orientations will include but not be limited to: 1) Tour of facilities used. 2) Orientation to program and/or facility. 3) Review rules of conduct and procedures. 4) Introduction to staff/providers and key volunteers. 5) Complete program specific forms (para 3-32) l. PCS maintains an electronic copy of the Family Care Plan (FCP) DA Form 5305 for dual/single military parents registered in full and part time programs. FCP is required for MST youth enrolled in weekly before camp supervision programs operating before DA Form 5305 is the acceptable Army form. Official FCP from sponsors of other military services (Air Force, Navy, Marines, etc) on their service forms are acceptable. If the service does not have a form they may utilize the Army form. The requirement for FCP only applies to US Active Duty Military. The FCP is required for children under the age of 19 who cannot care for themselves in the absence of the Service member. PCS maintains the Short Term Release Designee information. Updated FCP Operational Guidance is located on CYS Services Professional website at PROGRAM MANAGEMENT 2015

154 m. PCS will ensure that all children/youth are screened for special needs during registration and re-registration. Middle School/Teens are excluded unless there is an identified special need. n. CYMS will be used to maintain centralized staff records, e.g., training, emergency data, personnel records, background checks, etc. o. PCS will offer each new patron a viable child care/youth-supervision option within 30 days in CYS Services or make a referral to a viable on/off post option. p. PCS will refer Army Families to the appropriate third-party administrator when children cannot be offered a space that will be available within the next 30 days in Installation-operated or ACCYN/Army School-age Program in Your Neighborhood (ASPYN) programs or when Families live outside the Installation-defined catchment area. q. PCS will provide Army-wide transition assistance, e.g., Global Data Transfer (GDT) of staff and child records and accepts projected demand registrations. 1) The CYMS GDT is designed to streamline the relocation process for military and civilian Families. Standard data elements (such as names, birthdates, child health records, etc.) should follow these Families to their new duty assignments and make the local CYS Services registration procedure shorter and simpler. 2) This program is a more precise method of adding household information to the local database. Most important, it keeps the Family from having to provide us with redundant information (a very common complaint) - and it gives the Families a feeling that we are truly taking care of them if we already have their file half filled out when they arrive! a) The export process allows select household and Family member information from the losing Installation to be safely transferred to a secure centralized database maintained by the U.S. Army IMCOM. b) The import process allows the receiving Installation to safely move individual household files from the IMCOM site to their local CYMS databases. c) The import/export processes one household at a time. Data import/export for relocating Families should become part of the regular CYS Services in-and out-processing protocol. As soon as any CYS Services program element learns a Family is PCSing, the file should be exported. Chapter 3 149

155 r. PCS Staff will manage all MIAT paperwork in accordance with AR , para 1-25, 3c Additional P&OS Functions a. P&OS staff provide support and guidance for patrons stating an interest in establishing parent co-op (Parents on Site). b. P&OS ensures that CYSitters babysitter training is provided to military youth 12 years old and older (includes adult sitters). Twelve year olds may participate in training but will not be included on the certified babysitter listing. Trained/certified babysitter listing will include ages 13 through adults. List is maintained at PCS. c. P&OS will coordinate with contracting support for Kids on Site, SKIESUnlimited, special openings etc. as needed; e.g., initiates contracts, serves as contract officer representative and validates contractor payments. d. P&OS Director will coordinate CYS Services Special Events, e.g., Month of Military Child (MOMC), National Kids Day, etc. e. P&OS Director will ensure that special needs child/youth files or electronic files contain all the necessary medical/educational documentation prior to placement in CYS Services. f. P&OS Care and Supervision Options: PCS coordinates referrals to ACCYN, ASPYN and AYPYN where available on the Installation and, in cases where it is not, contracts for military child care/youth spaces in off-post facilities/agencies as necessary. All child spaces are in accredited programs. g. P&OS Kids at Home. PCS staff enrolls and provides training to imalone Families with children who are able to be home alone in accordance with the Installation Home Alone Policy. h. P&OS partners with a variety of community programs, e.g., eligible private organizations, schools and CYS Services programs to offer alternative child care and youth recreational opportunities, e.g., Kids on Site (KOS), Parents On Site, playgroups, community playgrounds, etc. i. P&OS coordinates with units to approve/support/train Parents On Site volunteers. j. P&OS coordinates with the Soldier and Family Assistance Center (SFAC) to provide short-term hourly child care services for Warriors in Transition, Army Warriors and their Families at the SFAC. 150 PROGRAM MANAGEMENT 2015

156 1) Child, Youth and School Services may wish to consider expanding the utilization of the Soldier and Family Assistance Center room (s) to meet additional hourly care needs when the following conditions exist: a) Low/non-utilizations of the classroom b) The unmet surge for hourly care demands cannot be met in other hourly/full day programs c) Utilization of the child care room for hourly care is in the best interest of the Army 2) When such conditions exist and the Garrison Commander wishes to expand hourly care services in the Soldier and Family Assistance Center the CYS Services Coordinator will submit an official Request for Exception signed by the Garrison Commander. The Request for Exception will be forwarded through the Region to IMCOM G9 Child, Youth and School Services for approval. 3) Operational Guidance for SFAC Childcare can be found the CYS Services Professional website at k. P&OS provides child care for Official Family Readiness Group (FRG) meetings. Child care for FRG meetings is funded to facilitate participation in official FRG meetings, for units that are in the deployed status in the Army Force Generation cycle. Activities covered for child care are regularly schedule FRG meetings. Activities not covered include fundraising, training, steering committee meetings or social events. Deployed unit FRGs may receive up to three hours of free group child care per month for official meetings. Operational Guidance on FRG Childcare is found on the CYS Services Professional website at l. P&OS SKIESUnlimited Instruction Program offers a range of school classes such as music, dance, martial arts, gymnastics, technology, life skills, SAT prep and athletic experiences. All classes are provided by CYS Services employees and contract instructors in a variety of settings. All participants in SKIESUnlimited classes will be registered for CYS Services in CYMS. There will be class offerings for each age group and opportunities for advancement from beginners to intermediate to advanced levels. Parents remain on site during SKIESUnlimited classes. PARENT HANDBOOK CYS Services will create a parent handbook. Topics should address: a. Mission/Vision/Philosophy Chapter 3 151

157 b. Eligibility for Services/Admissions Requirements c. Waiting List Policies/Registration Procedures d. Description of Program Services by Program/Facilities List/Operating Hours/Telephone Numbers e. Fee Policy/Vacation Credit/Late Fees/Delinquent Accounts/ Refunds/Financial Hardships/Multiple Child Discounts/Notification of Withdrawal f. Special Needs Policies/Multi-disciplinary Inclusion Action Team (MIAT) Medical Action Plans g. Health Policies/Administering Medication/Exclusion for Illness/Readmission after Illness/Immunizations/Allergies h. Child Abuse/Neglect Reporting/DoD Hotline Poster/Definitions of Abuse and Neglect/Home Alone Policy i. Guidance and Discipline j. Touch Policy k. Nap and Rest Time l. Daily Admission & Release/Arrival and Departure Procedures/Chain of Command m. Food and Nutrition Policies/Special Diet Statements n. Transportation/Field Trips o. Bringing personal Items from home p. Diapering/Toileting/Dental/Biting q. Adverse weather conditions/closing of CYS Services Programs/Alert System/Federal and Training Holidays r. Parents as Partners/Parent Education/Volunteering/Parent Advisory Council/Parent Conferences/Opportunities to share their culture, heritage and home language s. Open Door Policy 152 PROGRAM MANAGEMENT 2015

