THE WESTFIELD LEADER

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1 > I- c> -< o «-J a: _j R UJ o.-. *-< Ul LL -i t- w m co 3 rg LJJ Q- -* 3 MTY-SIXTH YEAR No. 34 THE LEADER Second Claw Poitage Paid *t WaatHald, NTJ. 77ie Leading and Most Widely Circulated Weekly Newspaper In Union County WESTFIBLD, NEW JERSEY, THURSDAY, APRIL 1,1976 Published Every Thuriday 24 Pages 15 Cents Volunteer Firemen Oppose Removal Opposition to the removal of the town's fire alarm box system was expressed this week by the Westfield Volunteer Fire Co., which unanimously approved a position that the system be modernized and extended rather than be removed. The Town Council has delayed removal of additional street boxes, but 11 already have been reported as eliminated. In a letter to the council, the Volunteers summarized their opposition to the system's phase-out as follows: "A Fire Alarm System is Of Box Alarm System an integral part of the Fire Department and just as necessary as fire trucks, fire hose, fire hydrants and fire fighters. "In Westfield, the box alarm system has evolved' as a back up system. In the event that telephone service is disrupted as frequently occurs in individual homes or entire neighborhoods, the box alarm system affords an individual a secondary means of reporting a fire. A vivid example is the wind storm on the afternoon of Mar. 21 when a tree fell severing telephone wires and power lines. The power line was arcing toward the house and the owner, unable to report the fire by telephone, was able to transmit the call via the Fire Alarm Box which was still operative. "Since the bulk of the community's tax base is from residential properties, it seems unfair to deprive the home owner of this necessary protection. "Following the logic of the lown administration that the unused fire alarm boxes be removed, is their next step the removal of unused fire hydrants? "Contrary to published statement by a Councilman that the Fire Alarm Box There's a New Sparkle At Roosevelt There's a sparkle at Roosevelt Junior High School these days. It comes from a committee called "The Sparkle Committee" which is composed of students, teachers, parents and administrators. Although the committee was initaliy formed by the student council, it is open to any student ai the school. Mrs, Mary Alice Stone and Mrs. Thelma Hobson officially represent the Roosevclt-Parent-Teachcr Organization, although other parents often attend and are involved in the committee. According to Eugene Voll, principal, the committee's formation and activities are an attempt to involve parents in student activities. "We are trying to achieve the same kind of quality found in private schools where there is a great amount of parental involvement and commitment," the principal said. The Sparkle Committee has a variety of continuing and future activities planned to help "turn the students on." Voll said that committee activities are planned to "enrich the academic program but not disturb it." Today, April 1, the Sparkle Committee is sponsoring a "hats-on-day" at the school. Ongoing committee projects include a suggestion box, a weekly newsletter and a celebrityof-the-week contest. Future Sparkle Committee projects include a dance on Apr. 9: a "Spring Fling" on Apr. 30 for students and parents at which a myraid of dances will be taught; a mystery bus ride on May 1 and school-wide "Olympics" in three areas: Academic, alent and sports. $47,000 Will Net $50,000; Outdoor Center Initiates Drive A campaign to raise "II is to close this gap teacher training programs. $47,000 - balance of $200,000 before the Nov. 15 deadline Community organizations needed to win a $50,000 that we are devoting the from disadvantaged youth "challenge grant" from the month of April to a drive to to senior citizens use the Kresge Foundation of Troy, complete the challenge," facility for camping, Mich. -- was launched today said Barrett. "We dare not recreational outings, all day by the Four Seasons Outdoor Center. the Kresge grant is a fine and environmental wait until the last minute for or all-weekend conferences investment in the future that Announcement of the educational. we are willing to work hard month-long drive was made to earn," Grants that have helped by Campaign Chairman Barrett pointed out that reach the challenge grant R.H. Barrett Jr., one of the an anonymous donor immediately responded to the Frank E. Gannett goal include those from the prime movers in the purchase and development of Kresge Foundation Newspaper Foundation, the 153-acrD family challenge grant with a Meta C. Mergott Foundation, Miles Hodson recreation, environmental $50,000 gift. education, camping, crafts and conference-workshop The 153-acre tract Vernon Foundation, and the facility located in Hunlerdon County's Lebanon provides facilities for all Wesl field Service League. ages, all seasons. For youth Township. there arc three summer day Busing Application camps, environmental "In August, 1975 the Four education programs in fall, Deadline Apr. 30 Seasons Center received a winter, spring and workstudy projects all year. The Westfield Board or handsome $50,000 challenge grant," Barrett said. "To Families are offered daily Education has announced earn the grant the Outdoor recreation and programming during the summer, busing of private and that applications for the Center must raise $200,000, i he balance of development holiday and weekend parochial school pupils for costs. mil ings all year, environmental education, native now being distributed by the Ihe!97(i-77 school year are "The Kresge Foundation's challenge has been crafts, sports, overnight private or parochial school responded to in a most camping, lectures, in which the student is heartwarming manner by n workshops und seminars. enrolled. It is requested that number of foundations and Schools may use specially parents complete the application and return the individuals, but we are still designed courses in environment al education and form to the school on or $47,00(1 from our goal. before Apr. :?0. Several Site Plans On Board's Agenda Monday Several site plan applications arc on the agenda for the Weslficld Planning Board meeting scheduled for 11 p.m. Monday in the council chambers of Ihe municipal building. The subdivision-site plan committee mel yesterday afternoon in Ihe office of the town engineer to review the appeals which concern three lots owned by O.W. Meyers Jr. on Fairacres Ave. and Gallows Mill Rd.; four lots on Springfield Avo. and Cardinal Dr. owned by the Norbin Keally Co., Darbrain Co. and Clarence Chehayl; a lot at 22!>(irove SI. owned by Ida Bcrenson trading as the Wesl field Indoor Tennis Club; Lincoln Federal Savings & Loan Association al 1 Lincoln Plaza; and a lot al '201 drove St. owned by Benedict nnd Elvera Toruivia. At its last meeting, the Planning Board agrees ID discontinue its II o'clock conference sessions in the administrator's office and begin its regulalr open-lothe-public sessions al that hour in Ihe council chambers. The public meeting of Die board previously had started at!l p.m. To be eligible for free transportation ulemenlary pupils (K-B) must live Iwo or more miles from the school Ihey attend, and secondary school pupils <!)- 12 inclusive) Iwo and onehair miles from Ihe school they attend. The school must be located in New Jersey and not more than 2(1 miles from Ihe resilience of the child. Schools Close Apr. 9 For Vacation Westfield public schools will close for spring vacation after the full session on Friday, Apr. it and will reopen at the regular time on Motulny, Apr, J<>. System is antiquated,, the System is well maintained and has been extended over the years. "The present fire alarm box system has been maintained at $2,000 a year personnel cost. There is no reason to believe that this maintenance not be continued at a like cost. "The Wesl field Volunteer Fire Company fully supports Chief Norman J. Kuerp's recommendations as expressed in his annual reports that the fire alarm box system be modernized and extended rather than be removed." Fund Drive Short of Goal The Westfield Volunteer Rescue Squad annual fund drive is coming to an end, but to date is short of its goal. The Squad is grateful to all Westfielders who have contributed, however, since sufficient funds have not been received to meet the operating budget, it is requested that all who have not yet sent their contribution do so now. The squad's only source of income are voluntary donations. To meet expenses in these inflationary limes and to insure continued around Ihe clock service by the Squad a donation is requested from every Westfield household. Tax decuctable contributions may be sent to the Weslfield Volunteer Rescue Squad, C-0 Central Jersey Bank 177 East Broad St. DeiHOCratS Endorse Fahey To Succeed Weiss on Council Members of the Westfield Democratic Committee from the fourth ward have endorsed Brian W. Fahey for the seat on Ihe Town Council to be vacated by Councilman Lawrence Weiss, confirmed this week as a Union County District Court judge. Democratic Municipal Chairman Robert A. Loder Jr. said the Democrat's recommendation has been forwarded to Mayor Alexander S. Williams and Ihe Town Council. "I am hopeful of early action on the Democratic choice of Mr. Fahey to replace Councilman Weiss," Loder said. "We believe that Mr. Fahey's experience, background and participation in community work make him most qualified to represent the residents of the fourth ward. "The law provides for 1he Opportunities for more public input at Westfield Board of Education official business a'nd^qmmittce-ofthewhole wiiw meetings will be provided.) Since Jan. 19, the board's committee-of-the-whole meetings have been open to public observations, according to the Open Public Meeting Act, also known as the Sunshine Law. "Opening these meetings to public input is a step further than (he law requires," said Joan K. "New Look"for Tuesday's Public School Board Meeting The Westfield Board of Education will hold its official business meeting for April on Tuesday at 8 p.m. in the cafeteria at Roosevelt Junior High School. This is the first meeting scheduled by the school board to be held in the cafeteria instead of the auditorium. Meeting in the cafeteria is expected to provide a more relaxed atmosphere for communication with the public. Also new Tuesday night will be opening the meeting for public questions and comments on agenda items prior to enactment of any business. This brief period of public input will be in addition to the regularly scheduled recognition of the public on any item at the conclusion of the meeting, Itiian W. Fahey appointment of a Democrat to fill the vacancy," Loder said, "and we have submitted the name of Mr. Fahey and have requested his appointment when the Bd. of Ed. Listening For Voice of the People Corbet, chairman of the Board's community information committee. "It is a step toward better communication between the Board and the community." The following three community information committee recommendations have been accepted by the board: -- At the board's official business meeting on the first Tuesday after the first Monday of each month, a brief time will be set aside at the beginning of the meeting to recognize (be public for questions and comments on agenda items to be discussed thai evening. "This is an opportunity for the public to comment on an agenda item prior to a board vote," said Mrs. Corbet. In addition, the board's presiding officer will continue to recognize the public for questions and comments on any item at the end of the formal business meeting. -- Al each cummittcc-oithe-whole meeting, members of the public will be recognized for questions and Junior High Commended Following State Evaluation Full approval has been granted by a State Department of Education evaluation team to Edison Junior High School. Samuel S o p r a - no, principal, discussed the evaluation at the Westfield Board of Education's com mil tee-of-t he-whole meeting Tuesday night. A seven-member team of educators, headed by Dr. Waller McCarthy of the Slate Department of Education, visited ICdison Junior High School on Jan. 20 to evaluate the school in accordance wilh the New Jersey Administrative Code. Their evaluation was based on the visit and a ISOpage.self-evaluation report prepared by Edison staff members in cooperation with students and parents. Joseph J. Salinard, social studies teacher at the junior high school, was chairman of the steering committee which prepared the selfevaluatinn. James J. Clancy, Acting Union County Superintendent of Schools, summed up the evaluating committee's report in a fourpage letter lo Soprano, The county superintendent's letter lauded the thoroughness of the selfstudy which included an indepth study and statistics of the junior high school. Soprano called the selfstudy which occurs about every five years, "a worthwhile experience which represented total commitment on the part of many people." The state report on the Hit)-student junior high school includes 12 commendations and 21 recommendations. Pleased with the state report, Soprano noted "Die recommendations emanate from strengths of the school and propose continuation of good programs and plans already in progress." The report includes commendations for the extensive efforts exerted in involving a variety of people, including staff, citizens and students; for Ihe distribution of student grades which indicate a suecess-urionlecl program; for statistics which show that advanced degrees have been earned by more than half of (lie faculty and relatively low studenl-toteacher and student-loguidance counselor ratios; for the "variety, depth and richness of the academic program and course offerings," for the good rapport between students and staff members and for the cooperation between the school anil Parent-Teacher Association. Recommendations include an evaluation of Ihe junior high school population zones as they relate to the most efficient use of existing facilities; a consideration of establishing resource centers and open-type study periods; the. development of a community resource file and a curriculum committee to look into the tolal curriculum and encourage more interdisciplinary approaches. Soprano told board members Tuesday night thai he fell recommendations which deal with curriculum should lake high priority. Copies of the self-study and Ihe county supcrinfi'nrienl's evaluation report are available in the school library for citizens to review. comments from 8 to B: 10 p.m. Westfield citizens interested in the agenda for the open-to-the public committee-of-the-wh'me meetings may telephone the board secretary, at beginningon Monday prior to <i Tuesday meeting. Copies of the agenda for the com tn it tee-of -the- whole meeting are mailed 48 hours in advance to each board member, the Westfield Lerder and the Plasinfield Courier News and the Town Clerk. A copy of the agenda is also posted on the board's "Sunshine bulletin board" at Ihe administration office, :i()5 Elm St. - Any member of the community may write to the board president, Clark Leslie, or any board member, asking to have an item placed on the agenda for the committee-of-thewhole meeting. Such requests must be received by Wednesday prior to the Tuesday meeting. (Cont inued on page 4) vacancy becomes official." Councilman Weiss is in his second term as a member of the Town Council The New Jersey Senale confirmed his appointment on Monday. Fahey was the Democratic candidate for the State Assembly last year. He is an attorney und senior partner in Ihi' firm of Fahey, Fahey, Scaia and Smith in Millburn. He is a graduate of West Orange High School. He received his bachelor of a rts degree from Bloomfield College and his juris doctor degree from New York Law School. Previously, Fahey served as a trial attorney with Allstate Insurance Company of Murray Hill and as a credit analyst with Dun & Bradstreet in Kasi Orange. He currently serves as representalive to the Joint Civic Committee in Weslfield. Fahey has served as a trustee of the advisory board of (he Inter- Community Bank in Springfield and as a irustee and member of Ihe advisory board of Christopher House in Jersey City. He also serves as a trustee of the Garden State Ballet Foundation in Newark and as a member of the issues committee of New Jersey Common Cause. In Weslfield, Fahey has been a member of the Parent-Teacher Organization of Tamauues School, active in Ihe YMCA Indian Guide program and as a major gifts solicitor for the United Fund of Weslfield. Fahey is married and Ihe father of five children and has been u Westfield resident since The family resides at K5S Luwnsidf 1 J I Council to Name Weiss Successor Apr. 27 Mayor Alexander S. Williams, speaking on behalf of the Town Council, has requested The Leader to make the following announcement: "Th*s resi^ualion ui Councilman Lawrence Weiss, effective March 30. to accept nomination as Judge of Ihe Union County District Court, has created a vacancy on the governing body. Under State law the Council, by a vote of Ihe majority of its whole membership, may fill the vacancy temporarily until the election und qualification of a successor. The vacancy mus! be filled within 3(1 days. "It is Ihe Council's intention to appoint the best qualified applicant to Mr. Weiss' unexpired term of office, which expires on Dec. 31, Under State law, the person appointed must bo a resident of the 4th Wtvd and a niambev o( tbe Democratic party. Person.-! interested in being considered for appointment should submit a resume to the attention of Mayor Willi.'ims at the Town Hall. Applicants will be asked to appear before the Council on Thursday, Apr. 22, at fl p.m. at the Town Hall in order to explain their interest in Ihe position and to answer questions. The council expects to appoint a successor lo.mr, Weiss on Tuesday, Apr. 27. at the regular public meeting." BrighKvood Park on [Monday's Agenda The regular monthly meeting of the Westfield Recreation Commission will be held in council chambers of the Municipal Building at li p.m.. Monday. In addition lo regular committee reports, the agenda will include discussion ol Hie Bright wood Park project, possible usage of Elm St. School, and reports from volunteer personnel. The meeting is open to the public. Registration Starts Monday For YMCA'S Spring Classes Registration for Westfield YMCA spring term classes - - including 43 swim courses, five kindergyms and a kinderseim, I2classes in Ihe Oriental martial arts. 10 adult fitness classes, and 8 trails classes - will be held Mondays through Saturday. Apr. 10 al (ho Y. A vacation fun club for youngsters ages fi to 12, a fashion modeling class, six preschool programs and classes in dog obedience are among the special offerings of the new 10-weck term. Classes begin Ihe week of Apr. 12and are open to men, womon, hoys and girls. Twenty-six progressive swim classes are designed to help each girt and boy - conquer a progression of skills from non-swimmer to expert swimmer. They are open tn children ages 5 to H Special swim courses include Accelerated instruction - classes held twice weekly lo move children ahead faster - private instruclion for youngsters who respond belter to smaller groups with more individual attention. A "competency based" class offers the student as many classes as he needs until he conquers Ihe top YMCA "porpoise." Advanced aqunlic classes include competitive swimming, skin diving, beginning and intermediate diving, water polo, aquatic safety. Swim classes for adult's include adult beginner. adult intermediate, SCUBA and lifesaving. A series of arls and crafts classes will be highlighted by a new textile class. Others begin wilh kindorart for children ages! through (!, and continue through crafts for youngsters ages 7 lo 12, carpentry for the same age groups, nil painting for ages f!and above, sculpture. pomery and drawing, all for ilrcs li to 18. Five kindergyms "movement education" for boys and girls ages 1 Ihraigli li -- will bo joined ibis term for a "kinitorswiin" class in which for Ilio first lime, parents need not participate will) the child. Spring training for youngsters is slated in ten favorite sports, including U'linis. I rack and lieid. soccer. floor hockey, baseball, nynnuistics. trampoline and tumbling, and wi'ightlifling plus an nil sports clinic combining nil. Adults are offered a host of physical education programs - ranging from creative exercise, lo coed fitness lo healthy back care to Oriental martial arts. A new flexible schedule lor creative exercise permits participants to attend any I wo of Ihe seven weekly sessions al their convenience. Oriental martial arts for men, women, boys and girls begin at the ago of 9 and include beginning and advanced karate and judo and a special course in ".Self Defense for Women." A fashion modeling course will he held Tuesday from B 'o in p.m. Six piv-schnol programs offer children Ihc option of twice. Ihrei'-limi's or fivetimes weekly programs. Hog obedience offers basic and advanced classes. A vacalinn fun club will be held Apr 12 through 15 from!)::si> a.m. In -I p.m. liegislration is al ihe V front desk from '. ::!!) a.m. to!!::«> p.m. Iixlay's InI<I«"X HIIMIIOSS IliifLtnry ( IHIKII < l.lwitkil 1 cltmihll SllL'iill Spmls 1 IlL'ElIri' ,2.1 23

2 *>«*«THE WK.STKIKI.I) (X.J.) l.kaokk, TIU'RSDAY. AI'RIL 1, 197B- Spring Concert Saturday Night The WHS. Symphony Orcheslra will perform its annual Spring Concert at il p.m. Saturday in the high school auditorium. The Brahms Serenade No. 1 in D major will open the concert followed tiy the Druch Violin Concerto in (> major featuring Jonathan Dailch as solo violinist - Daitch has played with the New Jersey' All-State Orchestra for four years, and was eoncertmaster of he All-Stale Orchestra for the Bicentennial Concert recently held in Atlantic City for the National Music Educators Association. He has studied violin for 11 years with several teachers, for the last five years with Steven Wolosonovich of Iv an West field and with Ciallamian, professor from Julliard. Jonathan is a National Honor Society student at West field High School and plans to major in the field of medicine after graduation this June Following an intermission will be Dance Macabre by Appearing at weekend concert will he Susan I'rebluda. violinist, who is i studying with Sally Thomas of the Julliard School. Susan has been a member of the New Jersey All-State Orchestra for three years and also h;is studied at the Meadow mount School and theamhei'sl Summer Music Center. Sainl-Saens with Miss Susan I'rebluda as solo violinist. Susan, who is a junior at Wcstlield High School, has been studying with Sally 1 ho mas of the Julliard School. Next on the program is Schumann's Symphony No. 2 in (' major; closing the program is the Nocturnes and Ki-tes by Claude Debussy. Tickets will be on sale at the door. All senior citizens arc welcomed as guests of the orchestra. Further information is available from Mrs. Marlene Bodner. W.H.S., music chairman, of 4IH Clifton St. is also a very.special Bakery. Open Monday thru Saturday 9 to 5:30 Call for your Special Order OF 109 NORTH AVE..W. CALL!)!> MQN. clin, SAT Bands to Compete At Sunday Festival Twelve school bands will participate in the Ihird annual New Jersey Junior High School Concert Band Festival, to be held Sunday in the Westfield Senior High School from 1 to 6 p.m. Sponsored by the American School Band Directors Association, the Festival is being coordinated by Theordore Schlosberg, instrumental music instructor at the Kdison Junior High School, and coordinator of the W e s I f i e 1 d Summer Workshop for the Performing and Fine Arts. Students will have the opportunity to hear their peer groups perform in concert, and become more fully acquainted with I Concert Band Music! literature on the junior high j school level. In addition tci receiving w r i 11 e n evaluations, each band has the option to compete for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place trophies based upon the performance of selected! material. Adjudicating the event will be Dr. Richard Scott, professor of music at Jersey City State College and Carl Wilhjclm, music professor at the County College of Morris. Participating bands include those from Kdison and Roosevelt Junior High! Schools, Orange Avenue Junior High School in Cranford. Avcncl, Berkeley Heights. Fords, Califon (Tewksburyi, Kinnelon, Matnwan. Somerset, Teaneck, and Wall. Instrumental Music Parents of Thomas A. Kdison Junior! High School is hosting the event. There will be a limited number of tickets available at the door on a first come, first served basis. Paper Collection This Weekend The Parent-Teacher League of Redeemer j Lutheran School will sponsor a paper drive Saturday and Sunday. Bundled newspapers should be brought lo the rear parking lot of the school, located at Clark St. and Cowperthwaitc PI. Magazines and cardboard wlu not be accepted. IT PAYS! KEEPING YOUR HOME IN GOOD CONDI. TION IS NOT AN EXPENSE - BUT AN INVESTMENT THAT ASSURES NO LOSS IN VALUE. Area residents are welcome to free eye screening tests and free blood pressure tests by the Weslfield l.ions Club. The Lions Club Kyemobile will be located in Westfield at the intersection of Broad and Kim Sts. and will be open fur testing on Thursday, Apr. K, h'rida.v, Apr.!» and Saturday, Apr. III. The hours oil Thursday will be 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. ami in the evening from 7 p.m. to!t p.m. l-'ridayand Saturday hours will be from Id a.m. to 4 p.m. The Kvemohile will be manned local ophthalmologists, members of the Delta (iainmii Sorority, the HedCross and the Weslfield Uons Club. The l.ions Club urges all residents to have their eyes tested for (ilauronia and other eye diseases free (if charge at the Kvemobile. The blood pressure test will he given by registered nurses. Story Hours Highlight Library Week An International Story Hour and a Family Story Hour forchildren ami their parents will highlight the celebration of National Library Week. Apr. 1 through 10. in Hie Children's Department of the Westfield Memorial Library. The International Story Hour, which the children are invited lo attend in costumes from around the world, will be held on Wednesday, from A to 4::so p.m. It is open to children from first to third grades. Passes will be available at I he children's desk beginning today. The Family Story Hour, which will be presented on Tuesday, from 2 to '2:30 p.m., is open to boys and girls from two-and-a-half to five years old and their parents. It is designed to show children who l' ilvl ' never been enrolled in the library's regular story hours what the sessions are like. Mrs. Sally Wi-hr. children's librarian, will tell stories and conduct games and creative dramatics. Children may he registered in person at' the children's desk or by phone At the Inlernulional Story Hour, Mrs. Wehr will present a puppet show based on the African folk tale "Why the Sun and Moon Live' in the Sky." The audience will take part in the show. Dressed in foreign costumes, Mrs. Mina Egfiinson and Miss Margaret Haughman, slaff members, will read stories from other lands. WHS Groups Join In Sponsorship The Weslfield High School Chorale under the leadership of Edgar Wallace, and the National Honor Society, under the direction of Anthony Quagliano will hold Of Flea Market a giant Flea Market at the Elm Street school lot on Saturday, Apr. 24. "With spring cleaning time upon us we hope residents of Westfield will find many usable items in good condition thai they would like lo donate," sponsors say. All household items, small furniture and appliances, handbags, jewelry and clothing, books and records will be appreciated. If anyone has such items that they wish lo donate, please call Chuck Irwin of 824 Bradford Ave., president of the National Honor Society, or Mrs. Marlene Bodner of 434 CILflon SI. W.H.S. music chairman. The proceeds from this flea. market will help provide some of the! necessary expenses for the I Chorale which has been j invited lo participate in an International Music l'esli- ; val in Copenhagen, Den- :inark, 'ilhis July, and will enabmthenhs to give more I scholarships this year. i Concerts Assoc. To Elect Officers I Members of the Westfield Community Concerts Association will hold their annual meeting on Saturday j morning at 10 o'clock in the Westfield High School. Reports of the membership campaign for the 197G-77 series of five concerts will be given by Mrs. Betty Kopt, membership chairman, Officers and members of the board of directors will be elected for next year. Mrs. S. II. Friedland is chairman of the nominating committee composed of William E. Elcome, Mrs. J. K. Hochlin, Mrs..Henry G. Schneider and Mrs. Donald D. Way. Advertisement The programs will be open only to westfield residents and library card holders. Barry Farber Here on Sunday West field-mountainside H'nai H'rith, in conjunction with the adult education department of Temple Kmanu-Kl, will sponsor u continental breakfast at 1) a.m. on Sunday morning at the Temple. Barry Farber will speak on "The Mosl Important 10 Seconds in Modern Jewish History." Farber is the host of one of radio's best known talk shows and is heard daily from Nova Scotia to Georgia and as far west as Indiana. Cookbooks, along w i t h Bibles, werp iunong the earliesi books printed and.si ill outsell any other kind of hooks. The Weslfield Leader Entered as second class mail matter at the Post Office at Westfield. New Jersey. Published weekly at 50 Elm St., Westfield, N.J Subscription: $5.0(1 per year, 15 cents a copy, back issues 25 cents per copy. His manner. broad knowledge of the world and ability to juggle livegrenade topics on the air have contributed to the.success of his show. The breakfast is open to all. John franks SHOE SALE SHOE DEPARTMENT Skip Stitch Moc Toe Slip On White or Golden Drown Calf Unmistakably Johnston ^Murphy USE OUR 30 DAY OR imonth NO INTEREST CHARGE PLAN MOAD ST., WISTFUL* OPIN THURSDAY UNTIL 9 P.M. (ranks Almost everything you need to do the jobi, you can find here Among them: Wood and Tile Panelling Doors Cabinets Floor and Ceiling Tile Aluminum Combination Windows and Doors Wallboard Roofing Siding Cement Driveway Patch lumber For All Purposes And In Our Hardware Department Pralt & Lambert Paints Brushes Rollers All Tools Electric Sanders and Drills Light Switches Hardware If You're Not Sure "How To Do l»" - Ask Us! -SJRViNjtk COMPANY. 6O0 SOUTH AVE..WEST, NEW JERSEY "Building Headquarter!" LUMBER MILLWOM MASON'S MATERIALS HARDWARE FUELS Phone Toll free loan info to homeowners How much are you good for? Now, homeowners any. where in New Jersey can call 80O This toll free number leads to TIM! MONEY STORK, u major lending institution specializing in homeowner loans, where courteous experts arc available from 9 A.M. lo fl P.M. daily, and up lo 2 P.M. cm Siiturduy, to anulyze your property equity plus your income and repayment capabilities and tell you exactly how much you can borrow and what your payments should be. All conversations lire held In -strictest confidence. SECONDARY MORTGAGE LOANS The rikurc.h quoted will he based on ;i highly popular mi'tliod of borrowing, licensed under state law, which allows homeowners to cash in on the equity of their homes without selling. This method of borrowing has become so popular that literally tens of thousands of homeowners file applications every year. BIG MONEY LOANS SMALL PAYMENTS Under this method a homeowner can borrow any amount from a few hundred dollars up to $25,000 and sometimes much more. The money can be used for any purpose at all including debt consolidation, payment of taxes, medlcul expenses, college tuition, purchase of an automobile, new furniture, or even for business purposes. This type loan permits for Ions term payout, therefore payments can he :is small us needed. NO OBLIGATION Modern Acceptance Corp. or Moselle, N.J., bettor known us THE MONKY STORE, with 13 offices throughout New Jersey, Is making this service uvailahle free of charge, even though the caller may liave no Intention of borrowinj!. So why not find out "how rmidi you lire ijood for." The toll Tree number l«>k«llisbo(m!t2-4<m. Make the right moves in Puritan Rod Laver tenniswear of Dacron and cotton. Rod Laver helped design them. His insignia is on them, Here's tenniswear that gives you full freedom to move and move fast. Match Point knit shirt of 50% Dacron* polyester/50% cotton. Machine wash and dry. Sizes: S-M-L-'XL HI Match Short of 75% Dacron* polyester/25% cotton that never needs ironing. Machine wash and dry. M4 ffi'g Dul'nnl T M Look like a winner. USE OUR 30 DAY OR 3-MONTH NO INTEREST CHARGE PLAN 207 E. BROAD ST., OPEN THURSDAY EVENING UNTIL 9 P.M.

3 Seek $13,500 Locally to Fight Cancer Weslfield Mayor Alex Williams signed a proclamation last week declaring April as Cancer Conlrol Month in Weslfield and urged all residents to "support the Union County Unit of the American Cancer Society's New Jersey Division in its cancer control programs through voluntary assistance and contributions. " April, which has been designated as Cancer Control Month by Congress, is the lime when the society launches its intensive Charles llurdwick, left, Westfield Cancer Crusade chairman, and Alex Williams, Westfield mayor, review plans for the annual Crusade. Mayor Williams ' proclaimed April as Cancer Control Month. Enlarged To Show Detail Adlers tapered marquise diamond wedding ring in handmade platinum. 5.85ct $4950. Regal! OVER FIFTY YEARS OF INTEGRITY GARDEN STATE PLAZA MORRISTOWN LIVINGSTON MALL LINDEN MONMOUTH MALL Sweater, all-over stripes, round neck, short sleeves, with the word, T-Shirt, printed an left front. Knit full-fashioned of 50% polyester, 50% nylon. Sizes: 4-5, B-6X, S to 14, Jade Green/White, Old Denim/White, Red/White. Shorts, stripes on waist and mock cuff, elasticized waistband, with the words, Shorts, printed above mock cuff stripe. Knit fullfashioned of 100% nylon, exclusive of trim. Sizes: 4, 5, 6-BX, S to 14, Jade Green/White, Old Denim/While, Rod/WhitB. Sweater, tank style, allover stripes, with the words, Tank Top, printed on stripe. Knit lull-fashioned of 50% polyester, 50% nylon. Sizes: 4-5, B-BX, to 14, Jade Green/Whim, Old Denim/White, Red/White. FOR SPRING and SUMMER fuuidraising and educational Crusade. In Westfield, the drive this year is headed by Charles Hardwick. He said the 700 volunteers from Westfield will attempt to visit every household with life-saving information about cancer. Hardwick said that Westfield's goal this year has been set at $13,500. These funds are desperately needed to carry on the society's three-fold program of research, education, and service to the cancer patient. In addition to asking the citizens of Westfield to support the American Cancer Society's Crusade, the Mayor's proclamation also reinforced the society's message urging all residents to have an annual health checkup as one step towards helping safe-guard themselves against cancer. Any residents who would like to work on the Crusade are urged to contact the Union County office in Elizabeth or to call Hardwick. Estate Planning Series Scheduled Three meetings on estate planning will be held at the Union County Extension Service, 300 North Ave. East. The dales arc Tuesdays, Apr. 6,13and20from7:45to!):45 p.m. The series is open to Ihc public, but telephone registration is required. Topics to be discussed include wills, (rusts ~and insurance in estate planning. Speakers on the program are Arlhur Attenasio, attorney in Westfield; Kenneth Morris, irusl officer with the National Bank of New Jersey, and Ralph Lagriola, insurance broker in Cranford. Extension programs are open to the public without regard lo race, color, or national origin. Experts tull us that the fruit Adam and Eve ate would not have heen an apple, but mort» probably an apricot. Series to Explore Women's Roles A series of discussion sessions on the changing roles of women will be held at the Union County Extension Service, 300 North Avenue East, Westfield on Tuesdays, Apr. 6,13, and 20from 9:30-11:30 a.m. The woman's movement is a social issue relevant to loday's world. These three discussion sessions will give facts and pose questions to help participants explore their own feelings about changing roles of women. The sessions will be conducted by Elaine May, Extension Home Economist. The program is free and open lo the public. To keep scissors working sharply, a drop of oil should be applied to the joints occasionally. Spring Registration t Underway at YW Registration is currently underway at the Weslfield Young Women's Christian Association for children's spring activities. Swimming instruction begins with ihree year olds and proceeds thru graded levels to diving, speed skills and aqua-sprites training. Classes follow Red Cross progressions from beginners to advanced beginners, intermediates, swimmers and advanced swimmers. Special kindergarten and "liny kids" classes are provided for children too shorl for regular programs. Gymnastics is also offered for four year olds thru 12th grade, with basics presented in three levels of tumbling, and pregymnastics for junior high girls. All classes meet weekdays after school and Saturdays. Junior highs may find other interest in tennis, trampoline, cheerleading, modern dance and jazz, folk guitar, bread-making and complete charm by calling the YWCA for further information. League to Discuss Garbage as Resource The units of the Weslfield League of Women Voters for ihe month of April will he entilled Garbage is A Natural Resource. A slide presentation from the National Center for Resource Recovery will be shown. The units will be hostessed Tuesday, Apr. 6, by Ann Addinall, 746 Belvidere Ave., at 12:45 p.m.; Wednesday, Apr. 7, by Val Kadlick,2O6MunseeWay, at 8:15 p.m.; and Thursday, Apr. 8, by Harriet Davidson, 138 Watson Rd., Fanwood; and at 9:15 p.m. -THE VIESTFJMJJ (\..J.) IJF.AUKK, THIKSOAV. APKII. I, 1 B7(i Fan.' X (Andy Kothman I'lioto) Twin sisters Jacqueline and Amy Beth Davidson limber up for their appearance (his w«ek«nd in the musical production "The King and I" directed by Edwin Illianu. Free Concert Tuesday at LJCTI The Kean College Bicentennial Chorale will present an evening of American music al Union County Technical Institute UJCTI) at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. The concert, which is open to Hie public at no admission charge, will feature choral Celebration GARWOOD DONUT KING featuring * THE BAKER'S DOIEN 54 DELICIOUS. VARIETIES and instrumental selections, including a medley of George M. Cohan tunes. Many traditional American folk songs will be included in the performance. * BAKED FRESH 6 TIMES A DAY FRtE SAVE YOUR RECEIPTS OfA'SSi PLUS DELICIOUS DANISH 5 VARIETIES AND CAKES BAKED FRESH TO YOUR ORDER BY OUR MASTER BAKER 233 E. BROAW ST. AD OPIiN THURSDAY NIGHTS 'TIL 9

