Health & Safety for Funeral Staff Unit HS2

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1 Health & Safety for Funeral Staff Unit HS2

2 First Aid provision in the workplace Reporting of accidents in the workplace Correct handling of clinical waste The rules for self hygiene Infection control

3 Understand First Aid provision in the workplace

4 Where to find the First Aid Box and what should be in it What to do in an emergency and how to summon help

5 Your employer should have someone appointed to take charge Trained First Aid staff for more than 50 staff An appointed person for less than 50 staff Accident book Suitably equipped First Aid Box or Boxes

6 The recovery position is simple to do, very effective and can and has saved lives. It is vital to ensure an unconscious person is put in this position as it clears airways Take a first aid course _ you never know when you will need it!

7 Shout I need help here Dial 999 or 112 On mobile phone or use internal phone system Never try to deal with any kind of emergency without calling for help FIRST Do not leave injured patient If possible send someone else for help

8 Depends on Number of Employees Depends on Nature of Business Make sure contents are in date

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10 Other useful allowable items Tweezers Eye Wash Sterilised Water Hand Gel Cotton buds Blue Plasters NO tablets or medicines should be kept in the First Aid Box

11 An eye wash station should also be available in the mortuary in case of chemical splashes

12 1.1 Name 3 things that a business must have with regard to First Aid in the workplace 1.2 Describe the recovery position and say in what circumstances it would be appropriate to use 1.3 State how to summon help in a medical emergency in your workplace 1.4 Identify the essential allowable items contained in a First Aid box, as recommended by the HSE 1.5 Locate the First Aid Box in your workplace Evidence Written work/ Floor plan Witness Testimony Photographs

13 Know how to report accidents in the workplace

14 You should know where to find your company accident book and other reporting documents Never been ashamed to admit you ve had an accident! (An accident book that has never been used looks rather suspicious!)

15 Required by law Every business must hold an accident book to record accidents to employees and visitors Satisfies all requirements of the Social Security Administration Act 1992 and the Data Protection Act 1996

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18 The Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995 (RIDDOR), place a legal duty on: employers; self-employed people; people in control of premises; to report work-related deaths, major injuries or over-seven-day injuries, work related diseases, and dangerous occurrences (near miss accidents).

19 Fractures except digits Loss of sight-temporary and Permanent Dislocation of Shoulder, Hip, Knee, Spine Amputations Electric shock or burn which causes unconsciousness or hospital admission for more than 24 hours Hypothermia, heat induced illness or unconsciousness requiring resuscitation or hospital admission for more than 24 hours

20 Collapse, overturn or failure of load bearing parts of lifts and lifting equipment Explosions, collapses or bursting of any closed vessel or pipe work Failure of any freight container in any of its load bearing parts Plant or equipment coming into contact with overhead power lines Electrical short circuit causing fire or explosion Accidental release of biological agent likely to cause severe human illness

21 Certain poisons Some skin diseases such as occupational dermatitis, skin cancer Lung disease including occupational asthma, asbestosis Other occupational cancers

22 Who should report? Only responsible persons including employers, the self-employed and people in control of work premises should submit reports under RIDDOR. If you are an employee (or representative) or a member of the public wishing to report an incident about which you have concerns, please refer to HSE for advice

23 Reporting online Responsible persons should complete the appropriate online report form listed on The form will then be submitted directly to the RIDDOR database. You will receive a copy for your records.

24 Telephone All incidents can be reported online but a telephone service is also provided for reporting fatal and specified injuries only - call the Incident Contact Centre on (opening hours Monday to Friday 8.30 am to 5 pm).

25 Paper forms There is no longer a paper form for RIDDOR reporting, since the online system is the preferred reporting mechanism. Should it be essential for you to submit a report by post, it should be sent to: RIDDOR Reports Health and Safety Executive Redgrave Court Merton Road Bootle Merseyside L20 7HS

26 2.1 Describe the accident reporting procedures in your workplace 2.2 Locate the accident reporting documentation in your workplace 2.3 Complete a copy of an accident report form 2.4 Give 2 examples of a workplace accident that needs to be formally notified to the RIDDOR regulatory authority 2.5 How would you report a RIDDOR related incident? Evidence Written work/floor plan Photographs Witness statement Sample (Completed Accident report form)