158 t. Parent Feedback/Parent Complaints u. Parent Rights and Responsibilities v. Supervision/Ratios/Use of VSS System w. Family Care Plans x. Staff Qualifications and Training y. Curriculum/Developmental Programming/Multi-Age Groupings z. Accidents/Illness/Injuries/medical emergency procedures while attending CYS Services Programs aa. DoD Certification/National Accreditation Status bb. Alcohol and Tobacco Policy cc. Sports Physicals dd. Birthday Celebrations ee. Transitioning Children ff. Lost and Found gg. Developmental Characteristics of Children hh. Outdoor Activities ii. Parent Orientation jj. Confidentiality kk. Denial of Services ll. Code of Conduct mm. Dress Code for Children nn. Diversity/Non-Discrimination oo. Special Events Chapter 3 153

159 pp. Sample Parent Handbook template is located on the CYS Services Professional website at Refer to the Parent and Outreach Services Trainings on the CYS Services Professional Website at SCHOOL SUPPORT SERVICES School Support Services (SSS) provides Commanders, parents, and CYS Services staff with strategies and resources to support academic success and wellness for Army children and youth. The School Liaison Officer (SLO) will manage, coordinate and implement School Support Services baseline programming. a. School Transition and Deployment Support. 1) Provide information regarding education transition to Families, schools and Installation leadership using a variety of media formats such as Installation website, newsletters, flyers, articles and electronic mail. 2) Ensure incoming personnel receive information regarding local school/installation policies, school registration options, graduation requirements, after school services/programs and home schooling during inprocessing and newcomer s orientations. 3) Ensure exiting personnel receive information about transferring school records, provide contact information for the School Liaison Officer at the next duty station and connect Families to youth sponsorship programs at the next duty station. 4) Assist Families with navigating the educational system and finding local education resources. This may require research and referral to the appropriate agency or service to resolve the specific situation. 5) Educate parents about the education process, school organization, school communication and interaction strategies, and school support services. This will enable parents to work with schools, navigate the school system and facilitate a smoother education experience for children and youth. 6) Facilitate and coordinate School Transition Support Team (STST) meetings two times per year, providing an opportunity for local districts and military community to work together to develop an action plan to ensure the smooth transition of school age children of military Families. 7) Promote and support a school managed, student led youth sponsorship program in school district(s) supporting the Installation. Examples of school 154 PROGRAM MANAGEMENT 2015

160 based youth sponsorship programs include Student 2 Student, Junior Student 2 Student or other local student ambassador programs. 8) Facilitate awareness of the Interstate Compact on Education Opportunities for Military Children to Families, Command and schools. b. Partnerships in Education 1) Provide and/or coordinate programs and services that support the education and transitions of mobile military children/youth. Army Partnerships in Education encompasses an array of partners and partnerships established and coordinated through CYS Services to leverage resources in support of the growth and development of children and youth. This model is grounded in the fundamental premise that all segments of the military and civilian community have a stake in today s youth. 2) Provide assistance to Homework Center/Technology Labs in providing tutoring, textbooks, and post secondary preparation materials such local/national tutoring programs, Tutor.com and availability of current textbooks. c. Installation and School Communications 1) Establish a written communication protocol that outlines the School Liaison Officer access to command, lines of authority, and levels of responsibility. 2) Inform and provide information to the Commander on matters relating to schools, youth education issues, school support services and school board attendance. 3) Inform school personnel of information on School Support Services and role of the SLO, Partnerships in Education opportunities, military lifestyle (including impact of deployment and relocation on children), Army policies and procedures related to children/youth and schools (parent-teacher conferences, in-out processing, Installation out of school supervision policy), military structure and resources. 4) Ensure Installation School Support Services website exists and includes the required information as listed in the School Liaison Handbook attachments. 5) Facilitate development and implementation of a Local Action Plan supporting school transitions. This plan specifies how the Installation and school district will address transition issues and identifies initiatives to be implemented for all military students. a) The Local Action Plan should also address special needs and enrichment programs. Chapter 3 155

161 b) The Local Action Plan should be reviewed with school district(s) at least twice a year to determine if adjustments are required. c) Facilitate and support school district efforts to receive Impact Aid by encouraging all military Families to complete and submit Impact Aid forms, assisting the school district(s) with validating forms, and providing a letter from Command in support of district efforts. d) A Local Action Plan may not be needed due to the implementation of the Interstate Compact. If there are issues outside of the Interstate Compact they can be addressed with a Local Action Plan Homeschool Linkages. Gather and share information on homeschooling resources, local school policies and state laws to inform military Families. Facilitate access to CYS Services facilities and program support, including access to computer labs and academic materials to support homeschooled students. a. All Homeschool Families that use the CYS Services facilities must be registered with CYS Services. b. While the Homeschool children are using a CYS Services facility, parents or designated Homeschool Group Leader must stay on site Post Secondary Preparation Opportunities. a. Partner with other Installation organizations to provide support to students (i.e. Youth Services and Army Community Services Employment Readiness). b. Provide information on test preparation software available to military youth. c. Coordinate with local schools/colleges on testing dates and locations. d. Create and disseminate updated list of scholarships available to military dependants. e. Maintain database/information on available vocational programs, junior colleges and career building experiences Additional Professional Responsibilities. a. Register and complete School Liaison Officer On-Line Course. The course is available through the IMCOM Academy at ( b. Follow the CYS Services Management/Trainer IDP to record Installation required training. 156 PROGRAM MANAGEMENT 2015

162 c. Ensure all CYS Services Integrated Online Reporting School Support Services data is accurate and completed by the 10 th of each month for the previous month. d. Develop and facilitate professional learning experiences for Families and school district staff. e. Support liaison opportunities between local schools and CYS Services programs to include Strong Beginnings and Community Based Programs. f. Complete the annual School Support Self-Inspection Checklist at Annex G each April and submit to IMCOM G9 CYS Services School Support Services by 30 April. The purpose of the checklist is to provide School Liaison Officers an opportunity to assess the extent to which they are fulfilling professional responsibilities and determine areas of focus for School Liaison Officer training, technical assistance and support. Chapter 3 157