4 <* ««TIIK H'KSTJ-'IKLD (XJ.) LKAUKK. TUfRSUAy, AJ'KII, 1, J976- OBITUARIES Mrs. Koger Stephens Mrs. Alice T. Stephens. 85. died suddenly yesterday at Medford Leas, where.shehad lived for the last I wo years. Born in Ni'w York City, she was the daughter of the lale Irene and Kdward Voohees Thornall, and had lived in Westfield since Her husband, Roger, a New York lithographer, died in Mrs. Stephens travelled extensively and was a member of the Travelers Century Club whose membership is limited to those who have visited in at least 100 countries. She and her husband had journeyed the entire length of the Panama Canal highway which was the subject of a book authored by Mr. Stephens. Mrs. Stephens was a member of the Presbyterian Church of Westfield and an associate member of the Medford Leas community church, had been a member of the Westfield Garden Club and (luring World War II was a driver for the Motor Corps here. Surviving art; a daughter. Mrs. William P. Holt of Westfield and two grandchildren. Roger and Alice Holt-Ryan, both of Phoenix, I Inursday Ariz. Memorial services will he held at 2 p.m. Sunday at Briar Patch, the former home of Mrs. Stephens at 1485 Prospect St., with the Rev. Richard L. Smith of the Presbyterian Church officiating. Contributions in memory of Mrs. Stephens may be made to the scholarship fund of the Musical Club of Westfield. J. Irvin Brohaek J. Irvin Broback, 73, of 42() Wychwood Road, a retired executive, diud Friday at home. Born in Eau Claire, Wise, Mr. Broback was graduated from Oskosh College and attended Columbia University. He was a former trustee of the Presbyterian Church of Westfield. Mr. Broback was president of J. I. Broback Sales Co., New York, for 40 years and of the Eastern Plywood Corp., for 15 years. He retired in He was a Navy veteran of World War I and a member of Echo Lake Country Club. Surviving are his widow, Mrs. Paula Peters Broback; two daughters, Mrs. Donald H. Bagger of Westfield and Mrs. Robert F. Weigel of Piscalaway and six grandchildren. Funeral services were conducted Monday afternoon in the Presbyterian Church of Westfield by the Rev. Richard L. Smith, Interment was in Fairview Cemetery. The Gray Funeral Home, 318 East Broad St., was in charge of arrangements. Memorial contributions may be made to donors' favorite charities. Supt's Office nooe. Broad St. ADa-0781 Established i8«8 Non-profit >1rs. Vito Greco Mrs. Angela Greco. 84, of 413 Clifton St. died Sunday in Muhlenberg Hospital, Tlainfield. after a long illness. Mrs. Greco was born in Italy and lived 57 years in Westfield. She was a communicant of Holy Trinity Church. She was the widow of Vito Greco Surviving are a son. Dnminick of Lakewood. NY.: two daughters, Mrs. Andrew Viglianti and Mrs. Alfred Del-orenzo, both of Westfield; a brother, Frank Chironna of Weslfield; a sister. Mrs. Maria Ponturo of Westfield; seven grandchildren and eight greatgrandchildren. The funeral is being held al 8:15 a.m. today at the Dooley Colonial Home. 55fi Westfield Ave. and al Holy Trinity Church, where at 9 o'clock a funeral mass will be offered Interment will lake place in Sy. Ger- Irude's Cemetery, Woodbridge. D. Harry Chandler D. Harry Chandler of 151)7 fleer Path, Mountainside, a retired executive and former president of Ihe board of trustees of the Mountainside IS years. ' She was a communicant of Weslfield YMCA, died j SI. Adalbert's li.c. Church, a* Overlook I Elizabelh. Hospital, Summit. She was a member of the He was purchasing agent, Polish Roman Catholic ferrous metals for the Union Queen of Peace former Esso Slandard Oil Society Kli/.abelh, Co., New York, when he She was Ihe widow ol relired in 1951) after 37 years Frank Kozborski. of service. Surviving are four sons. Born in Vineland, Mr. Frank and Robert Rnbart of Chandler was graduated Mountainside and Bruno from Cornell University and Charles liocbor of with a bachelor of science Ilighlstown; two daughters. degree in engineering. He Mrs. Helen Krezonis of lived in Weslfield for :)7 Roselle and Mrs. Mathilda years prior to moving to Baran of Middletown, eight Mountainside in likig. grandchildren and five He was a member of the great-grandchildren, board of directors of the Funeral services were YMCA from 1035 to 1945 and held yesterday at the was vice president in 1943 K r o w i c k i - M c C r a c k e n and president in Mr. Funeral Home, Linden, and Chandler also was a St. Adalbert's Church, member of the Century Club Elizabeth. Interment was in of Ihe association, having Ml. Calvary Cemetery, been a member 40 years and Linden. was active in its 19G0 building program. He also was a member of j the First United Methodist I Church. Westfield, and j Alias Lodge 125, F&AM. and j the Old Guard, all of I Weslfield. Me was a former member of the Cornell Club, j Surviving is his widow, j Mrs. Myra Bill Chandler,! and ir> nieces anc newphews. Private funeral serviceswere under Ihe direction of the Gray Funeral Home, U18 F.ast Broad St. Bank's Stock Value Increased Al the annual meeting of Ihe shareholders of the National State Bank Mar. 8 it was voted to amend the itlicle of association lo increase the par value of the common stock of the bank from $5 to SC per share having the* effect of increasing total capital stock of the bank from $15,000,000 lo $18,000,000 by a transfer of $3,000,000 from surplus to capital. mi Non-sectarian One of New Jersey's finett cemetrriet ONI- YEAR DEFERRED PAYMENT PLAN, INTEREST-FREE, AVAIL- ABLE FOR PRE-NEGD BUYERS. al 6>OO p.m. Executive Office taj Elm Street AD J-OIJO William Schnitzer William C. Schnitzer, 90. of 807A Featherbed Lane, Clark, died Saturday in the Karitan Health and Extended Care Center. Rarilan. after a long illness. Mr. Schnitzer was torn in ; Rumania and bad lived in 1 Garwood. Westfield and j Clark. He was a self-employed housing developer for SO years prior to his retirement 20 years ago. He was the husband of Ihe late Mrs. Bertha I'ickler Schnitzer. Surviving are three suns, George A. ol Clark, Umis of Westfield and John of Garwood: seven grandchildren and seven greatgrandchildren. Funeral services were conducted Monday morning al the Dooley Colonial Home, 55(i Wi'stfielrl Ave. by tin 1 Hev. Wilmont J. Murray, paslor of The First Baptisi Church in West field. Interment took place in Ihe family plot in Fairview Cemetery. Mrs. Frank Rozhorski j Jonathan Dayton Higi. i School will present Kismet, a musical based on a fable of! ancient Baghdad. April 2, 3, I <l and 10. at Ihe high school! auditorium on Mountain ; Ave. in Springfield. i Kismet is the tale of how a Eva Klimek Koz- Mrs. borski. 80, of Mountainside died Sunday in Overlook Hospital. Summit. Born in Poland, Mrs. Kozborski came lo Ibis country and Elizabeth (111 years ago. She moved lo Joseph P. Dekens Sr. Joseph P. Dekens Sr., 74. died Sunday at his home at 28 Mohawk'Trail. Born in New York City, he moved lo Westfield 18 years ago from Ocean Grove. He relired 12 years ago afler 30 years with Esso and had been an international field engineer affiliated with Exxon offices in New York City.. Mr. Dekens was a member of the Congregational Church of Weslfield and of John Stewart Lodge 871, F & AM, in Tuckahoe, N.Y. Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Letha McLam Dekens; a son, Joseph Jr., a student al Norwich University; a niece and a nephew. Funeral services were held yesterday afternoon at Ihe Gray Funeral Home, 3IS East Broad St., with the Rev. John \V. Wilson, minister of the Congregational Church, officiating. Interment will be at the convenience of the family in the New Sawyer Cemetery, Bradford, Vt. Resident to Lead Reservation Ram hie A ramble in Ihe Walchung Reservation is planned for members and guests of the Union County Hiking Club on Saturday. The meeting place will be at Seeley's I'ondat 10 a.m. with Martha Brandriff of Weslfield as leader. Sunday will be the club's annual trail maintenance day, meeting at the Packanack Wayne shopping cenlcr at 11:30 a.m. before proceeding lo the area of the Appalachian Trail which Ihe club mainliiins. Kouerl and Anne Vogel of Cranford will be in charge. EQUIPMENT STOLEN The theft of printing equipment from Suburban Tinting Co. al 822 South Ave. was reported to police Monday. CARS DAMAGED About $1,000 damage to ive new cars was reported lo police Tuesday by Westfield Ford Co. on North Lenten Drama At St. Helen's A special Lenten service will be held at 8 p.m. lomorrow at SI. Helen's Church. Adults and youth of Ihe community of SI. Helen's will present a dramatization of The Way of the Cross. Brother William Lavigne, coordinator of religious education says: "II promises lo help us all appreciate and understand what Jesus suffered for Ihe love of us and how He continues to suffer loday in the members of His Mystical Body. "Students from Ihe 5th grade up as well as adults will find this to be a moving experience and a good way to spend an hour on a Friday evening in Lent." Participating in the program are: Peter Houlihan, Mrs. Joan Stanley, Kevin KinseJla, Paul Aloia, Chuck Schweitzer, Steve Burke. Jack Coakley, Tom McNally, Rich Goski, Tom Gleason, Bob Salinger, Jim Diemer. Mark Sievers. Jim Hoblilzell, Colleen Burns, Bonnie Wengert, Kathy Aloia, Anne Bizink, Kathy Corcoran, Mary Jo Keenan, Paul'McLane. Bob Waters, John Engelhart, Maura Clancey and Dave Breen. Lighting is under the direction of Mike Podd and Jim Rokosny and production in charge of Mrs. Jean Noonan. The pastor of S'. Helen's is the Rev. Thomas B. Meaney, the Rev. William T. Morris is associate Dastor. [Dayton Students to Stage Kismet I poet-befifiar literally goes i from raj's In riches in a! single day; and how he changes the lives of five people. Playing Ihe part of Ihe poet in this two cast production are Howard Uruckcr and Stephen Legawiec. Howard Drucker is a! junior al Dayton and a I member of this year's Alli Slate Chorus. He lias been in j Ihe vocal music department I for three years and is Pack 171 Derby Winners Announced Winners in the Pack 171 Pinewood Derby at Wilson School were: First place, Mark Via; second place, Eric Czander; and third place Daniel Wright. Best design went to Creg i Schiable. Receiving awards were Jim Miller and Ernest Hua, Wolf; Brian Duggan, Michael Perry, Greg Czander and Gary Maher, gold arrows; Brian Jennings, Jeff Monninger, Joseph Quirk, Gold and silver arrows; Alfred Priscoe, Gold and two silver arrows; Matthew Quirk, gold and three silver arrows; Greg Hackenberg, Joseph Quirk, Peter Surhoff, Chris Hengcveld, silver: Mark Griffin, two silver. Wcbclos receiving awards were Creg Schiable, craftsman; Michael Petriano, crafsman and engineer, Rick Lankford, Craftsman; Mark Via, craftsman, scholar, geologist, scientist, showman and traveler. presently a member of chorale. He had a dancing lead in Carousel and he also appeared in the musical On the Town. Stephen U'gawiec is a si.mor and is also a member of All-Sla'e Chorus and chorale. His L 'dits include Carousel, On i.:e Town, West Side Story, Brigadoon, The Importance of being Earnest, The Crucible, Plaza Suite and Waiting for Godot. Kismet is under the musical direction of Edward Shiley with Miss Kim Martinelli as assistant musical director. The entire production is being directed and choreographed by Charles Qucenan. I at least $2 an hour by calling Gail Steinberg of 10 Fairway C. Scotch Plains or Laurie Romanowich of 2118 Dogwood Dr., Scotch Plains. Regional B of E To Meet Tuesday The following 1976 meeting date schedule has been released by the Union County Regional High School district: Apr. 20, Governor Livingston Regional High School Cafeteria - Berkeley Heights; May 18, Arthur L. Johnson Regional High School Cafeteria - Clark; June 15, David Brearley Regional High School Cafeteria -Kenilworlh; July 20. Governor Livingston Regional High School Cafeteria - Berkeley Heights Aug. 17, Jonathan Dayton Regional High School Cafeteria - Springfield; Sept. 21, Arthur L. Johnson Regional High School Cafeteria - Clark; Oct. 19, Governor Livingston Regional High School Cafeteria - Berkeley Heights; Nov.!C, Deerfield School Cafeteria - Middle School - Mountainside; Dec. 21, Jonathan Dayton Regional High School Cafeteria -Springfield; Jan. II!, 1977, Arthur L. Johnson Regional High School Cafeteria, Clark; Feb. 15, 1977, David Brearley Regional High School Cafeteria - Kenilworth. IAPPLIANCE & TV REPAIR AIL SMALL APPLIANCES REPAIRED CALL CRANFORD RADIO INCORPORATE) EASTMAN STREET. CRANFORO && 1fo _ Sixth grade students in Mary Ellen Sullivan's class at Tamaques School are shown making deposits of "paychecks" they earn by accomplishing various tasks. Acting as a bank teller is parent volunteer Mrs. David Ford. Students, shown left to right, are James Knglehart, Ken Nostrum!, Beth Lally and Jorg Mahatzkc. WHS Career Night Apr. 21 A program for all students and their parents, recent graduates, and senior citizens will be held on Ihe first evening "Career Night" on Wednesday, Apr. 21, at Weslfield Senior High. The main purpose of the program is to have successful people actively engaged in a given occupation discuss, outline, School Election Voting on Rise Waller G. Ilalpin, Union According to Ilalpin,.'19. cover, emphasize and County Clerk, has indicated that voter turnout school board elections as order to assist the student in 40ti people turned out for the describe Ihe occupation, in for last month's 18 local and opposed lo :i lotal in both decision-making in a choice regional school board major political parties of of a career. Approximately elections shows a switch of 25,8511 for Ihe las! primary 135 different careers and voter interest in Ihe "breadand-butter candidates" others, legislators who are counting to ecology will be election lo nominate, among occupations from ac- running for school board now in Trenlon determining available. seats as opposed lo those whether or nnl New Jersey The program will be running as candidates in the will enact a slale income similar to College Night primary election. tax. The primary vole except Ihe emphasis will be "Apparently voters represented annul 10 percent of the total eligible Students and parents are to on jobs and careers. recognize lhal the larger share of their local tax voters in Ihe county. report to the auditorium at K dollar is spent for p.m. for general remarks educational purposes as 'Plains Seniors and information. Kour 25 opposed to what rounds out minute periods will be Plan Work Day Ihe pie for Stale, County and scheduled for occupations local services." The senior class of Scotch located in Cafeteria A and Ilalpin said that for the Plains-Fanwood High second consecutive year, School will have a work day based on tabulations in his on Wednesday, Apr. 14, to records, more people turned earn money for Ihe class out lo vole in the 18 school treasury. board elections than turned j Seniors can be hired for out in Ihe 21 municipalities of Union County lo select primary party candidates in June of 1975, which included district candidates as members of the General Assembly now serving in Trenton. B. Students and parents can visit,at will, the50different occupations located in the cafeterias. Career Night is a joint venture sponsored by the West Held High School Guidance Department with the cooperation of the Westfield Rotary Club. V. William Vincent sen is serving as chairman for the Weslfield Notary Club and Vincent K. VVashvillc, director of guidance, is chairing for Ihe senior high school. Studded Tire linn Effective Today Studded tires will nol be permitted on New Jersey roadways after today, Director of the Division of Motor Vehicles John A. Waddington announced loday. The period for studded lire use, according to division regulations, is Nov. 15 through Apr. 1. Tenor to Sing at Sunday Concert Bernie Barr, tenor, will appear in concert at 4 p.m. Sunday, at the First Congregational Church of Westfield. Barr is well known to Westfield audiences not only as a singer, but as a director of musicals and opera for the Community Players, the Westfield Musical Club and Ihe Opera Theatre of Westfield. He has appeared extensively in opera and concert in the U.S. and Europe. As leading tenor at the Festival of the Amalfi Coast in Salerno, Italy, he was hailed as. "magnifico" by the press and audiences alike. Just last week, he was heard in the title role of "Fa'ust" with Ihe Suburban Symphony Orchestra in Cranford The program in Westfield will be entirely of a sacred nature and will encompass repertoire of the Protestant, Catholic and Jewish faiths and will be sung in English, Latin, Hebrew, German and French. Voice of People These ways to permit and encourage citizen input at the board's public meetings would require bylaws changes for them to become part of each meeting. In the meantime, a motiion at each meeting for the next three months (April through (Continuedfrom page 1) Krrnicliarr liarr is cantor at Temple Sinai in Summit. Nicholas A. Tino Jr., organist and choir director of Ihe First Congregational Church, will accompany Barr. The public is invited to attend this major musical event. Admission is free. June) will permit evaluation prior lo suggesting a formal bylaws change. Dr. Laurence F. Greene, superintendent of schools, commended the board for providing these extra avenues of communication. r; ti rt:nv mid m\«k SHOP» Kim Street, Weslfield, N<-w Jersey OI'IN'MI). < ID IIIUKS. III. 'I I'M. 15% special discount * / on blocking, mounting, framing of nsatjiawork NBNJ gives you 5 easy ways to make ft 5 % ^ ^^B Date of Deposit ^ l o Dale of With- ^^^v drawal Interest ^ ^ ^ with an effective annual yield of 5.13%. Minimum $ to 2'/i years* Statement Savings NBNJ's newest way to save. Convenience, efficiency and top interest tool Interest compounded daily, paid quarterly and statement sent quarterly. No interest penalty for withdrawals. Deposits and withdrawals are swiftly entered into our computer system programmed specifically for our Statement Savings Customers. Golden Passbook Savings This is NBNJ's most popular savings account. It pays a full 5'/j% interest, compounded quarterly Irom date of deposit to date of withdrawal. 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5 Participants Geared For Spaulding Walkathon Participants in Spaulding Walkalhon, refreshments groups, older children and for Children's Run- will be served enroute and handicapped children have Walkathon are gearing for at the end of the course. found permanent homes. the Apr. 4 event. They include numerous area high area police departments While Spaulding's ad- Spaulding has alerted five school track stars and even who will provide surveillance throughout the children are increasing, the ministrative costs in placing a West field businessman celebrating his 40th walk. In addition, a car agency's expenditures are birthday walking for caravan of Spaulding still below other adoption Spaulding. volunteers will cover the services. In 197S, Spaulding The fund-raiser will have course every half hour. placed 62 children at $1809 the support of tracksters per child -- much lower than Throughout March, each from such area high schools the national average of participant enlisted sponsors who have pledged a as Jonathon Dayton other agencies. These children included 31 with Regional, Westfield, and certain amount of money for Union Catholic, as well as emotional problems, six every mile walked or run. students from area junior neurologically handicapped, These (ax-deductible contributions will benefit and senior highs. Adults six physically handicapped, representing a variety of six retarded, and many Spaulding for Children, the community organizations multiple handicapped. free adoption agency for will run or walk, while special needs children. For further information others aid in the administration of the event. of all races, large sibling Through its efforts, children on the Run-Walkathon, call From 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., n ) (-, i i l c TO these spaulding supporters Flayers schedule Saroyan Play will follow a 15-mile course,; beginning at Spaulding's "The Beautiful People" Westfield office, and continuing through Moun- presented by Community by William Saroyan will be tainside, Watchung, Scotch Players as its spring major Plains, and Fanwood. production al the Clubhouse, According to Mrs. Frank 1000 North Ave., Friday and Dooley of Westfield, Saturday, Apr. 23 and 24, chairman of the Run- and Apr. 30 and May 1. The curtain is at 8:30 p.m. Directed by Marcie Decker, this Saroyan play Trtvate. 1 c was first performed in New York in The cast will Partiesonor include Andrew Tibbals as off-premises Owen, Grace Salomon as Harmony, Paula Singer as Agnes, Dan Pona as Jonah, Milch Albert as William, Ed Free as Dan, Carl DeWeever as Father Hogan, Paul Strock as Harold and Chris Wastie as Steve. The assistant director is William Holman. The Raymond E. Wheeler Prescription Opticians 110 CENTRAL AVENUE Ojyotft* Munkiptl J>irUn«Lot Scotts. producer is Letty Hudak and the technical director is Gerry Purdy. The show will be performed in the round. Tickets will be available at the door. Soprano to Report On Evaluation Samuel Soprano, principal of Edison Junior High School, will present an evaluation report at the Mar. 30 public commilleeof-the-whole meeting of theweslfield Board of Education. The meeting is scheduled for 8 p.m. in the board office, 305 Elm SI. Classic Studios Westfield Police Officers John Whealley and Frank Krimnelt discuss ways in which local businessmen can help protect Iheir properly at Thursday's luncheon meeting of the Westfield Area Chamber of Commerce. Members of (he relalively-new Crime Prevention Unit, the officers described methods to help thwart break-ins, robberies, holdups and shoplifting. The session was held at tlic Westfield Motor Inn. The reunion committee for the class of 1966, Westfield High School has been unable to locate the following persons. Anyone knowing their whereabouts may contact Mrs. Stephanie Stapp Mannino of 9 Sunnywood Dr., Mrs. Jan Packingham Nelson of 162 Hunter Ave., Fanwood, or Mrs. Kathy Higgins O'Day Individualizing Instruction in the Language Arts was the topic of last week's inservice training program for the combined staff of Franklin and Klin Street Schools. Photo shows Dr. Dorothy Strickland, (left) chairperson in the Karly Childhood Department ut Kean State College, going over materials from a skills box with Mary (."ucnian (center), fiflh grade teacher from Klin Street School, and Virginia Kraus, second grade teacher lit Franklin School. EarlyBird Sale Start turning your thin lawn thick again! Hercs how: Simply make an cnrly-sprinu ap ilicaii(>n?pi'.syoits;nuiu : -;j?>,:. Uini.niK" lawn I'enilizer. ll helps, grass plants soni.) out;^/: tillers above ground, and rhizomes under ground thai. ; «row in hi new grass plains. Result'.' Your Inwn grows thicker-iiiul greener, filling in tliose thin spots. The earlier you spreud Seotls Turf Builder, the better. And you'll siivc money by buying now. during Sculls liarly- Bird Sale 5,000 Sq. Ft. 10,000 Sq. Ft. 15,000 Sq. Ft. authorized REG. *8.95 M6.95 '23.95 Scotts. W retailer NOW $ 7.95 $ '20.95 MEEKER S 1100 SOUTH AVE., W. f FREE PARKING OPEN DAILY 91O6 WHS Class of '66 Seeks Missing Members Muri Cock burn. Judy Comisky, Bruce Conrad, Shirley Crane, Beverly Crawford, Barbara Crittenden. Elin Cuetaro, Edward Cuff, Glen Cummings, Christine Czarniak. Patricia Czarniak, Cynlhia Davis, Ronald DeKosa, Carol Di.Vlaii), Susan Disque, Gail Dixon. Dennis Doraghy, Diana Gale, Sandra Dunlop. Nancy Fisher, Andrew Ford, Susan Foraker, Kathy Fosler, Cheryl Fowler, Charles Friedman, Pcler Kunk, David Gibson, Walter Gill, Patricia Graham, Margot Greene, Alison Greer, John Hajdok, Ronald Hall, Robert Hand. Philip llanna, Elcen Hecht, Debbie llendrycy, George Herpich, Rosemary Hooper, Susan Iloppe, Gregory Horn, Bruce Hunt, Davie Hunler, Carl ImholT, Barton Jackson, John Jeffers, Paul Jenson, Glenn Johnson. Jill Jones, Jack Jones, Robert Jones, Richard Jordon, Elizabeth Kahn, Shirley Kansky, Joan Kavanaugh, Patricia Keil, Peler Kelman, Michael Kennedy, Kirwan King, Gregory Klaiber, Theodore Klein, Margaret Kramm. G. Ann Lambert, Barbara Lee, Jeffery Loftus, Linda Lyman, Ellen Mac Connachie, John Mackay, Robert Madden, Gail Maddox, Linda imalinski, Fred Marshall, Nunzio Marlorina, Donald Mayer, William McCabe, Patricia McGarty, Marilyn Mcigs, Dennis Meilin. Roy Melcalf, James Melllor, Arthur Michaels, M. Kalhryn Miller, Sandra Miller, Gayle Mitchell. Margaret M'onson, Sherry Ncuring. Jennifer Nelson. M. Christine Nesse, Michael IMewborg, Otto Niederer, Beverly Norris, M. Ellen O'Ncall. William Paden. Diane Pallo, John Parken. John Parkinson, Jnnel Pathway, Thomas Palhway. Michael Palton, Monte Pellmar. Richard Pepper, Gwendolyn Peterson, James Pfafflc, R. Molcher Phillips, William Pierce, Mario Pisano. William Powers. Douglas Prcdiger. Kussell Ragland, Ann Reul. Dianne Hoherls, Kay Robinson. Nancey Robinson, Jon dodgers." Unmdn Rollins, Nan Hnscnvinge, Maryannt' Rossello, James Ryan, Henry Salomon, Audrey S a u n d 0 r s..1 u I i o Senramastrd, Frederick Schacfcr, Laura Sensbncb, Jan R. Shapiio, Novella Shcarin. D e n n i s S li e r i d a n, Raymond Schleckser, -THE WKSTFIELD (M.J.) UJAUEH, THl KtiUAY, A^RIL 1, JS76 Urges Early Pool Applications Mrs. Ruth V. Hill, Director of Recreation, urges members of (he Westfield Memorial Pool to get their applications in as soon as possible as memberships are taken on a firstcome, first-served basis. Al! I.D. cards must be brought in to the Pool Office for validating. Cards with yellow or checkered backgrounds will be stamped with 76. Cards with floral background pictures will be retaken. Those who have lost I.D. cards, must apply in person to ihe Pool Office. Lost Cards will be replaced at the following seasonal fees: $1 for first replacement per season; $5 for any replacement thereafter, per season. Cards thrown away by members at the end of a pool season must be considered as lost cards and a fee for replacement must be charged. The Poo! Office in the Municipal Building is open weekdays from 9 a.m. till 5 p.m. Starting Apr. (i the office also will be open every Tuesday night from 7 p.m. till 9 p.m. until pool operation starts on June 12. of 2388 Bryant Ave., Scotch Sharon Schork, Alison L. Plains. "Missing" arc: Schrag, Martin Schray, Roxanc Ackcrman, Michele Susan Schreck, Jean II. Albisser, Judith Ammirala, Scolt, Steven Siege!, Joanne Susan A. Anderson. Gloria Siff, Calvin Simon, Wayne Avery, Richard Ayres, Sloeum, Anne Smith.DonaJd Jeffrey Baker, Janet Barkdull, Janice Baiter, Martha Patrick Smith. Steven Srnilh, Christopher Smith, Barker. Rob e r I Smock. Frederick Specht. Baruchowilz, Kolierl Leonard Spina, Phyliss Bassetl, Elizabeth Bentflen, Stevens, Harmon Swart, Lee Bctls, Bruce Hinklcy, Alan Teeple, Frieda Susan Botlorfl. Daviii Thompson, Charles Boyer. Tiedernan, Carl Tishler, James 13rix, William Richard Trcnner, Willie Brousc, Christopher Tucker, Margaret Urban, Brown, Robert Brown. Alan Gordon Van Dijk. Joanne Burnley, David Burnley, Verdoni. A. Lenore Vives. Philip Busby, Robert David Whal. I-carningDisabled Butler, Lynn Cairns, Joseph Werner, Nancy Michael Campbell, l.croy Weston, Richard Whiteford. Carmichael, Alan Corn, Victoria Wildman, Peter William Cline. Doris Williams, David Yarussi, Chamberlain, Charlotte Richard riartels, Anthony Charles, David Chiistiano. Bliss, Julia Weidman, Gail obcrt Clark. Houston, Nancy Fecoskay, Steven Palmer, Jane Hammer, Alyson Roff, John Greene, Douglas Oldfield. Guest Speaker Leonard Saines, regional director of special education for the State of New Jersey, wi!! be guesl speaker at the April meeting of the Learning Disabilities Association of Westfield and Mountainside. Saines topic will be: "Mainstreaming the Child." Al this time the new slate of officers of the association will be presented and voted on. This meeting will be held at 8 o'clock Monday evening al Children's Specialized Hospital, New Providence Rd., Mountainside. All members and interested persons are invited. iiarry Devlin, author and illustrator, will be guesl speaker al the Westfield Library's Sunday afternoon program at :i p.m. Apr. 4. Devlin's appearance is sponsored by the Friends of the Library in observance of National Library Week, and his subject will be the writing of children's books, from the idea stage to the finished publication. All area residents are invited to attend the free event and to take Ihe opportunity to meet Devlin during the coffee hour afterwards. MITES BE SURE... BLISS has been serving the Home Owner for 94 YEARS. For a complete FREE INSPECTION of your home by a Termite Control Expert, supervised by the finest technical staff, phone: AD BLISS TERMITE CONTROL OIV. OF BUSS EXTERMINATOR COMPANY EST.1M2 One of the Oldest l> Largest at Hudson City Savings Bank Marking our 108 th Anniversary For loflyeors we havcconimuousiy paid dividends lo our depositors We oiler you VJIIOUS savings piansla*-reflueing rclirernerm accounls-moiigage home >niprovemeni and olher loans-anci m.my older convenient soivices lo give you one-slop banking Now with over s600-million in assets This is one of New Jersey s largest Savings Banks Our moteihan 160-lhous,inddeposito-s. using lwen y-one difleren! offices aiiest to the financial stability ana know-how o! Hudson C'ly Savings Bark Show your independence during our nation's 200 th Anniversary Start banking where your money means more... TOTALLY FREE CHECKING for savings depositors Free pcvsonnlizcd cht/ service leos No ninmi Time Accounts ol 2Vi jeais Of Interest from dar of deposit lurttjr (paid monthly) Minimum VI " O.dl New Iimt Account} of I year lo Hi y«in. Iflteresl from day cf deposit lo mitunlr (paid monthly). Minimum depoiit iwo. HA 6.00 New lime Acc lo maturity (pa deposit S100 1 open ftut iiwnft iccount tofilj! a year INTEREST ON ALL SAVINGS COMPOUNDED DAILY AND PAID MONTHLY!ul3tion& {Jict^tv (nil i dfpq&ilor mi) not MifhdMirY All 01 tn^f pjri ol A tirnc d^pos'1 to t 119 Central Avenue, Westfield Hudson City y <TS you wish No monthly suiutniunt Offices in Bergen, Camden, Essex, Hudson, Ocean, Passaic & Union Counties. Member: Federal Deposit Insur.inre Corporation * Deposits INSURED lo $40,000 Serving Savers Since 1868 yield oi year ir Passbook Si m t»j ol dtpi.it lo thly dl! ft to

6 THK WK.sTl'IKIJl (N.J.) I.KAKKH, THIKSD.AV. APKIL. I, THE LEADER Qroj AFFILIATE MEMBER NATIONAL NEWSPAPER ASSOCIATION Svcond class posuxt' paid ai Wrsilu-ld. N.J. Published Thursday <l W.Nlfi.ld. N.w Jrrsry. by ibe Weslfield Leader Printing ami I'ublishnii: ('iimpanv An Inflepeudt'iil Ni-WNpauer. Orficinl Paper lor III.- Town.>( Wesllield and HurouBll ol Mountninude. Subscription. Sfi.lMI )ier \e;ir in <^ ami-. I-St.iblistli'il I K!H1 Oflic,- 5U I Jin NLnil. V\t sld.ld. N..I U7UHU Tel 1MZ.IIII7 '.M:M. IK Mi niliel gti.ilitv tt,-tkli. * >.t Ni u.irisi'v New I n n I'lev, A N~.-I.II mil WALTI-K J I.KK..... Publisher GAM.*. TK1MIII.I- Idiloi FLOKtNC'K B. SAMt'H.SON. Mlwrt is,n c M jn.ipr Till KSI1A1, AI'Kll. I, 19'li Back to Basics Seems to us lhat a lot of effort is being made lo discredit Betty Kopf as a member of the Hoard of Education, and lhat the same dedication could be channeled into more constructive avenues. Mrs. Kopf, challenged as a candidate because she was a president of a parent-teacher organization, met further opposition by some on the board who thought her dual role as a Recreation Commission for the town and n Board of Education member constitutes a conflict of interest between the two non-paying positions lone appointed and the other elected). The newest member of the school board met further complications yesterday when she w;is asked lo appear before a hearing by an examiner appointed by Stale Commissioner of Kducalion Fred (.;. Hurke alter 10 residents requested a probe that some unqualified voters may have voted in the Mar.!> election after distribution of a pre-t'leclion letter containing incorrect voting information. The letter had suggested that new residents could vote by filing an affidavit ol residency. We are sure that any results that might come from lhat hearing could no' changctlk't'lecl.ionresulls;seven votes wereatslaki-. On the conflict of interest challenge, the hoard attorney, William Peek, was asked to give a formal ruling to the board. Letters questioning Mrs Kopf'sdual service also were sent lo the Recreation Commission and the Town Council, whose town attorney Robert Monney has been asked to give an opinion at an Apr. 0 conference session of the council. One hesitates lo consider the lime (and time means money) that has been spent on these challenges to a candidate who, while last in ihe race, placed second on Ihe ballot, IKK) votes behind one incumbent seeking reelection and about lit) ahead of the other incumbent who won a new term. Nor do we recall Mrs Kopf having hid the fact of her associations with either the PTO or the Recreation Commission during her campaign. Fact is these same affiliations may have made her more attractive as a candidate. We think all supporters of a healthy school system should concede that Betty Kopf won election lo her seat fairly and squarely and welcome 1 her as a concerned citizen contributing her time and talents lo Westfield's Board of Education. As so many candidates in the recent school district election claimed, it's time lo get "back to basics." Committee Reviewing State Budget The busiest Committee of the New Jersey Legislature since March 12 is the Joint Appropriations Committee (JAC) currently reviewing the nearly $2.(i billion 1977 State Budgel recommended by Governor Byrne, notes the New Jersey Taxpayers Association. While the 1977 Budget represents a net increase of about $5H million over the authorized spending level of the current year, many regard the new spending proposal "austere." Since the increase in yields from existing Stale tax sources has slowed for the second consecutive year, and Ihe tax package approved by the Assembly on Mar. 15 was no! designed to provide significant amounts for 1977 Budget restorations other than $378 million for elementary-secondary education, the deliberations of the committee are crucial to future operations of State Government. The 23-member Joint Appropriations Committee, chaired this year by Senator Bernard J. Dwyer (D- Middlesex), consists of both Ihe Senate Revenue, Finance and Appropriations, and Assembly Appropriations Committees. Eight of the 23 members are serving on the JAC for the first lime. Assisting the JAC in their examination of Ihe 1977 Budget is the Office of Fiscal Affairs tofa), the "fiscal arm" of the Legislature. The OFA research staff is responsible for preparation of program and other budgetary and revenue analyses contained in a bulky black loose-leaf manual distributed to each Committee member. Prior to hearingsonspecifieddepartments and agencies, OKA provides legislators with "issue" papers and special studies concerning the programs and departments, and supplies additional information upon request from Committee members. The complete meeting schedule continuing through April 14 with all-day meetings varying from three lo five days a week, sets forth the specific day for appearance of each department before the Committee. Departments respond to questions regarding any aspect of the budget and to present arguments for fund restorations. Staff members of ihe Bureau of the Budget in Ihe State Department of Treasury are also present to explain the budget document from their viewpoint. The hearings, open to the public, are conducted in the Assembly Lounge, in the State House basement. In addition to departmental hearings, meetings of subcommittees of the Joint Appropriations Committee are also held. There are four sub-groups: Revenue, which examines revenue sources and determines yields; Personnel, which is responsible for reviewing justification of new position requests; Claims, which reviews claims against the Stale, and determines those for inclusion in the appropriations bill; and Capital Construction, which studies capital outlay proposals and suggests priorities. Kach of the sub-committees submits a report forconsideralion by the whole committee during the final meetings. Prior to the final meetings, the JAC has scheduled several dales at which citizens and organizations may appearand express their views on Ihe budgel. The public sessions are usually held in a different location such as Ihe 4(K)-seai State Cultural Center Auditorium and may extend into the evening. Final meetings of the Joint Appropriations Committee are tentatively scheduled for mid-april. At these final sessions, members of the JAC submit resolutions regarding cutting, restoration, revenue-changes, and other budge'-related recommendations. The end product of Ihe entire Joint Appropriations Com mi Hue process is the Appropriations Kill submitted lo the entire Legislature for further consideration. A supplemental Appropriations measure, providing added kinds needed for the present fiscal year may also be submitted. Meetings of Ihe Joint Appropriations Committee, an important phase of the.stale's fiscal process, can provide any interested taxpayer valuable insight inlo governmental operations,cunelitdeslhe. New Jersey Taxpayers Association, which regularly has ;i sluff member in attendance ul the committee's meetings. LETTERS TO THE EDITOR All letters lo the editor must hear a signature. :i street address ami a telephone number so authors may be checked II contributors are not able lo be reached M local phone numbers during Leader siih's* hum's. tlu> writer'smi'iiaturi 1 may be notarized Letters must he written wily on line side of paper ami typewritten All loiters must be in the "Leader" office by Friday if they are lo appear in Ihe lolliiwmg issue PKIMAHY i:i.i:ni<>\ DII.K.MMA Editor. Leader; The League of Women Voters is very much concerned thai many voters will he disenfranchised in this year's Primary Klection because ol recent changes made in New Jersey's Primary Kleclion Law. The new rules require tlujt 50 or more days prior lo the Primary Kleclion a voter who wishes lo change his party affiliation must so declare. A voter's party is that party which he chose in the last Primary Klection in which he voted. This means that even if you have not voted in a primary for many years, you must recall in which party you did vote. Kyou wish to change your parly you must fill out a form available at the Town Clerk's office in Ihe.Municipal Building. You must appear in person, as Ihe form is not to leave the office. The Municipal Clerk will forward the form to Ihe County Clerk, who will acknowledge receipt to you, allowing you lo vote in Ihe party of your choice on June 8. If you are a newly registered voter and this is I he first lime you are ] eligible lo vote in a j Primary, you need not make the advance declaration. This year, the deadline for making the declaration of choice is Apr. 19. If you lasl voted in the Primary Kleclion of party A and now wish to vote in the Primary of parly B, you should go to the Municipal Building and fill in the form. After several years of open Primaries, you may not recall in which party you last voted. This information can be obtained from the County Clerk's office in Elizabeth. The law is confusing and election officials involved are trying hard to set up regulations to carry it out properly, so if you have any questions, get to Ihe Municipal Clerk before Apr. 19. Margaret Walker Voters Service Director, L.W.V. TAMAQUESCOURTS Editor, Leader; Career demands preclude the continuation of my position as tennis coordinator for the women's program which I initiated in 11)73 for the Recreation Commission. Naturally I would hate to see the program flounder for lack of leadership but fortunately this will not be the case. Chris Voorhees has consented to continue my program with carte blanche from me to do with it what she will. I am delighted with the enthusiastic acceptance of my program and of course wish to see it continue. Joan Smith Boulevard Life In The Suburbs WELL. DON'T you SEE AMyTHlNG? HOLY Tit IMTV MS Kdilor, Leader; A lew weeks ago you published a letter from Helen M. Livesy. I just hope everyone realizes how right she is. As a recent alumnus of Holy Trinity High School, I see everything I was taught being I'ontradicteri. I have literally watched the high school students being treated as objects. In every report issued the problems were covered and in each report one as peel was i ignored.-- the students. 1 ' admit lhat it was slated that I he students could attend Ihe surrounding schools. This is a very good plan except I have one question for the people advocaling-ordering the closing of Holy Trinity High School: Whal matter's more, people or money'.' After i:s years of Catholic education at Holy Trinity I can't help wondering why they do not practice the Christian ideals thai they teach so well! Elizabeth J.Herold 316 Lawrence Ave. KKPMRKONKO.'K Editor, Leader; This is a letter in response lo Lisa Gorsky's of March 25. Mrs. Gorsky brought Ihe question of Betty Kopf's conflict of interest with regard to Kopf's position as president of lloosevelt to a P.T.O. board meeting prior to 'he election. Many members, myself included, were appalled, shocked and angered al.mrs. Gorsky's suggestion thai Betty Kopf's candidacy was unethical. At that meeting, Ihe board voted unanimously that Kopf's candidacy lo the Board of Education was not in conflict with her position as president of the P.T.O. Knowing full well of the board's decision in this ' matter, I cannot understand I why Mrs. Gorsky is still! awaiting Kopf's resignation. Having served on the Koosevelt P.T.O. board with! Betty Kopf this year, I have i found her to be a woman with endless zeal and enthusiasm. She has proved lo be a responsible and effective president. I feel certain she applies the same level of energy lo her position as Recreation Commissioner, and I am sure she will be a great asset to the Board of Education during her term. I personally feel it would be a great loss to the town if Betty Kopf resigns either position. from I find it amusing that Gorsky wrote Betty "has raised so many doubt's in the minds of Westfield citizens." Judging from the election returns, a large percentage of Westfield citizens have confidence in Kopf's capability in serving on the Board of Education. 1 urn sure these people who cast their vole for Kopf were aware of her other townwide activities and saw her Since its inception the register has expanded to approximately 1G5 participants, not incidentally all women. Mixed Doubles enticed about one-third of as a dedicated woman, that total number from the interested in Ihe town's male tennis players, most of growth in Ihe areas of whom just happened to be education, sports and Ihe married lo their partners arts. Contrary to what Mrs. (but not necessarily) Gorsky believes, there are very few people who sec this To digress just a bit, for kind of dedication as a any' justifiably annoyed conflict of interest problem. tennis fiends who are I have a suggestion for outraged al the fact that the Mrs. Gorsky, Mr. Knapp Tamaqucs courts are still and anyone else in their not repaired, I'UCASK don't little group who plans to blame the Recreation Commission. They are just iis upset us we tennis players. If you wish lo register a complaint, the responsibility for Ihe sluggish repair should fall nn Ihe town engineer's department. At the risk of Wood WalKer alienating the town council, why don't you conlact your Diyiskxi First Regional Securities, Inc. councilman in an attempt lo affeetuate a speedy restoration? By Al Smith AH,yES.' THE SNOW IS ALL GONE, THE GRASS V x^-x" IS GETTING GREEN--V^T V FINE WEATHER "^^ V\ FOR SOLF.' A write conflict-of-interest letters - Begin to accept the fact that your candidate did not win Ihe election, and j UIMVITIII'KOIM.K Kditor. U'ader; I have read in your turn your energy and en- j newspapor that the UP WiHi thusiasm toward achieving,,, been an old, quiet almost e C0IKCr[ is coming to something positive and 1 somnolent neighborhood, Westfield on Apr. 27 and 2K until recently constructive for Westfield. Joanie Parks Hughes On Sunday, March 21st, (>)7 Lawrence Ave. we were visited by some HICI'I.IKSON "WATKIH.ATK" Kditor, Leader; The following is an open letter to Mrs. Kgon (iorsky, iloli W. Dudley Ave.: Mrs. Gorsky: A Watergate in Westfield? We hardly think so!!! If you really did your homework by reading the papers and discussing your alleged "doubts" with those directly involved, your I "doubts" would be erased. I In this country we have a tradition of accepting the will of the majority and joining forces for the common good. The electorate has spoken. Enough of the divisive tactics. Let's work together with our elected Board of Education members and get on with the more important tasks at hand! Kllisand Suzano Howland! G45SI. Marks Ave., 1 BICENTENNIAL IDKA Editor, leader; i Wiilter Campbell, con- sultiny editor of Industry : Week has an unusual idea : for celebrating the Biccn- ' tennial. In an editorial in i that magazine, ho suggests reaffirming the Declaration of Independence -- "not i against a foreign despot, but! against ;i domestic I government that far exceeds what lhat government was inlended to be or needs to be." "It will require extreme pressure on Congress... and pinching Ihe monstrous pipeline of public monies lhat flow lo loo many bureaus and too many programs," he noted, but "should we be able to return a reasonable government to the people, we certainly would have something to celebrate." Another good idea will be a severe elimination of welfare lo underservinf; elements. Both ideas will help lo reduce the existing high taxes. Joseph B. Visceglia Mountainside P.O.Box 1070 KIRIOALAKMBOXKS Editor, Leader; A fire alarm box is an easy way for a kid to report a fire. Once, a friend of mine tried to report a fire in Ihe woods. He had to go to three houses before someone believed him and called the fire department. If he had not been able to get someone to report Ihe fire, al least there was a fire alarm box in the neighborhood. I don't think it is a good idea to remove the fire alarm boxes. Sincerely Matt Linden, Age Stevens Ave. PS. We are also taught in school how to use the fire alarm boxes to report a fire. MEM&6H, NEW YORK.STOCK EXCHANGE SINCE I*** 203 Elm Street, Westfield Open Thursday Evenings. 7 9 P.M. and I would just like to say that I have seen this great group of youngsters perform in Ihe past and they put on one beautiful show. I certainly recommend the Up With People Concert for everyone and 1 am sure that your readers would be greatly interested in liearing more about it. Sincerely, JimOri 2M Orchard St. Extended Hours For IRS Off ires Al! Internal Revenue Service officer in New Jersey will be open from Id a.m. until 2 p.m. on Saturday, Apr. HI lo help last minute, taxpayers wilii their Federal income tax returns. They will also he open from il a.m. until H::i(l p.m. on Wednesday, Apr. 14 and Thursday, Apr. 15. IRS loll free telephone lines will also be open during those same hours except thai phone service will not begin until R::)0 a.m. on Wednesday and Thursday. Nat ions spoiling for a fight usually fight for Ihe spoils. The Spirit of "WHKKK ARK Cmi.DHEN?" YOUR Edilor, Leader, Dear People of Westfield: "Do you know where your children are tonight?" So spoke the voice of a recent television ad regarding parental responsibilities for the whereabouts and doings of their minor offsrping. Some people scoffed a I that ad and others merely disregarded it. If they did not know EXACTLY where their children were, it didn't really matter. After all, their children wouldn't be doing anything wrong would they?? Our family lives in an older area of Westfield known as Germantown, bordered on one side by Sherwood Parkway and Oak Avenue and on the other by Woodland Avenue and Kimball Turn. We have lived here six years and have never been beset with the vandalism that has been visited upon others of our Weslfield friends. This has rather scurrilous individuals. They weren't clearly seen and unfortunately can't be identified - this lime. I was home alone, ill with Ihe flu, my husband and children out for the evening. A little after 1! p.m. my uninvited visitors made their presence known. Suddenly there was a banging al my front door accompanied by audible laughter and the sound of running water. I looked out from behind niy window shade and saw no one on my my porch. Opening the front door only inches I saw a large white bucket partially filled with water right in front of my storm door and my hose laying there running water ali over the porch, i could hear jeers and ca'callsasl put on the lights on both my front porch and over my side door. After about 15 minutes of silence 1 pu< out the lights and after listening and looking closely, slipped out my side door and turned off Ihe outside faucet. The hose had evidently been originally propped so that had I Answered Ihe door's knocking I would have received a faceful of water. After removing the bucket from my porch and replacing Ihe hose- I went back inside. Not ten minutes later I heard (he water running again. This time my front window was being directly sprayed as was the front door. I reached for Ihe phone and called the Police. The intruders alternated between spraying Ihe front of the house and my side so lhat if I had wanted lo I could not go outside without being soaked. Although it was really only 2-liminutes until the Police arrived it seemed achingly long, especially when (he vandals next move was lo thrust the hose through my cellar window. I stood on the landing by my side door and watched Ihe water pouring inlo my cellar unable to do anything about if, because THEY were still out I here laughing and having a terrific lime. The Police arrived and the culprits dispersed like polluted air before a hurricane wind, completely - The Constant Redder A Different Kind of Book Store on Saturday April lotrom 3 to 4 p.m. PATRICIA GAUCH aulhor ol "This Time, Tempo Wick" and other delightful children's books will be on hand to talk with children and parents and to autograph her books. and thoroughly The water was turned off and a neighbor attracted by Ihe lights of the Police cars kindly helped to disconnect Ihe hose and tend to the mess inside. All Ibis took place in less than :io minutes. Not'an enormous amount of damage to be sure...compared to some that has been done in this town of late...just an ill person much disturbed, a booby-trapped front porch and a flooded cellar, not much, nol much al all WHY, in as affluent a town as this one, do young persons have get their KICKS by shoplifting in our stores, when they could afford lo buy the merchandise, by stealing bicycles, on March 15lh my son's ten year old bicycle was among 4 or 5 that were stolen off Ihe Roosevelt Junior High School Field in broad daylight, and by bedeviling peaceful citizenry by night with their "innocent pranks" such as I have related. Is this Westfield, Colonial Westfield that we are so proud to live in - Westfield where these things are now happening on almost a daily basis'.'? What has happened lo our town and our children?? What arc we, whal are YOU the parents of Westfield children going to do about the ever increasing rate of juvenile vandalism and crimes that ARE happening here?? Do you know where your children were Sunday, March 21st? Do you know where they were lasf night? Will you know where they are tonight? Christine M.Brcnnan 1100 Franklin Avenue 4 New Providence Rd. Mountainside Mon. thru Sat. 10 to 6 mail and telephone orders welcome - books mailed anywhere. for your Vacation Club of...with a FREE Bicentennial serving tray PLUS an increased Vacation Club dividend! FREE BICENTENNIAL SERVING TRAY Money Mouse helps you celebrate 76 with your choice of one ol these attractive, durable 10-inch serving trays.. absolutely free when you open your 1977 Vacation Club account at any First Federal Savings office Limit one Iray per person while supply lasts... so come in today! INCREASED VACATION CLUB DIVIDEND Your 77 Vacation Club earns dividends at the ralo of 5% per annum of the average balance for completed Clubs Here s how your completed 77 Vacation Club can look,.. CLASS S1 S2 S3 S5 310 S20 AMOUNT PAID S DIVIDEND S Put Your Vacation Club Money Where Our Mouse Is YOU RECEIVE S FIRST FEDERAL SAVINGS MAIN OFFICE MOUNTAINSIDE HGfj MoiinUnn Avenue Mti\in\<nt\UHto N J (J7O92 Phonn 23? F'ft/SOfiaqi: floiit) Hdiltjn N J USi317 Phone M9-D7O7 WOODUNIDOE 117Mn.fi Slimd Woodhiiiiyu N J O7U95 Phono G36-0I00 Gr;int City Shopping Glr Clark N J O/OFifi Phone 381-IHQO SOUTH PLAINflELt) Middlost?* M.ill SirHiufi RU S Plamliuld. N J O70HO Phone 75391b! Rl Nu!) 4 C.iinptii'li Cl Froohcjld N J U71?H Hhune 431-f)UH(J GARDEN STATE DIVISION 335 E Fronl SIMMM PlltiMtiult! N J 0/OUO Pfconi! 7S4 1(J(J0 SEE