27 Know how to handle hazardous waste

28 What is clinical waste?

29 Clinical waste is defined in the Controlled Waste Regulations It refers to any waste that consists wholly or partly of: Human or animal tissue Blood or bodily fluids Excretions Drugs or other pharmaceutical products Swabs or dressings Syringes, needles or other sharp instruments which, unless rendered safe, may prove hazardous to any person coming into contact with it Clinical waste also refers to any other waste arising from medical, nursing, dental, veterinary, pharmaceutical or similar practice, investigation, treatment, teaching or research

30 Environment Protection Act 1990: Producers of clinical waste must ensure that clinical waste is transferred by an authorised waste collector Clinical waste is any waste that has come into contact with a body during transport, treatment, preparation or embalming There are various types of clinical waste

31 Clinical / Highly Infectious HAZARDOUS Highly infectious waste which requires disposal by incineration EXAMPLE WASTE Couch roll Wipes Gloves Dressings Bandages Aprons Disposable garments etc which are contaminated with infectious body fluids

32 Clinical / Highly Infectious HAZARDOUS / NON HAZARDOUS Infectious waste which may be treated to render safe prior to disposal or alternatively it can be incinerated EXAMPLE WASTE Wipes Gloves Dressings Bandages Aprons

33 Anatomical Not usually encountered by Funeral Directors HAZARDOUS / NON HAZARDOUS Anatomical waste which requires disposal by incineration EXAMPLE WASTE Body parts Blood bags Organs Blood preserves

34 Bodily fluids should be disposed of in a sluice or suitable main drain

35 Sharps bins enable the safe storage and disposal of all categories of sharps waste including Syringes Hypodermic needles Scalpels Razors and razor blades Phials & Pipettes Test tubes Glass (broken or intact)

36 3.1 List the 3 types of hazardous waste 3.2 Describe the methods of disposal of hazardous waste and what it must not contain 3.3 Provide a copy of a waste transfer note Evidence Written work Witness Photographs Sample (Copy of waste transfer note)

37 Understand infection control and rules for self-hygiene in your workplace (so if the thought of clinical waste hasn t already put you off your lunch this will!)

38 We need some information about the types of infections we may come into contact with and how they are transmitted

39 There are four main sources of infection that you need to consider when dealing with human remains: blood and other body fluids (for example saliva, pleural fluids) waste products, such as faeces and urine aerosols of infectious material (such as might be released when opening the body skin, direct contact

40 In order to become infected the micro-organism has to get from the source into the host by some means Most micro-organisms usually have a particular route of entry, but in some cases infection can occur by more than one route

41 Infection can occur via: putting contaminated hands, fingers, pens etc. into the mouth, nose or eyes breathing in small infectious droplets (aerosols) splashes of blood and other body fluids into the eye, nose and mouth broken skin if it comes into direct contact with the micro-organism a skin-penetrating injury, for example via a contaminated needle or other sharp

42 1st Line of Defence Unbroken skin and the lining of the mouth, throat, gut and airways all serve to provide a barrier to infection. The cells of these linings and the substances they produce are the body s first line of defence. 2 nd Line of Defence If a micro-organism does manage to cross this barrier, the next line of defence is the immune system. Whether or not an infection occurs depends on the outcome of a contest between the microorganism and the immune system. Result The outward signs and symptoms of disease such as fevers or rashes are a result of this contest.

43 Some people may be more susceptible to infection than others, for example those with reduced immunity because of a pre-existing illness, or as a result of some medical treatments. You should check this before employees start work, so that you can make sure they are protected or give them less hazardous work to do. Some people may be naturally immune to disease, for example because they had the disease as a child or else have been immunised again you need to check on this before work starts. We must look after ourselves and each other

44 Pathogens, Infections, Biological hazards Bacteria e.g. Staphylococcus Viruses e.g. Common Cold & Influenza Parasites e.g. Cryptosporidium Fungi e.g. Ringworm Others e.g. CJD (believed to be a protein)

45 Food Water Droplet / Aerosol Person to Person Sexual Direct or Indirect contact Vectors

46 Environmental Protection Natural Immunity Good Health Status Avoidance Artificial Immunity Simple Hygiene Education Life Factors

47 Get information about risks and find out if remains can be handled, viewed or embalmed safely From Trade associations From B.I.E From Local pathologist, doctor or hospital mortician From H.S.E Use protective clothing Correctly dispose of waste Good personal hygiene

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49 .to your health.or to the health of others

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51 4.1 Describe how to handle and prepare remains and maintain a clean working area 4.2 Identify 3 types of protective clothing and their correct use 4.3 Describe 3 ways in which the risks of infection can be avoided or reduced Evidence Written work Photographs Witness

52 End date for the 2 units of this course Hard copies of portfolios or word document sent by ? 52