163 Chapter 4 RESOURCE and PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT FINANCIAL 4-0. Business Practices: a. CYS Services Program is funded and operated as a Category B Morale, Welfare and Recreation activity. There is a minimum of 50% APF Support through Uniform Funding and Management (UFM) to 50% Non Appropriated Fund (NAF) support, primarily through income generated by patron fees. The 50% UFM is a floor, not a ceiling. b. CYS Services MDEP Funds are used only for CYS Services direct operating expenses. NOTE: This means that CYS Services funding does not migrate to other directorates unless specifically authorized by policy or guidance. c. Revenue generated by CYS Services programs stays within CYS Services program arena. NOTE: CYS Services Net Income Before Depreciation (NIBD) is based on the program as a whole, i.e. a loss in CDC is balanced by a profit in SAC. d. CYS Service program management personnel effectively manage CYS Services business operations, to include: 1) Preparing the NAF budget, including UFM. 2) Managing and executing the NAF budget, including UFM. 3) Accounting for variances to NAF budget, including UFM. 4) Knowing the amount of APF available for the Installation program. 5) Provide budget input to the Director and Coordinator. 6) APF support, maximizing through UFM dollars, to reduce the cost to parents and minimize NAF from the Installation. The total APF budget (UFM dollars) is obligated. e. CYS Services is not operated to generate a profit within its own Management Decision Execution Package (MDEP), but is required to break even and uses all approved CYS Services tools in analyzing data. Managers will utilize appropriate analysis of ratio sheets, Daily Activity Reports (DARs), Standard Management Information Reports for Finance (SMIRF), Financial Statements, Labor Scheduling Tools, CYMS reports, etc. to maximize operational efficiencies. f. Activity managers will use daily, weekly and monthly IRO data, financial and utilization data to manage resources and anticipate service trends. 158 Chapter 4

164 4-1. Cost per Space: a. Costs per CYS Services spaces are within DoD and Army ranges as defined by funding by space amounts and associated allocation of spaces. Allocated spaces will reflect the local demand and capacity as negotiated between Region and IMCOM HQ G9 staff. Funding will be determined based on the number of spaces allocated and the cost per space of each. Funding is aligned with quantifiable, objective measures of space delivery. b. Cost per space includes labor costs and NAF revenue on CYS Services standards and metrics, not actuals (staffing template, staff:child ratios, core operating hours, CYPA FT/PT/Flex mix, benefits, salaries, CYS Services fee data review/projections/patron income). Non-labor costs are based on actuals (NAF income statements by General Ledger Accounting Codes (GLAC)-SMIRF). c. Spaces meet the CYS Services metrics for age groups and program type (i.e. infant spaces = 15%, +/- 5%, FCC provides 20% of CYS Services child care spaces, etc.) unless negotiated with Region and IMCOM HQ G9 based on local current demand and capacity conditions. NOTE: This metric should allow program to break even. Deviation may result in financial hardship and not allow program to fill allocated spaces. Programs not in compliance with this standard should be aware of the implications and have a time line for when this will be corrected. For example, a temporary increase in infant spaces from 15% to 30% due to deployment should correct itself as the children age into toddlers and preschoolers. This is accomplished by only filling vacancies according to the current age of the children in care, i.e., a deployment infant who is now a pretoddler leaves. The vacancy is filled by a pre-toddler, not an infant. d. Actual space delivery data is entered monthly into CYS Services web-based reporting and management tool IRO. The data on spaces filled is accurate based on CYMS reports and actual count of children/youth in each program. Information entered into IRO determines management staffing. e. CDC, FCC, SAC and MST programs maintain a daily occupancy rate of at least 85% of the facility /home/program funded spaces. f. Compensatory enrollment of up to 10% per facility will be practiced in regularly scheduled programs when documented circumstances indicate a pattern of absenteeism. Results must be rounded down to the lower whole number (e.g., 10% of 18 pre-toddlers = 1.8. Rounding down permits the program to enroll one, not two additional pre-toddlers.) 4-2. Food Program Financial Management a. Programs enrolled in the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) have been audited in the last 3 years by a Chapter 4 159

165 state or region USDA CACFP office approved agency or Army agency if approved by the state. Any findings identified during the audit will be corrected and identified on the IMCOM G9 CYS Services Food Program Annual Report. All CACFP documentation is current, accurate and reviewed to ensure compliance with USDA regulations. b. Menus are planned and randomly checked for actual cost to monitor CACFP expenses impact. Standardized CYS Services menus will be implemented and where possible, bulk purchases and prime vendor contracts will be used to minimize food costs. c. Each CYS Services program with an operating meal/snack service has a Department Code 7D and kitchen supplies has a Department Code of 726 utilizing appropriate General Ledger Account Code (GLAC). CONUS USDA Reimbursement income is listed under GLAC 543. USDA Program expense is listed under GLAC 691. OCONUS supplement is in GLAC 809. d. USDA expenses and reimbursement or OCONUS Food Program Dividend is accounted for in the program that incurred the reimbursement/expense. e. USDA/OCONUS Supplemental Dividend Funds are not used to pay for any expenses already using UFM (USDA funds may not be used to double dip ) or for positions/expenses not directly related to the food program. NOTE: Cooks are always pure NAF and may not ever be UFM. FEE POLICY 4-3. Fees: The most current DoD and Army Fee Policies have been implemented. This includes the Standard or High Cost Fee Structure, FCC Subsidy guidance, Community Based Child Care Referral Process and Sports and Fitness. The annual Fee Review Reporting Tool and all other Fee Policy related documents are posted for download from AKO. Refer to current Fee Policy and Operational Guidance for additional information. The AKO link to access Fee Policy guidance and tools is: a. Department of Defense (DoDs) Ultimate Goal is to transition all Military Services to standard child care fees for each TFI Category. b. Patrons who choose to request a Financial Hardship Waiver must have their finances reviewed by an Army Community Services (ACS) Financial Counselor or a certified financial professional external to F&MWR. Garrison Commanders (GC) may temporarily adjust fees for individual Families on a case-by-case-basis. c. Unless an approved Financial Hardship Waiver has been requested and approved, services will be terminated and a collection action will be initiated if full payment is not received prior to the start of the 3rd semi-monthly billing cycle. 160 RESOURCE and PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 2015

166 Therefore, Hardship Waivers must be submitted to allow sufficient response time to preclude termination of services in those cases where a request would be granted. Even if a Hardship Waiver has been requested, services will be denied until approved. Hardship waiver discounts are not funded from CYS Services MDEP funds. Category 9A Contractors are not eligible for Hardship waivers, multiple child discounts or fee assistance. d. Operational Hardships for staff fee reductions are only offered with IMCOM G9 approval. Installations must re-apply with justification annually. All requests are approved/disapproved by IMCOM G9 CYS Services. Request must be forwarded to the IMCOM G9 Parent and Outreach Services. e. Parental fees are only used to compensate employees directly involved in providing care/supervision and for food service and sanitation expenses (cook salary, cleaning supplies, food-related expenses not paid by the USDA or DoD APFs, etc.), consumable supplies and some non-capital equipment. Parental fees are not used to compensate management staff and clerical staff. f. Registration of children and youth for the CYSFP is conducted at PCS. The Sports and Fitness fees must be paid before any youth may participate. Additionally, fees and charges are authorized for activities and programs to help defray the cost of operations and to provide supplies, materials, and equipment necessary for the activity or program. g. Fees published for Child & Youth Sports and Fitness are the same as those provided IAW most current DoD and Army Fee Policies. Fees are paid in full at the beginning of the selected sport season or activity. h. A Multiple Child Reduction (MCR) is given to Families when more than one child is enrolled in any youth sport during the same sport season. Discounts for volunteer coaches are in accordance with the most current DoD and Army Fee Policy. i. Fees for team sports that are not listed in sports activity fee chart are locally determined per current DoD and Army Fee Policy guidance. j. An annual fee audit of the processes and procedures used to determine Total Family Income (TFI) and the assignment of child and youth fees has been conducted within the last year. For information on conducting the audit see the Army Child and Youth Annual Fee Audit Operational Guidance on the CYS Services Professional website at k. Family Child Care Business Policies: 1) All new FCC providers must participate in the FCC Fee Assistance and Support Incentive Program in order to receive fee assistance. Existing FCC Chapter 4 161