7 By April 15 - the fastapproaching federal income tax filing deadline - more than 54 million Americans will have been subjected to another round of discriminatory taxation. Under our present tax The newest change in charter flight regulotions means that everyone con book aboard a charter flight. Formerly, one had to be a member of a club (or "affinity"; i,e,, dues paying, common-interest organization). In addition to "ADC's (from Canada) and "TGC's (from the USA) which offer reduced rale air transportation, you will want to know about (hose? vocation charter package plans: "I.T.C." Inclusive Tour Charter: This type of charter "packages" a low-cosl fi ight with a ground tour, but neither component can be booked with out the other. At least forty persons will be participating in the same itinerary, and no dovi ations are permitted. There will be at least three stops on the tour schedules and reservations will normally be accepted up to fourteen days prior todeparlure, when space remains available. "O.T.C." One-Stop Tour Charter: This newest concept in vacation charters became valid late last Winter. The difference from the TC regulation is im portanl: the three stop require ment is eliminated. Now il will be possible to book charter pack ages to such popular single des tinations as Las Vegas, ski resorts and the Caribbean sun spots. Minimum duration for these packages is four days for North American destinations... seven days for international flights. Transportation may not be sold without land arrange ments. "S.E-C." Special Events Charters: Charter flights for as brief a time span as one day with or without hotel accommodations will be offered for conventions, product showings ana fraternal or religious gatherings. Butdo not expect "S.EC's to the Bowl games or to the Olympics. The Civil Aeronautics Board (C.A.B.I precludes event!, 'publicized to the general public lor more than 90 days. Traveling ELM ST code, unmarried individuals are being denied full access to income splitting as a means of reducing tax liabilities. And many married couples, both with incomes, find themselves paying more taxes than they would if they were single. It is deplorable that such blatant inequities persist in our lax system 200 years after a revolution against unjust taxation. The time is overdue for elimination of tax penalties based on an individual's marital status. Americans should be taxed as individuals and not as single persons, married persons, or members of any other category. I feel so strongly about this that I have introduced a bill giving unmarried people full access to income splitting, and removing tax rate inequities for married persons where both are employed. Enactment of the measure into law would be a fine way to mark the bicentennial. Look at what's happening : Unmarried individuals, whether widowed, divorced jointly or separately. But if or single, pay up to 20they filed as single taxpayers, they would pay percent more in taxes than some married persons filing $5,230 each in taxes, or a a joint return. total of $10,460. By filing jointly, married The present tax code couples split their income produces a different tax and pay taxes at a lower liability for individuals with rate. A couple with a taxable the same income not income of $30,000, all earned by the husband or by the wife, can file a joint return and pay taxes on $15,000 each - which works out to a lower total levy than one tax on $30,(100. Kven though they may have family responsibilities, unmarried individuals are denied full access to this income splitting advantage. Comparisons of taxes paid by unmarried individuals and by married couplesclearly demonstrate the arbitrary and unfair nature of the tax system. An unmarried individual whoso taxable income is $12,000 pays $2,630 in taxes. If he or she was married and was the sole wage earner filing a joint return, the tax would be $2,260. That's a difference of $370. As incomes rise, the penalty on unmarried people becomes greater. At the $14,000 taxable income level, the penalty is $450. At $10,000 it is $570; at $20,000 it rises to $850, and at $30,000 it reaches on astonishing $3,130. This discrimination also extends to single persons who try to file as head of a household. Consequently a widowed, divorced or single parent earning $8,000 pays $100 more a year in taxes than a married couple with one income of $8,000 a year. The penalty rises as income mounts. Just as inequitable is the fact that tax advantages available to married couples with one income who file a joint return do not extend to couples with two fairly equal incomes. Consider the case of a woman who earns $5,000 a year along with her husband's $5,000 income. This woman and her husband pay $200 more in taxes than if they were single persons filing individual returns. This is a 10 percent surtax on the taxes they would pay if they were unmarried. If the husband earns $20,000 and his wife earns $10,000, the couple pays $780 more in taxes than if they were single individuals filing separately. Where the husband and wife have separate incomes providing them with a taxable income of $20,000 each, they pay a total of $12,140 in taxes - $6,070 for each of them. This applies whether they file because of demonstrated differences in ability to pay, but because of differences in marital or household status. This is patently unfair. After allowable deductions and exemptions are taken, the graduated tax rate should apply to everyone's taxable income regardless of martial status. Eclipsing Stars Program Feature "Eye of The Demon," the story of eclipsing variable stars, will be the featured program at the Trailside Planetarium in the Watchung Reservation at 2, 3 and 4 p.m. Sunday. The program will be repeated at H p.m. Wednesday. A nature talk for children will be given at the Trailside Nature and Science Center on Wednesday and Thursday, Apr. 7 and 8 at 4 p.m. The subject will be "Snakes of New Jersey." MADL IN -AMERICA: LAST 4 DAYS 37th ADVERSARY SALE SAVE 10% to 50% On \ Wide Variety of Merchandise! Just A Few Samples of Values Remaining : >7Mt SI\liKV>1 DELUXE MIXMASTER v- 1 q ; New 225 Watt Motor. Doucjh hooks. Gold. UT«W us OVER SINK ClITTINIS BOARD $<> 47 Hardwood 12"x1-Vx3/<r. Adj. Vinvl Coated Extension Wires. Fits up to 20" sink. tf.tl -lib IISIIIl 10-SI'EED DUAL RIME ItlKMIhlt $iq,r Four Cycle Speeds 2 Lo Range - 2 Hi Range 6 Continuous Speeds. Gold. Iw«wl 'IU1 UMHt KNIFE & S< ISSiHtS SHARPENER $n,,- Split Wheel "Flontirui" Grinding Action. 5 Slots for Storing Knives. While. V«MI 1000 Mil I'RO-TYPE HAIR BLOWER $ II 07 Directional Nozzle - Plus 3 Heat and Choice Hiijh or II t*fl BEACH 3-SPEED HANIMXEI PRESTO BURGER HAMBURGER COOKER Juiciest Hnmburfleis Euor Fiisi nnci Easy. TRIO SOT IIHiUH MIIVIIM, (\M)I KS '8.97 Moving Ahead -Construction begins on new addition to CMMren'i Specialized HospiUI In Mountainside, as equipment clears land for the building, «shown in this recent photo.butdespitethe inconveniences, it's business as usual ai the rehabilitation facility for physically handicapped ywingslersonnew Providence Rd. Report From Trenton By Sen. Alexander J. Meiraa The Senate is considering the Assembly-passed tax package of 15 bills that would establish a tax program for New Jersey based on a gross income tax. Within the package is a words, the local municipalities would benefit from any additional revenues. At the outset, the amount to be distributed, other than senior citizens'; and veterans' deductions would providing for thebe $100 million. As revenues bill sharing of State tax revenues with each municipality as the means of reducing local property taxes. When the Botter decision struck down the local properly tax as the main source of revenue for school funding, it became necessary for the State to come up with a program to fund each child's "thorough and efficient" education. The Legislature is acting, therefore, under court mandate. Hearings have been scheduled by the Senate and changes in the original measures will be made There are certain basic concepts of the bills that will remain, however. The income tax proposals make it clear that the money from the income tax will go lo property tax relief. The funding will not go into a general fund to restore budget cuts. In other words, the income tax each in- dividual pays will be spent on T & E funding, home stead exemptions and revenue sharing. The revenue sharing concept would provide local tax relief by putting money into the local municipality and thereby reducing the amount the local government would have to raise by taxes. Under this new revenue sharing legislation, the total amount to be distributed would be $150 million. Of this, approximately $39 million would be transferred from existing programs, one of which was not funded this year the $25 million under the sales tax act. The other $14 million is the present reimbursement of senior citizen deductions in each municipality, i The bulk of the money-! $100 million-would be distributed on a per capita basis. This was the method previously used to distribute the sales tax monies. To this amount, each municipality would also receive the total cost of senior citizens' and veterans' deductions. There has been a provision made in this particular bill to dedicate 10 per cent of any new lax or $100 million-whichever is greater-to this revenue sharing program. In other increased, however, and as population and income increased, there would be a built-in natural increase in the distribution of such funds to the local level. This Legislative District, District 20, would receive $3,584,044 in this new money revenue sharing plan. The > taxes. But the State is now debating the merits of this current package to determine if will implement an equitable means of financing our children's education, answering a court mandate, providing Papers, and related il to property relief on the local contemporary America. breakdown for each j tax level, and getting this Seminars will also be held in municipality is as follows: ' State moving again in accepting its responsibility Madison, Wis.; Boston, Cranford, $548,092; Garwood, $110,540; Hillside, toward its residents. Mass.; San Francisco, Calif.; New Orleans, La.; $427,318; Roselle, $437,707; Roselle Park, $281,485; Union, $1,147,770; Westfield $031,132. There is no way to put an absolutely exact figure on the effect this new revenue sharing will have on local taxes, because local assessment and tax levies have not all been taken into con- \ sideration. The following figures, however, should approximate the actual effect in These are points on Ihc General Tax Hate. For every $100 of assessed value, multiply that number by the following-cranford, $.127; Garwood, $.143; Hillside, $.132; Roselle, $.333; Roselle Park, $.198; Union, $.120; Westfield, $.150. As an example, if the assessed value is $20,000 and the points on the lax rate show $.255. the taxpayer would multiply 200x$.255 for a savings of $ This would be in addition to his homestead exemption. It is difficult to speak of an j "average" home in any one j 'own. To get a general idea j of the exemption in our district the following are being considered "average." Savings would be: in Cranford, $278, Garwood, $207; Hillside, $280; Roselle. $284; Roselle i Park, $281; Union, $255; i Wcstfield, $278.! The important concept of the lax package is that i revenue raised from an income tax will be deposited in a special Property Tax Relief Fund account that will be used exclusively for property tax relief. The funds will be annually appropriated to counties, municipalities, school districts for property tax relief. Tenants and owners of cooperative apartments will receive a credit of $110 against their tax liability. Senior citizens will receive a John Edison Sloane, Inc. INVESTMENT COUNSEL-SINCE NORTH AVENUE WEST TIFFANY gross income, as will their spouses. There are also provisions for additional exemptions for the blind or disabled. Under the Assembly bill, A-1777, a permanent Commission on Efficiency and Economy in State Government would be set up as a "watchdog" commission. No one likes to pay taxes. No one wants to pay new We, here at Wyatt Brothers, are proud of this fine selection of Pierre Cardin clothing for the young man. The largest display of stylish suits, sport coats (and contrasting slacks) and leisure suits you can imagine... very today.. all expertly tailored. -TUB WESTFIKJJ) (N.J.) I.KAM.K, TJII'KSDAV. APKII. I, l»7«the League of Women Voters Education Fund recently received a $196,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to hold six seminars around the country to examine the Federalist Papers' historical and contemporary importance. Leading scholars, government officials, and journalists will participate in seminars, chaired by League members to provide citizens with background on the origins of the Constitution to help them evaluate contemporaryconstituliona] issues. Each seminar held in a different area of the country will focus on one of the following topics: Background of Constitution, Bill of Rights, The Congress, The Executive Branch, The Judiciary, and the Nature of American Federalism. The first seminar was held March 13 in Annapolis, Maryland, and explored the social, political and intellectual climate which shaped the Federalist I'll)! I' and Denver, Colo. League the fuel it needs to In making the an-rekindlnouncement of the grant heritage and the tenets upon interest in both our Mrs. Huth C Clusen, which this country was chairperson of the League of founded. The league is very Women Voters education pleased to be able to offer fund, said, "The this invaluable gift to the Endowment has given the American public." phltllllllllhuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUII Own a lord for only *V29L% I & Garden I 349 South Ave., E. I I Westfield, N.J I "If c si'rvict 1 li-iml ue sell" Open duily *i to 6 j glmllllllllllllll illilllllllltllllllllllllllllllllllllluiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiihr Spring /s a great time to treat a young man's fancy.. with wonderful clothing NEWVORK! nmu KIVMKV HUM si - win THIS HIm OJI,V - i TIIMSIIAY - FRIDAY -SMRIIAY i 20% OFF! - CASH ONLY ON EVERY NONELECTRIC ITEM IN STORE. NOT VALID FOR j FARBERWARE, "SALE" OR "OUR PRICE" TAGGED ITEMS. in s mm IIF miiihiiishii rmiit.m}; mm ' Abovo Items Subjeci lo Prior Siilu Ihnidi Charge Master Charge HimkAmericiird I MADE > IN * AMERICA 128 ELM ST., Open Tliursdiiy Evenings "Til ') P.M. TWO WAY RADIO TO INSURE SPEEDY SERVICE OPEN DAILY 9 a.m. "til 10 p.m. SUNDAY 9 a.m. 'til 6:30 p.m. AD RUSSELL STOVER CANDY PANTENE & LOREAL HUDSON VITAMIN PRODUCTS FREE PICK UP AND DELIVERY Ampla Fr«i Parking 1115 SOUTH AVE. W. Wyatt Brothers 138 Central Aw./Westfleld. New Jeis*y/232-27(X) Open Thurs evening until 9PM Park (re*? in our lot

8 THK WhSTFIKU) (N.J.) i.ladkit, THIHSDAV, AI'KII, ], Rocks Wear Green for School Contest, Win Owners Onyx Eggs, Pebble Candy Thu first Koosevelt Junior High School St. Pat rid.'s Day Pet Rock Contest sponsored l>y I hi 1 Sparkle Committet', drew a laiige number of entries. All rocks, regardless of bivrd Or pedigree, were required to be trained in nbodionee ulnd dressed in suitable Kt. Patrick's Day costume to be eligible lor judging. Accompanying each rock was a written entry loin giving the trainer's natu', the Pel Rock's name, lineage, breed. AKi' registration, place of bit In. age. special u- complishmenls, special tricks, and any other items about 'lie rock which mi^ht impress the judges. Notable features of M> v ne of the rocks included: u.is in the (Ireal Wall of Chin i "was used by David to sla\ Goliath." "was once thrc over Big Ben and IK tor immortalized in ihesong 'Rock Around the Clock.' " "loves Breakstone cottage cheese." "iinitatesa brick. "quit smoking the time the earth dil," "dances to rock music," "has gone through washing machine at ind! the ast two times. The contest was open to all Roosevelt students, teachers, and parents. Entries included rocks ol all sizes and shapes from a Proud owners display their uinuiiik entries in the Roosevelt Junior High School St. Patrick's Day I'et Mink Contest. Holding their traiiieil and costumed pets are Krie Kiiminrlsky. Hriicc Mid ;ouil. Kelly KuUlmrt and llrint llutcharl. large slab of pink quartz to a splinter of natural asbestos. After much deliberation the judges awarded the following prizes: Best in show, Mrs. Ann l-'onlana: ninth grade first place, 1$ill Odenkirk; second place. Maryanne MeUoan: third place, Brendan Shea; eighth grade first place. Thomas Buehlerl; second place, Brint Bulchart; third place, first place. Kelly Bulchart: : Kaminelsky; most talented : second place Adam Shapiro; third place, Cliff Booth; teachers first place,.michael Barha; second place, Frank Nolde: third place. Sam Jones. Special awards included: Best Afro, Garnell Nichols; best Puerto Hican rock terrier. Oarlene Smith: special alumni, best education and best costume. Kind Brooks Betz; seventh grade j Ilarting; bravest, Kric Correctional Institutions Described by Mrs. Walker "Correction. Is i II indeterminate term left to Enough?" was the puzzling the discretion of the question posed by M,rs. correctional authorities. George Walker in an address before the Old Gulird Usually, (hey come from of Westfield at Ihe YMCA last Thursday. Mrs. Walter, a Girl Seoul leader for several years, has boen active in the league of Women Voters, holding Ihe position of director at the local, state and national levels. Since 1975, she has been associated with the Youth Correclio lal Institution Comp ex maintained by the Institution and Agencies division of the State ol New Jersey. New Jersey has three such complexes, located at Bordentown, the oldest; at Yardville, the newest, and at Annandale. Youths' at these complexes range from 15 years lo 30 years of age (but mostly are 21 tc! 27 years). They usually are offenders sentenced to an poor homes, broken homes, large families and families where the parents are very young. Most of them (about i>0 percent) are addicted to marijuana, heroin, cocaine or alcohol and these addictions are a main source of their problem. Offenders are sent to Yardville first where they are screened and then assigned lo one of the three complexes where they are placed in a work and educational program. These programs include psychiatric counselling and vocational training. At Yardville, which has the best facilities for education and job training, they have a program called PIE, or Program for Intensive Education. The youths are given intensive instruction in reading, writing and arithmetic for many are drop-outs and none have high school diplomas. Group therapy is practiced in groups of 12 where they "let il all hang out" in language that is often shocking as they work out their problems by talking about them. These institutions are run by a superintendent and staff. They have a board of directors or trustees that oversees them and renders the final decision on who is to be paroled. The parole is based on the offenders file which includes reports from instructors, supervisors, psychiatrists and others, but the decisions are heavily influenced by the need to accommodate the influx of new offenders in facilities that arc already overtaxed. Many of the incoming of-' lenders are repeaters, indicating that (he program is not working and hence Ihe question "Correction is it enough?" Henee iiidgood; and most contented, Sue B. Lewis. Judges for the event were Marshall Fine, Mrs. Ruth Foster and Mrs. Sydna Hoick, under (he leadership of Samuel Stone, head judge. Prizes included a plant for a rock garden, onyx rock eggs, bags of pebble candy, crackled rock lollipops and a piece of rock candy for all Talk on Ulcers To Open Series Dr. Samuel Gray of Westfield, a gastroenterologisl, will speak on "The Contemporary Dilemma: Ulcer Disease" at 10a.m. Saturday at Union College. This is the first of six free medical lectures to be offered by Union College in cooperation with Ihe Union County Medical Society. The "Meet the Doctor" lecture series is designed to provide information on a variety of diseases and medical issues thai are of concern lo Ihe general public. Topics for Ihe current series were selected on the WHS Ensemble In Berklee Fest The Westfield U.S. Jazz Ensemble, directed by Ronald Starner. has registered to participate in the eighth annual Jazz Knsemble Festival, scheduled to be held at Boston's Berklee College of Music on Saturday. May 1. The event, sponsored by the National Association of Jazz Educators and co-ordinated by Berklee Vice-President I,ee Eliot Berk, is a multistate affair open to all high school stage bands. Since its conception seven years ago it has attracted more than 12,000 student musicians and educators from (he U.S. and Canada. Gary Burton, Ray Copeland and John LaPorta Planning session - Third and fourth grade teachers plan a Bicentennial Frogram scheduled for Saturday, May 22, ;it Lincoln School. The session was part of Lincoln School's inservice program last week. Pictured, left lo right, are Dorothy llorner, Janet llutchinson, John Oivt'ns, Constance Garbus and Helen Gregory. basis of requests from those attending previous lectures, according to Weyman 0. Sleengrafe of Westfield, director of continuing education at Union College. Future lectures will deal with diabetes, male menopause, eye infections, malpractice and female menopause. Klhel Stevens, executive director of the Union County Medical Society, is coordinating the series. While the lectures are free lo the public, a small registration fee is required. Those interested may obtain registration forms from Stecngrafe at Union College. are among Ihe Berklee faculty members who will conduct clinics, demonstrations, workshops and adjudicate band performances. The Festival's activities will culminate in an evening concertcompetition al which time awards and scholarships will be presented. The awards include Best Band trophies. Citation plaques and tuition scholarships for study in music totaling $5000. Human nature toils down to the fact that imperfect people expect perfection in others. Jaycees to Sponsor Apr. 27, 28 'Up with People" Performances The international troupe "Up With People" returns to Westfield Apr. 27 and 28, 7:30to9:30p.m., at the high school auditorium. "Up With People" has been touring the United States and Europe for ten successful years. This year more than 800 communities in America will be visited, as well as the capitals of Poland, Yogoslavia, Austria, Switzerland, and Holland. As always, this show performance is rated "G" (great for general audiences of all ages). The All American, family musical and dance presentation embraces folk, soul, country, rock and contemporary sounds with themes of communication, brotherhood and pride in America. Tickets may be purchased at John Franks, Jane Smith, Music Staff and Duke's Submarines or from Tom Rickerof 810Wallbert Ave., or Gary Sitcer of 232 Golf Edge. Checks may be made payable to the Westfield jaycecs, Ihe sponsors of the "Up With People" concert. The money raised by Ihe Jaycees goes lo charity. In the past, the Jaycees have donated funds to the Westfield Rescue Squad, the United Fund, Chilren's ROBBINS & ALLISON INC. Established SOUTH AVE., E. LOCAL AND LONG DISTANCE MOVING STORAGE PACKING TEL CRANFORD Specialized Hospital and lo approval of the Westfield the New Jersey Camp Bicentennial Committee Jaycee, the only overnight and Town Council, are summer camp in America providing the community for retarded children. The with Ihe Bicentennial picnic Jaycees also sponsor a and fireworks display for collegiate scholarship the Fourth of July program, and with the celebration. "My father's an actor" said Tommy Cannarella, kindergarten student in Elvira Kettino's class at Jefferson School during a discussion of occupations. Tommy's father, Hichard Cannarella, is shown visiting the class. He discussed his acting profession, the Broadway show in which he is now appearing, sang a song he composed himself, and demonstrated the use of stage make-up. Zenith Hearing Aids are priced for any budget Purchase any Zenith Hearing Aid trom us in a wide range of prices and we will give you all ihe consultation and after-purchase adjustments to insure your satisfaction BqualilmoeS before me nametjoeso HEARING AID CENTER 203 ELM ST., N.J WE A P O L O G I Z E for not being able to help all our customers who attended our Spring Clearance Sale, or did not receive our card; Therefore we are going to extend it. Lincoln School teachers are shown at work on March 2!) while students had the day off for teacher inservice training. In the morning the teachers worked with a consultant on a systematic approach to reading improvement. Pictured ;it an aitrrnnon session when Rose BOOA art teacher, standing. cf. showed inexpensive ways to make papier macho, lire.lean (Jrahowksy (standing, right), Vi'ra I.mini', <seated, left) and Lisa Taylor. MI TRANSFERRED? WITH OUR NATIONWIDE NETWORK OF GALLERIES AND AN EQUITY RELEASE PROGRAM WE CAN BE OF REAL HELP. NO OBLI- GATION WHY NOT ASK ABOUT IT! H.CLAY FRIEDRICHS.INC. SOUTH 1MARTINE, FANWOOD NORTH & ELMER, vie ANNUAL PROGRAM < /2C PE,, ear. on (our linn enery 14 wetks with tillrti a service of a check back 3 { t, : /,,.: [X' 1030 \Q It t -. -! t Cont'oi Gfub I>UICI -CHECK-BACK EARL* SUMMER: PjL< ArMi -..s- «FptH,f.U''.*< ih\,-<*": - '3B-- JfJ '<rwr/,»i.j. - - ' - «P.ft.frWH»r,. h'jkr'.m ". -' TORY PROGRAM 24 Guaranteed* 95' per ye 4 0(X)sq It rn.n ;i 1.AH SUMMtR ' > H ',: '< 'lifi/at"-" 1. (-5O-. -,-., / ii -, I ln'o :.f. fima Co- TKiimtn,! "!- 11!) :." CONDITIONING PROGRAM Vll)HU 1Q " HO'-O ELM RADIO Tel. S33-O4OO SO Elm St Westfield, N.J. Whirlpool SPRING CLEARANCE SALE sales and service S I THURSDAY APRIL 1st 'TIL 9 P.M. FRIDAY APRIL 2nd 'TIL 5:30 P.M. SATURDAY APRIL 3rd 'TIL 5:30 P.M. OVER $100,000 INVENTORY OF RCA. XL-100 COLOR TV, BLACK & WHITE TV, STEREO AND j WHIRLPOOL WASHERS, DRYERS, FREEZERS, REFRIGERATORS, DISHWASHERS AND ROOM AIR i CONDITIONERS TO BE SACRIFICED DURING OUR - - SPRIIMG CLEARANCE SALE WE SERVICE WHAT WE SELL RC/1 XL-100 sales and service Price includes all labor and materials no COMF YOU'LL Bt AMAZfcD AT THF SAVING ON fvery ITEM IN OUR STORE C. li'my or mj->il I'.i FREE i"iiim,iti!.irid Mwn analysis -GARWOOD F R E E Delivery & Service! F R E E Removal of old appliance! E ~ Z Terms!

