Challenges to the uptake of ehealth and digital solutions in the EU and the role of the ESI Funds. Csizmadia István

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1 Challenges to the uptake of ehealth and digital solutions in the EU and the role of the ESI Funds Csizmadia István

2 Challenges in New ideas and analysis by Dr Cameron K. Murray Tuesday, December 14, 2010 Health economics unnecessary treatment and economic costs of illness... and goodbye inking.com/2010/12/healtheconomics-unnecessarytreatment.html Health economy Digital economy ESIF programmes

3 CHALLENGES LACK OF WORKFORCE AGING POPULATION GROWING NEEDS GROWING EXPENCES TECH VALIDATION (HTA) SUSTAINABILITY ACCES / EQITY DIGITAL economy HEALTH economy ESIF

4 Traditional care models are unlikely to sustain the escalating growth in patient needs and healthcare costs in high-income economies. Digital medicine innovation holds promise to help reduce inefficiencies in health-care delivery, improve access, increase quality, and make medicine more personalized and precise in an era of increasing budget constraints.

5 DATA IMPROVED OUTCOMES Quality and length of life Efficiency Patient experience HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT Innovation management and Design thinking Gritty individual, teams, organizations, system Education, training, empowerment Human resources provision / supply SYSTEM GOVERNANCE Pathway management, Deinstitutionalisation, Access, Prevention Service and system performance assessment LOGISTICS Supply, Purchasing and Inventory Waste management FINTECH Controlling Financial management Performance assessment Unlocking the potential from data collected across the NHS will be critical in delivering a sustainable health service and personalised coordinated care as well as enabling research and innovation. digitalhealth.net

6 European structural and investment funds (ESIF): 1. European regional development fund (ERDF) promotes balanced development in the different regions of the EU 2. European social fund (ESF) supports employment-related projects throughout Europe and invests in Europe s human capital its workers, its young people and all those seeking a job 3. Cohesion fund (CF) funds transport and environment projects in countries where the gross national income (GNI) per inhabitant is less than 90% of the EU average 4. European agricultural fund for rural development (EAFRD) focuses on resolving the particular challenges facing EU's rural areas 5. European maritime and fisheries fund (EMFF) helps fishermen to adopt sustainable fishing practices and coastal communities to diversify their economies, improving quality of life along European coasts

7 The ESIF mainly focus on 5 areas: research and innovation digital technologies supporting the low-carbon economy sustainable management of natural resources small businesses Investment areas o jobs, growth and investment o digital single market o energy union and climate o internal market o economic and monetary union o justice and fundamental rights o migration Partnership agreements on ESIF lead to a series of investment programmes channelling the funding to the different regions and projects in policy areas concerned. Hungary, through 9 national programmes, benefits from ESIF funding of EUR 25 billion. This represents an average of 2532 euro per person from the EU budget over the period

8 Organizational Grit Thomas H. Lee, MDAngela L. Duckworth Harward Business Review September October 2018 issue Idea in Brief THE PROBLEM THE SOLUTION HOW IT WORKS Health care has long depended on the passion and perseverance of individual doctors and nurses. But with the advent of modern medicine, providing superior care has become so complex that no lone caregiver, no matter how gritty, can do it all. Hospitals and health systems must develop grit at the individual, team, and organizational levels. That requires ensuring that all participants are committed to pursuing a shared high-level goal. Putting patients first is a common and effective objective. Sustaining a gritty organizational culture requires clear communication of values by leadership, programs that celebrate successes, and the promotion of a growth mindset that embraces continuous improvement and learning from setbacks.

9 Organizational Grit Thomas H. Lee, MDAngela L. Duckworth Harward Business Review September October 2018 issue Grit predicts who will accomplish challenging goals. If an organization s leaders don t use the goal to make decisions, it will undermine their credibility. In health care, patients have long depended on the grit of individual doctors and nurses. But in modern medicine, providing superior care has become so complex that no lone practitioner, no matter how driven, can do it all. Today great care requires great collaboration gritty teams of clinicians who all relentlessly push for improvement. Yet it takes more than that: Health care institutions must exhibit grit across the entire provider system.

10 Thank you for your attention