167 providers who are currently not receiving subsidies may continue to choose not to participate in the FCC provider Support Initiatives. Existing FCC providers who select not to participate in the Provider Support Initiatives will only receive RIMP and training support. IMCOM must establish Army standard FCC Fees that are 10 percent 20 percent below installation fees based on the availability of funds. 2) All Families using FCC must enroll their children through Parent Central Services Even though FCC providers are well trained to provide quality and safe care, accidents/injuries can and do happen. To better protect them from claims, the Army is committed to including all FCC providers in the Army Risk Management (RIMP) claims fund program. a. RIMP is a fund established to pay parental claims arising from the death of or injury to, a child in the care of a FCC provider. The claim must be based on a negligent act (something done), or an omission (something not done) by a FCC provider. The act must result in the death or injury of a child in the care of a provider. b. All provisionally and fully certified FCC providers, including approved substitute providers and authorized members of the household living in government-owned or leased quarters are covered. c. Participation in RIMP ensures that children in your care have the best possible protection. It also demonstrates your commitment to your business, your customers, and the children. It shows you have taken steps to control risk. Participation in RIMP is a condition of FCC certification. d. RIMP is not a substitute for private insurance. You make that decision as an independent business owner. The Army does not require you to carry private insurance to become a certified FCC provider. Annex H: RIMP Request form EFMP Respite Care Funding/Child Care Cost: a. EFMP Respite Care funding may not be used to reduce/eliminate full day child care fees in Army operated CYS Services programs. This includes FCC providers. b. Any or all rates/costs for the CYS Services programs, including hourly care are the responsibility of the sponsor. c. Family Programs will pay all salaries associated with EFMP providers. d. FCC providers can provide respite care as part of FCC Extended Hours Home, regardless of the time of day the care is provided. The FCC provider must 162 RESOURCE and PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 2015

168 continue to follow all CYS Services policies and procedures to include providing only those services and medical procedures authorized by CYS Services. e. EFM children count in the FCC provider s caseload Community Based Programs Fee Assistance a. Community Based Programs will be configured to meet the needs of the installation. b. Efforts shall be made to ensure quality, affordable child care options exist for all eligible patrons, including those geographically dispersed active duty military and their families. Community Based child care options are designed to supplement, not replace, child care programs on the Installations. c. Care may be delivered through military-approved community-based child development programs, utilizing a myriad of delivery systems, including existing child care facilities, schools, recreation and after-school and summer programs, and home-based care programs. d. Programs that support the needs of eligible Families in approved militaryapproved community-based child care programs where care is needed for a shortterm basis during the deployment phase must meet the state licensing regulations and requirements and be inspected by an outside agency once a year. All other types of care must meet the intent of this instruction. e. Programs shall meet state licensing standards for background checks. f. In accordance with the Army Child & Youth Programs (SY) Fee Policy, Army Installations are required to refer Army Families to the General Services Administration (GSA) when children cannot be placed in Installation Operated or Affiliated Programs within 30 days of request for child care when these programs exist within the Installation catchment area. The process for referring patrons is outlined below Understandings, agreements and responsibilities: a. IMCOM G9, CYS Services will: 1) Ensure all Army Installation PCS offices have current Points of Contact for GSA (as the Third Party Administrator for the fee assistance program). In addition, IMCOM G9 staff telephones, web sites and hot lines are available as applicable. 2) Provide the GSA the contact information for Installation PCS Points of Contact. Chapter 4 163

169 3) Provide marketing materials such as rack cards and flyers. b. Installation PCS staff will: 1) Verify the non-availability or availability of Installation spaces by signing a Statement of Non-Availability/Availability Form with the exception of geographically dispersed families and school age Families. This form is returned to the Sponsor or if received directly from GSA, returned to GSA within 2 business days of receipt in order to determine the sponsor s eligibility for benefits. 2) Maintain on file copies of all non-availability/availability statements. 3) Inform Families of the availability of fee assistance for Community Based programs. c. Explain two types of child care for the Installation: 1) On-post Options: a) Center Based Care b) Family Child Care 2) Off-Post Options: a) Center Base Care b) Family Child Care d. Determine what type of child care the patron is looking for. If they state Center Based or FCC, verify the availability of openings in the CYMS. e. If there is space available on the Installations within 30 days, normal registration process applies. f. In the event there are no available child care spaces within 30 days, refer families to the GSA Third Party Administrator and perform the following: g. Contact the GSA at or by phone at to enroll in Army Fee Assistance programs. h. Families referred to Community Based Programs by the Installation must be enrolled in the Community Based Activity within CYMS for those parents who are referred to GSA. 164 RESOURCE and PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 2015

170 i. Perform the following modified registration procedures in CYMS: 1) Ensure the basic required demographic data for the Family is entered into CYMS: a) Initial demographic data from the patron can be obtained in person, from a WebTrac application or via or phone. b) Confirm accuracy/completeness of the data through a desk side, telephonic or electronic interview. c) Complete modified registration by filling in the following CYMS screens: Sponsor Screen, Spouse screen and the first child screen. NOTE: for the modified registration: NO PAPER WORK IS REQUIRED. Patrons must complete all of the regular registration requirements before children can participate in on-post CYS Services programs. No CYMS pass is to be issued without the paperwork. d) Enroll all applicable children into the current month Community Based Referral activity. See attached CYMS Topic Doc-Community Based Programs. e) Details on setting up and running these CYMS reports are included in the CYMS Topic-Doc Community Based Programs. f) Maintain the referral information in CYMS on a monthly basis for the fiscal year. g) As part of the End of Year Closeout (30 September), PCS will ensure all required reports are on hand and then transfer all of the referrals of the past year to history. This allows them to reuse the same Community Based Referral activity every year. h) Detailed instructions for this End of the Year process are included in the CYMS Topic Doc-Community Based Programs. j. Families using Community Based full-day services pay fees comparable to those on post. k. Installation conducts local market analysis/surveys to ensure rates charged by participating Community Based providers are reasonable for the geographical area and the provider s baseline rates (excluding Army Fee Assistance) are the same for military and non-military children. When Army Fee Assistance is factored in, fees charged to Army Families are comparable to those on post for full-day care. Chapter 4 165