9 Henry Lewis, music director of the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra was honored recently at a post-cnncrri reception given by Ihe Westfield Chapter of the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra League ut the home of Mr. and Mrs. Donald J. Sawtelle. Lewis is leaving the.symphony at the end of this concert season. Mrs. l>orothv (i. Burns, outgoing president of the Wvstfield Chapter, is shown presenting a gift to Lewis from the chapter members. Looking on are Mrs. Joanne Sullrbargcr, reception chairman, Mrs. Satvlclle, and Mrs. Joan Corbet, president elect of the IV'estfieid chapter. 1- Plan Tay-Sachs Prevention Day Tay-Sachs, one of 'he more lhan 2,000 genelic diseases, is the only one in which Ihe genes thai carry it can be pinpointed, and which can be detected in a fetus. Thus, though still incurable, it is nol totally preventable. A simple blood lest can effectively determine the carriers of this once dreaded disease which affects primarily those of Jewish descent. The Jewish Federation of Central New Jersey, as one of its services to the community, is sponsoring a mass blood testing program on Sunday, May 16, at Temple Emanu-El, 750 East Broad St. from 10 a.m. to 4 Mrs. Sanfnrd Keiss p.m. A contribution of $7.5() graduated from Cornell per person will be asked to University's New York cover some of the costs, but Hospital School of Nursing no one will be refused with a U.S. and an H.N. because of inability to make After working at New the contribution. York Hospital, Mrs. Heiss The Jewish Federation is was head nurse on Ihe conducting the blood neurological and oncology screening program in floor at the Monlefiore conjunction with the Hospital in the Bronx. genetics unit of Ihe New She and her husband, Jersey Medical School Sanford, a physician, have under the supervision of Dr. throe daughters and a son. Theodore Kushnick and the They arc members of New Jersey Chapter of the Temple Emanu-El, where National Tay-Sachs and Mrs. Reiss is on Ihe temple Allied Diseases Association. board, the sislerhood board Co-coordinator along with and is chairman of the Mrs. Paul Shapiro of nursery school. Hillside is Mrs. Sanford Keiss of Weslfield. The chairmen ask that anyone wishing further Mrs. Reiss, originally information call the Jewish from the Bronx, attended Hunter College and was Federation at Green Lano, Union. Jaycees to Award 2-Yr. Scholarship The Westfield Jaycees will again offer a two-year scholarship of $500 for each year to a Westfield high school senior who has lived in Westfield for a1 least one year and has been accepted by a college or vocational institution approved by the Weslfield Jaycee scholarship commillee. The continuance of Ihe scholarship will be dependent upon the recipient's achievement of satisfactory grades during the first year. Criteria for the award will primarily be a combination of academic excellence and demonstrated financial need. Community service and school activities also will he given serious consideration. Scholarship applications arc available from the guidance directors at Weslfield and Holy Trinity High Schools or by writing the Weslfield Jaycee Scholarship Committee at 52:5 Westfield Ave. Applications musi be received by Apr. 30 and the recipient will be notified by Ihe first week of June. Regional 13 of E Slates Dates The Board of Education of Ihe Union Counly Regional High School District No, 1 will hold an adjourned regular meeting at i) p.m. on Tuesday in the board offices in Ihe Keyes, Martin building, 1141 Mountain Ave., Springfield. Story Hour Signup To Begin Apr. 14 Boys and girls will be registered for ihe second spring session of Ihe Westfield Memorial Library's Ihroc-year-old Story Hour from Apr. 14 through 21 at Ihe Children's desk. The slory sessions will be held on Tuesdays, Apr. 27 through May 25, from 10 to 10:20 a.m. and from 1 to 1:20 p.m. The sessions are open only to Westfield residents and library card holders. Grant Parents Hear Social Worker "H's all her fault" and "Yes dear, I'd love to go anywhere you want to" are examples of two common family communication styles, "blaming" and "placating," according lo export Hcrmene Terry Frcedmnn. Mrs. Frccdman, a psychiatric social worker with a private practice in Weslfield, led discussions about communication between family members al >i recent Grant l'to sponsored Parent Education meeting. Grant parents and teachers learned through Common Cause Launches Program New Jersey Common Cause, the citizens' lobby, has launched "Citizens Want to Know", a program designed lo obtain answers lo citizens' questions from candidates for President of the United Stales. This has been announced by Harris Gilbert of Weslfield, Common Cause coordinator for the 12th New Jersey Congressional District. During April, the approxiamlely 12,000 members of Common Cause in the stale will be asked lo solicit, from their friends and neighbors, questions about important national issues. The queslions thai are obtained will be reviewed and submitted lo all candidates for President. During the month of May, candidates' responses will be reported lo the press and publk inthis way Common Cause will act as a clearing house for questions thai voters want answered so that they can make an intelligent choice among candidates based on issues ralher lhan image and personality. The New Jersey project is an extension of a national Common Cause program to call on candidates lo follow certain practices in their campaigning, including regular press conferences, interviews by a broad range of journalists, participation in open forums with other candidates, and discussion of issues thai rank as important in opinion surveys. The program has been adopted in the hope of changing political campaigning in this country, which, according to Common Cause national chairman John Gardner, has become an enormously skilled exercise in "image manipulation and issue evasion." role playing why some communication styles lead lo serious family problems and how much more successful communication can lake place when direct and honest statements are made about true motives and needs. A unique and interesting collection of owls belonging to Mr. ami Mrs. Richard I. Smith of Westfield is being displayed in the window of Barrett & t'rain, Inc. with Nancy l'\ Reynolds Associates Division at their I!! Elm St. office. Mrs. Smith began her collection over :w years ago and her first piece, a china owl, is included in the display. Figurines, paintings, etc. from all parts of the world have been given to Mrs. Smith from friends who, knowing of her interest, have collected in their travels, and each article has a special meaning to her. Carvings from mahogany, sand casting, and owls designed from pewter, mother of pearl, fine china, and Steiibi'M crystal along with many others may be seen in this exhibit. Current homes for sale may be seen in Barrett & Craln, Inc. with Nancy I*. Reynolds Associates Division's other window :it Elm St. -THE WEOTriEUD (NJ.) LKAUKH, THURSU4Y, APKII. 1, 1076 clothi 4> 1 TI c 3 O >. J) D O4) E 0).c * 6 IS i & Jf O v, <D 4) J3 O 0) 01 c o 5 2 o " 0) O I y- :: '-~i- v:': '' V - -, -.' E o 1 c < 0) O T3 > E o «Q.T3 O 2 $ 0) >. O»-?? o o? f i O 4) -5 Q S 0)- 0) X t/i C o 1c Lrt 01 c0) *wi 11)»- 0 _C 0). >. o eaf 3 - o C 3 O 0) «5 le 41 al O 0) O) o "U 0 # **«' ' ' ^ W-^f^ new, custom-built offices n?at GarderTSta lull 35, Will divide to j PROMPT OCCUPANC Call or write lor brochure building. AS IfWilrlut hel II esl ci if Bri«Hill Associates ^ i.;;ibwaers/deslgnors/properly Managers U^T^Vplr^i^vonue, Clark, NBW Jersey 070B6 The ulllmotc In office building design concept.. a suburban selling with city conveniences. Closo lo nil types Diversilied labor sources of transportation Private mealing rooms Motels, restaurants, lor up lo 200 wilhin shopping wilhin mimitos walking distance Custom yi?nr 'round Ample on-site parking tempurnlum controls Snack biir in lollbv NATIONAL CORPORATE TENANTS HERE NOW Anhouser-Busch HewlMCorp. Barnard & Burk SharcdMedlcal E««on Chomlcal Syitomi HunlSWoion SlngerCo. AND OTHERS 574-, ' SHOP 6 NIGHTS 'TIL 9;30 AT MONMOUTH MALL AND LIVINGSTON MALL,'i, 6 NIGHTS TIL 9. SHOP MON...WED,, FRI., IN MONTCLAIR 'TIL 9 AND WED., FRlii IN 777 f l

10 Page 10 THK WKSTFIKI.K <NJ.) I.KAUKH, Tfll'KSUAV. Al'KII. 1. l»7«rial ESTATE FOR SALE HEAL ESTATE FOR SALE REAL ESTATE FOR SALE REAL ESTATE FOR SALE REAL ESTATE FOR SALE REAL ESTATE FOR SALE REAL ESTATE FOR SALE 1 REAL ESTATE FOR SALE REAL ESTATE FOR SALE PEARSALLAND FRANKENBACH INC. REALTORS INSURORS Westfield Fanwood ESTABLISHED 1922 Members Multiple Listing System 115 Elm Street Scotch Plains Mountainside RICHARD C. FISCHER INC. REALTORS INDIAN FOREST $185,000 ".TV BETZ SC BlSCHOFF Realtor* A HOME FOR ALL SEASONS ECKHART * REALTORS GARDENS >*- always popular and rightfully so. Gracious and expansive 6 bedroom Colonial. Huge rooms throughout. Modern kitchen. Two dens. Fire Alarm System. Top neighborhood. $94,900 Excellent condition. 5 bediooms. I 1? baths. laige kitchen and dining room, night club style recreation room. $53,500 3 bedroom brick and. stone ranch, centrally an conditioned, pecan pan eled recreation 100m. ap ptoxirnately 27x29". An easy to maintain home. Our newest listing... Rambling two-story brick & frame home on picturesque wooded knoll with 180' of road frontage... Majestic yet gracious with intricate detailed panelling, sunny 6 over 9 windows, cove mouldings... two master suites - V-k baths on first floor... Three more bedrooms and sitting room plus two baths on second... superb construction - elegant appointments. Call today. WYCHWOOD CHARM $89/900 Quality built with an exquisite view from every window. Slate entrance hall, family room with fireplace and expensive panelling, four bedrooms, two and a half baths, large screened porch, two car garage, 100 x 170 completely and beautifully landscaped. This immaculate home in the Parkwood Section of Scotch Plains is being advertised for the first time. $84,900. CHARMING! Nestled among tall trees on a quiet Northside street, this nicely maintained home includes 3 bedrooms, 2Vi baths, comfortable den, screened porch. A really super home in a super location! $67,500 AT THE ENTRANCE OF SOUTH GATE stands the Wychwood gate house with all its charm and beauty. Cathedral ceiling, leaded glass windows, hand hewn beams, and stone fireplace in the 25' living room. Formal dining room, modern kitchen, den with fireplace. A unique home with four bedrooms and 4 baths. Set on spacious property with many flowering trees and shrubs. May we show you this stately Tudor? $185,000 SPECIAL INVESTMENT Special for home of offices. Large twelve room older home, excellent location, large deep well shrubbed property well maintained and perfect for offices or gracious family living. So conveniently located near the heart of Westfield- Call today for an appointment to inspect this charming one of a kind home. $99,500 FANWOOD $59,900 Superior condition, a really delightful home. 3 bediooms. 2 baths, and a tremendous, newly refinished lecieafion room. $82,900 a a Custom Cape Colonial with master bedroom & bath on first floor plus panelled den, striking newly remodelled kitchen with breakfast nook, adjoining laundry & powder room... Stone fireplace in living room, glassed & screened porch... Two large bedrooms & bath up... Spotless condition and gleaming new exterior paint... Our first ad - please don't delay. NEW ARRIVAL $82,500 SOME PEOPLE HAVE ALL THE FUN OF Living in special places like this enchanting home with nine spacious rooms, three and a half baths and a maivelous floor plan. COLONIAL RANCH Located on beautiful Golf Edge, 2 first floor bedrooms plus 2 second floor bedrooms, magnificent family room with fireplace. Many extras included. Immediate possession $114,000 IT'S EASTER BUNNY TIME and what better place to hunt for those colored eggs than in this beautiful park-like yard with many trees and shrubs. You can enjoy the 3 bedroom house too, with its 20" family room and living room with fireplace. In Westfield. $51,000, WALK TO TOWN from this freshly decorated colonial home. Gracious entrance hall, bright and cheerful living room, large dining room, modern kitchen weating space. Powder room and first floor laundry. Up a few steps to a large den. On the second floor are four bedrooms and a new bath. Real value at $54,900 THINK SPRING On a knoll, this lovely home has all the amenities for comfortable family living. Large bedrooms, 2'/i baths, formal dining room, screened porch and two car garage. Asking $67,500 and occupancy can be flexible. LOCAL AREA REPRESENTATIVES FOR HOMERICA Evenings only: Mrs. Alan Bruce Conlin AllhlldW.MIChoKon Jcartelle Fodorocko 232-B532 Alice S. File 23J-W4 DorlfH. Boyle Mildred-Dlrumorc p»l RlchHrek "Ill" Elvira M. Ardroy EV«rt on F. Pr«all A lovely home ready to take on a new family, its spacious 5 bedrooms. 2 baths, plus 2'?s. fine area. MOUNTAINSIDE $98,500 Springtime in the mountains, it's gorgeous and so is this ranch. Sunken living room, family size dining room, master bedroom suite, paneled family room. PLACE YOUR HOME IN OUR HANDS KICHAKD C. 8 LOCATIONS COVERING CENTRAL NEW JERSEY Baskino R idgo M.irtinsville.. Somcrville Berkeley Heighis Washington....Whitehouse. Warr.cn.. 7M «4-f EAST BROAD ST Spacious rooms for large active family... plenty of room for games & outdoor cookouts in the 95x200 yard... Mother and Dad can get away from it all in the 3-room master suite complete with sitting room, bedroom, remodelled bath and porch... two more bedrooms & remodelled bath on second floor plus room for teenagers on third... first time offeied we hope you'll call soon. FANWOOD $65,900 Just right for the younger crowd in an area where playmates abound and schools are close by... Eight rooms two baths include a recreation room at grade level and a family room adjoining lovely remodelled kitchen... Another new listing we highly recommend. FOR RENT $575. Conveniently located executive home on a pretty lot in Basking Ridge offers 4 bedrooms, eat-in kitchen with dishwasher, and panelled family room. Available May 1st. Lease required. Please call our Country office. / f6r appointment. BARRETT&.;RAIN, Inc. (T-A) BARRETT &CRAIN INC. with NANCY F. REYNOLDS ASSOCIATES DIVISION # REALTORS "FOUR COLONIAL OFFICES" (43 ELM STREET) OtrvlLcwIi C. Richard Woterhouse Jr M. D. Sims. Jr ? O5J1 Bell/ riumislon...i Shirley McLlnden (302 E. BROAD ST.) m Gr<il... 23? 7136 Myrtle Jenkins Doriiild H. Husch KichnrtfM. Corljt't D.ivicl C. Po>iroon Howard W, Mplzger, MAI, SPRA LIBERTY CORNER (Basking Ridge) Agnes Duckloy I2O Douglas R. Weeks ? Guy D. Mulford R.R. QARRETT JK..CPM -. MULTIPLE LISTING MEMBERS' WESIHELD-IVIOUNTAINSIDE SCOTCH PLAINS FANWOOD SOMERSET t HUNT6RDON COUNTIES n H H -fr a H -H -it -it Step down living room, two fireplaces, two family rooms, kitchen for the gourmet cook, two master bedrooms plus two other bedrooms. Central air conditioning, screened porch. Hospitable warmth and charm abound. Indian Forest Section of Westfield. $125,000. a* DIAMOND IN THE ROUGH Basically this well-built brick and frame home is a jewel that needs polishing. Living room with fireplace, large dining room, den, kitchen with eating space, three bedrooms, tiled bath, garage and nice yard. If you have imagination and a little energy, come take a look. Asking $55,000. BliTZ &BlSCII()FK liivuors 202 Mountain Ave. (AT THE PARK) Evening Phones:. Constance Davis DonnA. Snydor Deurl5 Sweeney Barl Blschorr OLD WORLD CHARM A magnificent French Norman style home with 5 bedrooms, 4'/? baths, custom kitchen, charming family room, separate maid's room and bath. One of the most distinctive homes in Westfield! $150,000 RAMBLING CUSTOM RANCH A beautiful setting on a quiet circle in a premier location, 4 bedrooms, Vh baths, ultra modern kitchen with adjoining laundry room, panelled family room with raised hearth fireplace, basement rec room. Terrific floor plan for easy living and entertaining $132,500 We have many other fine homes to show you in addition to the ones described here. Why not plan to call soon for further information and an appointment to inspect. ECKHART ASSOCIATES. INC * REALTORS Lucilli-K. Roll Doris M. Mulov/,l N.lncv Hrcqm.in MEMBERS MULTIPLE LISTING SYSTEM 113 LENOX AVE. WESTFIELO, NJ AMPLE Of F STREET PAR KINO Evening phones: 733 HJ)9 N.ckO rmm,,,s V Oilrs K Alttoort 7:3 aoj? Hill Znch.ir f ( Ecktuirl ]jj ;M ? IJ J672

11 -THE WESTFIJSU) (N.J.) USWKR, TH1KSIJAV, AI'Hll. 1. I»"K MEAL ESTATE FOR SALE REAL ESTATE FOR SALE RIAL ESTATI FOR SALE REAL ESTATE tok SALE RIAL fstate FOR SALE REAL ESTATI FOR SALE REAL ESTATE FOR SALE REAL ESTATE FOR SALE OFFICES FOR KENT ON POPULAR HARDING STREET! THREE CHEEHV BED- ROOMS - FIREPLACE - LARGE FAMILY ROOM - FULL DINING ROOM - CARPETING - MODERATE TAKES, LOW HEATING COSTS - WIDE DEEP PROPERTr - MOVE RIGHT IN! ONLY $51,000! MEIERDIERCK &MAISH,lnc. illort Wcsllieia Multiple Listinc Evenings MOelmar Ritchie George Bidjood , Peter way RuthMeierdierck : Charles Moicrdierck 233-3SS4 Bill Maish J32-SS»3 HeauorJ 2 O PROSPECT STREET W E S T F I E L D, N E W J E R S E Y 2 O I O 3 0 O CAPE COD in convenient Westfield location for transportation and town. Four bedrooms; living room fireplace; finished basement recreation room, full dining room. A cozy small home priced to sell. $39,900 COLONIAL in (he attractive Crestwood area of Scotch Plains just over the Westfield line. Sunny living room with fireplace; formal dining room opening to a side glassed and sc. porch, modern kitchen, breakfast bar. Three better than average size bedrooms. A lovely first home. $53,900. TUDOR nine room home with amazing amount of room yet warm, cozy, not too large. Four bedrooms. Small den off the living room with fireplace; another spacious family room adjoining the modern kitchen, formal dining im. Convenient n. side Westfield area. Transferred owners. $68,500 -,, i. u (94, BEDROOMS - 3 BATHS - 2 CAR GARAGE Built in 1974 on a lot 160x250. Fireplace in 31x15 family room. Large living room, dining room and kitchen and central air conditioned. Owner transferred. Located on a quiet court in Scotch Plains. We have other lovely homes on large properties in Scotch Plains as well as Warren, Watchung, Basking Ridge and Bridgewater. WILLIAM A. CLARK, INC. - REALTOR 436 SOUTH AVE., W., O0 Eveninqs Please Call: Mrs. Elaine Colo S024 Mr. Thomas Decker S Mr- Colcman Hamer Mr. Hob Johnson, B38 MEMBER OF & SOMERSET COUNTY MLS One of the prettiest on the block and it's a very nice block. Family room, playroom, living room fireplace, dining room, three bedrooms and l'/i baths. In Westfield $62,500, SPEND LESS THAN YOU'D EXPECT FOR A CHANGE IMPECCABLY groomed, one year new 5 Bedroom Colonial in Tewksbury Township (only 20 miles west) Double-Door entry, gracious floor plan accented by Science Kitchen, 22' paneled Family Room, first floor laundry acres, moderately wooded. Asking $82,500 VICTORIAN CHARM accented for today's life style. 4 bedroom Center Hall plan, inlaid oak floors, 2nd floor laundry, 24' new kitchen with dishwasher, self-cleaning oven and center island counter. Fireplaced Family Room. Asking $89,500 51R ROGERS REAL ESTATE 129 Prospect Street Westfield, N. J MEMBER OF THE WES7FIEID BOARD OF REACTORS > JojrBrovniW REALTOR H2EUt SHEET, KESTFIELC Member of the Wettfirld, Crjnfcrd ant Somerset Multiple Listing Systems AN AREA FUND ASSOCIATE MEMiER NATIONAL REALTY RELOCATION ASSOCIATES $50,900! Charming 7 room Colonial in a friendly Fanwood neighborhood. 20.3'xl 1.6' living room, formal dining room, eat-in kitchen, 3 sizeable bedrooms (master 36.2'xl 1.6). Home in fine condition; exterior of Beauty Guard seamless aluminum siding. Extras included! ENGLISH COLONIAL rjorthside PROFESSIONAL ZONE Pnvoh- cniranif. ground door, 55L) so ft Oil!?J ?b H CENTER OF WESTFIELO, 3SU SQUARE FEET, ground <lunr.hi utilities included S1V:» <i monih CcllltSd ';V5'J 2 WS tf - 3 ROOM SUITE AND 6 ROOM SUITE. Parking. good ItXcilion JAAAES J DAVID SON. Rt'dMor??5 Lenox Avc II 76 If APARTMENTS FOR RENT WE STFIELO UNFURNISHED A ROOMS. 3rd floor intlucfei utilities, quiet top lotril.on F'IT ICC t for o*rj«-r s>nqli! workmr] l<irjy $195 Available I April Ple^si? wr ife Bo/ 8<), Wr*E.t p(-ici U-tiUi-r. 50 ClrnS* 3 Id!b TF FOR RENT New on the market, available May I Northside WcsHield, 3 large bedroom, 1' < bath Colonial. Fireplace in hving room, corner cabinets in full dining room, modern kilchon with breamas' space Gas. TA heal, Nite area, easy distance lo Wilson School. S*JS>5 monthly. (if you Duy a house thru us, we'll cno 'he lease at your tonvenir.'nci. 1 ) Randolph Wieg man Co - keditors 23? 6609 days, c\'os ROSSMOOR "REVERE" CON- DO E XI T 8A NJTP, ideal location cloio lo.ill services golf, sw.m 711 ng pool, c lull Mouse. f«press bus to NYC OrflpPd, c.irpt-tpcj, all rtppsranr^s, iticiost-d paiio. 7 bed rooms, 1 balh. Avdilcible Sepi I. Call U09) ROSSMOOR - JAMESBLJRG N J MASS, MODEL CONDOMINIUM' 7 0i*drooms.?rj<tth^. den. LR, OR, sunny sr.rcon glriss porch. AIL (ipphrinc rs, carpeting and drapes Golt. pool. NYC bus S 1?B7. 2 I? 16 ff REAL ESTATE FOR $ALI HOUSE WtTH LOTS OF ROOM FOR SALE BY OWNER. WeM fifl(! normv.irjf. / ik'flroolvis, J 1.- lirttns. hviiuj room, (lining foorn, kitchftv sfucio, Idm.iy room, ft rii Special (crtt'jt'cs ol unusuiil home MicJ HO's Pr!iicf,(l<, only \H Jt 3T YOU CAN'T AFFORD TO PASS IT UP! This 3 bedroom split-level home has had T.L.C (tender loving care) and so has the garden. Fireplace, wall lo walh carpeting in ti ving room, dining room, hall, rec room and bedroom. Most charming eat-in kitchen, dishwasher. Parkwood Section Scotch Plains ONLY $59,900. UNIQUE SETTING high on a knolled lot commanding a lovely view of the Mountainside hills. Unusual plan as it affords one floor living with a beautiful 1st floor bedroom suite and bath plus four more bedrooms and two full baths on the second floor. Two fireplaces, one in the inviting living room, the other in the family room adjoining the spacious very modern kitchen, nearby 1st floor laundry and lavatory. Two finished basement rooms. Fully air conditioned. Convenient northside Westfield area. $117,500 BRAND NEW EXQUISITE CENTER HALL COLON IA L SET AMONG OLD TREES. TOP NORTHSIDE LOCATION. PART BRICK FRONT. LOVELY ENTRANCE FOYER. DECORATOR'S DELIGHT LIVING ROOM. FORMAL DINING ROOM YOU'LL LOVE THE SCIENCE KITCfHEN WITH SEP- ARATE EATING AREA. FIRST FLOOR LAUNDRY. FIRST FLOOR POWDER ROOM. EXCEPTIONAL PANELLED FAMILY ROOMWITH FIR IEPLACE. OIL HEAT. DOUBLE GARAGE. CLOSE TO GRADE SCHOOL. NOTHING LIKE IT FOR S.99,500. CALL TODAY.FOR DETAILS. YOU'LL BE GLAD YOU 01 Or LEE K. WARING, REALTOR I5EASTBROADSTREET 232-7<02 CUFNING PHONES pottiobnun Marie Elsie LocK. Waring, III J An inground pool and cyclone fenced yard are two of the features of this well cared for Westfield home. Family room, formal dining room, four bedrooms and 2V4 baths $82,500. This center hall, one floor home is in Westfield's Wychwood. Three bedrooms, 2 baths, family roam, 15' dining room, and panelled recreation room. Centrally air conditioned $98,500. Harriet Goodson Lilian.Walczak Jessie Plant Brown Ruth Tavlor Judy Zane Al Bello Kay Boothe Betty Hampton Helen Baker Belly Flannery Distinguished Victorian Home of Grand Proportions All in Grand Condition! Unparalleled Country Kitchen (24' X 1314') with a brick barbeque, center island, double oven and a dining area richly panelled... First floor den + family room with fireplace... Four bedrooms... 2 l A baths.,. Convenient 2nd floor laundry facilities... Nine rooms in all with every amenity and warmth to please the most discerning family... Brick patio (37X24 1 ) on the 180 ft. deep property... Great Westfield Location! Asking $89,500. Much more to "Show and Tell"! Wesllield Multiple Listing Member Alliliateof "EXF.CUTRANS" An International Realty Service Qfganiiation 44 ELM STREET CORNER QUIMBY, N.J. RANDOLPHWIEGMAN CO., REALTORS Interesting Brick. Frame and Timber 3 bedroom, I 1 /? bath home. Entrance hall, 24'X12.6' living room with fireplace, formal dining room, kitchen and den. 24' X 16' swimming pool with redwood deck. Quiet Westfield street. $55,900. CHARMING VICTORIAN Rarely can you find a house of this vintage so well updated. Fascinating floor plan features 30' living room with two bays and panelled fireplace wall. 18' dining room with antique pine corner cabinet, new gourmet kitchen. Five second floor bedrooms. Twelve delightful rooms in all. Westfield. OUR NEWEST LISTING! $93,000. WYCHWOOD Don't miss Ihisone" J. J. Schwartz Co. Realtors "Results Count" Town And Country Properties CRESTOOOD AREA BY OWNER Immaculate 7-room colonial on quiet street in popular Crestwood section of Scotch Plains. Large LR. formal DR, modern kitchen, 3 BR. panelled heated porch, full basement. Large 10'x 20'deck off kitchen. Beautiful shaded yard with many large trees. New 100 amp service, all combination windows. Asking $51,500. Principals on/y please. Call for appointment. REAL ESTATE WANTED WANTED TO BUY IN WEST. FIELD Younq (,'xcc. 2 children wish to purchn'.e 4 bedroom cliorm-nci Coloninl honip. Must hnvr f ireplar.o (working).? baths,?c/ir ci,irttc)t?, si/ciiblc lot. Low, low $7O's Ple/iM.' cnll J. J SCHWARTZ CO K?(M).isk lor Mr Brom APARTMENTS FOR RENT SUBLET I BEDROOM UNFUR- NISHED GARDEN APART- MENT. Porm<iiienl loose avail.iblp. Immediately.? WES TFIELO UNFURNISHED 1 BEDROOM APARTMENT, wnlk to statiun. modern kitctien iincl bath month. Heat and not water included Call 23? 8913.iller t P M ENGLISH COLONIAL $55,900 There is the aura of English Tudor Irom the moment you walk thru the entrance vestibule, and step-into the 24 ft. fireplaced living room with adjoining 12x11 ft. den. The dining room is larger than most, and there is a powder room off the modern kitchen. Space will not allow the tabulation of the many line features. You must see the pretty Westfield street with mature trees and convenience to schools, shopping and transportation. Call us today. CHARLESW. ROKOSNY Reflilor III Central Avc Wosllleld Eves. Pierce J. Joyce George P. Hall WANTED TO BUY WANTED TO BUY MOLLY FLICKER-BEA JACOBS CONDUCTORS OF HOME & ESTATE SALES Complete Liquidation Extensive Mailing List SALES CONDUCTED WITH SKILL & DIGNITY We also buy 153 Mountain «ve.,w«stfield dip eves GO DUTCH TREAT a charming Dutch colonial in a lovely northside setting. True center hall... sunny, modern eat-in kitchen, desirable first floor den... wood burning fireplace, king-size master bedroom... 2 full baths... 2 car garage. Owner including wall to wall carpeting, appliances and air conditioning. Convenient to schools and park. Only $63,900 Multiple Listing Members Serving Westfield, Mountainside, Scotch Plains, Fan wood Lillian Lynch Helen Pepe. LorottaWllion. J22-4D57. 2) l.oroho " " « Allwri H.C. Wlegmart J33-3JS4 L Handsome eight room two bath centrally air conditioned Ranch in attractive setting. Spacious rooms, conveniently arranged. 598,500. JOY BROWN REALTORS MULTIPLE LISTINGS WesHtuld Mountainside Scotch Plains Fanwood Clark, Cranlordand Somerset County Evenings Isabollo Borse )4 Addle Chanson BB9-SO99 Sylvia Cohen* Helen Ciubacki! Lorraine Foldmiiti Elizabeth Ffynn Frances Frank 454-SO69 Carolyn WFIdny Wynant Wllday Joy Brown Garrpli Brown S WANTED TV SETS WANTED PORTABLE J3" AND COLOR CALL6B II ENTERTAINMENT PERSONALIZED POEMS HUMOROUS OR SERIOUSPO *Jir thtinys. wcdd>n<r,. rnutvrr s.irics ;,il otcmonsi R.:,v>t cfblv ir! F'II CiiM ;:i/ft.ls7 'or (I tailsii(>(,r / p,^\ -j itf ;ft j FOR SALE ANTIQUE MIRRORS AND BRIC- A-BRAC, IH" window I (in. mibcel lani'ous furnii urt;,iiul housetioltl itnm^. Call 733 S6-I7 eji-rw^om 9 aiui SPM THINK SPRING AT CONSIGNMENT SHOP Sp'irklinn rr«,h ini.tcliiuiclt',0 l.irni 1 si-li'clinn nl children'!. <ifj (hircl lupsi.iirs) M4EIMHT St.

12 .Charles B. Clark REALTORS Thtre is a lot of room in this brick and frame home situated on a large treed property in Fanwood. Entrance fojer, large living room wfireplace, formal dining room, eat-in kitchen, 3 large bedrooms plus family room, 2'A baths, extra large 2-car garage and patio. Asking $72,900 Professional-executive home in most-wanted area of Watchung. Nine unbelievably large rooms - ranch, owner transferred. Priced for quick sale, $109,500. Lovely frame and brick Colonial-Split in immaculate condition. Large flagstone entrance hall, living room w-raised hearth fireplace, formal dining room, modern kitchen, 4 bedrooms plus rec room w-raised hearth fireplace, Z'A baths, 2-car garage on large lot on winding street in North Plainfield. Asking $69,500 JUST-RIGHT Colonial located in Sleepy Hollow area of Plainfield. Brick and frame construction, 3 bedrooms, fireplace in living room. Reduced to $51,900. Looking for a custom built ranch in the country? Here it is with raised hearth fireplace, picture windows,, modern eat-in kitchen, 2 bedrooms plus den or 3 bedrooms on over-anacre of professionally landscaped property. $74,900. Spacious home-tree-lined street in North Plainfield offers 3 bedrooms, l'/s baths, living room w-brick fireplace, formal dining room, eat-in kitchen and family room. $46,900 Charles B. Clark 193 South Avenue COMPANY Realtors Fanwood, N.J Evening Ptie-nes Bob Hahn 75S-6S10 Norms Scovuno 8B9-6S6B Hal Mar It Mat Soyre Bill West MS-1327 Margaret Steelmnn Florence Rasmussen V1 Bill Hollownv J3S-3S90 Serving you on 4 multiple listings boards ******* * * * *. * Captivating five-room cottage nestled in a picturesque heavily wooded 115x278 foot Mountainside "garden". Property adjoins Park and offers unlimited 12 THE WESTMELD (N.J.) JLKADEK, THl'RSIMV, Al'RH, J, IB76- possibilities to the imaginative homemaker and-or handyman. Convenient to all facilities, even the community pool. Owner just reduced price for quick sale to... $49,800. MEMBER: NATIONAL "HOMES FOR LIVING" NETWORK CTL Crane, Taylor (j Love, Inc A FULL SERVICE REALTOR 189 Elm St., Westfield B Ray Richcy DwicihtF Weeks J7 William H. Coles, III Mary McEnerney Florence Ronnync George G Crane Wm. C. Taylor Roger D. Love. Jr ?S FOR SALE BY OWNER Inquire within BEFORE YOU DECIDE TOGO INSIDE, ASK YOURSELF THESE QUESTIONS: r 1. How can I lell il Ihe asking price lor Ihisliomc is realistic? (Naturally Ihe ovvnci will lell you -fs worth every penny But is il 7 ) 2. Can I visualize rclalivcly simple clinikio'; lhal could make this home more livable lot me.hid my family? (Sometimes a liltlp reniodoliriy c.in make n big dillerence in utility and value ) 3. Wherocan I linj accurate inlorni.huin on Mxes. ulilrly cosls. zoning tiiut diner uiipormiii l.iclor:;' 3 (The owner can U'M you what's hnppenni so l.ir Bui does he know abouc pioiccliorr tm Ihe luliiro'') 4. If I decide 1o buy, where can I lirnl lin.itirinij 9 (If you do locale funds, will you bo ;il>lu! > nrranne the most advanlacioojs icrnik?) A REALTOR"* already has :ho nnr.woi^ :r> Ihcse questions, and many others Onr. of.i I If ALTON'S responsibililies as n rcnl eit;ilo pn->f«~-.i.:iind is providing you with Ihe bor-l mivioc.mj Liuost Ireatmen) possible Here's one more queslion lo consider "Doosn'l i! make sen-.t lo buy,i 1K;IMI' Ihe ptolessionnl way and save inypril lime, ellorl and money?" Call n REALTOR" today oalan Johnston,, Inc. -'I Noli Ilia "T"] REALTOR 3 Mountainside HELP WANTED HOUSEKEEPER TO LIVE IN. Adults only, Musi have references. Fine living conditions. 6545SB9 Joan Thomas Norma Tolmach Carol Wood Henry L. Schwiering PARTTIM6 DRIVERS FOR LO- CAL NURSERY SCHOOL. Good pay, nice working conditions. Call J PHYSICIAN'S OFFICE ASSIST- ANT OR RN. Mature person, experienced, must type. AMtrnoor and ovenincis; 25 hours per week. No weekends. Pleasant surround Ings. Springfield area SALES PERSON EXPERI- ENCED 3 TO 4 FULL DAYS YEAR ROUND. Able to coordin ate table sellings anil accessories EMPLOYMENT WANTED INCOME TAX PREPARED IN YOUR HOME OR MINE. Please call aller 6 PM wilt prepare quarterly payroll, stale and federal returns lor small business. 3 i 76 If SELL IT IN THIS SPACE Jsunker & JJanker, Jjnc. REALTORS-INSUMRS WALK TO TOWN This well located center entrance Colonial is only a short walk to Park, Town and shopping. It has four bedrooms and two baths on the second floor, plus two very usable bedrooms on the third. There is 5 fireplace in the center entrance hall, a living room with builtins, a large dining room with bay, large kitchen with dishwasher and table space and a first floot den. The heating is warm air-oil (4 yrs. old), there is a 2 car detached garage and the lot is 60 x 162. Priced at $63, WISHED Qt^Miinii +*W%>^ MRxR ) J * u,iim 11:1a; 149 Elmer St., cor. ' Lenox Ave " Westfield Evening phone Luciello A Gohrlc.n,,, etty Ba9ger..'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'_.'. J ""'«Albert G.DanVor...',...'.'.'.'.''.'.'.'.',',',," \\\'.\ EMPLOYMENT WANTED DOMESTIC. EXPERIENCED j DAY WORKER. Call alter 6 P.M TYPING SCHOOL PAPERS, MANUSCRIPTS, THESES, MEDICAL AND INSURANCE REPORTS, TAX FORMS AND BUSINESS LETTERS J I STUDENTS LOOKING FOR LANDSCAPING WORK IN 4 ye.irs expori oner, profossion.il equipment, low priced, free eshni.ilc 11!. C<l" KAP LUS. HOLT 8. KAPLUS JS.liter 6 P.M GLENN WOMAN WISHES WORK IN A RESTAURANT Irom6 P.M. until closing Call alter t P.M. 7S7.0?8?. J FOR SALE WAGON WHEELS S28., BUGGY SEATS56.. MILK CANS $B., melol garden gate SI?., pair ol ornate driveway yates $95., storm windows S2., shutters S3. r'air- rnod ern girl's 20" bicycle S2O., lull size canopy bed $65., full size mahogany bed S2S., Oriental ucdroom set $145., rattan arrn chair S45., oval wicker table S36. ARCHIES RESALE SHOP Meyersville Open 10 to 5 SAT. 8. SUN ALT EN BURG EUZADETH.NJ OpenOaily ti)9 Sat til 6 BALDWIN PIANO SALE! NEW BALDWIN CONSOLE $ Huge Selection Entire Truckload Rental Purchase Plan Availiable OO Al.TENBURG PIANO HOUSE 11S0E Jersey St. Elizabeth,NJ TF FIREPLACE WOOD' - SEA- SONED, SPLIT OAK, DELIVER- ED AND STACKED. 4x8 load 436. Call AM or evenings, CAR TOP CARRIER FOR STA- TION WAGON 38 V W x 57'j" i- «IV."H Like new. $25. Cnll Til M3"> POOL - OVAL DOUGHBOY THREE YEARS OLD UX 24 liner 10 yenr (ju.iranlee, slainless steel liner with motor, cover, ladder. <tll cleaning equipment. $350. Call?3? MERCEDES '75 J30 SEDAN H(irv«?">l heicje with bamboo interior. This car is fully equipped and has been driven only approxi malely miles. For further inlorrnnrinn call GOODWIN MOTOR CORP. now. 6th si. Plainfield, N.J. (2(11) ESI '74 FORD MAVERICK - AIR CONDITIONING, AUTOMATIC, 4 door, slack vinyl roof. 19,000 miles CAPRI SPEED FM stereo miles,, dark green metalic. Ian interior, $1,000, Call LOST & FOUND LOST BENJI LIGHT BROWN TAMED RABBIT. Vicinity Lawrence Ave. Call J.D. CARTON H SON, INC. United Van Lines Long Distance Moving Local Export Storage Watchupg Ave., Chatham, N.J MOTORCYCLES THE HONDA EVERYTHING STORE IS IN A DILEMMA Duo to expansion and renovation, we ii r e LIQUIDATING Over 50O New Hondas, 250 Used Cycles, a 5300,000 Paris and Accessory Inventory, S Boutique and Leather Stock Leather Riding Jackets Reg. $74.95 NowSW.W 5H.P MINI-DIKE Rcg.533?. Now $199. plus freight, dealer prep 8. hand- DIRECT FACTORY REBATES, up to $80.00 on most popular Honda Cycles Riding Insurance and Immediate Credit WALK IN DRIVE OUT V.I.P. HONDA Open Daily IM9pm Sat.til6pm 108 W. 7lh St., Plainlield CB350, slock No. 1362,6,781 miles, S others to choose Irom. V. I P. HONDA CB5O0, stock NO. 1673, 5.3J2 miles, S others to choose Irom. V. I. P. HONDA 7S3-15O ? CL 175. stock No. 1415, 5,189 miles. S others lo choose from. V. I. P. HONDA Honda CB350, slock No ,766 miles. $ others lo choose Irom. V. I. P. HONDA H D stock No. 1512, 12,180 miles, S others lo choose from. V. I. P. HONDA ROYAL ENFIELD 650, slock No milesn- A,S others tochoose from. V.I.P. HONDA YAMAHA 175, Stock No. 1829, miles N A, S others lo choose from. V. I. P. HONDA HONDA 500 (4), 4 Into two exhaust. Immaculate, under 4,000 miles. SI,OOO. Call Services UNeed GENERAL CONTRACTOR SPRING SPECIAL TOTAL HOME REMODELING. Carpentry, painting, roofing, leaders and gutters. Masonry work; foundations, stoops, steps, floors, patios, sidewalks and chimneys. 18 years' experience All work fully guaranteed MA5ON CONTRACTOR Sleps-fireplaces-repairs plastering - repair fireplaces O. Massa PLASTERING, PATCHES SPEC- IALTY; MASON REPAIR; WALKS, STEPS, PATIOS; shed rock applied and refinishod. Selfemployed and insured. Call TF "At Goodwin, we won't sel you a new Mercedes. Wen help you buy one.' KON COU INS fiosicjcnt Goodwin Motors 1 "To some dealers, letting a prospective buyer 'walk' is a cardinal sin. We believe just the opposite "We'll encourage a man to go home and think over his decision. We want him to be sure To be comfortable." In the two years since Ron Collins took over Goodwin Motors, many things havechanged.theatmosphere is just one of them. At Goodwin, salesmen have no sdles quotas Ron knows that if a salesman isn't pressured, he won't pressure you. What you will get is help. All the help and experience thai New Jersey's oldest Mercedes dealership can offer (By helping buyers analyze their needs, we've become central Jersey's Mercedes-Benz Diesel specialist-with nearly half our sales in Diesels.) And the extensive changes in our service and parts departments, both in people and facilities, are par! of our commitment to having the happiest Mercedes owners in New Jersey. We'd like you to be among them, and we'll do anything we can to help. RONCOLLINS'l V S m qoodwifi motors ^NEW JERSEY'S OLDEST MERCEDES-BENZ DEALER. 130West6th Street. Ploinfjeld. New Jersey Services UNeed JOSEPH ZICHICHI & SONS INC. FURNITURE REPAIR AND RE- FINISHING. ANTIQUES RE- STORED FURNITURE POLISH- ING MORRIS AVE.. SUMMIT tl D&A LANDSCAPING Former cjoll course superintend enl offers a complete lawn, shrubs rtnd tree <are protjrom lor your homeor business. Spring clean up New sod installed.? TF EXTERIOR HOME REPAIRS Fencing, landscaping, sidewalks, pointing, lenders and qulters, y.ircl cleanup. Free estimates. Work rjuaranloed or T BONGIOVANNI'S LANDSCAPE SERVICE ERICHOPPE PAINTING RESTORE THAT OLD CHAIR OR TABLE IN THE ATTIC TO Interior-exterior painting, antiquing, staining, hang all cane, liber-rushor reed. Call John THE BEAUTY IT ONCE HAD. I refinish pieces, replace seats flocks, foils, etc. Large or Bray, small jobs. 15 years' experience. Absolutely neat and CLEANED window washing, GUTTERS AND LEADERS screens put up, pointing exterior. clean work. Large or Small Walls and woodwork cleaned. Call 4176 tl jobs EXPERT MASON, CAR- PENTER: Sleps, patios, walks, cjaracjes, plastering, plumbing, heating, railing nnd ornamental iron work, repairs of all types. Building violations removed. Salisfaction guaranteed. Ace Serv ices II PLUMBING AND HEATING CLARENCE H. BRIANT N.J. LIC. No.355S 8 2? 74 TF BUILDERS, DESIGNERS. ALL FORMS MASONRY, CARPEN- TRY, RENOVATIONS, ADDI- TIONS, ALTERATIONS, CURS- ING. DRIVEWAYS, LANDSCAP- ING AND EXCAVATION If I L.iwn Maintenance Insect, Weed, Disease Control Lawn Renovation: Thatching - Aerating Ucscccling Sodding Phinling Pruning Shrubs CALL Cartiflod, Llcuruad, Iruurud Serving Wusifiuld Sinco 1050 PIANO TUNING REAL ESTATE APPRAISERS ROBERT YOUNG Confer! Tuner lor m,"iior N ni'l.vorks Prcp,"irr<l pinno lor nivolvimu in depth analysis of ihe N Y Melropol-lnri Mcmm-r c urrcm m.irkel A prerequisite Pi.ino Technici.ins Guild fir ro dec i'.ion imikinct " l)u<ulincj. huvs,ino sells,.ill r<- ARD APPRAISAL COMPANY IJ.lirs lone and loud* rrtjumtintj 250 E Broad SI. Wcjlfield m ll/o II 171 TF 6S44S4S TF WILLIAM OITROLIO PIAN0TUN6R Expert piano tuning, repairs, appraisals, estimates and cleaning.. Used pianos bought. Call II TREE SURGEONS 'SCHMIED6 TREE EXPERT CO. Complete Modern Tree Service Stale Certilied Tree Expert Insured Service Phone TF did You know. YOU CAN BUY A NEW 7 6 CADILLAC CM. OtVILLf pn1. AM/PM radio: -i. IIM«d (latl. 1M*I II^IA^m h.lumtlni 4*7847 i n E A S T ith ST. P L A I N F I E L D Termites and Carpenter Ants Are Swarming! FREE INSPECTION!,., DON'T TAKE CHANCIS WITH THE LARGfST INVESTMENT OF YOU* '«YOUR HOMI! IET TKAINtO S«CIAUST5 DO THE JOB RIGHT. NOW TO DISTINGUISH TERMITES... TKMITES ANTS l. Laow Wlnu 1. Mild Hack ««!» 1. iwarm Uiu*l[y twmn IiM a.m. an* lioo p.m. 1. ftttaln Wlnga 1. waip-wclittd Brown or lack lodlti 1. Swarm Anyilma. Day or night. WILLIAMS TERMITE CONTROL 427 SOUTH AVE., W., N.J. NOT AN ANSWERING SERVICE