171 l. All fee reductions/discounts available to non-military children by Community Based providers (e.g. early payment discounts, multiple children and vacation credits are also available to military children. This information is considered before any additional Army Fee Assistance is determined as part of the parent fee calculations. m. Families and providers are provided information on Fee Assistance enrollment. n. Customer Service issues or suspected fraud is reported per IMCOM G9 guidance. o. For additional information see Annex I: The Army Fee Assistance Family Handbook. PERSONNEL 4-8. CYS Services Staffing Configuration. CYS Services programs are staffed according to the number of filled spaces (such as numbers of enrolled children in Child Development Centers determines number of managers) or established workload (such as numbers of meals/snacks prepared determines number of cooks). Staff who work directly with children and youth are determined by staff/ratio. For example, there is one Child and Youth Program Assistant (CYPA) for every 4 infants or 15 youth. All other staff are determined by completing the Staffing Worksheet found in the Integrated Reporting Online (IRO) under the Generate Reports Tab / Staffing Reports. The link to IRO is For assistance on staffing rules in IRO, click on Help / select Help Topics Tab / select Staffing Rules. When deciding on both the salary for an individual and number of staff to hire for a position, consideration should be given to the total level of available funding. NOTE: It is expected that the Staffing Template will be updated in FY 15. Installations will be notified of any changes Position Descriptions for staff positions can be found at the Fully Automated System for Classification (FASCLASS) website: Once you are logged in to IRO, you can view individual position descriptions through the link to FASCLASS provided in the Staffing Worksheet. a. Family Child Care Directors should develop a Position Description for FCC providers to be used to orient new FCC provider applicants as to the expected job requirements Programs do not operate unless sufficient management and direct in-ratio staff are present to provide the necessary program oversight that will reduce potential harm to children and youth while they are in CYS Services Programs Data concerning the operation of CYS Services programs (such as enrollments and staffing) is input into IRO by the 10 th of the following month. As IRO is a 166 RESOURCE and PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 2015

172 management tool as well as a reporting tool, Program Managers, (i.e. the Child Development Center (CDC) Director, the School Age Care Program Manager), are responsible for inputting the data into IRO monthly Management staff will review the Installation Staffing Summary and the Installation Detail Spaces Reports monthly. a. The Installation Staffing Summary Report compares authorized positions calculated on information input into IRO to the actual positions on board. The Installation Staffing Summary reports on three of the four categories of CYS Services Staff: Management, Specialist, and Support Staff (the 4 th category, direct in ratio CYPA Staff is calculated by ratio requirements). The Installation should align the staffing as closely as possible to the IRO recommendations. However, sometimes a variation may be necessary to meet the needs of the program. If the staffing as outlined on IRO does not match the actual staffing, an analysis must be conducted to determine if the program is overstaffed or understaffed. 1) If overstaffed, a plan must be put into place as to how to rectify the situation, typically through attrition or reassignment to another position within the organization or MWR. If the program wishes to retain the employee in the current position, a business case must be made with adequate justification as to why the position or individual is critical to the success of the mission, how the cost of the employee will be absorbed without a detrimental effect on the program, and suggested strategies for not recruiting an authorized position in favor of keeping the current position. 2) If understaffed, a plan must be put in place to recruit or justify filling the vacancy is not necessary for effective management of the program. A justification of lack of funding is not sufficient to prove that the position is not required, just that a hiring action cannot be supported without additional funding or reallocation of current funding. b. The Installation Detail Spaces Report displays enrollments and attendance by age group and compares funded spaces to operational spaces, thus, highlighting vacancies. It is useful in determining the requirement for the CYPA staff. This report, combined with an analysis of the staff/child ratio sheets in the CDP and youth attendance reports in the MST program will pinpoint areas and times when the staff is over or under ratio. Steps must be taken to ensure staff is at ratio, not over or under. Often, it can be determined that while one classroom was short a staff member, there were other classrooms that had one extra. c. The Sports and Fitness Director recruits and supervises qualified Clinicians per IRO staffing model. Chapter 4 167

173 4-13. When additional staff, FCC providers or volunteers are required, systems must be in place to recruit only the best qualified. The recruitment effort must also focus on the retention of those highly skilled. a. Recruitment actions are initiated and staff/providers on board within a 60 day window. The 60 day begins when the Hiring Official submits a recruitment action to Human Resources. b. FCC providers are recruited in accordance with policy and when a documented need exists. Being an FCC provider is a privilege and not a right, only the best qualified candidates willing to provide the services required should be recruited. For example, if the need is to increase infant spaces, recruiting providers only willing to care for preschoolers is not justified. c. All volunteers are registered with P&OS who oversees for CYS Services. Local procedures are developed for recruiting, screening, interviewing, placing, orienting, training, evaluating, and recognizing volunteers. DD form Volunteer Agreement, DA form Volunteer Service Record, and DA form Volunteer Daily Time Record Supervision are utilized. d. A recognition plan/protocol is in place to reward employees, providers and volunteers in accordance with AR e. Efforts to retain staff should be reflected by an annual turnover rate of less than 30% using the Annual Report turnover formula The Child and Youth Personnel Pay Program (CYP3) will be fully implemented IAW public law (PL) a. CYPA pay increases and promotions will be tied to successful completion of training and demonstrated competence within prescribed time frames. Evidence of completed training and demonstrated competence will be provided to NAF Human Resources Office (HRO) to justify the non-competitive promotions. Additional factors for promotion include areas such as time and attendance, work ethic, and compliance with other non-training related employee performance standards. 1) Entry level CYPA staff will receive promotions from CYPA-2 to CYPA-3 with a minimum of three months full time equivalency and a maximum of 6 months full time equivalency. 2) Skill level CYPA staff will receive promotions from CYPA-3 to CYPA-4 with a minimum of 12 months full time equivalency and a maximum of 18 months full time equivalency. 3) CYPAs will be promoted within two pay periods of meeting the requirements in accordance with nonappropriated fund (NAF) pay-band policies. 168 RESOURCE and PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 2015

174 4) Every CYPA position description (PD) contains the phrase, Successful completion of training and demonstrated competence is a job requirement. If the employee fails in either of these areas, steps must be taken to ensure either separation or continued employment contingent upon completion of training and improved performance. 5) CYPAs transferring from other Installation CYS Services programs will be reinstated according to AR Retention of pay rates and full/part time status should be honored at gaining garrisons. Transferring employees on LWOP should be reinstated at equivalent pay rates and duty schedules as held previously and not have to start over as flex or at entry level. 6) New-to-the-Army CYPAs will start at the highest rate of pay for which they qualify (CYPA-2, 3 or 4 depending on their qualifications). 7) Time in grade and successful completion of training are transferable between facility-based and FCC programs. Therefore, a Fully Certified FCC provider with a CDA credential and appropriate experience is qualified to apply for a Program Lead position. A Skill Level CYPA may transfer to FCC as fully certified vs. provisionally certified, provided training requirements are met. 8) Flex employees will be eligible to become regular part time (RPT) and regular full time (RFT) employees without having to complete Foundation Training. b. 75% of the program's total labor hours are paid to direct program staff who are in benefit status. You can calculate this by using the total hours worked in a two week period and include the Collective Bargaining agreement (where applicable). Consider all direct care staff in the Installation CYP programs. Total all hours worked by direct care staff in the two week period, then total the hours worked by those direct care staff who receive benefits. The percentage of those with benefits will be 75% or higher. 1) 25% of CYPAs are APF supported and 75% are pure NAF. 2) Flex employees will be used only for limited time periods to substitute for regularly scheduled staff or as subordinate staff in hourly care programs and will comprise no more than 25% of the caregiving staff. PERSONNEL POLICIES CYS Services personnel policies include: a. The employer s copy of staff personnel actions and FCC Director s copy of FCC provider records (DA Forms 5219-R, 5220-R, 5762-R and 5221-R) will be kept in Chapter 4 169