13 - T «- K T '»«Social and Club News of the Westfie Classic Studio Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Sanders Robert Sanders, Bride On Florida Honeymoon Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Sanders, who were married Ihe afternoon of March 20, will reside in North Plainficld after their wedding trip lo Florida. The bride is the former Miss Lynn Schnell, daughter of Mrs. Lorraine Adams of Lavallcttc. Mr. Sanders is Ihe son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Sanders of 72B Colcman HI. Official ing at Ihe four o'clock ceremony in Christ Episcopal Church, Toms River, was the Rev. Canon Booker. II was followed by a reception al Doolan's Motor Lodge, Spring Lake. Given in marriage by her uncle, Thomas Rcpela, Ihe bride had Mrs..Jon Allen of Norlh I'lainfield, formerly of West field, as matron of honor. Bridesmaids were Miss Sue Pope of Westfield, Miss Barbara Bickel of Elizabeth and the bridegroom's sister, Mariclaire Stoller of North Plainfield. Richard Shaw served as test man. Ushering were John and Brian Sanders, the b ridegroom's brothers; and Andrew Stoller, their brolher-in-law. Mrs. Sanders and her husband earned B.S. degrees al East Carolina University, Greenville, N.C. where they majored in child development and family relations. He is now seeking certification and a master's degree in special education al Kean College. Musical Club Sets Auditions Spring auditions for active membership in Ihe Musical Club of Wesl field will be held April 7 with Miss Elizabeth Wood, 18-B Parkway Village, Cranford. Application forms and further information may be obtained from Mrs. Willis S. Martyn, 136 Effingham PI., plus sponsorship. Women residents of Westfield, Cranford, Fanwood, Garwood, Clark, Mountainside, and Scotch Plains are eligible to join. Soloists must perform from memory; accompanists and ensemble must show their skills in reading music. Instrumental soloists must play from memory one number from the Classic Period up lo and including Beethoven and one number from either the Romantic or Modern periods. Vocal soloists must sing from memory one song from each of the same periods and also provide their own accompanist unless otherwise arranged. Accompanists shall be prepared to play two accompaniments. Composers musl submit and perform two compositions suitable for performance at the club. Ensemble applicants shall audition as a unit with appropriate literature. Chorus applicants must sight read and show ability in partsinging to the satisfaction of the choral director. Wcst/ield Welcome Wagon members will prepare for Easier by learning the art of Ubranian egg decorating from their president. Mrs. Nigel Harlan at 0:30 a.m. April 7 in the home of Mrs. Ken Lyons. Pictured, from left, are Mrs. Harlan. Mrs. C.B. Nelson and Mrs. Lyons. For The Best In and "B Register With Our Bridal Registry Receive A Free Monogrammed Toasting Glass Bradford Bachrach Mrs. Bruce C. Williams Valarie Andrews Is Bride Of Bruce C. Williams The Presbyterian Church was the setting Saturday for the early evening wedding of Miss Valerie Smith Andrews to Bruce C. Williams. The bride is the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Howard P. Snyder or 322 Elm St. and Mr. and Mrs. Jack Frost Andrews of Lawrenceville. Mr. William's parents are Mr. and Mrs. Carl J. Williams of Larayette Hill, Pa. Mr. Andrews gave his daughter in marriage at the six o'clock ceremony performed by the Rev. Dr. Theodore Sperduto. A reception followed at Ballusrol Golf Club. Matron of honor was Mrs. Francis Peterson of Ithaca, N.Y., the former Robin Ackerson of Westfield. Bridesmaids were Miss Marnic Carter of Darien, Conn., Mrs. Paul Walraven, the bride's sister Gail who came from Hilversum, Holland, with her husband and children; Miss Gwendolyn Andrews of Montreal, another sister, and Mrs. Howard A, Shaw, sister of the bridegroom. Junior bridesmaid was ten year old Jennifer Williams of London, Kngland, daughter of the bridegroom. Joseph Kane of Wesl Chester, Pa. served as best man. Ushering were Howard A. Shaw of Lafayette Hill, Jay F. Smith of Gulf Mills, Pa., Gerald McBride of Norristown, Pa., Ronald Mandell of Philadelphia and Alfred Williams of Vail, Colo. Mrs. Williams attended Westfield schools and is an alumna of Knox School on Long Island and of Beaver College. She holds af{raduato degree from Temple University. Her husband is executive vice president of A.H. Williams & Co..Philadelphia based municipal bond dealers. He is an alumnus of William Penn Charter School, Philadelphia, and Dickinson College. The couple will live in Philadelphia after a trip to California. Pro nuptial parties were given by Mrs. John M. Ackerson, Mrs. Francis Peterson and Mrs. Cindy degorgue, by Mrs. Harry E. Smith, by Mr. and Mrs. James Kilduff and by Mrs. Vincent Murphy. The bridegroom's parents were hosts at a rehearsal dinner at Ballusrol Golf Club. Dr. Tubbs To Speak On Divorce Dilemma At YW Lunch-Learn The Hev. Dr. Ace L. Tubbs will speak on "The Divorce Dilemma" on Monday, April 13 al the Westfield YWCA's Lunch and Learn. Lunch is served al 12 noon and Ihe mini-ialk concluded by 12:45. Dr. Tubbs, a clinical member of Ihe American Association of Marriage and Family Counselors in 1970 established a private practice in Weslfield as a marriage and family counselor. He has been a resident here since 1962 when he came as a minister to ihe Presbyterian Church. Dr. Tubbs is also a member of Ihe National Council of Family Relations and the Rolary Club of Westfield. He has an impressive knowledge about divorce problems faced in our prescnl society. The Learn and Lunch program is designed for Ihe busy person who wants to keep abreast of current topics but only has an hour lunch break. Reservations may be made by calling the YWCA before Friday, April 9. MAKE THE HOSPITAL ROOM BLOOM! Mrs. DouglasC. Crawford Douglas Crawford Wed To Beverly J. Heier Miss Barbara J. Heier became the bride Saturday afternoon of Douglas C. Crawford, son of Mr. and Mrs. Allen R. Crawford of 1284 Rahway Ave. in SI. : Louis Church, Pittslord, j N.Y. A reception followed at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick J. Heier in Fairport, N.J. j The honor attendants at the one o'clock ceremony, performed by the Rev. David Grumkee, were Mrs. Garry K. McGuire of Beverly Hills, Mich., sister of the bride, and Dr. Allen R. Crawford Jr. of Mucangie, Pa. who was best man for his brother. The bride wore a wedding dress of organza and Venise lace with a sweep train. Her illusion veil fell from a Juliet cap. She carried a cascade of white roses, carnations and ivy. Her attendants, costumed in long dresses of light green, carried Colonial bouquets. Bridesmaids were the Misses Cynthia and Nancy Heier of Rochester, N.Y. and Mrs. Roger Miracle of Springfield, Mass. Ushering al the wedding were Frederick J. Heier Jr. of Rochester, Roger Miracle and Randall M. Davis of Ithaca. Mrs. Crawford earned her B.A. and M.S. degrees at the State University of New York College at Cortland, taking a semester during graduate study at the University of Reading, England. She is a kindergarten teacher at Van Etten Elementary School. The newlyweds will live in Ithaca, N.Y. after a trip to St. Maartenashe is on leave from Western Electric as a quality control engineer while working toward a master's degree in operating research at Cornell University. After August they will reside in Reading, Pa. Mr. Crawford is an alumns of Bucknell University. Service League Donates $2,500 The Westfield Rescue Squad, Children's Specialized Hospital, Visiting Nurse and Health Service, Children's Service Commiltee and Center for Counseling and Human Developmenl were recipients of $2,500 contributed by Ihe Westfield Service League in February. The Service League raises money through operation of its Thrift and Consignment Shops al 114 Elmer SI. Paul Barry, founder and director of the "New Jersey Shakespeare Festival" was the guest speaker at the Service League's March 23 meeting. Hostess in her home was Mrs. George M. Weimer, 80G Cedar Ter. THE WESTFIBLO <NJ.) 1-EADKK, THI'RSOAV. AFKII. I. 1*70 Junior Leagues Are Merging Today For More Effective Community Action The merger of the Junior League of Elizabeth and Cranford today with the Junior League of Elizabeth brings together twj Junior Leagues which have been active in Union County for more than 50 years demonstrating he effectiveness of trained volunteers. Overlapping membership areas and activities are among the reasons for Ihe merger according to Mrs. Robert E. Royes, )resident of the Plainfield League. Mrs. Peter B. Step! ens, who has headed the Elizabeth and Cranford group for the past two years add; that the merger will increase Ihe number of trained volunleers To be known as I le Junior j League of Elizabeth and Plainfield, the purpose will continue lo be Ihe promotion of voluntary partie pation in community affairs and the furthering of awareness, advocacy and actidn in Ihe fields of youlh and child services, health and welfare, arts and criminal justice. Mrs. Floyd J. Donahue of i if* 1 J " L. ' i \ I J Westfield is being installed as president this morning at ihe meeting at 'lainficld Country Club. Shejiotes that "The Junior League represents a serii us effort on the part of yourg women to become act ve and constructive paiticipants in Ihe communities in which they live, lo be intelligent citizens and toi assume leadership in problems inherent in a democracy." Mrs. George B. Lucas Jr, of Plainfield will pe a vice president. Board members from Westfield include Mrs. Chauncy M. DepEW, Mrs. Douglas Yearky, Mrs. Larry Biederman Mrs. E. Clifford Hall, Mr; Harmon Wood and Mrs. Michael Taranto Jr. A large percentage of the membership ndw comes from Westfield. Others reside in 21) neighboring communities. The Junior league of Plainfield, foundejd in 1923, served as seconder the following year When the Junior League of'elizabeth joined the Association of Junior Leagues ofiamerica. The Association bpgan with six Leagues in There are now more than 220 Junior Leagues throughout ihe United States', Canada and Mexico with! a membership of over 100,000. Projects of the plainfield group include Dra ;e House, Y.E.S., an art slides school program. Neighborhood House library, th Family Development Ceiter and remodeling plans for thai city's YWCA. It al 50 helped button Who's to know how many bags you own. One w xxlen handle and a sta :kof button on cover: and... voila! zillions of handbags. Buttcnon gabardines with hand painted designs suedes, crewels, tweeds paisleys, flannelsand maybe even velvet and nobody s the wisjer Two sizes: 11 "x 12" and 9"x9".'available Frames From! 11 to $14 ext a covers $5 and 57 establish the genito-urinary clinic at Children's Specialized Hospital. The Elizabeth League merged 15 years ago with the Cranford Junior Service League, also because of Kean College in a Learning Disabilities testing overlapping membership program Others have been areas and activities. Their I trained in Ihe use of closed recent projects have included the Colonial Coach of circuit television with a Westfield demonstrated this summer, establishment of the Union County Environmental Resource Center, a cardiac fitness program at St. Elizabeth Hospital, an adult workshop wilh Ihe county Cerebral Palsy Center and aid to West field's Neighborhood Council. Joint efforts of both Leagues resulted in a Grantsman project for Union County, which realized additional funds for day care agencies, and promotion of ihe voluntary action Center for Union County Members have recently completed a special training program at continuing program at Rahway Hospital. All funds raised for projects are placed in a Community Trust Fund to be returned to Ihe community. Dues take care of administrative costs. The Jumble.Store at 110 Walnut I Ave., Cranford, is a continuing source of income. The Elizabeth-Cranford league had a Christmas Boutique in Weslfield for several years and the Plainfield League last spring staged a successful [)( signi r's Showhou ( Viewing (he many prizes being awarded at the annual Spring Parties 0/ the Senior Auxiliary to the Children's Specialized Hospital being held April 6. 7 and 8 at Shackamaxon Country Club are Mrs. George B. Schroeder, left, chairman 0/ the prizes committee, and Mrs. Roy Nceven, co-chairman 0/ reservations, both 0/ West/ield. The parties will feature a cocktail hour, luncheon, fashion show and bridge. THE SECOND DIAMOND... HOW SWEET IT IS Many years ago you gave her a diamond. It was beautiful and it was sweet. Now, you'd like to give her a larger diamond. A diamond that says "I Love You" as nothing else can. Visit the Marcus Diamond Island where a fabulous selection of magnificent diamonds and settings awaits you. A Marcus consultant will help you choose that second diamond and you'll find out how really sweet it is Visit the Marcus Diamond Island. Diamond rings from $ INuOtilignlionl Jeannette's Gift Shop Hoodqunrton for Hallmark Cards pnd Barrltinl Candy 227 E. Broad Street SHOP IN WES1FIEID - QUALITY - SERVICE - VALUES Rear Entrance la Municipal Parking Lot ' Open Thursday Evening 'til 9 p.m. MAJOR CREDIT CARDS HONORED A beautilul bouquet ol I lowers can help any patient get well faster! Let us speed your get-well arrangement on Its way. Stop In or phone us today. We Deliver Around Tim Corner Or Around The World McEwen Flowers Eitablithtd 1921 FREE 0FF-THE-5IRIET FRONT DOOR PARKING Grove St. at Wettfield Ave.,Wetrfiold, Op*n B a.m. to 5:30 p.m. dolly 137/CEntBfll 137/c AVEnuf LUESTFiFI 0. neuj JERSEV *-*S* RUTHERFORD. N.I. 58 Calk Avtrnjn 939-Qn'U i) I H&CKEKSACK. N.I 1S2 Main Stteet'4B'l?2lt P*R«MUS. N.I. P3fa.mus fark Shopped Center a/wad.1 I. W! If ' /'- RIDGEWOOO, N.I. WESIFIELD. N.I.. n ()ft I R'QaO Street 23JO52U opoh thurs. til BO00

14 P*tfe II THE VVESTKIKLI) (N.J.) LEAUKR, THURSDAY, AFKIL Mrs. McGill Is INew President of Area City Paiihellenic Mrs. Charles McGill was seated as presideni of the Westfield Area Panhi'llenic at its annual luncheon March 17 at Echo Lake Country Club Olher officers installed were Mrs Philip Cease, secretary; anil Mrs. Allan Leisl, treasurer. Completing the board for will be Mrs. Glenn Maggio, references: Mrs. Robert List, publicity. Mrs Thomas Weldon, advisor; Mrs. Steven Harvey, 1977 luncheon chairman. All women in the area who arv not members of organized sorority groups, and would be interested in joining the Westfield Area 1'anehullenic, should contact Mrs. Weldon or Mrs. McGill. Joins Squad Auxil. Mrs. Glen Kittk'son was welcomed as a new member of the Weslfield Ilescue Squad Auxiliary at its March meeting. Members wrote receipts for Ihe annual Squad Fund erne. sirit Diane scatters a confetti of popcorn over wedgewood blue or red rayon and cotton knit. It's her famous flowing silhouette to belt or not. 6 to 14 in the group, The next meeting is scheduled for April 29 at the home of Mrs. Weldon, 417 Colonial Avenue. Drive and completed plans for 'heir annual card party on April 2:5. Tickets may be obtained from Mrs. George Mau«?r. None will be sold at tjie door. It's so soft, so fresh that it could be called a two-pioce dress. It's so smart, so versatile that it could cover a season in non-stop versatility this duet has great possibilities, cotton, 6 to 16 In the group, from Schrador Sport. See them both of... 13?/CENTRAL AVENUE., NEW JERSEY Carlan Kathi Diane Horowitz Engagement Told Of Miss Horowitz Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Horowitz of 89G Highland Ave. have announced the engagement of their daughter, Kathi Diane to Kenneth Warren Rosenblum, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jersome Rosenblum of 1 Bryon Cl. Miss Horowitz, a member of the Class of 1971 at Westfield High School, was graduated cum laude from Syracuse University with ;i R.F.A. degree. She is employed by Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Kenner and Smith. Inc., New York. Mr. Kosenblum. an alumnus of Laurclcrest Preparatory School, Bristol, Conn., earned his B.A. degree in 1974 from the University of Miami. He is a sales representative for Weyerhaeuser Co. in New York. The father of Ihe bride-elect is vice president of Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner and Smith, Inc. Mr. Rosenblum's father is president of Abbe Lumber, Inc., A vend. The couple plans to be wed Aug. 21 at Temple Emanu-El. Caren Clark MacKinnon Former Resident To Marry in May Mrs. Alexander B. MacKinnon of Emporia, Kansas, formerly of Scudder ltd.. Westfield, announces the engagement and approaching marriage of her daughter, Miss Caren Clark MacKinnon Lo David L. Kerr. son of Mr. and Mrs. Earl A. Kerr of Winfield, Kansas. The couple will be married May 29 in Emporia. The prospective bride, daughter also of the late Mr. MacKinnon, was a member of the Class of 1972 at Westfield High School and is an alumna also of the Rarbizon School of Modeling. She studied at the College of Emporia and will be awarded her B.S. degree in May from Emporia Kansas State College where she is majoring in social science. Her fiance is a graduate of the Winfield school system and served in the U.S. Army from 1M He is in Ihe restaurant management business. African Violet Bicentennial Show Opens Tomorrow Evening "Violets at the Crossroads of the Revolution" is Ihe title of this year's show of Hie Union County Chapter of Ihe African Violet Society of America tomorrow and Saturday at the American Legion Hall, 1003 W. North Ave. Admission is free to this official Westfield Bicentennial event. Hours tomorrow arefi-10 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Over 200 entries will feature African violets and their exotic plant cousins, floral design interpretations of New Jersey history, underwater floral displays and terrariums. The public is invited to exhibit their blooming. single-crown African violets by bringing them to Ihe American Legion Hall this evening from 7-9 p.m. to be entered. Junior gardeners have their own special section. Show chairman is Kred Brenner. Additional in formation may be obtained from Mrs. William Leppard. The Union County Chapter of the African Violet Society of America meets the third Travelogue To Be Given On Himalyan Kingdom When Dr. and Mrs. phase of Lamaism. Lorrimer Armstrong Mr. and Mrs. Armstrong present their benefit lecture will show the natural April 28 for the travel beauties of this mountainous department of the Woman's country with its rushing Club of Westfield, they will streams and waterfalls, its be showing some of the first people, how they dress and travel pictures taken in the live; activities of the Himalayan kingdom of Dzongs, the great fortress Bhutan. The armchair tour monasteries; the Queen at Terrill Junior High.School Mother with whom the Scotch Plains, will begin at R Armstrong's had an p.m. audience, and traditional Mrs. Russell F. Elsener is dances of the Royal Ballet chairman of the event, Troup. assisted by Mrs. George Fraser, tickets, and Mrs. James C. Wilson, publicity. Tickets may be obtained from any member of the department. The title. "Bhulan.-Lanri of the Thunder Dragon" emphasizes the symbolism that is dominant in this lil tic-known kingdom between Sikkim, Tibet and Bengal where Buddhism permeates every phase of Bhutan life. It is one of the few places now available for Ihe study of Ihe ancient Delta Delta Delta Delta Delta Delta, Westfield Alumnae chapter, will meet Wednesday evening, April 7, at 8 p.m. in the home of Mrs. Joseph Kiningham, 410 Jefferson Ave. Each member is asked to bring a Pan-Hellenic friend as a guest. Tri-Delta members, Mrs. Frederick Boss and Mrs. Allen Malcolm, will present a program on "Historic Houses." Co-hostesses are Mrs. Harry Knudsonof Watchung and Mrs. Douglas Bonham of Cranford. HKIDC.EPAKTY The. start of the spring season will be celebrated by the recreation department of the Woman's Club of Westfield when it meets April 6 for a salad luncheon bridge. The party in the club house begins at 12:30 p.m. YW Day Trips Have Openings There are openings in two day trips in May, sponsored by Ihe Indies Day Out committee of the YWCA. Of special interest in this Bicentennial Year should be the day at Washington Crossing State Park and New Hope. The Memorial building at the park is a popular national shrine in which the famed painting, "Washington Crossing the Delaware." is displayed. Lunch in Lambertville House will be followed by an afternoon to browse and shop in New Hope. A trip to Great Adventure is slated for a Saturday in May. This is the largest safari park outside of Africa. Children accompanied by adults are welcome. For further information regarding these day trips, please call the YWCA. Arts, Crafts Show An Arts and Crafts Exhibit ion sponsored by the Auxiliary to Ihe Union County Osteopathic Medical Society, opens today from 6- it p.m. at Ihe Short Hills Mall. There is no admission fee. Proceeds will go to Ihe Society's Scholarship Fund. Hours Friday and Saturday are 10 a.m.-fi p.m. and Sunday from noon - (> p.m. Cindy Weiss and Shirley Abend of Mountainside are among the exhibitors. Date Corrected The date for the one-mint? introductory discussion of Consciousness Raising (CIO at the YWCA, to be conducted by.janet Lundy in cooperation with Union County NOW, will he on Wednesday. April 7, not April (> as previously announced. I CR groups will be formed, Thursday of each month at Women unable to attend this I ::)(> p.m. in the Somerset I session, but who wish to join j Trust Bank, Blue Star ' ' 'hopping Center. All are! 'come. a CR group, are asked to call the YW and leave their names. There is no fee..rule Foley and Marianna Frerechs are looking over the articles woven by Charlotte Cohen which will be on sale at Ihe Y's Owl Boutique April 8, 9 and 10 at the Y-Toen //ouse, J32 Ferris PL Hours arc 10-4 and Thursday night until 9 p.m. Items crafted by people throughout the state will be sold on consignment. On Thursday and Saturday, Jeanne Christmann will make personalized thumbprinl pictures. Proceeds will benefit the YVV'CA. europe 41 different tours to all of Europe, incl. Scandinavia, Russia, Balkans, etc. Plus Morocco. 2 to 4 weeks, escorted, all expense incl. air. $995 to $2275, d'ble occupancy. Frequent departures. For your free copy write or phone: Traveling. ^ A m~ i A a r*t r*i r* r~ T* 122 ELM STREET INC. Miss Cory Plans Summer Wedding Miss Barbara Kllen Cory, a third year student at Cornell Law School, plans to be married August 21 to Spencer Richard Knapp. a law clerk to Judge Albert Coffrin of Ihe U.S. District Court, Burlington, VI. Following her graduation in May, the bride-elect will serve as law dark to Judge James S. Holder) of the U.S. District Court, Rutland, Vt. An alumna of Kent Place School, Summit, she was graduated from Wellesley College in 1973 where she was a Wellesley College Scholar. During her junior year, she studied at Dartmouth College. Mr. Knapp, an alumnus of St. Andrew's School, Middletown, Dela., was a Fhi Heta Kappa graduate of Trinity College in He received his degree from Cornell Law School in H)75. Miss Cory is the daughter of Paul R. Cory of New York City and of Mrs. Mary II. Cory of Singer Island, Fla., former Westfield residents. Mr. Cory is chairman and chief executive officer of New Jersey Life Insurance Co. with headquarters in Saddle Hrook. Mrs. Cory is editor of Florida Property, a The Westfield Day Care Center Women's Auxiliary will sponsor its annual (ligantic Garage and Bake Sale Mays from 9:30a.m. to :i:30 p.m. (May 15 is rain date.) Again this year, the Stephen Wythe home at 330 Hillside Ave. will be the site for the sale and for storage of the items prior to the event. A! a recent meeting Mrs. lleinn F. Tomfohrde III and Mrs. John W. Wilson, cochairmen, announced as b o o I h chairmen: Appliances, Mrs. Robert K. Ellsworth; books and records, Mrs. Douglas C. Yearly; boutique, Mrs. Charles McGill; Chinese auction, Mrs. Norman D. Hal Met; Christmas decorations, Mrs. John P. Shepard; furniture and frames, Mrs. Harmon V. Wood; giftshop, Mrs. Philip A. Campbell; greenery, HATKSCLUK The New Jersey Bates Club will hold its annual dinner meeting tonight, at the Steak and Brew, West Orange, beginning with a social hour at 6:30 p.m. Assistant Professor Martin Andrucki, chairman of Ihe department of theater and speech at Bates College, will be tlu> speaker for the evening. Barbara F.UenCory publication in Florida. Mr. Knapp is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Kichard S. Knapp who live in New Canaan. Conn, where the wedding will take place. His father is a partner in the New York city firm of Ward Howell Associates. Chairmen Named for Day Care Center's Garage-Bake Sale Mrs. Robert 15. Furstner. Also, Handyman's Haven, Mrs. (ieorge Rounds; jewelry, Mrs. William Maish; kitchenware, Mrs. John Buehlor; linens and rugs, Mrs. Stephen Perry; snackbar. Parents of children in the Day Care Center; sporting goods, Mrs. Robert Hall; toys, Mrs. Douglas E. Tutlle. Mrs. Charles G. Dixon heads the pricing committee and Mrs. William Swarts, the telephone. Again this year, the bakery booth will be taken care of by ihe women of the First United Methodisl Church with Mrs. Kichard Griggs and Mrs. John Tittle as co : chairmen. Articles are still urgently needed and may be dropped (iff at 33(1 Hillside Ave, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday mornings from 9 11::U). Pickups may be arranged by calling Mrs. Stanley P. Clark, 132 Stanmoro PI., or Mrs. C. Chesney MeCracken, 745 Highland Ave. '. 'COLONIAL HILL LEARNING CENTER^ ( i-rtl/ifj t'\ \I'M Jtr i f l)ff>jrt>nriii.. I f,1;,, nii-.i, NURSERY SCHOOL (iillcth' trained I aiull> t\cll l.c uipjh'<l 1'l.ititriiiuuls Small Claws Ilitn-lnl Programs' " Spivial Art. Musu-. 1lan«. I ttinre,l I nrollincnc I rench.l Spanish W'ariicrs REGISTER NOW FOR SEPT Transportation Provided SUMMER CAMP Kxperl Swimming Instruction 24' Filtered Pool Arts, Crafts and Music l">aily Trips to Points of Interest Small Groups CalluKu Staff I'icnics Sports Register Mow, Ages 3-6 TRANSPORTATION PROVIDED v CALL Take the Work out of Washdays! Whirlpool Washers and Dryers Built by the people who believe "Quality Can Be Beautiful" Isn't it time you get to know how easy washdays can be? Washdays are a snap with famous Whirlpool laundry appliances. Designed with your family in mind, there is a Whirlpool washer that offers the leatures you need and want for today's modern fabrics. But regardless of which model washer you choose you'll find famous Whirlpool quality built Into every one, And if you've been thinking about replacing your old gas dryer, the washer can be paired with a matching Whirlpool gas dryer, featuring a large capacity drum, extra large lint screen, and the exclusive "tumble press" control. See these famous Whirlpool laundry appliances now in white and decorator colors at your nearest Elizabethtown showroom. Whether you buy a washer, replacement dryer or both... remember, prices at Eliznbelhtown include delivery and normal installation, plus a one-year warrantyon parts and service backed by Elizabethlown Gas. USE OUR LIBERAL CREDIT TERMS OR YOUR MASTER CHARGE CARD lizabethtown Gas A Subsidiary of National Utilities & Industries ELIZABETH' MENLOPADK* ONE ETOWN PLAZA OPP SHOR CENTER I ELM ST OpmniMiil»!0 "Thoso showrooms ppon shopping nlghis and Saturdays PHILLIPSBURQ nosedennv ST Dill)I MI m So m In HI,m ill Si m-7 p m Ollor good only in nroo sorvlcod by Efi/nbiithtown Gas CONSIRV1 NATURAl GAS IT'S PURE ENERGY! NEWTON SUSSEX COUNTY MALL nt Djilv 10 i m 3 p m ICIoud Siluidi i Oihtt Hout! by Appl 154 MM

15 Manners, Morals of 1776 i Topic For College Club There are not too many places in the world today which have not been visited by Phyllis Kepler, journalist and explorer, who will speak here April 6 to the College Woman's Club. The meeting at the First Baptist Church will commence at 8:15 p.m. Mrs. Kepler lived in the Westfield-Scotch Plains area for several years in the late 60s when her husband, John, was employed in the legal department of Merck & Co. Turning from world travel lo travels in time, Mrs. Kepler will speak on "Manners and Morals of 1776' 1, an intimate look at our ancestors, their at- Phyllis Kepler litudes, customs and etiquette. Any woman college Two. naturals. Both from Stride Rite. Both with the latest in natural soles for walking ease. And hoth with Stride Rite's }>reat wear. And our tine fit. Stop into our Authorized Stride Rite Fitting Center now. A f i R i t ftmpbto Una» OrthopMlk Shaw DOCTOrS ntscmptions ACCUHATUY NUB W» KMR ACCURATE MCOM» «f AR Mall REMINDER CARDS Pravid* FREE SIZE CHECKUPS "Mod. Bandars A Family Affalf" Randal's 82 ELM ST. open Thursday Evenings graduate in the area is eligible to attend. Information about joining the college club can be obtained from membership chairman, Mrs. R.V. Morse, 849 Knoll wood Terrace. One of Mrs. Kepler's recent trips was through the Arab world, including Lebanon, Syria, Jordan and Saudi Arabia. As the Middle East peace negotiations were reaching an agreement and the press covering Dr. Kissinger were sitting through briefings and conferences, this vivacious journalist was traveling through the cities and countryside meeting people in their homes, talking with their children for her widely admired Scholastic magazine articles, and visiting places seldom seen by foreigners, especially foreign women. Mrs. Kepler's life has been packed with adventure and danger. Since graduating from Northwestern University with a degree in journalism and home economics, she has worked on a top secret intelligence assignment in Washington, has been a staff writer with Associated Press, home furnishings editor of the Indianapolis News, and worked for one of New York's major public relations firms. Mrs. Kepler now devotes her time to travelling, writing and lecturing, with particular emphasis on women, children, families, and the varying ways of life throughout the world. As journalist-guest, she has lived among the veiled women of the Mid-East, visited homes in areas as distant as Korea, Venezuela and Afghanistan, attended a Japanese wedding and has been granted the seldomallowed privilege of visiting Ihe temple of a mysterious Lebanese religious sect, the Druzc. Mrs. Kepler's previous travels took her to Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and Koumania in the spring of Prior to that she traveled through 5,000 miles of South America from the mountains of Bolivia to the coastal nation of Venezuela; 12,000 miles in a Volkswagen from Europe to Asia following in the footsteps of Marco Polo and camping in the Afghanistan deserts, crossing Ihe forbidding Hindu Hush mountains and getting lost near the Chinese border. She has traveled the Pan American Highway, toured Ihe Central American Republics and Mexico and gone through the Amazon basin with a headhunting Jivaro Indian as her guide. Mrs. Kepler's articles have appeared in the New York Times, Chicago Tribune, National Observer, Christian Science Monitor, and other publications. How much fish to fry? For filets and steaks, 1/3 to 1/2 pound per person; for whole fish, 3/4 to 1 pound per person. MILADY'S -THE WESTFIEIJ> (XJ.) LEADKB. THCK.SDAV, APRIL 1, 1976 I* GRAND REOPENING SALE & DAILY DOUBLE CONTEST Today through Saturday Save on Spring and baster fashions FAMOUS SPORTSWEAR COORDINATES Buy any jacket or vest at the regular price... MATCHING PANTS OR SKIRT PRICE Spring's raciest styles, colors and easycare fabrics. Misses' sizes. Alfred Ounner Devon Queen Casuals Ecco Bay Plus many others FAMOUS MAKER ROBES Buy any robe at the regular price.. MATCHING GOWN V2 PRICE Choose from our entire spring collection in colorful short and long styles. Vanity Fair Gossard Formflt Rogers Kayser Lorraine Vassarelte And other fine makes SPRING HANDBAGS IN VINYL OR STRAW Every handbag in our entire stock 20% OFF Regular Prices Spring's newest shapes and sizes lor dress and casual wear including shoulder to multi-compartment double handle styles FAMOUS MAKER POLYESTER PANTS Buy any pull-on pants at the regular price... MATCHING BLOUSE 1 / 2 PRICE Sporty spring favorites in misses sizes. Alfred Dunner Ship'nShore Aladdin Caprito Others FAMOUS LABEL BRAS Buy any bra at the regular price... SECOND BRA 1 2 PRICE Choose from every shapely style and fabric from bandeau to lonqline. Maldenform ;*»>Warner8 Van Raalle Bali > Olga Lily of France Playtex More WEATHER OR NOT RAINCOATS & PANTCOATS Every raincoat and pantcoat in our collection 20% OFF Regular Prices Spring's reigning styles in a bevy of shower-shedding fabrics and sunny colors. Win Valuable Prizes! JUNIORS'AND MISSES' JEANS Buy any leans at the regular price.. MATCHING GAUZE SHIRT Vi PRICE Get if all together by the makers doing It the best! Rumble Seal H.I.S. And other lop makers PANTIES, BRIEFS AND HIP HUGGERS Buy any panty at the regular price,.. SECOND PANTY 1 /2 PRICE Cottons, nylons, and blends in solid colors and pretty prints. Vanity Fair Lollipops Sylray Vassarelte fc Plus others HOSTESS GOWNS, CAFTANS AND BEACH COVER-UPS Every current style in our collection 20% OFF Regular Prices Glamorous fashions to lounge or entertain in plus knock-out cover-ups for pool and shore. Enter the daily double contest RAZZLE-DAZZLE COSTUME JEWELRY Buy any necklace or bracelet at the regular price... MATCHING EARRINGS 1/2 PRICE Spring pastels, white, earth colors plus gold-silver tones. FAMOUS MAKERS' PANTYHOSE Buy any pair of pantyhose at the regular price,.. SECOND PAIR PANTYHOSE V2 PRICE Every lashlonable style and shade tor day to evening Including support styles. Hanes Mojud Berkshire Mayer PANT SUITS AND SKIRT SUITS Every new Spring style in stock. 20% OFF Regular Prices for juniors and misses in polyester knits, garbardines, plus fashion's newest fabrics, Martin Jewelers presents a frankly tempting collection of Earrings... Bracelets... Pendants... and Rings. All artfully Hand-Crafted, Of Sterling Silver. Tho Qucon of metals. That's always in good taste. Definitely the right garnish for today's fashion mood of more casual clothes. And popularly 'priced, yet of enduring quality. Indulge in affordable opulence. It's definitely rich... but has no calories! Mujnr Chaw I'luiis I'trsfwal Chargf HiulKei c( I.uy-A-U'uv 1'lans You could be a Winnerl Enter Milady's 3-Day 4 Daily Double Contest Nowl Here's how it works: 1. Pick up your entry blank at Milady's and fill in your name, address and phone 2. "Deposit your entry in our race box - the earlier you enter the more chances you have.to win No purchase nocessary: No need to bo present - winners will be notified 36 Winners! 4 Contest Races Daily - Thursday, Friday & Saturday, April 1,2,3 3 winners in each race - 12 races in all! WIN First name pulled wins a m» jiff certificate PLACE Second name pulled a ^ ^ % gift certificate SHOW Third name pulled wins a A» gift certificate Dally V:30 lo 5:30 except Wai 9:30 lo 1:30.Thursday 9:30 lo 8: E. Broad St., ' Westfield SHOP DAILY TO/6 THURS. TO 9/SAT. TO 5:30 MASTER CHARGE/ BANKAMERICARD/ HANDI-CHARGE