175 the facility/program (records must be stored in a secure location with limited access). b. Each employee must have a standard CYS Services NAF PD. Use of nonstandard CYS Services PDs are not authorized unless permission has been granted from IMCOM G9. c. Support Pages (specific positions only) on employees have been completed and are on file outlining specific job requirements and collateral duties. In instances where union agreements preclude the use of Support Pages, the standards will be included in the employees performance standards. Support pages are located on the CYS Services AKO site. d. Hiring practices include reference checks, personal interviews and background checks of all categories of personnel. e. A hard copy of AR will be made easily accessible to all staff. f. Supervisors must meet at least twice a year with all employees to review job performance and document on DA Form or DA Form The ratings will be due on a specified date each year or on the anniversary date of the employee s service computation date, as determined by the servicing CPAC/NAF CPU. 1) All employees must have written job performance standards that are contained in their program personnel files. 2) Satisfactory performance is determined based on management observations and employee compliance with expected performance standards. g. Staff and providers will be held accountable for successfully executing their duties as outlined in their performance plan. Failure to demonstrate on the job competence results in performance counseling and may lead to additional adverse actions in accordance with AR (employees) and AR (providers). h. Staff at all levels will participate in their own evaluation and receive a written official annual performance appraisal within the prescribed time frame. Employees who demonstrate on the job competence receive awards, promotions, increased compensation, and commendations as appropriate. i. Child and Youth Sports and Fitness Program (CYSFP) Director or designee provides periodic supervision during the season and written evaluation of coaches at the end of each sport they coach. NOTE: National Alliance for Youth Sports (NAYS) has Website for evaluation of coaches. Parents should have the opportunity to evaluate coaches on the NAYS website: RESOURCE and PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 2015

176 j. Managers and Trainers will perform periodic spot checks on volunteers to ensure they are providing the services outlined in the volunteer agreement. Program Oversight To ensure sufficient staff are available to provide program oversight the following procedures apply: a. A Facility Director/Program Manager or Assistant Director must be on duty at all times. 1) When none are available, a Supervisory Program Specialist (SPS) or Satellite Site Leader may be left in charge. 2) In rare instances, a CYPA 5 Program Lead or other CYS Services Management staff may act as the manager. A Trainer should only act in lieu of a management staff when no others are available. NOTE: For nontraditional management staff to act as a manager, consider adding it as a nonroutine duty on the Support Page. 3) In programs open only Monday Friday, Director or Assistant Director must be scheduled to both open and close the facility on a regular basis. The Supervisory Lead is not used for opening or closing in lieu of the Director or Assistant Director, but intermittently. For the Youth Center, the Work Force Prep Specialist and EDGE Director can also serve in this capacity when needed. b. CYSFP staff are on duty at all times youth are participating in sports and fitness programs. On duty does not require a paid staff member at every field. CYSFP staff should conduct daily random checks, but it is not required staff check every field on a daily basis. c. SPS and Education Technician (Mentor) are full time employees. In accordance with IRO, programs may hire Mentors in lieu of, but not in addition to, SPS positions. For example, IRO states the program is authorized three SPS positions. Installations may hire 3 SPS, 2 SPS and 1 Mentor, 1 SPS and 2 Mentors, or 3 Mentors. d. Program Associates, Program Leads and Primary CYPAs must be part time or full time employees. e. Program Leads must be on board for every four (4) ratios of children/youth. If funds are available, program leads may be on board for every two (2) ratio groups. Chapter 4 171

177 4-17. To ensure sufficient staff are available to maintain adequate staff/child ratios, and that breaks, lunches, training time and planning time are considered when staffing, the following procedures apply: a. CYPAs will have one (1) hour for planning time per week and one (1) hour of training time per week. b. All Lead CYPAs/teachers will have two (2) hours for planning time per week and one (1) hour of training time per week. c. Strong Beginnings Pre-K teachers will receive one (1) hour of planning time per day. d. Training time may be scheduled in 1, 2, 3, or 4 hour blocks each month and must focus on CYS Services training content. The training time is intended to allow the CYPA s undivided attention to be focused on the training. e. CYPA staff who work more than four (4) hours will receive a 15 minute paid break. The break may not exceed 15 minutes during each 4 hours of continuous work and cannot be a continuation of lunch. SPS staff, required to be in classrooms 50% of the time, will be the primary source to maintaining ratios when staff are on a break or at lunch. f. CYPAs working more than 6 hours get a 30 minute non-paid lunch break, except during a field trip when no breaks are given. CYPA will be paid for a 20 minute on the job lunch period. g. Unless on a field trip, CYPA lunches are not scheduled during child lunch periods. SPS staff will be the primary source of maintaining ratios when staff are on a break. h. CYS Services professional staff, Trainers/Directors will be used in ratio only during short term emergencies (less than 2 hours per day on a temporary basis). When no CYPA staff are available, SPS staff are the first choice for emergency back-up care followed by Assistant Directors, then Trainers. i. Work schedules and child ratios will be documented daily and analyzed monthly by Assistant Directors and SPS staff, and analyzed quarterly by the Facility Manager/Program Director. Permanent changes to the schedule occur as trends develop with proper notification to the union. 172 RESOURCE and PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 2015

178 4-18. Basic Youth Tech Lab (YTL) Management Functions and Responsibilities: Program Manager Has direct oversight over YTLPL and physical property YTL Daily/Weekly Monthly Task list Ensures that tasks are complete Ensures that staff have access to the lab for training and planning purposes when no children/youth are in the program Youth Technology Lab Program Lead (YTLPL) Directly responsible for developing and delivering age and community appropriate programming in YTLPL Completes the Task list informs Program Manager and FTS of any irregularities Ensures that children and youth sign in/out, are authorized by parent to engage in activity and have been trained and tested Functional Technology Specialist (FTS) Develops and approves programming in conjunction with Trainer and Program Manager. Provides training, guidance and mentors YTLPL. Responds to irregularities identified by YTLPL and solves or escalates to Infrastructure Maintenance Management System (IMMS)* F&MWR Information Assurance Security Officer (IASO) Ensures that staff have been trained in basic computer skills and are trained in Emergency procedures and facilitating in the lab. Ensures that YTLPL is in compliance with procedures, informs Program Manager of irregularities. Coordinator (CYSSC) Ensures system is in place, used consistently and effectively Ensures the system is in place, used consistently and effectively Ensures that the lab is available for outside organizations and Youth Groups. Ensures that these groups abide by applicable rules and have time scheduled with FTS/YTLPL to avoid conflicts with CYS Services programs *Basic maintenance and troubleshooting will be done by the YTLPL all remaining issues will be forwarded to the FTS for resolution. The FTS may refer to the IASO for assistance (or report through IMMS All other technology maintenance (connectivity, staff and management workstations, peripherals and CYMS hardware maintenance, troubleshooting and repair are the responsibility of the F&MWR IASO). Mini-Technology Lab Computers (TLC) is a static image with no connectivity all maintenance/troubleshooting/repair done by FTS with assistance through IMMS* Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR). Program Manager is responsible for physical property and use by direct care staff in Strong Beginnings/Pre-K or Kinder as locally age appropriate Basic Video Surveillance System (VSS) Management Functions and Responsibilities. For more information see the VSS Guidebook on the CYS Services Professional website at Chapter 4 173