16 Page 16 THE WKSTI'IKLl) (N.J.) LKADKR, THIRSDAY, Al'KIL I, Martino Studio The Moses Ross House, built in 1777 and owned now by Mr. and Mrs. Roy C. Carrigan, will be open April 24 for the Bicentennial Historic Tour of Homes and Kitchens, sponsored by the Woman's Club of Westfield. Pictured in the kitchen, from left, are Mrs. Carrigan, club president; Mrs. Alexander MacKinnon, Mrs. David Ranney. Airs. L. L. Gleason and, seated, Mrs. George Fraser. Homes on Bicentenial Tour Cover Years From To celebrate our country's 200th anniversary. The Woman's Club of Westfield is combining its annual kitchen tour this year with a tour of homes on Saturday. April24, from 10a.m.-2 p.m. A brunch, prepared by Jerry Holmes, (he "Omelet King," is included in the cost of the ticket. Brunch will be served during the tour hours at the Woman's Club, lilt) So. Euclid Avenue. The live homes to!jc open for viewing are those of Mr. and Mrs. H.M. Stork Jr.. known as Becker's Farm, 1844; Mr. and Mrs. Hoy V. Carrigan. the Moses Koss Home, 1777; Mr. and Mrs. CD. Seaman, the DeCamp Home, 1739; the A.B. Annis home 1900, and the Fairbanks home, 197(5. The Carrigan home is of Federal architecture and is noted on the Westfield Revolutionary Map dated On the 300th anniversary of the Town of West field, there was a walking tour and at this time the Carrigan family was presented with a plaque noting their home to be of historical significance. This plaque is now mounted on the barn adjacent to the house. Known as the Moses Koss m. i home, it was originally a one room domain with room after room added over the span of 2(X) years. It is believed that the dining room is the original part of the homestead. II has no square corners and, where Hie front walls meet, the loom is rounded. The kitchen has been modernized, hut the old colonial look has been retained. Reds predominate and blend with old oak cabinets. An antique rocker sits near the stow and an antique Hour tin is used for storage. One wall features antique kitchen utensils. The Carrigans' love for antiques is reflected in their many collections throughout the house. A combination of early American and Victorian periods have been successfully blended in furnishings. WOMAN'S CLUB OF Wedding Receptions Social Functions 318 S. Euclid Ave. For Rentals Tickets for the tour are limited, bul may be purchased by calling the general chairman of the tour, Mrs. Anthony J. Stark Jr.. or her assistant, Mrs. Harold Bracher; also by calling the Woman's Club between 9a.m. and 5 p.m. or at Lancaster, Ltd. on Elm St., or at the Constant Header, Mountainside. Piano Recitals Meetings Murray Hill Square Photo Gerda Bamberger and Midge hoik, the managementsales team for Marie Stadler. fine Apparel for the Lady, put the final touches on fashions selected for the Marie Stadler Grand Opening today at Murray Hill Square, New Providence. New Shop To Feature Diverse Collection Fashions A new shop, Marie Stadler. Fine Apparel for the Lady, is opimiinf- today at.murray Hill Square, New Providence. A unique combination of chic, sophistication and practicality, is shown on two lull floors of the "Bassinger House" al I he Square. Owners Nat and Carol C'onli are offering a most diverse collection of fashion values. Bringing their own enthusiasm and good taste to the operation is the management-sales team of Cerda liamberger and Midge Folk, well known in fashion for almost IS years. Having spent the better part of three months buying for Marie Sladler, they are now ready for the grand opening. "We've bought items for all ages and tastes, 1 ' explains Midge, "and aim to provide all of our customers with that just-so smart look without being overdone." They will carry a melange of feminine pieces from lingerie and long casual knits to casual and designer sports and evening wear "stated softly, simply, and with style." Placing a heavy emphasis on sportswear, Midge notes the "shop will offer a tasteful sampling of golf. I tennis and swimwear for the ' sportive yet feminine woman." Midge's flair for fashion comes from her mother, once a buyer for I. Alagnin. A model and saleswoman, Midge has :i keen eye for matching the proper clothes to her customers and is always willing to make helpful suggestions. Gerda is the organizer of the two. Having studied merchandising and serving her apprenticeship in Germany, she finds her forte is in decorating, managing and presenting the garments to the public. Both have had more than 12 years experience in buying, selling and displaying women's fashions and carry a following of happy customers to attest to their knowledge and skill. The grand opening celebration April 1, 2, 3, includes complimentary gifts to the first 100 customers, refreshments, and prizes of Marie Stadler gift certificates. Marie Stadler will be open Monday through Saturday 9- T>;30,Thursday evenings until it'and Sunday from 12-4:30 for browsing. Free Hearing Tests Scheduled Free hearing screening will be conducted in West- j field on April 6 by the New York League for the Hard of Hearing. Sponsored by the Greater Westfield Section of National Council of Jewish Women, the screenings will be given in a mobile unit at Temple Emanu-EI, E. Broad St., from 0:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Testing is available for those children from 3la years through adults, Thelest, which lakes only a few minutes, will immediately identify those with hearing problems. John Buckley, director of the Department of audiology and speech palhology at Overlook Hospital, will assist. Referral to area facilities with audiological and otological services will be provided. The New York League for i he I lard of Hearing is a nonprofil, out-of-hospital facility which has served the hearing impaired for the last (16 years. Recognizing trie necessity of early detection of a hearing loss, the League has developed the most extensive hearing screening program in the metropolitan area. About 50,000 people have received these screening tests in the last year in the League's' completely equipped threeroom mobile test facility. To Address Bank Women Peter Cartmell, president of Fidelity Union Bancorporation, will speak April 6 at the fifth annual Joe's (Enlontal Farm Market EFFECTIVE FRIDAY, APRI L 2 thru SUNDAY, APftIL 4 FRESH TENDER ASPARAGUS 49«LB. CARROTS 1 POUND AAC yx M PKGS. Washington State RED DELICIOUS APPLES GOLDEN DELICIOUS APPLES or AINJOU PEARS CRISP CELERY 29c FRESH FLORIDA JUICE ORANGES 15 FOR $j00 Mix or Match Your Choice 3 $100 LBS. 3Frutt Saaket0 If at All ( ttnbian& Large Grade A Eggs 69 C DOZ. Cigarettes 55 C PACK-AH sizes Coke 64 oz. 76 C 611 Central Ave., Westfield MARKET 9 A.M. 6 P.M. Daily HOURS: 9 A.M. 2 P.M. Sunday (Across from Andruw's Shoos) ' hoesl i Associate Night dinner j meeting of the Centra! New Jersey Group of the National Association of Bank Women, Inc. at Plainfield Country Club. His topic will be "The New Jersey Bankers Association", which he is presently serving as president. TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITATION" l> dim* II, \l,,),,i,,~iu \l, I Kt I- I K1UHFS KVtR\ WKI). AT 8 P.M. TM CENTER 141 South Avunue Fanwood, New Jersuy cull: :«7-:u; LEARN ELECTROLYSIS the KREE way Reivairling career in perrnaneni hair removal Age no barrier Full Of parl tim Day o'eve Man, Women Come, write or phone lor FREEBOOKLET K.! SI, HI. I003B ll! 1IU2I0 mmmmmmim Steven Menzie Is Engaged The betrothal of Miss Sandra Gabriel to Steven Menzie, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Men/.ir of 714 Austin St., has been announced by tier mother, Mrs. Carol Gabriel of 234 Central Ave., Mountainside. Miss Gabriel, daughter also of Walter Gabriel of 1'erth Amboy, is a graduate of Governor Livingston Itegional High School. She is employed by Phonodisc, Inc. Mr. Menzit* is an alumnus of Westfield High School and Union County Vocational School. He is employed by Exxon. The couple plans to be married in October. Sandra Gabriel N.J. Symphony To Hold First Phon-A-Thon A massive Phon-A-Thon is about to take place to solicil individual contributions for the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra's current concert season throughout the state. On April 5, i). 7 and K, between 7 and 9:30 p.m., hundreds of phones at the Prudential Insurance Company's offices in Florham Park will be manned by volunteer workers. This is the first lime that the Symphony will be attempting to conlact this many individual music lovers for personal contributions. In the past, substantial funds and contributions from (iovernment and the larger corporations have been the main source of the Orchestra's income other than that derived from ticket sales. Individuals were solicited through various methods throughout the year by phone or mail, but total contributions from the private sector were not proportionate to monies derived from corporate campaigns. The new campaign is constructed to Delta Gamma The Summit-Westfield Alumnae Chapter of Delta Gamma will hold its annual Founder's Day luncheon Saturday at Canoe Brook Country Club, Short Hills, at 12;30 p.m. It will commemorate Ihe 20th anniversary of the local ulumnac group. Phyllis Kepler, world traveller and lecturer, will speak to the chapter on "I'Yom Veil to Khaki: A Glimpse of the Arab Woman". A former West- field resident, she is a longtime member, of the chapter. All Delta Gammas in the area are urged to attend. They may call Mrs. Warren Kicker or Airs. Richard (juantrille for further information. In Scotland, a grandfather is sometimes called a luchic dad. reach a greater number of individuals and lo contact them only once for a contribution instead of many different times as in the past. APRIL 1 Coffee for prospective members of Intermediate Woman's Club, home of Mrs. Niedzwiecki, 8:15 p.m. 1 Social service dept., Woman's Club, 1 p.m. 2 Travel dept., Woman's Club, 1 p.m. 2 Duplicate bridge, Woman's Club, 8:15 p.m. 2, 3 African Violet show, sale, American Legion hall, 1003 W. North Ave., Friday 0-10 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m.-4 p.m. :i Delta Gamma Alumnae, Canoe Brook Country Club, 12:30 p.m. 3-5 NCJW rummage sale, j 23 VFVV hall, South Ave., Garwood. I Kun-Walkathon, Spaulding lor Children, Hadassah, home of Mrs. Sol Gold, 12:15 p.m. 5 DAK Girl Homemakcr contest, High School I!,7,8 Spring parties for Children's Specialized Hospital, Shackamaxon Golf Club. I (i Choraleers, Woman's Club, 9:30 a.m. 6 Recreation dept., Woman's Club, 12:30 p.m. fi College Woman's Club, First Baptist Church, 8:15 p.m. 7 Welcome Wagon, home of Mrs. Ken Lyons, 9:30a.m. 7 Crafts dept., Woman's Club, 9:30 a.m. 7 Auditions, Musical Club of Westfield, 18B Parkway Village, Cranford. 7 Delta Delta Delta, Mrs..Joseph Kiningham's, Jefferson Ave. 8 p.m.!) Open duplicate bridge, Woman's Club, 8:15 p.m. 12 Woman's Club of Westfield, Presbyterian parish house, 1:15 p.m. 13 Mt. Trail Garden Club 21st anniversary, M'side Library. 13 Choraleers, Woman's Club, 9:30 a.m. 13 Junior Woman's Club, 7:30 p.m. And catch a gleam of spring! Here's a shiny patent wedge with a bright future! It's sassy and lady-like and has a Hair for looking pretty whenever the occasion demands it! Jumping-Jacks M,in' imim pi'rliv Whpi'vsr Amount of TIME, SKILL, PATIENCE ii required we give It gladly and courteouily. TWILIGHT DOCTOR'S PRESCRIPTIONS ACCURATELY KILLED EPSTEIN'S BOOTERY 165 Easl Broad St., Westfield OPEN THURSDAY'TIL 9 HANDI/CHARGE/BANKAMERICARD/MASTER CHARGE, Those who will be called j April 5-8 ape individuals who have not responded to an NJSO request for a contribution mailed during March. 13 Echo Lake Naturalists Club, 205 Beechwood Ave., Cranford, 8 p.m. 16 Antiques dept., Woman's Club 1 p.m. Mi Open duplicate game, Woman's Club, 11:15 p.m. 1!) American home dept., Woman's Club, 1 p.m. 2 0 Intermediates, Clubhouse, 8:15 p.m. 21 Art dept., Woman's Club, 1 p.m. 21 Fortnightly, clubhouse, 8:15 p.m. 22 Garden dept., Woman's Club. 12:30 p.m. 23 Westfield Rescue Squad auxiliary card party, Squad building, Watterson PI. Open duplicate game, Woman's Club, 8:15 p.m. 24 House tour and brunch, Woman's Club of Westfield, Spring concert, Westfield Men's Glee Club, High School, 8 p.m. 25 Flea market-antiques show of Temple Emanu- Kl Sisterhood, south side rail road station (Rain date May 2) Yankee Doodle Fair The Mountainside PTA announces plans for its Yankee Doodle Dandy Fair on May 8, which will begin at 10 a.m. with a bicycle decorating contest at Beechwood School. A parade will form and proceed to Deerfield School where the Fair will officially open at 11 a.m. There will be games for all ages; many booths offering handicrafts, plants, books, rides; refreshments; and entertainment. our "Petite Page" with something extra! To the classic page boy we add a perky side bang that flows into a subtle deep wave; your personalized coff. And we personalize your hair color with Fancl-tone, Roux's creme hair tint that covers gray and brightens natural color. Our unique Roux dispenser lets us mix a precise color for you and recreate it, every timel Come in: let's discuss hair styling and coloring for just you. lanti- mom I \ CREME HAIR TINT Mr. Roberts Hairdressers 134 Elmer Street, Westfield MURRAY HILL SQUARE ANNOUNCES THE GRAND OPENING OF Fine Apparel for the Lady APRIL 1,2,3 Marie Studlcr now has a new home in the lower courtyard at Murray Hill Square. Two full floors of casual ami designer sports and evening wear, lingerie, long casual knits, (ennis, golf mid swimwear and a fine line of accessories. COMPLIMENTARY GIFT TO OUR FIRST 100 CUSTOMERS DRAWING FOR $350 IN GIFT CERTIFICATES come in mid i;ilk with GERDA BAMBERGER and MIDGE FOLK uhmn your individual fashion needs 9:30-5:30 Mon.-Sat.; Theirs, 'til 9; Sun. 12-4:30 for Browsing THIS COLONIAL SHOPPING COMMUNITY FLORAL AVE., MURRAY HILL, NEW PROVIDENCE

17 Rummage Sale Slated By N JW Us semi-annual rummage sale has been slated April 3-5 by the Greater Westfield Section of National Council of Jewish Women at the VFW Hall, 221 South Ave., Garwood. Children's and adult clothing, toys, and house- The first silver dollar was coined in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1794! ITALY 15 DAY SPECIALS JK/8PT7I <859 COMPLETE! Absolutely no loww priced FIRST CLASS Uaiy lows' hold goods, priced from ten cents and up, will be on sale Saturday from 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Sunday from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and Monday from 9-11:30a.m. There will be new merchandise daily. Proceeds will further the work of the NCJW section which includes such community services as eye and hearing testing, babysitter training and plays at children's hospitals and day care centers. Pan American let NY-flome-NY. F«fst Class hotels [%* nitesk brcimnt and dinner daily. airconditloneo moio rco aches, stdhtseeing. transits. hotel tips flic JO HI DOCK OT MSI (HAH lilt Rome * Naples Ponipeti Sorrento Capti Florence Pisa Pot lot mo Milan Switzerland Como Venice San Marino Perugia ABSISI Las) years ITC seiies was sold out entirely many months in advance, so don'l wait! Call or write loi color brochuie. Traveling- 122 ELM STREET UNION - CHATHAM - SUMMIT fleminffton furs AND A TOUCH OF FABULOUS FUR Top ofl your spring ensemble with the enduring beauty of a fur acket, cape or stole. All your favorites are here In Mink, Chinchilla, Fox, Lynx, Sable and more. It's the fashion look ol spring lor the fashionable woman ol today. SWART SHOPPER PRICED FROMS495TOS4SOO. The fashion look of Spring and the fashion feel of luxury are here in all their glory. Flemington's Town & Country collection y, of new spring coats, all-weather coat3 and pant suits. Supple leathers and suedes, caressable cashmere and rare beauties in silk blends and polyesters. And they are all rare value priced (or the knowledgeable shopper. Hurry in-while the selection is at its greatest. RARE VALUE PRICED FROM $70 TO S395. flemington fur company OPEN SUNDAY S EVE«Y DAY 10 AM TO 0 PM NO. 0 SPRING ST. FLCMINGTON NEW JtllSEY Ono ol lh<i World s Lorousl Spucinllsls in Tint] Furs- Winners of the annual history essay awards of the Westfield Chapter DAR are Elizabeth Asbjornson, Mary Elizabeth Ryan, Frederick Ahlholm, Patrick Kennedy, Kathleen Kennedy, Susan Dinsmore, Amy Szot, Francis Gagltano, Bonnie Weinberg, John Kennedy, Gerard Clyne, John JVfaher, Mary Beth Roche, Ellen Weinstein, Diana Butler and Patricia Majcher. Youngsters Win Prizes for Essays On the Declaration of Independence. Sixteen youngsters were presented awards Friday afternoon by the Westfield Chapter DAK as winners in the DAK's annual history essay contest. Open to pupils from the fifth through eighth grades in the public and parochial schools of Westfield and Mountainside, the local contest was a preliminary lo Ihe annual slate and national DAR competitions. The topic was "The Declaration of Independence." Judges were Miss Marion Scott and Miss Ilowcnc Miller. Miss Marion Cubberly, the chapter's history chairman, presented the prizes at a ten in the Woman's Club of Westfield. Alfred Linden Jr., director of the Union County Planning Board, spoke on "The Then and Now of Westfield'" tracing the growth from the lhlh century West Kields lo the present day. First place winners from Westfield are Gerard Clyne, son of Mr. and Mrs. John M. Clyne, 8th grade Holy Trinity; Elizabeth Asbjornson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Asbjornson of SOS Iloanokc Hd., (ilh grade Kim St. School; Three littie maids in Colonial costumes are watching the preparation of wool for making cloth. This process from teasing through spinning will be demonstrated Sunday aflernoon at the Miller-Cory House, 614 Mountain Ave. from 2-5 p.m. Spinning Classes To Give Demonstration at Museum The preparali ons necessary for making cloth in Colonial days will be demonstrated Sunday afternoon at Ihe Miller-Cory Museum, 614 Mountain Ave., from 2-5 p.m. Kathy McVicker and studenls in her spinning classes will show how wool is teased, combed, threaded and spun. The spinning will be by use of a drop spindle and by a spinning wheel. After a tour through the Bullcr, nth grade; all Our Lady of Lourdes School. Second place winners from Westfield arc Susan Dinsmore. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Itohcrt Iv Dinsmore, grade l> Elm St. School; Amy Sv.ol. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S.P. Szot of 210 Midwood PL, grade 8 Kathleen Kennedy, Holy Trinity. Patrick and daughter of Mr. and Mrs. l-\ John Kennedy, sons of Mr. J. Kennedy of 532 Lenox and Mrs. 1 J.J. Kennedy, Ave., filh grade Our Lady of grades 7 and (i respectively. Mrs. Peter Kuhn of LourdcK School, and. from Our Lady of Lourdes. Moutainside and Mrs. Mountainside, Honnie Those from Mountainside Wcinberg, daughter of Mr. winning sccnrol places a IT and Mrs. Robert Weinberfi, John Maher. son of Mr. and nth grade and Ellen -Mrs. E. Maher, grade 5, and Weinstein, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Morion S. Weinstein, Hlh grade: both Deerfield School. Also, Francis Gagliano, son of Mr. and Mrs. F.P. Gagliano, Mh grade; Patricia Majcher, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John S. Majcher, 71h grade, and Diam Butler,daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Peter K. M'side PTA Calendar APRIL 1 Foothill Club luncheon. Town 'n Campus, Union. 2 VFW dance, Mountainside Inn. 2, 3 Jonathan Dayton Regional High School play, "Kismet", B:15 p.m. 5 PTA board, 9:30 a.m. 5 Kindergarten Roundup, Bcechwood School, 9-11 a.m., 1-3 p.m. 5 Rosary Altar Society, Our Lady of Lourdes, 8 p.m. G Board ol Education open meeting and work session, Echobrook School, 8 p.m. (> Volleyball game of Eighth Grade mothers and daughters, Deerlield School, 7:30 p.m. G Mountainside Music Association, rehearsal, Beechwood School; solos - 7 p.m., General cast- 8 p.m. 8 VFW. Elks Club. 7 Kindergarten Roundup, Deeriield School, 9-11 a.m., 1-3 p.m. 8 AAUW, Mountainside Public Library, 8 p.m. 8 Volleyball game of Eighth Grade fathers and sons, Deerfield School, 7:30 p.m. I) Pack No. 70, Deerlield School, 7:30 p.m. 9 Wine-Cheese Festival, Our Lady of Lourdes 8:30-11 p.m. 9, 10 Jonathan Dayton Regional High School play, "Kismet", 8:15 p.m. 12 Board of Health, Borough Hall, 7:30 p.m. 12 Board of Adjustment, Borough Hall, B p.m. 13 Board of Education, Deerlield School, 8 p.m. 14 Mountainside Women's Club, Mountainside Inn. 14 Senior Citizens, Community Presbyterian Church, 12:15 p.m. 14 Newcomers Club, Towers Steak House. 15 Public Schools close spring recess, 1 p.m. 15 Planning Board, Borough Hall, B-p.m. 15 Recreation Committee, Borough Hall, 8 p.m. 20 VFW, Elks Club. 20 Borough Council, Mountainside Public Library, 8 p.m. 24 Little League opening day, 9 a.m. 25 Community Concert, Community Presbyterian Church, 8 p.m. 26 Public Schools open, 9 a.m. 28 Senior Citizens, Community Presbyterian Church, 12:30 p.m. 28 Orchestra-Vocal Concert, Jonathan Dayton Regional High School, 8 p.m. Miller-Cory Aides Meeting Tonight The public is Invited to the meeting tonight of the Miller-Cory Volunteers at 8 p.m. in the Wateunk Room of Ihe Municipal Building to hear a talk by Trudy STORK Mr. and Mrs. William Jock Irwin III of Burbank, Calif, became parents with Ihe birtli March 13 of a daughter, Rebecca Jean. Mrs. Invin is the former Harbiira Bliss, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Bliss <if Oceanport, formerly or Westfield. Paternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. William.1, Irwin of Bradford Ave. Flories, a member of the Brigade of Ihe American Revolution. Mrs. Flories and her husband were married last year in an authentic reenaclmen! of an 18th cen ; lury wedding. She will bring her wedding dress ;in<l her husband's bridegroom altire and will also display her collection of colonial toys and dolls, There is no admission charge. Then. 1»rc pruclicitlfy mi taste limls in Mt(-> center of thn Mary Helh Roche, daughter of M*r. and Mrs. T.F. Roche Jr., grade 8, both Dcerficld School; Frederick William Ahlholm, son of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Ahlholm. grade 5, and Mary Elizabeth Ryan, daughter"of Mr. and Mrs. liichai'd Ityan, gradek. both at Our Lady of Lour- Historic Mansion To lie open Sunday An open house tour of the historic Belcher-Ogden Mansion at 1040 K. Jersey Si.. Elizabeth, is slated Sunday from 2-4 p.m. by the historic arts committee of ihe Junior League of Eliza beth-plainfield. One of Ihe most distinguished colonial houses in New Jersey, the mansion built in Ihe 16G0s was the home of two New Jersey Governors. Jonathan Belcher, a Royal Governor, resided there from Governor AaronOgden lived in the mansion from There is a nominal admission. Busy Director Henry Alister of JA'estfield is on the faculty at Lincoln School, New Providence, where tie is producing and directing "Sweet Anne Page," choreographed "George M" recently Tor Gov. Livingston Regional High School and is musical director for "Two Cienllcmen of Verona" being staged by the Craig Theatre, Summit. Robert Neri is playing n citizen of Verona. "THK WESTFIKLD <NJ.) LfcADEK, Till KSIJAV, AI'BU, 1, J»T farmhouse with costumed guides, guests are encouraged locontinue their visit in Ihe Frazee building to watch open hearth cooking. The dutch and reflector ovens as well as the kettles will be full of goodies prepared from recipes in the Miller-Cory cookbook, The Groaning Board. They may also watch the demonstration of rope making by Dennis Stewart. Junior League Sus tamers To Meet A Getting-lo-Know You meeting for sustaining members of the Junior League of Elizabeth and Plainfield will be held at 10:30 a.m. Thursday, April 8, at Echo Lake Country Club. II will be the first assemblage of the suslainers of (he Junior League of Elizabeth and Cranford and (he Junior League of Plainfield which merges today Koberl Sutman of Westfield will chair the group of over 30(1 sustaining members. Mrs. Frank B. Young and Mrs. Robert D. Younghans, outgoing co-chairman of the rclizabeth-cranford suslainers, arranged for the luncheon meeting. After years of active participation in Ihe Junior League from Ihe ages of 18-42, members become sustaining, losing their right lo vole and hold office in Ihe League, bul continuing (heir voluntarism in Ihe community utilizing the education, training and experience they have received. They continue lo support the League with heir skills and advice, serving on numerous League committees and on B.P.W. Offers Scholarships Mrs. Jessie Plant Brown, chairman of the Scholarship committee of the Business and Professional Women's Club of Westfield, has announced that applications for ihe B.P.W. scholarships are available now in t the high school guidance department. The club's yearly scholarships are offered lo girls graduating from Westfield High School or Holy Trinity High School, provided they arc residents of Westfield." Completed application forms musl be returned to Mrs. Brown by April 15. In t-iimlu mythology the afterworld has 28 divisions, indudhih one in which people are required to eal cuke. The Wardlaw Hartridge School Co-educational Country Day School C miles K-12 Two Beautiful Campuses in Plainfield and Edison Small Classes and Full Athletic Programs for Everyone Sludonis oro accoptod without mgard to Race, Color, Creod, or Financial Noeil. ENTRANCE TESTING - Sat., April 10 at 9: Inman Ave,, Edison SSAT Scores Accepted Kindergarten by Appointment Write: Box 1882 Plainfield, N.J. O7O60 Cafl many community boards. Mrs. Stanley Mansfield of Cranford will discuss activities of sustainers in Ihe oilier 220 Junior Leagues in the United States, Canada and Mexico. Mrs. Glen KlinefelUr of Mountainside, left, was elected chairman of the Westfietd-Mountainside Twigs of Overlook Hospital at the annual spring luncheon May 25 at Echo Lake Country Club. She succeeds Mrs. Frank Dugan who will serve as advisor. Pictured from the chairman's right are Mrs. J. Kenneth Boyles. vice chairman; Mrs. Edmond Rotchfotd, health careers, Mrs. Howard BUden, secretary-treasurer, and Mrs. Carl Corbett, public relations. Guests at the luncheon arranged by Twig No. 5 included Robert Mulraney, president of the hospital's board of trustees: Mrs. George Sullivan, Auxiliary president; Mrs. Peter Weisse, third vice president, and Miss Emiiy Joesl, director of volunteers. Volunteers Aid Handicapped at Saturday Program The Westfield chapter of Beta Sigma Phi has played a major role by contributing volunteer services throughout the year to the Saturday Recreation Program of the Easier Seal Society for Crippled Children and Adults of New Jersey. Recently the chapter joined for a party at which all of Ihe children's birthdays were observed. They had invited a magician and contributed a cake. The Saturday Recreation Program at 108 Eastman St., Cranford, is designed to meet Ihe social and recreational needs of physically handicapped children of Union County. II offers special events and a variety of activities including music, reading, Member A ttwrican Gem Society Martin Jewelers is always pleased to help you discreetly dispose of unwanted diamonds, fine jewelry, silver and related items. We pay cash to private owners, banks or estate liquidators. Diamond evaluations are based upon the world's most respected AGS grading standards. Count on Martin Jewelers to handle your transactions in the strictest confidence. 12 North Ave., W. Cranford TRU1LLO- In White, Bone or Navy Calf. S33.00 QUIMBY i t CENTRAL, WESTFIELO * films, games and even gourmet cooking lessons. If NIATA ALUMNI The New York-North Jersey Alumni Club of Juniata College will meet in Watchungat 5 p.m. Sunday, April 4, at Wally's, Bonnie Burn Rd. The program will feature ihe president, Dr. Frederick M. Binder, and a multimedia show prepared by James H. Lehmann. Elm & Quimby Sts. Westfield Pretty Shoes for Spring Lovely Sandals in the spirit of the season. T1LIO - In Bone or Navy Kid S50.00 O,m null? *<ll ArtO Tliurulfl) Mir 'III II AGNOln White or Caramel Kid S47.OO WE HONOR MASTER CHARGE IIANKAMERICAHO HANOI CHARGE AMERICAN EXPRESS CARTE BLANCHE

18 THE I'HESBYTKKIAN ClU'RCIi IX WESTFIKI.I) 140 Mountalualdu Avenue I Ministers.! Mr. Thcoilore C. SINTIIIIIO Rov. Richard I.. Smith! Rev. M. Bolln Utlrwuy Dr. Henry < Kovciikerk Martha I'. Omlrrklrk, j I>ire»tnr of Youth i Suiutsy S I.', a r.'. worship i orvi.-.v \W\ i::>'!:.u\l 1. Sn, Hi ' irimi'limi: i>:> ll'.i' vil'h-il -Aif! Ve Kn.-n.l.s ol 1 C,.«i '" «.1 n; ] -l:i:ir, of.i,\m:>. l>r Henry :n wim>hl ' M-I-M,V. Pi!>j: > :. she s;:.;,vl. A:: I 1!!- Norlvv. H;V.f r;.i-.- '. 10 :iiut 11.» :;: i-v.-.::\-(-..«,-hivl. l:' :>0 ' y :' : Oo'.vi.-:: Aco v ';;;!' t p :u. l*h:l:p «.' O!.^: 1. (-:\ii:iathin.."> p -r. vvtv.:v.;::-.:o:i 7 1* :r.. Si>!\- ler H'.t^. t'cv'.^wsixp 7 p III. B;Me.<:.:.:> > p :v. Ko'.\ Spirit ^rv.:r > -.Mr. A A M.r.A;;. 7.;.> ; :: r.a'.:!-.*: vv:v.:".'. f.tiv T..e.-i.A> 7 I*-. 1 p :;. s»vsio:i rr'.t*^:r^ > p :v. roo^tnion for LI. $?-"'. O 1. vrvuters Anony- J>-.-ii-. Apr o. 7 f m. Winjr rvr^ 0'...* 7 oo p n:. Junior A A *j.-.-ri.iy. Apr IP. S p.m.. «T. HU-EVS K. C. CHURCH R#v. Tnomas B. Meuney, Pastor Rev. William T. Morris Assistant Lambert's Mill Road at Rahway Avpnue Westtleld, Jf. j Masses are scheduled as follows: Dally Mass - 9 a.m.; Sunday Masses - Saturday at 5:30 p.m., 8:15, 9:30, 10:45, i ind 32 i:oon on Sunday. OUR LADY OF LOUKDKS R. C. CHURCH (Air-Condltloiieci) S00 Central Avp., Mountainside R«v. Gerard.J. SluUurry, Pastor Assistants Rev. Gerard B. Whelan Rev. Charles 1). L'rnlck Svnday, Masses at 7, 8, 9:15. 10:30 a.m. and 12 noon. Saturday Evening Mass, 7 p.m. Weekdays, Masses at 7 and 8 a.m. Holyday Masses, 0, 7, 8, 10! a.m., 8 p.m. \ Miraculous Medal Novena j and Mass: I^Tonday at 8 p.m. you'll love the Christian Science Reading Room. Heie you'll find Bibles, concordances, commentaries. Bible Lessons, and a book that can help you understand the Scriptures as never before You can use them here, or borrow them from our free lending library. You're welcome any time at the CHRISTIAN SCIENCE READING ROOM 116Quimby St. Westfield THK \vi:stin:i.d <N..I.> I.KADKK. TIUK-SIMV, AMIIL I. IMIU- C H U R C H ALL SAINTS' EPISCOPAL, CHURCH.559 Park Avp., Scotch rialn* Tho Reverend John K. Nellson, lector SIIM<1;I\. 1 ^-ni V, t> a.m.. \Ui' Holy Kili'hm'ist: 1U ii.ni. Hie llnly Km li.-irist: 1(1 a.m., 1 h::r. li M-IIHIII. nursery 1-S. M.Mi.liiy. <.' am.. I lie Hcly l-:»i liari.-l. Altar CuiUi ineei- :n^ 1 mile (han^e in (his :r.ni:lll».late': 7,:i(l > ill. H. S. j TIM.I >.in ; T-.;< 1 SI1MV.!' 1"» t )ver- ; <-;iti-r.- Alum. :i p in.. (;. s. Tr. I''-: N\i(» pin.. A A meflin^. UYdm-s.i:iy.!' a III. the Hilly l!u. h.uim: l'>.so t in. parish l.el,,,t, supper l'lyi!~.lay!>..ii> a :n IJibli" >-Ia--. I ]>:i:. Al Anun: S p.m.. s.-i-.u'i 1'h.tu:.s pin, Nrw- p.r:. Ler.'.er. po*. l.xk supper.»? r-.-. A A Tv_rs<Uy \\\-~-..ir.'s Asso- l'rnla\. a m. the Holv 7;-1 r> p.m.. Mm.l l S:i!iinla\-. S a 111. to ll?iio p in tnlerai t paneau'e break- ' 1 'ii ST. PAIX'S KriSCOI'AL CHURCH 111 East Broad Street Westfield, New Jersey The Hev. Canon Richard J. Ilurdinan Tho Rev. Hu^h Livonffood Tho Itev. Herbert Arnintegiil The Rev. Frederick Miller The Kev. Herbert I,. Mnley l.i'ntt'ii sfi'^ices: 7 a.m.. holy foniiuuihou ^f«ndily thru Sjilurdav; prayer!' a.m.. morninii Monday thm Fri- Tluii-sday.!i:S0 a.m.. Christian hoalinp service: 12:45 p.m.. holy communion followed uy K. C. AN', meeting: and luncheon. i-'riday, 7 p.m.. Junior Episcopal Young C'hurchpeople. Saturday, 6 p.m.. iioly com- i and 11 a.m.. worship services in the sanctuary. Dr. Robert nuinion ;ind sermon. 13. Goodwin, senior minister, Sunday, Kifth Sunday in will continue his Lenten scries on "The Meaning of The I.i'dl. 7:-1 n a.m., holy communion; 8:-i5 a.m., morninp; Cross," this Sundav, 1'nssion prayer and sermon: 10 and Sunday, he will spenl< on 11:30 a.m., holy communion and sermon as ii wa-s in 1776: 7 p.m.. S.E.Y.C. Monday. 7:30 p.m.. Boy Scouts: 8 p.m.. trustees meet- im.'- Tui'sday.!i:l"> n.m.. prayer ^rinip; 8 p.m.. \'estr\' meeting- Wednesday. 10:30 a.m.. Reclor's Discussion: 11:30 a.m..! holy communion: 12. noon '. luncheon; *i:-1 n a.m.. Altar! (jililfl meeting: 8 p.m.. evening ' cosnru.vity! PltKSBYTERIAN CHUKCII i Mretlnc House Lane \ Mountainside, New Jersey Minister Tim Rov. Rimer A. Talcott, Jr. Orjjnitlst and Choir Director Mr. James Little Sunday.!i:SO a.m., adult Biblt? class, church school for trratios 3-8: 10:30 a.m., morning worship. cradle roll, church school for nursery Ihru 2nd oracle: G:30 p.m., confirmation class; 7 p.m., University of Life - speaker: David Opdyke; 7:30 p.m.. Youth Fellowship. Wednesday, fi a.m., prayer and meditation tfroup; 1:30 p.m., Junior Choir rehearsal; 8 p.m.. Senior Choir rehearsal. WOODSIDK CHAPEL H Mor^ Avenue Fumvooil, N. J. Sunday, 11 a.m., Family Bible Hour, James Mayer will be the speaker. Christinn education school from 4 years to Sr. High at same hour, nursery provided. Sunday, 7-8 p.m., instead of the regular Sunday night service, tonight will be the 3rd class of a 10 week series where one may take a choice of 3 subjects: Romans, Maturing in the Christian Faith, and Bible and Science, there will be suitable classes for children. Tuesday. 8 p.m., prayer service followed by a program by the Literature Crusade Team, consisting of five young people. Thursday, 6:15. Pioneer Girls; 8 p.m.. choir rehearsal. Friday, 7 p.m., VVoodside Boys C'iub. Saturdav, all day work day: 8 p.m.. college - career group. For information call 88H or SERVICES TEMPLE EMANU-EL 156 F. Broad Street Wentfleld Rubbl, Charles A. Kroloff Cantor, Don S. Decker Tautlne Tanuenbauni, Director of Kdtuatlon Joel Sofflti, Sr. Youth Director Tel Friday. Khnblmt st'rviro. b:ki p.m.. fij>l Sh;iM.iat SITVu-e i.f "Ciu-li- «f Hope."' liv Charles Davulsim. a innlintiims niiisii'a] M'llmg to i.atcs of!'r;iyt*r in»v!eliration (if 2'>\\\. LliML\('r>ary. Satur«ia>-. Shiibbat inunhiik sitvicc, Ul:'in a.m. Bal Mil/, vah of Ann' Xurhi-r. Siimlay. Mihli- rlass. f> - 4:". a.m:. ailull i-tl-ivii.-n H'nth Irarli with Harry F.-irbi-r. 11: inlim-f.-iith ]'a>sov,m- S.'d.-r. 7 pin. Miimlay. Si.stiTliiicid yof;a class. 10::*ci a.m. Tii,-s<lav. '.il>li'.'lass. Id a in ; ritual rciiiiiniheo. «p.in : evening hiid^c. "i p.m. \Vciincsda\-. Community Seder. 1 pin.: Kinanu-Kl Singles. S im.: Mins l'lull linanl. S p.m. Thursilay. Mall JoligK. ": >" ji in : class in.judaism. 7:.'WI p.m.: ndiill Hal Mity.v-.-ih class. 7::i(l p.m. FWST UNITED METHODIST ClfURCII AT WTSSTFIEU) At The riaza Minister*: l)r. Knliprt II. (ioodiihi Rev. Philip 11. Dlettcrlch KPV. <i. Basil Taillock Siintlay. fi:'{0 and 11 a.m.. al) liepartine-nls of the church school meet;!)::io a.m.. "The Meaning of the Miracles" will be tin- fueus of the adult youth Bible class, led bv FCrnest Harlcll. social hall;' «i::)0 "Gods Suffering and Our Sin;" 12 noon, the "Oiving. Living Lent" series will have a luncheon each Sunday nnon. with special activities for all the family, in the social hall, bring picnic bnslu't. beverages will be provided:.'j p.m.. Kiirly Music Consort, choir room: ṟ» p.m., Brass Choir, [loom 218; 0 p.m.. Youth Choir, choir room. Tuesday, 3:30 p.m.. church school,.'jrd floor; 7 p.m.. Men's Club cabinet. Room 20D; 8 p.m., council on ministries. Fellowship Room. Wednesday. 3:30 p.m.. Boys Choir. Room 21S: 3:30 p.rii.. Girls Choir, choir room: -1:30 p.m., Anliphonal Choir, choir room; 8 p.m.'. ecumenical affairs commission. Room 209: 8 p.m., finance commission. Room 214: 8 p.m., public relations committee. Room 208. Thursday. 10:80 a.m., the business session of the United Methodist Women. Fellowship Room, luncheon will be.served at 12M5 in the social hall, followed by the.'ifternoon program in the Fellowship Room; 3:30 p.m.. 3rd Grade Choir, choir room; 3:30 p.ni, 2nd Grade Choir. Room 218: 3:30 p.m., 1st Grade Choir. Room 218: 8 p.m.. Sanctuary Choir, choir room. Friday. 8 n.m., Coffee House, social hall. REDKKMKR 1XTIIERAN CHURCH 229 Cowpcrnaito Place Westfleld, Now Jersey O7090 Tho Rev. Eugene A, Rehuinke! 2S2-1.->17 Family Worship hours: 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Christian Nurture Hour: 9:50 a.m. Thursday, 3:15 p.m.. Children's choir; 6:30 p.m., Youth choir; 8 p.m.. Luther choir. Saturday. P.T.L. paper drive. Sunday, 8:30 a.m., holy communion will be celebrated at this service; 9:50 a.m.. Sunday school and Bible classes; 11 a.m., Matins service. Monday, 3 p.m., Cub scouts; 7:30 p.m.. P.T.L. meeting. Tuesday, 3 p.m.. Cub scouts. Wednesday. 9 a.m.. Day School Chapel; 7:30 p.m., Lenten Service No. VL I FIRST BA1T1ST CinJRCH THK CATHOLIO CHURCH 170 Elm Stri-ct OI r THE HOLY TKINITY Westfleld. New Jersey Kt. Kev. Msgr. Hev. Wllmont J. Murray, Charles li. Murphy Minister ( ) B.L.S. I'astor Thursday, (1:30 a.m.. Woman's Mission Society board: Kev. Thomas E. Daly Assistants 12 n. children's committee: llev. Michael Oesmond 7311 pin. board of Christian Kev. Stunlslaus Su i-illicatii>ii. ".!"> p ill Chancel Kev. ICohcrt J. Harrington Choir rehearsal KKCTOKY: Silllilav. JO a in., mornini; 315 First St \s(uship. i onintnnion sci\icc, 1 CONVENT: b:t it lslllal sel\ii(.. ^cllnom by 523 Trinity l'l the inini.-lcr. the Ki-v. Wiiinonl.1,Mm ray. on the topic I Grammar Schue i Hleh School ' Tlie Trial of ji-sus." thinl in i Sunday, Masses at G:45, 8, a seliis o(' Lenl.'ii sciinims on 9:15 10:30, 11:45 am., 1 p.m. Ihe llli'lue "Un-at l-:\cats ill Cl.apcl Masses, 9:45, 11 a.m. tin- Life of.lesas." child can' High School ^fas3 (Youth lor piv-m'lnii>li-r>: 1(1 a in., Moss). 9:30 a.m. ilr.uvh s, boot for children in Uaturday Evening Mass, trades -I; 11 a.m. eluircli 5:30 p.m. school lor Mil anil fit hi ^raclcis. youlh and.ululls: 12 HOLY TRINITY II. special business nteelin^ : fi GREEK ORTHODOX p.m.. Junior llie.h Fellowship: ciiimcii 'f p.m.. Senior Hi^h Kellou Gallows Hill Road ship Tuesday. 7::lu p.m.. youth : Rev. Alexander G. Leondls Corps; 7::;n i m. Choral Art! Sunday services: Orthros 10 Sociclv. j a.m. Divine Liturgy and Sunday School 10:30 a.m. Wednesday. 12 n. Senior Citizens bridge. WILLOW OROVE. TRESBYTERIAN CHURCH l»(ll Iiarlton Itoad ; ScaU-h rialim, N. J Telephone: 282-5G78-1'a.stor: Jlcv. Julian Alexander, Jr. Telephone: Thursday. 10 ii.lll.. -idull Hi- Me sludv. itcm-latinns: H p.m., i I'hiiniol' chdii- icheaisal; K I i.m.. "Wlml is Chrisliiinlty?", : a iliscussion s<>fii's nf the t'hristiau faith and life. t! p.m.. proki'aj)) of sacred ' J H 'rida\-. 8:'M) ji.m.. the Arki music with liernir Harr, lenoiand ; Col'fe<'hou.se. i Sun.,!':30 & 11 a.m.. worship Nicholas A. Tino Jr. al the keyboard: 6:30 p.m., Scni j sen-icon. Lenten enmnmnion iur Hi'iih fellowship at the service, the Rev..lulilin Alexander! church. Jr. \\'ill.siieau. church ; ^fonday. 12:15 p.m., \\'cst-.school: 0:30 a.m., grades a IhrouKh 12; 11 a.m., three i field Day c'aiv Center meel-! infr In I'atton Auditorium. year olds Lhrou^h -Itli ^rade, Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.. Old nursery c;uv :it both ser\'ic*!.s; Utiitrd of Westfleld; 7 p.m..!l;.'j0 u.ni.. adult and vollth Cllapel Choir rehearsal; 7 study. "The Holy Spirit; 11 p.m., Al Ateen meeting in C'oe; 10:.'ib a.m.. Coffee Hour; 7 8 p.m.. Chancel Choir rehearsal; 8 p.m., Al Anon Family p.m.. Members in Prayer: 7 p.m., Junior HiKh Fellowship. Group in Toe Fellowship Monday. fl:30 a.m., Women's Room. Assoc. hoard meeting; Wednesday. 8 p.m.. deacons 7:30 p.m.. Senior HIRII Fellowship. meeting In the Noil! Room. Thursday. 1 p.m.. Reader's Tuesday. K p.m...session meeting. W't'dnusda.N'. S p.m.. Adult Study Teaching Motlitation. FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST. SCIENTIST 422 Emit Broad Street Wcstflr.WI Sunday Services 11 n.m. Stiialaj* School 11 n.m. Children's Room 11 a.m. (for children up'to Ihe air" of six) Wednesday Evening Testimony Meeting 8:15 P.M. I Children's Ilnom 8:15 p.m. I (for chlltlren up to the aefl of BIN) ] Lesson Sermon: Unreality. Golden Text: "Lvl not j mercy and truth forsalte thce: bind them about thy neclc: ; write them upon the table of ; thine heart" Proverbs 3:3. CAI/VARY LUTHERAN CHURCH (LCA) 108 Kastiiian Street, Cranford Pastor: Tho Kev. Arnold.1. Dahlqulst The Sacrament of holy communion will be offered at both the S:30 and 11 a.m. services during Ihe Lenten period. Uaby-sitting is available at the later service..sunclav Church School is held at!l:4'rj n.m. for all ages. The Adult Forum meets at the same hour in the lounge. Mrs. Frances Avalone, director of "Right to Choose" will be the speaker at the Forum. The adults attending: have been studying the issue of abortion. Thursday, Children's Choir. I p.m.; Calvary Choir. S p.m. Friday, Junior Teens, 7 p.m. Tuesday. Toen Choir. 7 p.m. MOUNTAINSIDE GOSPEL CHAl'EL 1180 Spruce Drive Mountainside, New Jersey (1 block off Central Avenue, Kouto 22 West) Church phone: In case of emergency, or no answer at church call: Sundays, 9:45 a.m.. Sunday School classes for all groups and adults {buses are available for pick-up and delivery of children; call the church office for times and routes); 11 a.m., Morning Worship Service (nursery care and children's church for grades 1-3); G p.m., Junior and Senior High Youth Fellowship; 7 p.m., Evening Service. Wednesdays, 8 p.m., Mld- Weck Prayer Service. Fridays, 7:.1O p.m., "Chapel Mountaineers" (weekly Bible all children grades 3-8). I FIRST CONGREGATIONAL ] CHUKCH j 125 Elmer Street Westfleld, New Jersey! Kcv. Mr. John W. Wilaon, i Minister ; Mr. Itohert Harrison! Youth Assistant! Sunday. 10 a.m., morning ; woi-ship service and church school; II a in.. I.eyden Choir j rehearsal; 11 it m.. (^offee ; Hour in 1'atton Auditorium; Cii-ele at the home of Mrs. Anthony I'aone, t.1 falrhlll I Road, reviewer u-jll be Mrs. l.nren H. Gasltill. WHO LAKE CIII'KCH OF CHRIST Kasl Ilniiiil Stnet at Springfield Avenue West Drill, \..1.(1701)0 Minister -lerry L. Daniel Sunday. Bible classes, 9:30 a.m.: worship, 10:30 a.m.; evening worship. 0 p.m. j Wednesday, I3lblc classes. I 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Ladies' Bible Class, 1 p.m. Pro-School: (October thru Mavi - - ; Three year olds, Wednrdd.iv and Friday, fl-u a.m.: Four year olds - - Tuesjday nnd Thursday. n-h:30 ia.m.: (A3! pre-school classes meet only when the Westfield schools are in session. I1ETHEL BAITIST CIIUItCH 53D Trinity Place Westfleld, N. J. 070DO The Rev..Miles J. Austin Pnrsoimge IS Study Sundny, church school 9:30 a.m., wor.shlp service 11 a.m. Weekdays, Wednesday 8 p.m. prayer and visitation of sick shut-in Monthly meetings, first Sun- day, 4 p.m., missionary society; first Monday, 7 p.m., board of deacons; second Monday, 8 p.m., pastor's aid auxiliary; fourth Monday, 8 p.m., women's fellowship; first Tuesday, 8 p.m., board of deaconess; second Tuesday, 8 p.m., board of ushers; second Tuesday, 8 p.m., nurses unit. GOSPEL, SERVICES Non-denominational gospel services will be held In the j Scotch Plains YMCA, Grand : n: d Union Streets, Tuesday evenings at 7:45. (ih.ack ORTHODOX PRKSHYTKIIIAN CllriiCII 1100 lloulevaril Itev. Albert Edwards, Minister Friday, Senior High fellowship al 8 p.m. Sunday, Sunday school for all ages at 9:30 a.m., nursery care provided; worship services at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m., nursery care provided at 11 o'clock service; Junior Mnchen League. Tor lth through Oth gnideis. at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday, prayer meeting and Bible study at 7:45 p.m. Informal Bible.study groups meet in homes nt various limes throughout the week. For information call 232- ilo3. Musical Service at Temple Emanu-El The premiere of "Circle of Hope," a newly composed musical liturgy, will take place at Temple Emanu-Kl al 8:13 p.m. tomorrow evening. The event will mark the culmination of months of rehearsal by the temple choir under (he direction of Mrs. Herbert Spasser of Westfield and Cantor Don Decker. Composer Charles Davidson received (he commission to create Ihe service from the Al D. Finkelstein Memorial Choir Fund. The fund was established l>y family and friends of the late Al I). Finkelstein, who died in May, He had heen an enthusiastic participant in Temple Emanu- El's volunteer choir and loved Jewish liturgy. Mr. Kinkelstcin had been an involved member of (he congregation since 1955, a founder and president of the Jewish Community Council or Ihe Westfield Area, and an officer of the local United Jewish Appeal. He also had served as a trustee of the United Fund of Westfield. Charles Davidson is one of the most prolific and successful contemporary synagogue composers. He has written hundreds of works for Ihe American synagogue. numerous music-dram a lie pieces based on Jewish subjects, widely performed secular choral and vocal compositions, orchestral and chamber works, and an opera in one act, "(iimpel the Fool," based on the story of I.B. Singer. He is perhaps besl known for his "Chasidic Sabbath" and Ihe first jazz-blues service written for the American synagogue. "And David Danced Before The Lord." "Circle of Hope" is the continuous musical selling of a Sabbath service in "(Sates of Prayer." Ihe new prayer book of Reform Judaism, The composer has used an ancienl Babylonian lune as the underlying and unifying musical thread on a pattern of all original thematic material. Davidson commemorates the Bicentennial in this work and in discussing the composition states, "Other tunes and treatments were composed to reflecl the 200 years of migration by Jews lo America and represenl Schedules Talk On Hypnotherapy Hynotheraphy, the. use of hypnosis w i I h psychotherapy, will be discussed by ;i guesl speaker al ihe Rahway Hospital Auxiliary meeting at B p,m. Tuesday, Apr. 13 by Dr. Raymond F. Levee, executive director of Ihe Morion Prince Center For Hypnotherapy, East Orange. Named after a famous American psychiatrist, Morton Prince, who was an early practitioner of therapeutic hypnosis, the center deals with people who want lo give up smoking, alcoholic beverages, overeating or seek alleviation from anxiety, depressions, phobias, etc. The meeting is open lo Ihe public. Alcoholics Anonymous Drinking Problem? Write P.O. Box 121. Westfield or Telephone The choir «>f Temple Kinaiiu-KI, prepares for Ihe first Sabhalh service of "Circle of Hope" by Charles Davidson. From led U> right, top row: Virki Itubinslein, Mitch l-'rei'dinan, Jill Spasser and Aaron Kruger; middle row: Liz Shapiro, Klaine Itosen- Ix'ig. Edna Siegel. Selinu ISeiijainin. Ahi' lienjamin and Sandy Herman; front row: Cantor Don Decker, Phyllis Corwin. Kstelle KitikfIslein. (Irate (iutinan, Barbara I'liiindand Marcy Decker. Missing from the picture are Susan Indick, Sidney Koorse, Charlotte (.old, llurbara Cray. Lynda Horlick, Harold Colicn, Naomi (ielfond, l,eni Slimier and Hen Weil. some of (he cultures and countries from whence they come." In addition to the liturgical part of the services, the usual Sabbath readings will be offered by Ilabbi Charles Kroloff and Joel Soffin. The evening will begin with highlights in the development of Temple Emanu-El in observance of its 25th anniversary. The public is invited to participate. Rev. Fasono New Pastor At Mtside. Gospel Chapel Tho Hev. John Fasano will assume Ihe pastorale of Ihe Mountainside Gospel Chapel Spruce Drive, Mountainside, on Sunday. Hev. Fasano comes from Ihe Klkliart (Ind.) Bible Institute, which he founded in l!l(!7 and has directed since thai lime. The Hev. Fasano al tended the Bible Institute of Pennsylvania (Philadelphial and lioughlon College. He received the B.A. degree from Grace College, Winona Lake, Ind., and tho M. Div. degree from Grace Theological Seminary in l<j7:i. He received an honorary D.I). Degree from Pioneer Theological Seminary, Hockford, III. in 1U54. The Kev. Fasano brings extensive experience in the ministry to the Chapel. He served as pastor of Immanuel Baptist Church, Klkhart, Ind. from and it was during this period that lie founded the Elkhart Bible Institute. He also served as pastor of Tippecunue Community Church, Tippoeanoe, Ind.; as assistant paslor of Grace Tabernacle, Fairmount, W. Va.. and as associate direclor of Ihe Sunshine Mission, Buffalo, N.Y. He has had a radio ministry in West Virginia (on WMMN) and in Indiana (Bible Institute Echoes, WCMK), and in Canada (CHVC, Niagara Falls. Ontario, Canada). The Rev. Fasano has had special Iraining in music (Ilodheaver Music Conference), photography (New York Institute of Pholography), and radio script development (Firs! Summer School of Christian Radio). In addition lo bringing these varied talents to his new ministry in Mountainside, the Hev. Fasano has also organized and conducted eight tours to the Holy Land and spent Ihe summer of l!)f>5 in graduate study al the American Institute of Holy Land Studies, Jerusalem. 11<> ir» me author of several books, including Figures of the True, The Tabernacle of Witness, Tabernacle Notes, Tabernacle Notes Revised, This Way to Ihe Holy Land, and Christ's Second Coming Scheduled. The Rev. Fasano and his wife, Ruth, who is a computer supervisor, have no children. Registrations are Now Open for... OAK KNOLL SCHOOL Of the Holy Child SUMMER DAY-CAMP For Boys and Girls Ages 4-13 June 28 to Aug. 6 Mon. to Fri. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sun'in.rs O<iK K noli School of (hi: Holy Child's indoor a no out door I rich I ics once <iqmn will be the r,\ic ot a (My camp for boys <inti (itris wicj'.-b J 13). The prourani is geared to stimulate <>iiidri.-n to uw their summer leisure time for developing perioniil idtunts and abilities in an enjoyable onvironmenl. l.iisl year"* successful summer program has been extended.c«u cnlarqcd to (iccomodciie the broctcjc&t possible spectrum of ini».tdsts of participants. Several now activities have been added to.dtisfy the specialiied interests nnd needs of campers. 'Tutornil iiid in reading and malh will i>e available to Ihoie fce.iur.'s.tinq such ci service by special nrranqement.) Highligtsof Oak Knoll School's Summer Day Camp services: cfoor to cioor transportation!<?nnis instruction (indoor eitr concjiiionecl) by a professional all key programs directed by specialist sensitive to children's needs Swimmmt) instructional as. well as recreational Sports Clinics: gymnastics, baseball, track and field, archery, basketball, deck hockey, bowling and golf For the younger campers V.olor skill development, gymnastics, balancing, multimedia art workshops, sculpture, weaving, painting, mosaics, ceramics, puppelry and morei Science...awareness through dicovcry... studies in butter ll'cs learning theory and animal behavior...chemistry... oceanography, pendulums...and more*... Pnotoqranliy..R-ding. Dance Music.. Movies.. Dny Trip* Ccriiiiedby men J. Youth Gimp Safety Act Commission Rates: Six weeks, S320...Five weeks, S270...Four weeks, S220...Three weeks, J175...Two weeks, $»25. {!0 O/ discount lor second child in <i family) For application nnd brochure, write to address below, or call: (201) 273-MJ5 OAK KNOLL SCHOOL SUMMER DAY-CAMP Ashland and Lamed Roads Summit, N.J Gigantic Savings of First Quality Broadlooms by One off America's Foremost Carpet Mills! What you really want in carpets is beauty that lasts. The plush surfaces are thick and luxurious. The skein-dyed colors are rich and clear. But because the piles are 100% Antron and 100% Nylon, you can be certain of enjoying long-term performances from these elegant broadlooms. They resist soiling, hold on to their springy bounce, fight off stains and are a pleasure to clean. New, improved dyestuffs and dying methods produce bold, sparkling colors. Two great qualities to choose from. DOOLEY COLONIAL HOME 556 Westfield Ave. AD A Funaral Ham* of homtlike atmo»ph«r», completely modtrn air conditioned, off->tr»et Parking Factlitlti Llt«nwd Staff. A)to froiiw l bo'o.y" V DOOIEY FUNERAL HOMt Carolyn M. Dool.y J '" North Av.. W. f Cranford Joi.nh f. DooUy BR JAR VIS DRUG STORE Prescriptions Drugs Cosmetics Kodak Dealer 54 Elm St. Westfield FREE DELIVERY Mandarin Orange Crystal Gold Golden Amber ANTRON REG. $ ounce nylon REG. $23.00 Chiffon Lime Marseille Green Chiffon Blue Stuck is limited su please hurry! *19.50 *17.25 Authorized Karaslan Dealer Colonial Beige I'iiprika Moselle Beige a square yard a square yard 234 East Broad St., Westfield , Open Thursday 'til 9 p.m. 333 North Broad St., Elizabeth , Open Mon. and Thurs. 'til 9 p.m.

19 Or«-g Kunfgeld To Present "The Passion of Jesus Christ" Calvary Lutheran Church, Cranford, will present "The Passion of Jesus Christ," a multi-mediu experience of the Lord's last week on earlh, at 7:30 p.m. Sunday. The Gospel narration is heightened by the use of poelry, bolh from Medieval and contemporary poets, by great works of art on slides of all periods and styles, and by organ music and improvisation. There are seven sections: Palm Sunday; The Last Supper; Gethscmane; The Trial before Pilate; Jesus Carrying the Cross to Golgotha; The Crucifixion; and The Entombment. Art work is Rembrandt, Michelangelo, Caravaggio, Riemenschneider, Bosch, Titian; the organ music, Marcel Dupre, Paul de Maleingreau, Johonn Sebastian Bach, Jehan Alain and Helmut Walcha. Greg Funfgeld and Dr. Augusta Barrois have prepared I he program. Funfgeld is director of music at Calvary and in May will receive his bachelor of music degree from Westminster Choir College. He was music in- 'ern las) year at the First Presbyterian Church, Oklahoma City. Dr. Barrois is professor of history and f he fine arts at Westminster Choir College, Princeton, ;ind a native of Austria, graduating from the U. of Vienna. She is a frequent guest of churches and universities throughout America, sharing her collection of over fi.ooo slides. The public is invited this free concert. to Local Prebyterians to Reap Miracle Money Harvest May 2 For the second successive year, members of the Presbyterian Church in Westfield are working on Miracle Money projects, the proceeds of which will aid the needy of the world. Fifteen church families contributed a total of $2675 as "seed money" for the endeavor. On Mar. 7 this money was available to the congregation at each of the three worship services in one and five dollar denominations. Each bill, along with a dozen or so money plant seeds, was sealed in authentic seed envelopes. The money is being used to buy materials so that various moneymaking projects and services can be offered by church members. These projects and services are being co-ordinated by Robert Hanger assisted by John Michener and Mrs. John Enders. Inspired by the grim statisticthat 15,000people in the world starve to death daily and guided by Jesus' parable of the talents, members have been inspired to multiply their seed money and to plant the seeds. Tlie money plant is a biennial, producing purple flowers the first year and opaque white discs the second. These discs are a familiar sight in dried arrangements and contain ihe seeds for future plants. A spokesman said that they are "a living example of the everlasting, universal love and concern of God for all Contact Group Marks Anniversary Contact-We Care, local teleminstry for people in trouble and needing someone to talk to, recently celebrated its first year of around-the-clock operation in the area. Nearly 200 telephone workers and their spouses, trustees, and officers attended Ihe nondenominational commemorative group's dinner by Buster Brown The natural walking shoe for boys and girls. Here's Buster Brown's child size version of the grown-ups' shoe. Same styling... including n padded top. Snmu rugged leather. And same sole... almost. Instead of the lower heel, Buster Brown's Nature Sole keeps your child's heel and toe level. For a more natural way lo stand straight and walk with the fi-cling of barefoot freedom. 70 ELM ST DOCTORS' PRESCRIPTIONS EXPERTLY FILLED tlsndichaiqe - Master Charge - BankAmericard meeting at Immaculate Heart of Mary Church, Thursday evening. Cdontact-We Care has handled nearly 10,000 calls since it opened a year ago, according lo a report by Dr. Marilyn W. Suter, the j agency director. The center's president and chairman, Marvin W. Champlin, cited 33 telephone staff members for having served 100 hours or more on the phone, and one for 300 hours. Following the meeting, 30 new volunteers were commissioned after 50 hours of professional training to handle the variety of calls Contact-We Care receives. Calls involve problems of loneliness, depression, grief, emotion, family, i marriage, health, alcohol, drugs, employment, pregnancy, sex, adolescence and the like. Participating in the commissioning service, in addition to Dr. Suter and,mr. and Mrs. Champlin, were the Revs. Robert Connors, G. Milton Johnson, Dr. Gerald Mills, William Moll and Kelmo Porter. The newly inducted class brings to 131) the number of Contact-We Care members manning the center's phone at Archdiocese Plans Workshop The Religious Education Center-CCD of the Archdiocese of Newark is sponsoring a workshop on the new rite of reconciliation for coordinators of religious education, catechists and parish leaders at Holy Trinity Church Apr. 7 from 7:30 to 10 p.m. The program will present the new rite of reconciliation with emphasis on the theological and catechetical aspects of the sacrament. Lumkie Serving On USS Independence Navy Electrician's Mate 3-C Boyd W. Lamkie, son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert A. Uimkic of 14 H Orchard flood, Mountainside, is solving aboard Ihe Aircraft Carrier USS Independence and recently participated in Fleet Exercise "National Week XX". Twenty six ships and over 17,000 men look parl in Ihe exercise held in the Tyrrhenian Sea between mainland Italy, Sicily, and Sardinia. The exercise was part of the U.S. Sixth Fleet's realistic readiness training and included surface ship, submarine, amphibious, logistic, and aviation operations. The USS Independence is hoineporled in Norfolk, VH. A I<J72 graduate of Bryandl & Slralton College, Buffalo, N.Y., with an associate degree in data processing, he joined the Nnvy in August 1!I72. mankind, and exemplify, in addition to the financial help, a tangible involvement with our fellow man, according to the teaching of Christ." Members of the church have prepared such items as fresh, homemade bread and rolls, often still warm, carrot cakes, pot-scrubbers, tape-recordings and madeto-order T-shirts. Other offerings, advertised on a Miracle Merchandise bulletin hoard include handdipped candles, placemats, puppets, wooden peg games, pot-holders, wooden crosses and wood plaques. Services include sewing lessons, futoring in mathematics, and consultation with a professional planner of meetings. A handsome reproduction of a pen-andink drawing of the Presbyterian church is available and 12 photographs of one's child, mounted in an album, are being offered. Shrubbery will be bought and planted by one member. Children THADDEUSKOSCIUSKO POLISH PATRIOT & GENERAL Throughout th* chapters of hiitory aro numoreui pagoi d«vot*d lo th«heroic account! of m«n of vory nationality who, btcaut* of thoir lov* of liberty, hav» travoltd to foreign lend* and contributed much to tho caus* of liberty. During the Revolution, tho colonies were no exception. One tuch man to arrive on thete shores to offer assistance to tho Continental Army was tho Polish Patriot, Thaddeus Koiciusko. Born February 12, 1746 in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, near present-day Brett, Koiciutko wot educated at the Piaritt College in Lubiouow. At tho age of 19 ho entered the newly opened Royal Military School in Wanaw. Upon graduation, ho received a scholarship from the king to continue hit studies in military engineering in France. Impelled by a passion for freedom, Kosciusko arrived in America in August, In October ho was appointed a Colonel of Engineers, in which ho served throughout Ihe war. During his American service his two most noteworthy contributions to final victory over tho British was his fortification of the highlands of West Point, which he made tnpregnabte, and his selection of Bemis Heights (New York) for the Battle of Saratoga. Koscuisko not only advisod the American Commander, General Horatio Gates who was considered by many as a serious rival of Washington's for Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army to fortify Bemis Heights, but also prepared the American positions at this point which helped stop the advancing British troops under the leadership of General Burgoyne, Kosciusko's Bemis Heights fortifications was a deciding factor in bringing victory to the American forces during the Battle of Saratoga, the first great victory of the war for the new-born republic. Many noted historians consider the Saratoga engagement as the decisive battle of the Revolution. : In 1780 Kosciusko was transferred south and fought with distinction under General Nathanael Greene in the Carolina Campaign. His chief duties were to survey the field of operations, indicate strategic points, determine possible sources of food and water, and devise rapid transportation for troops and supplies, especially in Ihe crossing of rivers. Congress, in the year 1783, awarded him citiionship, a land grant and the rank of brevet brigadier general. Upon his return to Poland in 1784, Kosciuiko's reputation, established while serving in America, put him in the forefront of those considered quali-- fied for military leadership, and he was commissioned a major general in the Polish Army. In 1793 the 2nd partition of Poland took place, this time between Russia and Prussia. Plundered and weakened bolh physically and morally, Poland looked to Kosciusko as Ihe only man who could organize an uprising. People rallied behind him. His forces defeated the Russians at Raclowice and ably defended Warsaw, but was defeated by a combined Russian-Prussian force at Maciejowico. He was taken prisoner at St. Petersburg. When released in 1796, he revisited America, and while hers stopped in Elizabethtown and Philadelphia. In Elizabethtown he was introduced to Kosciutko Kollock, the son of Publisher Shepard Kollock. He was so impressed with the boy that he presented him with a jewel that had been awarded him far the defense of Poland. While in Philadelphia Kosciusko met Thomas Jefferson, and they developed a mutual admiration. Before leaving America he executed a will dated May 5, 1798, whereby he left his American properly consisting mostly of back pay for the purchasing of slaves, and giving them liberty in his name, and, at the same time, providing the money needed for them lo learn a trade. He appointed Thomas Jefferson as executor of Ihe will. Later in 1798 he returned once again to Europe and settled in France where he continued his efforts in behalf of Polish freedom. From France he then established a home in Solothurn, Switzerland where he died October 15, 1S1 7 as a result of a fall from a horse. His body was later returned to his native Poland and reburied in Wowel Cathedral in Krakow. Nearby following an ancient custom honoring a national hero the Poles raised a huge mound of earlh from all his battlefields. In 1BO9, 8 years before the death of Thaddous Kosciusko, a boy was horn in America who also celebrated his birthday on February 12th. Like Kosciusko, he deplored slavery and is best remembered for issuing Ihe Emancipation Proclamation lhat eliminated human bondage In America. The boy destined to become tho 16th President of the United States was Abraham Lincoln. are giving puppet shows and members of a third grade Sunday School class have made hundreds of at tract i ve key chains under the direction of their teacher, Mrs Ralph Anthony. One teen-aged boy offers taxi service to meetings and worship services. Chaircaning, furniture refinishing and window cleaning are some home-improvement services. Sluffed animals, mouse bookmarks, large, colorful Easter eggs and spider plants also are being THE WKSTFIELU (N.J.) 1.EADKK, THI'IISIIAV. ATHII. I.!»?< by the time and effort utilized, has not only brought us closer together but will help the needy and I love." sold. The results of all these efforts will culminate on May 2 when the seed money and profits will be returned at the worship services. The Miracle Money will be added to the One Great Hour of Sharing offering, which will then be divided among world relief, emergency and resettlement services, selfdevelopment of people, and the hunger fund. Hanger sums up the total endeavor, "The deep concern of our membership, demonstrated starving throughout the world and show them the true meaning of God's BOWCRAFT PLAYLAHD it. 22 Scotch Plaint Baseball Sotting Amusement Rides For All Ages Indoor and Outdoor Mini Golf Arcade Games-Go Karts OW You Knowr... ihpt during America's itruggl* for independence, men of many ethnic, cultural and social backgrounds come to the colonies to offer their services to General George Washington. Among those were Boron Frederick von Sreuben from Prussia, the Marquis de Lafayette from Franc*, Count Casimir Pulaski and General Thaddeus Kosciusko from Poland. Each, with his own special skills and knowledge, contributed much to the final victory. and Did You Know... that during Harmonia Savings Bank's 125 year history, many families of various nationalities and backgrounds have contributed to our steady growth, and today we show assets in excess of $260,000,000. To these people we say "Thank You" and, at the same time, renew the pledge made by our founders to continue at "The Family Savings Bank." Invest Your Money In a REGULAR SAVINGS ACCOUNT that pays the Highest Interest Rate You Can Be Sue of Your Interest and You Can Deposit or Withdraw Anytime Without Loss of Interest 5.47! IS Withdrawals anytime without losing interest provided you maintain a balance of S5.00 or more THE EFFECTIVE ANNUAL YIELD ON ' EHuhvc Annual Yield Appliet When Principal and Interest Remain on Deposit for o Yeoi FREE PERSONAL CHECKING FOR DEPOSITORS NO MINIMUM BALANCE NO SERVICE CHARGE and Your Checks Are Absolutely FREE Also FREE BANKING BY MAIL Postage Paid Both Ways By Harmonia For Worry-Free Convenience and Safety 5 1/% YEAR SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES SATURDAY HOURS DRIVE-IN & WALK-UP BANKING DIRECT DEPOSIT of Your Monthly SOCIAL SECURITY CHECK SIGN UP NOW AT ANY OF OUR OFFICES- IT'S EASY AND TAKES ONLY MINUTES TO DO! MAIN OFFICE UNION SQUARE, ELIZABETH Lobby: Doily 9 A.M. to 3 P.M.; Monday 6 P.M. lo 8 P.M. Drive-In: Daily 8 A.M. lo 6 P.M.; Monday 8 A.M. to 8 P.M. Walk-Up: Daily 8 A.M. to 9 a.m. and 3 P.M. lo 6 P.M. Drive-In & Wolk-Up: Saturday 9 A.M. to 12:30 P.M. BANKING HOURS SCOTCH PLAINS AND MORRIS AVENUE, ELIZABETH lobby: Doily 9 A.M. lo 3 P.M.; Thursday 6 P.M. to 8 P.M. Drive-In: Doily 8 A.M. to 6 P.M.; Thursday 8 A.M. to 8 P.M. Walk-Up: Daily 8 A.M. to 9 A.M. and 3 P.M. lo o P.M. Drive-In & Walk-Up: Saturday 9 A.M. to 12:30 P.M. The Family Savings Bank OUR 125th ANNIVERSARY S In ELIZABETH: 1 UNION SQUARE & 540 MORRIS AVE In SCOTCH PLAINS: NORTH AVE. & CRESTWOOD RD In MIDDLETOWN: 1 HARMONY ROAD Member F.D.I.C. SAVINGS INSURED TO $40,000