179 Program Manager Program Clerk Functional Technology Specialist (FTS) VSS Daily Checklist completed by or delegated to Program Clerk VSS Weekly Checklist alternates with FTS. All issues solved or reported to SPAWAR within 24 hours Identify Incidents, pull video and record VSS Daily Checklist all irregularities reported to Program Manager or FTS immediately Troubleshoots and solves or reports to SPAWAR within 24 hours VSS Weekly Checklist alternates with Program Manager. All issues solved or reported to SPAWAR within 24 hours Identify Incidents, pull video and record Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command (SPAWAR) SPAWAR will provide support via technical assistance (phone, parts or onsite) SPAWAR will provide support via technical assistance (phone, parts or onsite) Bi-annual Preventive Maintenance Visits (PMV) (should include basic training to Clerks and Management team with certification by FTS ala demonstrate the skill CPR training) Provide Training during Bi-Annual PMV. a. Rack access will be documented via the Rack access log and maintained at the VSS Rack (TAB A to VSS Guidebook). b. The management team (the director, assistant director(s), supervisory program specialist(s) and training & curriculum/programming specialist(s)) at each facility is required to view one hour of real time video surveillance footage each week when they are physically at work during program operating hours. 1) Viewing of the video surveillance footage should be recorded on the VSS Log (TAB A to VSS Guidebook) and documented on the VSS Observation Record (TAB B to VSS Guidebook). 2) Each member of the management team should review the log and observations prior to conducting their own observation to ensure that they are reviewing a different room/area of the facility than what were viewed previously by their team members. Every effort should be made to view classrooms / activity areas at different times of day through-out the week. 3) Observations should include at a minimum the names of the staff members in the footage, the number of children and the activities that are on-going. 4) If during the observation, the observer sees any significant health or safety risk, immediate intervention must occur to include appropriate disciplinary action. 174 RESOURCE and PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 2015

180 Ratios c. Daily and Weekly Checklists (TABS C and D to VSS Guidebook) will be completed as listed above and maintained in the Program for a period of NLT 3 years Staff to child/youth ratios must be maintained at all times of the day, indoors and outdoors. The intent is to always be at ratio and not over or under ratio. Ratios are: a. Infants 6 weeks to 1 st birthday = 1:4 b. Pre-toddlers 12 months 2 nd birthday = 1:5 c. Toddlers 24 months 3 rd birthday = 1:7 d. Preschoolers 36 months to Kindergarten = 1:10 e. Kindergarten = 1:12 f. SAC co-mingled with kindergarteners = 1:12 g. SAC = 1:15 h. Youth = 1:15 NOTE: This standard is intended to address the ratio of personnel to children and youth in a program as a whole, rather than for a particular room or group of children and youth. In other words, a program with 60 participant s age six and over would need at least four staff members to meet the specified ratio. Chapter 4 175

181 i. Ratios are met at all times with the following stipulations and exceptions: OTHER RATIO REQUIREMENTS Compensatory Enrollment Nap Time Instructional Classes Sports Resident Camps Field trips and Tours (including bus transportation) Occasionally all children will be present. When this happens, additional staff must be brought in to meet the prescribed ratios. If ratios for children over 24 months are doubled during nap time, the other staff person remains in the building to assist with emergencies. For pre-toddlers/toddler rooms where there are children 24 months and younger, the ratios cannot be reduced during nap. Follow professionaly accepted practices with consideration given to ages and skill levels of participants and type of instruction being provided. Follow the adult to child/youth ratios defined by the national governing body rules for each sport; volunteers may be used to meet the ratios. Following the American Camping Association adult to youth raios; only adult employees/contractors are used to meet the ratios. A normal paid staff ratio for age group with adult volunteers used to supplement adul employees and reduce overall group size, especially for off post trips. Additional volunteers to supplement the ratio are NOT required for routine trips to and from school or other CYS Services/MWR facilites Ratios will not be decreased to accommodate children/youth with special needs unless required by law. Volunteers or other non-cys Services staff not paid with CYS Services funding may be used to supplement the ratio All rooms in a CDC will be multi-aged with a minimum age span of 18 months excluding preschool Maximum group size is limited to two ratios of children/youth (e.g. two ratios of preschoolers = 20; a ratio of infants and a ratio of pre-toddlers = 9). Ratios are not lowered when combining multi-aged children, as authorized in DoDI a. The standard allows for standard design rooms constructed for 30 preschoolers to be used when each ratio has clearly divided space and basic interest areas as outlined in the CDC Space Census Course and materials. b. Group sizes must be met at all times except during playground periods and special activities. Sufficient staff will be on the playground to meet ratios at all times. 176 RESOURCE and PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 2015

182 c. Personnel in direct care of children/youth have primary responsibility and accountability for a group of children. d. When one staff member is alone in the room with a single ratio of children or during naptime if ratios are doubled, they must have a completed background check and be monitored through VSS or visual access panels. The adult monitoring the staff member must also have a completed favorable background check. The location of the VSS should allow for easy monitoring by various people as view rotates. e. For SAC, the accountability/choice/locator board should be used to allow children to have modified level of freedom, but children still must be supervised by staff. Unless the following conditions are met: When one staff member is alone in the activity area they must have a completed background check and be monitored through VSS or visual access panels. The location of the VSS should allow for easy monitoring by various people as the view rotates. SAC is staffed and grouped according to minimum facility mandatory ratio Youth Programs (YP) are staffed and grouped according to minimum mandatory ratios and group sizes. Enforcement of ratios and group sizes ensures the adequate supervision of youth and minimizes liability for the Army. In YC settings, adult staff-toyouth ratios apply to the entire facility, not to a single activity area. Only those staff members who have direct supervisory responsibility for youth may be counted in adult staff-to-youth ratios. Youth are not required to be maintained in groups of 15, but may move around as they choose both within and around the facility. Volunteers may be counted towards achieving a lower group size, but only when assigned to a specific CYS Services activity and only in the presence of CYS Services staff. a. Group size. Group sizes are dependent upon the type of YC activity and must support developmental programming, safety and risk factors, as well as building or room-carrying capacity. b. When one staff member is alone an activity room with a single ratio of youth, They must have a completed background check. The adult monitoring the staff member through VSS or visual access panels must also have a completed favorable background check. The location of the VSS should allow for easy monitoring by various people and the view rotates. Youth Program is staffed and grouped according to minimum mandatory facility ratio. Enforcement of ratios and group sizes ensures the adequate supervision of YP youth and minimizes liability. c. Ratios. 1) To protect the health and safety of youth, and to ensure developmental programming and positive youth/adult interaction, a sufficient number of YP personnel must be present at all times. Chapter 4 177

183 2) Adult staff may not be counted in the adult staff-to-youth ratio unless they are physically present and provide direct service to youth. Staff must be 18 years of age or older in order to be counted in ratio. 3) In situations where an unexpected influx of participation requires an immediate increase in staff, CYS Services support and management personnel, to include the Trainer, may be used on a temporary basis to maintain ratio. 4) On field trips, ratios must be maintained by paid staff supplemented with adults such as parents or volunteers. NOTE: This standard is intended to address the ratio of personnel to children and youth in a program as a whole, rather than for a particular room or group of children and youth. In other words, a program with 60 participant s age six and over would need at least four staff members to meet the specified ratio In the Sports and Fitness program, appropriate youth/adult ratios are maintained 100% of the time during all sports and fitness programs' operating hours. Depending on the team, the ratio is different team configuration is based on the national governing body. The volunteer is the adult in the ratio Bus Transportation. a. CYS Services does not provide bus monitors when transporting children/youth from schools to the CYS Services programs at CYS Services expense. If a CYS Services employee (a CYPA cannot be a regular bus driver) or a contracted employee is in the role of providing this transportation, a CNACI is required. Ratios are not taken until the children are at the front door of the CYS Services programs. A complete sweep is made of the bus to ensure no children are left behind. b. The transportation funding for the CYS Services busses is intended to transport youth to and from the youth centers. This transportation enables youth to reach the front doors of our programs they otherwise would not be able to attend. Transportation funding is not intended for overnight travel or normal budgeted operations or school bus transportation. c. Ensure that all children transported during the program day are accounted for before, during, and after transport. d. For FCC, CDC and SAC children that arrive from school via bus, the parents are notified if children do not arrive. If parent request is to notify when youth do not show up at the program, ensure system is in place. 178 RESOURCE and PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 2015

184 EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK CYS Services Coordinator will create an Employee Handbook to familiarize the CYS Services employees with the components and basic policies of the installation s CYS Services Programs and to provide employees with guidelines for personal conduct as a self-confident, knowledgeable, professional member of the CYS Services staff. The handbook will be reviewed and approved for use by the Civilian Personnel Advisory Center (CPAC), Staff Judge Advocate (SJA), Employee Assistance Program (EAP), Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO), and the local union. Employees will be required to read the Employee Handbook carefully, referring to it as needed as a valuable resource for understanding the organization and the mission. All employees have important roles to play in any organization and will be expected to conduct themselves in a professional manner at all time remembering that first impressions are often lasting impressions. After reading the handbook, employees will sign acknowledging they have read and understand the Employee Handbook within their first week of employment Employee Handbook topics should address: a. CYS Services Mission b. CYS Services Vision c. CYS Services Goals d. Chain of Command e. Customer Service Caregiver Creed and Customer Covenant f. Time and Attendance (Schedules, check In/Out, Punctuality, Mission Essential Personnel, Overtime/compensatory Time) g. Scheduled Breaks (Rest Periods, Lunch Periods) h. Training Requirements (Training plan, quarterly reviews) i. Positive Guidance and Appropriate Touch j. Professional Development (Position Description, Career Development, Performance Standards & Ratings) k. Orientation Checklist l. Occupational Health Requirements (TB Tine, Physicals) m. Attire/Personal Hygiene Chapter 4 179

185 n. Communication o. Transportation of Children p. For APF: Civilian Corps New Employee Handbook / For NAF: Non-Appropriated Fund Employee Handbook LABOR RELATIONS Commanders and supervisors are reminded to fulfill all applicable labor relations obligations. Consult with your local Civilian Personnel Advisory Center (CPAC) Labor Management Employee Relations Advisor. COLLECTIVE BARGAINING Collective Bargaining (CB) is a process of good faith negotiations between employers and the exclusive representative of a group of employees aimed at reaching agreements that regulate working conditions. It is defined as, the performance of the mutual obligation of the representative of an agency and the exclusive representative of employees in an appropriate unit in the agency to meet at reasonable times and to consult and bargain in a good-faith effort to reach agreement with respect to the conditions of employment affecting such employees and to execute, if requested by either party, a written document incorporating any collective bargaining reached, but the obligation referred to in this paragraph does not compel either party to agree to a proposal or to make a concession. 10 U.S.C. 7103a(12). Managers should review any collective bargaining affecting their employees when they begin working at a CYS Services activity. In the case of Army CYS Services, the interests of the employees are commonly represented by a union to which the employees belong. The interests of CYS Services are usually represented by a management team including a Management Employee Relations Specialist from the local Civilian Personnel Advisory Center and supervisors or managers from the relevant CYS Services activity The Collective Bargaining and subsequent bargaining addresses bargaining unit members conditions of employment. Conditions of employment are personnel policies, practices, and matters, whether established by rule, regulation, or otherwise, affecting working conditions, except that such term shall not include policies, practices, and matters relating to political activities, relating to classification of any position, or specifically provided for by Federal statute. (See Antilles Consolidation Education Association 22 FLRA 235 (1986)). Examples of conditions of employment which may be subject to substantive or implementation bargaining includes: a. working hours/changes in schedule b. training c. overtime 180 RESOURCE and PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 2015

186 d. grievance mechanisms A collective bargaining agreement (CBA) is usually in force for a fixed term of years. When that term is up, it is typically renegotiated between management and the union. Sometimes there are disputes over whether one side or the other is complying with the CBA. If these cannot be resolved, arbitration typically ensues. Arbitration may be similar to an informal court hearing. An arbitrator then rules on whether the agreement has been breached and orders a remedy if breach has occurred It is of utmost importance that CYS Services works in earnest with the Union, where a duty to bargain exists, to ensure program success and to ensure management does not commit unfair labor practices. Sometimes the Art of Compromise must be used to ensure a win-win situation and ensure fair and equitable managementemployee relations. Keep in mind, however, that the CBA should not be contrary to law and should not impact management rights Areas that typically require careful bargaining include: a. Staff scheduling. Generally, CYS Services programs set work hours and may temporarily or permanently change employee work schedules or duty station to meet the mission. However, according to most CBAs, notifications of impending changes are required. There should be a clause indicating that during emergency situations, an employee may have to work additional hours or in a different work setting. b. Breaks/Lunches. CYS Services standards require a 15 minute paid break after four hours of work, and a non-paid lunch break after 6 hours of work (typically 30 minutes, although 60 minutes is allowed). Most CBAs include this provision. c. Fair Work Hours. In programs where there are many Flex employees, the CBA may have a clause requiring all flex employees to receive approximately the same number of hours per week. CHILD, YOUTH AND SCHOOL (CYS) SERVICES-BRANDED APPAREL The CYS Services Coordinator will maintain a professionally-attired, readilyidentified workforce that promotes continuity, workforce pride and ultimately impacts positively on customer service. CYS Services Program Directors will make reasonable provisions for turn-in and re-issue of CYS Services-branded apparel due to normal wear and tear at no cost to the employee. CYS Services-branded apparel replacement due to staff member negligence shall be at the staff member s expense The appropriate CYS Services logo on the branded apparel is. Using the correct Child, Youth and School Services logo in our programs will end customer confusion and provide a logo for CYS Services programs and services that Chapter 4 181

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