20 20 T1IK WKSTKIKI.I) (N.J.) IJKADKK, Tin'KSOAV. Al'KII, 1, 1976 * * * *'* * * *'* *# ** ** ********* + * Nw ''! i I*" New Jersey in the Revolution * 4- * WASHINGTON'S-MAI' MAKKIt By John T. Cunningham Two years of moving armies through uncharted American wilderness so acutely underscored lht> need for accurate maps thai George Washington wrote Congress on July : "A good geographer lo survey Ihe roads and take sketches of Ihe counlry where Ihe army is lo act would be exlrt'me!\ useful, and might bo a' tended wilh exceedingly hroughl enough money to valuable coiisc( uences." ; settle all liilis with enough homeland for the years of his life. Born in Dunfermline, Scotland, in 17:55. the Kith child D a poor Scottish minister. Robert Krskine was educated to be an engineer. Soon after his 25th birthday, he was threatened with debtor's prison when a business partner absconded ami left Erskine with a pile of bills. He escaped jail only be promising repayment. Two years later, in 17W. Krskine invented a successlui water pump that UOAL none* q The letter was not ;i mere setting forth of a need. Washington pointedly told Congress that the only man for the job was Robert Erskine of Hingwood. New Jersey. Erskine was notified by Washington on.july 2B I hat Congress had commissioned him "Geographer and Surveyor-General of the A m e r i c a n A r m y Washington urged Krskine to sign on, declaring thai."your entrance upon the business will be immediately necessary, as there can be no time in which your services will be more necessary than the present." Three days later, in his letter of acceptance, Erskine sent Washington a detailed plan on how he proposed to map the wartorn country. He warned 'hat manpower would be necessary: "the more hands are employed in it, the sooner it may be accomplished." Enough personnel was supplied to enable Erskine to furnish Washington with more than 200 beautifully drawn maps in less than three years. Most of those maps are preserved in the New York Historical Society. Remarkable was the fact that the 42-year-old man chosen for this delicate and intensely secret work had been a British citizen of unquestioned loyalty to his lefl lo permit marriage in ITliii. His invention also earned him ineinhership in <!iv;il Britain's prestigious Koval Society. Krskino's success earned him the attention of the American Company, owners of extensive iron mines in northern New Jersey, The Company hired the young engineer in 177(1 to manage its failing properties al Hingwood and elsewhere, Kr.sk i tie and his wife first 40 j approved Washington's recommendation on July L'7, and within three weeks of their first meeting. Krskine became Washington's personal map maker. Using all possible resources - other maps, surveys by assistants, drawings by other surveyors Krskine painstakingly put together maps that covered much of the total area of New York. New Jersey. Connecticut and Pennsylvania, between 1777 and I7R0. His maps delineated the very heart of the war effort. Washington feared for Krskine's work. He asked Hie map maker to leave Hingwood in March. 177'.).! despite Krskine's plea that : he worked best at home. Washington wrote: "Con- j venienee is over-balanced I by the danger you are in,. should the enemy the j aughts on which you are i I'll I 1'i.fr'jgi't! worth their al- 1 tention." : Working on his hist map. : Krskini 1 was stricken with a 1 severe cold and sore throat readied Hingwood in June, I on September 1H, Two I weeks later he died at The iron holdings had. Kingwood. He lies in a been started and managed j simple tomh near the for several years by Peter j Kingwood iron mines un- Hasoncleavor, whose genius noticed -- even by historians had produced substantial who use bis maps hut have p properties, even as his high standard of living ate up profits. Erskine kept I he struggling company alive, but barely, fl was offered for sale in 1773 and found no buyers. Gathering war clouds troubled Erskine. He repeatedly warned his company that the colonies could not be turned aside. He wrote in May, 1775: "The people, as I have said before in private letters, are sincerely in earnest everywhere." Erskine founded his own militia company in the summer of 1775 and was commissioned a captain. Washington and Erskine mei for the first time at Pompton early in July, 1777, when Washington was delayed in the village by stormy weather. Congress p little awareness of the man who drew them. LEGAL NOTICE Awards At Pack 673 Dinner Prizes, awards and food made up the annual Blue and Gold Dinner for Pack No. 673 of Thomas Jefferson School. Paul Sinnickc, Neighborhood Commissioner Watchung Council B.S.A., and Mrs. Sinnicke were guests of honor. Highlight of the evening was entertainment provided by the Order of the Arrow, Indian Dancers. As a gift of appreciation for his many years as Cubmaster, Mickey Venezia was presented with" a digital watch by Webelo Christopher Troy on behalf of the cubs and their parents. A copy of How to Historic Tour Slated Tuesday A Bicentennial tour of historic Philadelphia will be conducted by Union College on Wednesday it was announced today by Weyman O. Steengrafe" of Westfield, director of continuing education. Independence Hall, where the Declaration of Independence was signed, the Liberty Bell, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Congress Hall and the Betsy Ross House are among the historical sites that will be visited during the one-day lour, Mr. Steengrafe staled. The cost of the tour includes transportation by bus, admissions and guide. Kay Weiner of Mountainside, coordinator of a series of one-day travel programs sponsored by the Department of Continuing Education, will serve as guide. Day trips are also planned to the Duke Gardens in Somerville, Apr. 2.1; the town of Smithville, May 5; Bucks County and New Hope, Pa., May I a, and Longwood Gardens and Winterthur Museum, June 2. Registration procedures for all trips may be obtained by calling or writing the Depurtmenl of Continuing Education, Union College, Cranford. Confidence is so sensitive II never returns if it's abused. Improve Your Model Railroading, was placed in the Jefferson School library from the Parent Teacher Association, in his name. This is Venezias last year as Cubmasler. Achievement awards were presented to the following: Wolf Badge, Edward Haag, Michael Stagaard, Lawrence Friedmann, Peter LaTarlara, Stephen Huff, Edward Flack, Hank Kline, Brian Loughrey, James Hutton, Steven Ciarrocca; Bear Badge. Bill MeSalis. Matt Petrik, Brian Delhagen, Brian Landadio, Kevin Sullivan, Craig Paulsen, Matt Wofsy, Greg Mueller, Wolf Badge and Gold Arrow, Tod Bixler, Brian Mitchell, Doug Baker, Wolf Badge and Denner Braid, Paul Maravetz, Ken Burke, Stephen Maly. Bear Badge and Denner Braid. Chris Gergich: Wolf Badge, gold arrow, two silver arrows, denner braid, Mike Landadio. The oldest group of Cubs, Webelos, received achievement awards that included: Denner braid, John Lambert, Robert Coclla; citizen, naturalist, engineer, artist, Brian Gray; artist,sportsman, naturalist, aquanaut, Martin Hugg; artist, engineer, craftsman, David Venezia, engineer, denner braid, Bob Oehler; engineer, artist, John Cacchione; sportsman, naturalist, Robert Whack; naturalist, showman, Paul Miller; showman, Richard Miller; artist, citizen showman, Dan Scott; artist, naturalist, scholar, traveler, Christopher Troy; aquanaut, artist, citizen, craftsman, Steven Ladas; badge for overnight camping trip, Ricky Brown, Dan Scott, Christopher Troy, Brian Gray, Paul Miller, Richard Miller, Martin Ilugg, Hobby Oehler, David Venezia. Cub Ricky Shmurak earned the Aleph Award which is a religious award earned by cub scouts who have completed 1he requirements as set by the Boy Scouts of America. Special lhanks went to Den Chiefs Ralph Franco Brian Sullivan and David Scoll. LEGAL NOTICE BOAROOF EDUCATION 305 Elm Street westfield, N.J Scaled bids lor Classroom Lumber lor the school year wilt be received by the Score tary ol the Board ot Education of fnc Town ol Westfield in trie County of Union, New Jersey, in the Board Room, 305 Elm Street. Weslfield, N.J, on April 15, 1976 at 3:00 PM prevailing time. Specifications and conditions of bidding may bo obtained from the Business Office, 305 Elm Street, wesllield. N.J., from 8:30 AM to 4 30 PM, Mondays through Fridays. The Board of Education reserves the right to reject any or all bids, in whole or in part, to make awards item by item, and to waive any informalities when deemed best for the interest of the Board of Education. Bids must be submitted on the forms furnished by the Board of Education and in accordance wilh Ihc condiiions ol bidding. By order of the Board of Ecluca tion. Town ol Westfield, County of Union. H. TOAALINSON. Secretory Published in THE LEADER April 1, 1976 J 1 76 IT Fees: SI 1.7G INVITATION TO BID Sealed proposals will be received by the Mayor and Council of the Town of Westfield, on Morv day April 12, 1976 at 10:00 A.M. prevailing lime at the Municipal Building, A7S East Broad Street, Westfield, New Jersey for Ihe fur nishing of agricultural chemicals and fertilizer during Proposals must be delivered at the place and belore the hour mentioned above and must be accompanied by a certified check or bid bond made payable to the order of the Treasurer of the Town of Westfield in an amount equal to at least ten percent C10> of the base amount of the bid. Each proposal must be accompanied by a surety company certificate stating that said surely company will provide the bidder with Ihe required bond, and must be delivered at the place and before the hour mentioned above. Plans and specifications may be seen or procured at the otiico o! ihe Town Engineer, James Josephs, Public Works Center, 959 North Ave., w., Westfield, New Jersey. The Mayor and Council reserve the right to reject any and all bids, if, in ihe interest of the town, It Is deemed advisable to do so. JAMESJOSEPHS TOWN ENGINEER IT Fees: $12.00 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby 9'vcn lhat ihe following action was taken by the Board of Adjustment on appeals which WITC heard March 15,1976: Appeal oi Donn A, and Mary M. Snyder for permission to re-sub civ.do lo's known as No 16 and 17,n Block 117, and creel a one fami ly OA'elliticj fit -»50 Charming Avc nut' GRANTED Appeal ol George W. and Char ID.h 1 W Litidquisi fur permission ii? t'riht ii ono family dwelling at?3v Warren SI reel GRANTED tt.ln condition AfiiJcai of Antonio and AAor ihi't rt<i Kinimaiotor permission (l> rrrci a frrupidte al ill Park Mrert i doc is ion was reserved ) -M 76 GRANTED HI tanore SANFORD Secretary, Boardol Adjustment.t l 76 IT foes. S/.G8 PUBLIC NOTICE St-.-ilecl proposals will be re c rived by Iho Town Clerk of trie Town of Wes'fielcl. New Jersey, on or hefore A Afl, prevail uicj tune. April? in the t.ouncii Chambers of the Munici pal Bujldmt), 425 East Broad S'rccl. Westiiela. tor the furnish inc.) ol services and materials necessary lor maintaining the r.idio communication equipment,ind other emergency equipment n use by the Police Department, liirf forms and specifications nviv lie obtained from the Pur c li,iv*ic) Acjent, Municipal Build iiici, J?5 Easf Bro.icl Street. West fit-id. New Jersey, 070V0. The 1 Town Council reserves the nciht to reject any and or all O'CIS, 'f in the.nleresl of the Town it,s deemed advisable to do so. JOY C. VREELAND 10WN CLERK J 1 76 IT Fees $8.16 INVITATION T08ID Sealed proposals will be re ceived by the Mayor and Council of the Town of Westfield on Mon day, April 19, 1976 at 10:00 A.M. prevailing lime al the Municipal Building, 435 East Broad Street, Westfield, New Jersey for the fur i nishing ol communication equip. ment consisting of two way radios and personal pagers. Proposals must be delivered at the place ana belore the hour mentioned above and must be ac- j companied by a certified check or bid bond made payable to the order of the Treasurer of the Town of Westfield in an amount equal to al least ten percent < 10J of the base amount of the bid. Each proposal must be accompanied by a surety company cer. tilicate stating thai said surely company will provide the bidder with the required bond, and must be delivered at the place and before the hour mentioned above. Plans and specifications may be seen or procured at the office ol Ihe Town Engineer, James Josephs. Public Works Center 959 North Avenue West, Westfield, New Jersey. The Mayor and Council reserve the right to reject any and all bids, if, in the interest of the town, it is deemed advisable lo do so. JAMESJOSEPHS TOWN ENGINEER J 1 76 IT Tees:S12.Z4 SHERIFF'SSALE SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY LAW DIVISION UNION COUNTY DOCKET NO. L J 965 7A CENTRAL PENN NA TIONAL BANK, Plaintiff vs, EDWARD J. MC NELIS AND BARBARA K. MC NELIS. De fondants. CIVIL ACTION ALIAS WRIT OF EXECUTION - FOR SALE OF PREMISES By virtue ot the above-stated alias writ of execution to me di rected I shall expose for sale by public vendue, in room B-8. in the Court House, in the City of Eliza beth, N.J., on Wednesday, the 14th day of April, A.D., 1976, at two o'clock in the afternoon ot said day, all the right, tittcand interest of the above named defendants in iind to the following property, to wit: ALL THAT tract or parcel of I land and premises, hereinafter particularly described, situale, lying and being in the Town of Westfield, County ol Union and I State of New Jersey: I BEGINNING at ihe point formed by the intersection of the Northwesterly side of Clitton Street with the Southwesterly side of Beverly Drive, and running thence {}) North 48 degrees 18 minutes West and binding on said sideof Beverly Drive a distanced 135 feet ton point; running thence (2) South 4S degrees 10 minutes Wosl a distance of 70 feet to a point; running thence (3) South 4B degrees 18 minutes East o disonce of 135 feet to a point in the Northwesterly side of Clifton Street, and running thence [4) North 45 degrees 10 minutes East and binding on said side a distance of 70 feet to the poinj and place of BEGINNING. Premises commonly Known as No. 130 Clifton Street, Westfield, New Jersey. There is due approximately S2, and costs. The Sheriff reserves the righl to adjourn this sole. RALPH OR ISCELLO, Sheriff Arnold R. Lieberman, Atty. DJ & WL CL T Fees: $74,88 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN lhat Robert w. Brennan, Assessor of ihe Town ol Westfield in the County of Union, has filed his reports, maps and assessments for special benefits done under ordinances therein named. He has ascertained the whole cost of materials, incidental gi ading and expenses incurred in the construction of the improvements therein named and has assessed the lands and premises fronting on the Improvements to the amount that they have been specially benefited. The ordinances and improvements are as lollows: SPECIALORDINANCE NO AN ORDINANCE TO PROVIDE FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF A SANITARY SEWER EXTEN- SION ON KIM8ALL AVENUE, THE APPROPRIATION OF THE MONIES NECESSARY THERE- FOR AND THE ISSUANCE OF BOND ANTICIPATION NOTES FOR THE FINANCING OF SAID WORK. Passed and adopted June 25, 1974 SPECIALORDINANCE NO.I465 AN.ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF A SECTION OF WELLS STREET, THE APPROPRIA- TION OF THE MONIES NECES- SARY THEREFOR AND THE IS- SUANCE OF BOND ANTICIPA- TION NOTES FOR THE FI- NANCING OF SAID WORK. Passed and adopted June 2S, The reports above referred lo nre now on Hie in the office of the Town Clerk nncf open lor examination by all persons Interested therein. NOTICE is hereby given that the Council will meet In the Court ell Chamber, Municipal Building, 425 East Broad Street, Westfield, Nev/ Jersey, on Tuesday evening, April 13, 1976, ol eight-thirty In the evening lo hear and consider ot>- Iccllons lo said reports, maps and assessments, which ob ectlons must be In writing and must be Mod wilh the Town Clerk at or before the time of said meeting JOY C. VREELAND.,,. TOWN CLERK lm -" 2T Foes: $38.^0 INVITATION TOBID Sealed proposals will be re ceived by the Mayor and Council of the Town of wostlici.1, " Mon day April 19, 1976 at ". #> A.M. prevailing time at the Mun'cipal Building, 425 Easl Broad Street Westfield, New Jersey for Ihe fur- L nishing of one 111 heavy duty.' Iruck chassis and tab., Proposals must be delivered at the place and before the hour mentioned above and must be ac companied by a certified check or bid bond made payable lo the order of the Treasurer of the Town of Westfield m <m amount equal to at least ten percent (10) of the base amount of the bid. Each proposal must be accom panied by a surely company cer lilicale slating thai said surety company will provide the bidder with the required bond, and must be delivered at the place and before the hour mentioned above. Plans and specifications may be seen or procured at the office of the Town Engineer James Jo sephs, Public Works Center, 959 North Avenue W. Weslfield, New Jersey. The Mayor and Council reserve the r ight to rejec t any a nd all bids, it. in the interest of the Town, it is deemed advisable to do so. JAMESJOSEPHS TOWN ENGINEER IT Feei: $12.00 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given mat sealed bids will be received bv the Mayor and Council of the town ol Westfield for the reconsirurtion ol Grove Slrcct, Section 2. '"»»«Town Ol WesHieid in the County ol Union. The major construction items, units and quantities are 1'J" bituminous concrete mix No. 5, 300 tons, 6"' bituminous stabilized base mix No. 1, 205 tons, granile block turb 1,400 L.F., opened and read m public at Ihe Municipal BU'lcimq April 19fi 1976,11 10:00AM prevailing lime. Drawings specifications and forms of bids, contracts and bond for the proposed work prepared by James D. Josephs engineer and approved by the Commissioner of ; Transportation have been filed in Ihe office of the said engineer at the Public Works Center, 959 North, Avenue. W., Westfield, New Jersey and ol said Commissioner of Trans portation Trenton, New Jersey and ihc Bureau of Local State Aid Programs, District Office located at Teaneck Armory, Teaneck Avenue and Liberty street Teaneck, New Jersey and may be inspected by prospective bidders during business hours. Bidders will be furnished with a copy of the specifications and blue prints of the drawings by Ihe I engineer on proper notice and payments ot cost of preparation. Bids must be made on standard P roposal forms in the manner esignated therein and required by the specifications, ntust be enclosed in seated envelopes, bearing the name and address of the bidder and; name of the road on outside addressed To the Mayor and Council ol the Town of Westfield. Union County, New Jersey, and must be accompanied by a non-collusion affidavit and a certified check for not less than ten percent (10) of the amount ot bid, provided said check need not be more ttian $20, nor shall not be less than $ and be delivered at the place and before the hour named above. The standard proposal form and the non-collusion affidavit are attached to the sup ptementary specifications, copies ot which will be furnished on application to the engineer. During the performance of this j contract, the contractor agrees as 1 follows: a)the contractor or subcontractor,1 where applicable, will not discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment because of age, race, creed, color, _ national origin, ancestry, marital status or sex. The contractor will take affirmative action to ensure that such applicants are recruited and employed, and that employees are treated during employment without regard to their age, race, creed, color, national origin, an cestry, marital status or sex. Such action, grading, demotion, or transfer recruitment* or recruitment advertising: layoff or terminations: rates of pay or other forms of compensation: and selection for training, including appreiiceshid. The contractor agrees to post in conspicuous placet, aval I able to employees and applicants for employment, notices to be provided by j the contracting officer setting forth the provisions ot this non. discrimination clause: b) The contractor or sub contractor, where applicable will, in all solicitations, or advertisements for employees placed by or on behalf of the contractor, state that all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to age race, creed, color, national origin, ancestry, marital status or sex: c) The contractor or subcontractor, where applicable, will send to each labor union or representative or workers with which he has a collective bargaining agreement or other contract or understanding, a notice, to be provided by the agency contracting officer, advising the labor union or worker's representative of contractor's commitments under this act, and shall post copies of the notice in conspicuous places available to employees and applicants lor employment By Order of the Mayor and Council of the Town of Westfield JOY C. VREELAND, CLERK T $73.44 JU6T APHCWC CALL BRINES PROMPT SERVICE A HANDY REFERENCE LIST OF RELIABLE LOCAL f IRMS ALWAYSCALLVOU«LOCAL DEALER ONLY WEATHER TEK ALUMINUM COrtP. Buy Direct - Factory Outlet "Shop-A l-homv Service" PUBLICNOTICE Notice is hereby given that the Board of Adjustment established under an ordinance entitled, "An Ordinance Establishing Building Districts and RestrlcHons in the Town of Westtield," will meel in the Municipal Building on Monday, April 19, 1976 at 8:00 P.M. to hear and consider the following appeals: Appeal ol Lorraine A. AAcBride and Carolyn J. Kclman for permission to extend a two-family dwelling a! 543 Summit Avenue, conirary to ihe requirements of Article 10, Section 1003, Paragraph (c) of Ihe Zoning Ordinance. Appeal of Lulsevon Vogeler for permission to extend a one-family dwelling al S03 Benson Place, contrary lo the requirements of Article 10, Section 1003, Paragraph (c) of Ihe Zoning Ordinance. Appciil of Thomas A. and Marlon T. Bavolor for permission to extend a one family dwelling at 659 5ummil Avenue, contrary to the requirements of Article 10, Section 1003, Paragraph (c) of the Zoning Ordinance. Appeal of Adlers for permission to alter existing buildings at 219 North Avenue, contrary to the requirements of Article 7, Section 702, Paragraph (a) of the Zoning Ordinance. Appeal ol Lincoln Federal Savings 8- Loan Association One Lincoln Plaza for permission to amend n variance which was granted June 23, 1975, to include a vestibule, and change In Ihe np pearance ol (ho proposed build ing. Appeal ol First Federal Savings &, Loan Association (or permis sion to erect and use a Savings & Loan Association Activities build ing, drive up bonking, and park inq facilities on Lot 8, Black Elm Street, Lot 35, Block Prospect Street, contrary to the requirements of Article 7, Section 701, Poragraph <d>; Sec Hon 70?, Paragraph (ol; Article 14, Section 1402 ot Ihe Zoning Ordl nonce. ELEANOR E. SANFORD Secretary Boorcfof Adjustment IT Foe5:$3B.4O SHERIFF'S SALE SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY CHANCERY DIVISION UNION COUNTY OOCKET NO. F FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, a corporation organized under an Act of Congress and existing pursuant to the Federal National Mortgage Association Charter Actr Ploinliff vs. ISAAC BROWN, et ux, el ats, Defendants. CIVIL ACTION WRIT OF EX- ECUTION FOR SALE OF MORTGAGED PREMISES By virtue of the above-staled writ of execution to me directed I shall expose for sale by public vendue, in room B-8, In the Court House, in the City of Elizabeth, N,j., on Wednesday* the 28th day of April, A.D., 1976 at two o'clock in the afternoon of said day. All lhat iract or parcel of land, situate, lying and being In the City of Elbabeih in the Counly of Union in the State of New Jersey: Beginning at a point in the northwesterly side line ot Jacques Slreet dlsjant therein 111 leet tn a northeasterly direction along the said bide line from the intersection of said side line with the northeasterly side line op Lafayette Street; running thence (1) along snid side line north 31 degrees 30 minutes east 25 feel lo a point; running thence (2) north 5B degrees 30 minutes west feet lo <i point; running thence (3) South 76 degrees 27 minutes west 25.»0 feet to a point; running thence (4) south 58 degrees 30 minutes pas) feet to the poinl and place of beginning. The above description was pre pared in conlormance with survey made by Peter Troast, dated June?3, 1966, Commonly known as 158 Jacques Street, Elizabeth, Now Jersey. There is due approximately il3,7?6.39 wllh Interest from Feb ruary 17, 1976 and costs. The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn (his sale. RALPH ORISCELLO, Sheriff Kaufman, Franconero, Rlccor delli 8. Erde, Attys. DJ & WL CX T Fees;$7G.B4 1 STORM DOORS STORM WINDOWS SIDING AWNINGS C^LL P.O. Box Z92. Weitfield it wai PAY YOU To GARDNER MOTORS INC. in JVSJ SALES SERVICE PARTS»"» iltm I Kii HWV NO?0? HRNARDSVILLE NORMS CHEVROLET Authorized SALES It SERVICE Mt)or and Minor Kfptlii Ltrfce Selection of Used Cui and Trucks CALL I Central Ave. «nd North Ave. K fuj (UMfM i P9MI' : i. O KM I KltS B«lUr Dir Cleanini Since 1(94" Better Dry Cleanlnf Shirt Laundering Told Fu> Storage Drapery and Hug Cleaning IN WKSTFIF.LD 11 E.ProadSt. Dial MAI* OFFICE AND PLANT: 120i South Ave., Plainfield Olber SIOIO! In Flalnlleld KtCMMI Homemade Ice Cream S3 Elm'Strtet WetlfMd KEIUY OLDSMOBILE CO. Authorized Oldsmobile Sale* & Service 560 North Ave. E, AD Wettfield, New Jerwy AN AD ON THIS PAGE MAY EARN YOU MORE DOLLARS UKMOttCS SAM SET Advertise ROTCHFORD APr-LIUHCtS 433 IMOMli Avenue. C.lit WESTriELD.N. J LAUNDRV SERVICE INC EST I9J7,;'' " r f+. t'aur.clrfts ' \ DRY CUA>;tns CARIW ArfAHll, ^ J ^ Rftll/.L & SALI5 1.0'ILII C I'KM. I L 01 1!VUY CALL NORTH AVE. HLAlNFlltLO LUMKI ELM RADIO > * TV, Inc. Headguartera For WHIRLPOOL- KITCHEN AID HAMILTON Waiheraand Dryeri Hoover Vacuum Cleaner! RCA Color TV. Radio,, etc Elm Street Westlield AUTOIOOYREPAHS BODYART ; COLLISION SHOP George W, Kochera, Prop. Complete Body it Fender Repaying Auto fc Truck RefinUhlnt»4 Hour Towing Call South Ave. Garwood Service PARTS k DELICATESSENS SAAB and - SUBARU n Th» Front Whml Drive Cars SEVELL'S AUTO BODY SHOP CO. Body and P«Uit Shop AAA* ALA M.C.A. Road Aid!, 24 Hour Towing ] Fender ReptLri Painting Truck Ptlnttng tnd Repairs Foreign Ctr Service Call Windwr Ave. Wettf i»ld! 1 Congenial Salesmen Superb Service LINCOLN MERCURY 369 SOUTH AVE. E. UNION COUNTY VOLKSWAGEN, Inc. Authorized VOLKSWAGEN CENTER S«let Service P»rt» New tnd U«d CLUI Trucks Sutton Wiftoni Karmtn Ghilt Factory mined MpchaUitca PL 6* South Ave, PUlnfleld "Delicious Eatin" Home Marls Baked Good!. Mors d'oeuvres Cold Cuti Salail< OpenSund.iv> 8 a.m. 3 i m OuimbySl. Wwllield PMC STORES.: TIFFANY DRUGS Open 7 [livi A Werk Math-!) «.m. t.t 10 p.m. Sundays!l M.m. In (j:.lu p.m. Hydi^n Vmmin ProduCtl Russell Stover Candies Ample Free I'arktn* Frep I'kk-l'p and Ofllvfry South Ave., W. Westfield J. S. IRVING COMPANY LUMBER i MILLWORK Of Every Description FUEL OIL - OIL BUHNEHS IIAHDWAIIF.-PAINTS OH South Avc.W. Westfield PAINTING EXPERIENCED AND RELIABLE Interior work, antiquing, staining. Hang ill flocks, foils, etc. Lane or snull jobs. References available. Free estimates Call after V PUIWBtHG,, MOUNTAINSIDE PLUMBING ft HEATING BODY WORKS, INC.; R.J. Pompllano, Prop. i COLLISION SPKCIALISTS j KXPERT AUTO HODY «. FENDER REPAIRS! Dial South Ave. W. Westfield Your Local Volvo Dealer William Jay Clark Ltd. j 50S Somerset Street No. Plainiield, NJ RANKIN FUEL CO. Since lfi'jft "Nothing Counts Like Service" OIL BURNER Siles *nd Service Dial Centennial Ave. Cranford Charlei A. llonecker RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL Complete One Contract Short Dr., Mountainside, N.J. ROOFING AUTO DEALERS BRISTOL Motors Inc. SALES SERVICE PAItTS AUSTIN - MG JAGUAR - ROVER LAND ROVER DATSUN DODGE, Inc. AUTHORIZED Sales and Srrvlca DODGE DART DODGE "Jotl Hat.d" TRUCKS Dial North Ave. E. Weitfield IIS II S «) > 12 UtrtS Plalnlltld DOM'S TOYOTA AUTO SALES Servfru tht Art«2!, YMri CORONA Spurt Srtlini L l!uil Tups t.u(f Selection ol Up-lo-Dtte L'SKt) CARS DUI 75G-f>300 Iflf. U.S. llwy. No. 22 North PUIiificId (Betwern Snmrrwl & C.rnvp) LEADER PHONE FORDi SALES SERVICE CARS & TRUCKS FULL LINE OF USED CARS LEASING & DAILY RENTALS NORTH AVE. E. BARBERSHOPS ^Barte ALL HAIRCUTS S3.00 (Ladles', Men's, Children;) WE STYLE LONG HAIR Daily 8 to 6; Closed Wednesday We Service & Repair All make Electric Razors Quimby St. Wcsrficld REEL-STRONG FUEL CO. EST HEATING & COOLING FUEL OIL-BURNERS ' HUMIDIFIERS AIR CONDITIONERS DIAL LEXINGTON AVE. CRANFORD HEATING CONTRACTORS 0 SINCE 1936 RTALIS ROOFING AND SIDING CO. Deal Direct No Sub-Contracting Roofing, Leaders, Gutters Aluminum Siding & Repairing Fully Insured Satisfaction Guaranteed For FREE ESTIMATES Call J.Gabriel RUG CLEANING RUG SHAMPOOING by the new stoam cleaning method. Commercial or in your home. Quality Work - Ksllmales AL'S RUG CLEANING SERVICE after 3 P.M. SERVICE STATIONS? EUCLID SERVICE AIR CONDITIONING HEATING Residential Commercial Industrial Sfllos- Service - Installations DIAL South Ave. Fanwood INSURANCE PEARSALL & FRANKENBACH, INC. 'i'f.'ji" or INSURANCE Elm St. Weitiiold Arthur Willkf, Prop. 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21 Rehearsing original play are Mountainside'^ Beechwood School students Tom Lausten, Jimmy Bennett, Kevin McLaughlin, Judy (.eiger, Nancy Prachl and Lisa Falcone. Children to Present i Original Play "Happy Birthday New Jersey". Some students will Jersey", a factual play, accompany their written and researched entirely by the children of Charlotte F. Ross's fourth grade class al Heeehwood School in Mountainside will be presented to the, children's parents as the fourth graders birthday present to New Jersi>y. This original production will be one of the language arts - social studies related activities for this year. Props, scenery and costumes are being designed and made by the students. The pupils also wrote a number of songs such as "Down Upon New Jersey's Coasl" and "New Area of feaxel Hall. The Jersey's Famous Men" concert will feature two which will be presented in local bands. Plying Dogs "Happy Rirthduy New and Warp Factor 1. classmates with various instruments and innovative movements. Among other Social Studies and Language Arts related activities include each child writing a book of original slories about the Bicentennial. Rock Concert At UCT1 Tomorrow The staff of the Union County Technical institute (UCTI) student newspaper "The Catalyst" will sponsor a rock concert at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow in the Commons For Gracious Dining THE HALFWAY HOUSE open 7 (Uiys a week LUNCHTON<-OCKTAII,S-I)INNI:R Rt. 72, F.astbound, Mountainside Your Utntt-Skk Mauoluii John Piinm Private Room Catering tor Parties up to 60 people PHONE Additional Latin Club Banquet The WHS Latin Club will hold its annual club banquet Tuesday from 6-8 p.m. in Cafeteria A at the high school. According to Richard Konet, WHS Latin teacher, "the banquet will be a potluck dinner, with Latin Club members preparing the food themselves." Konet said that there will be two major activities at the banquet. One is a play which is being presented by Latin V students. "They have not told me what the play is about. All they said is that is will be a surprise," said Konel. The other activity will lie the final round of Ihe Latin Bowl, which is very similar to the College Bowl. Latin IV students will be taking on Latin V with the winner having its class name engraved on a special plaque. The semifinal round of Ihe Latin Howl was held at Lover's Night In February. The banquet is open to all Latin Club members and I heir guests. There will be a small admission fee for those wearing a toga and a slightly higher one for those without togas. Mr. Konet said that the banquet will be the final club function of the year until the Foreign Language Carnival on Saturday, May 1. Hunt Kimlerffarton The Mountainside PTA ; round-up for Ihe : kindergarten will lake place in both schools from (HI a.m. and from 1-3 p.m. Monday and Wednesday. The following schedule will be maintained: Beechwood, Monday; April 5, Deerfield, Wednesday April 7. Parents may register at the school which is most convenient to them. To be eligible to untcr kindergarten in September, the child must be five years old on or before Dec. 1, 197(1. The child's birth certificate must be presented at Ihe lime of registration. The child must be present, for pre-school j vision evaluation. An ap- Copies of the Special Section About Westfieid Published With the March 18 Issue Are Available For a Limited Time.lay Andre wins trophy for fastest car in the pack and Bryan Gildenberg for the best appearance of his entry in Pack 172's Pinewood Derby. 34 Cubs Race in Derby It was not the Indianapolis 500, but at Ihe Franklin School gymnasium the enthusiasm and competition were just as keen for Cub Pack 172's annual Pinewood Derby held Mar. 27 when 34 cub scouts representing five dens registered to race their 5-ounce mode) cars which they had designedandmade. Chairman Jack Andre organized Ihe evening events and Cub Master Donald Wortzel was master of ceremonies. Various heats were run on a giant wooden tract to determine den winners. Then first, second and third place den winners competed for the grand prize. Htmnditp Apr. 5,7 poinlmcnl for hearing evaluation will also be arranged at this lime. Anyone who has further questions, may contact Mary Post of 1559 Coles Avc., Mountainside. Be»:rl>ower Retires From Exxon Alan Becrbower of 1400 Lamberts Mill Rd. has recently retired from the Kxxon Research and Engineering Company. He held the position of senior research associate in the products research division at the Exxon Research Center in Linden. Bcerbower joined the company in 193G. Winning medals for speed were Alan Schmidt, Den No. 1; Steven Kosch, Den No. 3; Taylor Wright, Den No. 9; Paul Newman, Den No. 15; David Odenkirk, Den No. 27. The trophy for the fastest car in the pack was awarded to Jay Andre. Awards were also given for appearance and the following boys received medals: David Lovejoy, Den No. 1; Steven Mobson, Den No. 3; Richard Covinglon, Den No. 9; Dennis Kinsella Den No. 15; and Mark Mosmueller, Den No. 27. The trophy for best appearance in pack was won by Bryan Gildenberg. A special award for best design was given to David Love, best decorated. Alan Schmidt; and most unique, Mike Bennetson. During the evening Cubmaster Wortzel presented John Haggerty with a Wolf gold arrow point and Robert Fuller with a Wolf Badge. MyrlleJenkins Myrtle Jenkins Joins Realtors R.R. Barrett, Jr., CPM. president of Barrett & Crain, Inc. (T-A) Barrett & Crain, Inc. with Nancy F. Reynolds Associates Division with four colonial offices serving the Westfield, Mountainside, Scotch Plains, Fanwood, Somerset & Hunterdon Counties areas, announced recently that Myrtle Jenkins had joined the firm and will continue to be active in the sale of residential real estate in Ihe firm's 302 E. Broad S', office. Prior to joining the recently merged firm, Mrs. Jenkins had been associated for six years with Nancy F. Reynolds Associates, Inc. and just missed the million dollar sales and listings qualification each year. Mrs. Jenkins is active in the Nomahegan Club of Westfieid and the Roundtownes of Railway. She has lived in Scotch Plains for 18 years with her husband Frank \V. Jenkins, contractor, at Ml Harding Rd. The Jenkins have two married sons living in the area. -THE (N.J.) LEADER. THIR.SD.4V. APRIL I, 1876 Recent Real Estate Transactions Mr. and Mrs. l.r. Berry, formerly of New York, have Just purchased (his new home at 805 Sherbrook Drive, Ihe former home of Mr. and Mrs. James Donmoyer who have moved to Greensboro, N.C. The sale of (his Multiple Listed property was negotiated by Mrs. Alan Bruce Conlin. for (he office of Pearsall & Krankenbach, Inc., Realtors. David G. Pearson of the office of Barrett & Crain, Inc., Hea I tors recently negotiated and sold (his home a( 1339 Outlook Drive, Mountainside. This property was Multiple Listed. Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Zardocki of Linden, have recently moved into (heir new home at I.'(Ia Woodside Itoad, Scotch Plains, which was the former residence of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Boright. This property sale was negotiated by Al Bello, II. Clay Friedrichs, Int. The above home at 2!)» Springfield Ave. Multiple Listed through the Westfieid Board of Realtors, has recently been sold for Mr. and Mrs. John Evanchik by Sylvia Cohen of Joy Brown, Inc., Realtors, 112 Elm St. Mr. and Mrs. Jagdish Vasudev, of Expressway, Kego Park, N.Y., have recently moved into their new home at 34 Canterbury Dr., Scotch Plains, which was Ihe former residence of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Nobile. This property was negotiated by Al Bello, H. Clay Friedrichu, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Wagner are now residing in their new home at 214 Belvidere Ave., Fanwood, which they purchased recently from Mr. and Mrs. Frank DeSantis, The sale of this property was negotiated by Ruth C. Tate of the Pelerson-Ringle Agency, 350 Park Ave., Scotch Plains. Mr. and Mrs. Willis T. King's home at 129 Woodland Ave. Multiplf Listed through the Westfieid Board of Realtors has recently been sold through the office of Joy Brown, Inc., Realtors, 112 Him St. The above property at 26 Shady Lane, Fanwood, has been sold to Mr. and Mrs. Michael Schneider, formerly of Westfieid. This sale was negotiated for Mr. and Mrs. Kurt Uebele by Joan Thomas of the office of Alan Johnston, Inc. Realtors. At Dwight F. Weeks, of the firm of Crane, Taylor & Love, Inc. listed and sold the above home on Fairfield Circle for Mr. and Mrs. John Snyder. The new owners are Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Peters, formerly of Ballwin, Mo. Mr. and Mrs. Gary Matviak, formerly of Phillipsburg, Pa., urc now ul home at G5!1 Glen Avenue. This property was bodi lis(ed and sold by the firm of Crane, Taylor & Love, Inc. The Westfieid Leader 50 Elm St. OIL HEAT NtH HTIMfcTI CONVENIENT TMMi Phon Price 25 Cents "Building Headquarters" LUMBER'MILLWORK MASON'S MATE RIALS HAHDWAHE»FUELS The new owners arc now residing in the above home lit :»!1 Orviulu Circle which they purchased through The Thlcl Agency, Inc. (if Mountainside. Mr. nml Mrs. Sum N. Itosenzwelg have moved Into (heir new home nt <im Greenbriur Court. The sale of this Multiple Listed property was negotiated by Betty K. llumislon of the office of Barrett & Crain, Inc. Realtors.

22 *"»«22 THE WKSTFIKLU (N.J.) I.EAI>KK, THIR-SDAV, Ai'ltll. J, 197G- Congressman Mathew.1. Rinaldo, R-N.J.. 12th District, third from left, meets with leaders of a Westfield delegation in a social action trip to Washington sponsored by the Union of American Hebrew Congregations. With Kinaldo are Kabbi David Sapcrstrin, left; Mrs. Diana Cohen, social action chairman with temple Knianu-Kl; and Joel Soffin, student rabbi and youth group adviser with Temple Emaiiu-Kl. Congressional issues were reviewed. Grant PTO Elects ]\ew Board Nominations for next year's Grant PTO Executive Board were received and approved by the general membership at a recent PTO meeting. Sandy Frantz will serve us board president. Other elected officials include Cindy Heinbach, vice president; Cappi Post, recording secretary; and Pat Simons, treasurer. New board members will officially take over their posts on June 2 when a joint meeting of all old and new board members will take place. At the same meeting. current PTO President Arlene Bertrand announced that several events would be taking place a t Grant School during the next few months. The annual progressive dinner is being organized by Mary Jo Daly and will take place on Apr. 28. On May 27 a Bicentennial celebration will feature craft demonstrations and a "Footsteps for Freedom" display in which students will dramatize different dates in American history, in chronological order, through the halls of the school. And on June 2 and 3, students and parents of students who will be transferreo to Grant from other schools will be welcomed for orientation and getacquainted sessions. Panel to Explore Employe Benefits "Questions and Answers Concerning Employee Benefit Programs" is the theme of a seminar today at Snuffy's Koute 22 and Mountain Ave., Scotch Plains at 3:30 p.m. to be followed by cocktails at 5:30 p.m. This seminar is being conducted jointly bv Richard C. Griggs, C.L.U. and Herbert 11. Wright, C.L.U., partners in Benefit Service Company of Westfield, a firm specializing in the design and administration of pension and profit sharing plans, and United Counties Trust Company. Guest panelists will include Griggs, Wright, Edward G. Hearn, a C.P.A. with the national accounting firm of J.K. Lasser and Company, who has been selected by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants as a technical consultant to review the institute's training material on the new Pension Keform Act; and Ralph E. Hossmilia Jr., trust investment officer of United Counties Trust Company, who is knowledgeable in the investment strategy vital to the success of pension and profit sharing plans in today's economy. These panelists will discuss such topics of interest to all employes as fringe benefit costs, legal requirements, investment goals, administrative needs, and "Are the Days of the Tax Dodge Over?" Questions will be welcomed from the audience. Ryan Named Honda Civic Dealer Rod Ryan, president of Open Road Honda, has been named the newest Honda Civic automobile dealer in New Jersey, with headquarters on Route 1 in Edison. In its short three year history, Open Road Honda has made unprecedented growth as a Honda Motorcycle dealer, being named lop dealer in New Jersey for Ryan earned a trip to Japan for this singular achievement. The Honda Civic is the Kindergarten Story Hour at Grant School - Marie Williams, librarian, reads "Six Foolish Fisherman" to Kindergarten students in Lorraine Mullen's Class in a favorite corner of the library. NORTH CAROLINA "GOLF CAPITAL OF THE WORLD" A TOTAL RESORT COMMUNITY CHOICE HOMESITES AND LUXURIOUS CONDOMINIUMS Call today and ht us fe// you about our V.I.P. inspection trips. ASSOCIATES. INC. REALTORS 23^ LENOX AVE. IESTFIELD, NJ. ObfflJn HUD pnrmrlr ravofi 1mm darelopvr md nod II tmlo IfnioBocrlhUig- HUD n.llh«i oppiofi. u,., *! ol u,» oile g aar lh«valu*, II anj, ol th» property gas mileage champ (EPA estimates CVOC 5- speed 47mpg hwy, 35mpg city) and utilizes the Honda advanced stratified charged engine that meets all EPA pollution standards without a catalytic converter, frontwheel drive, rack and pinion steering, Mac Pherson strut suspension and other Honda innovations. A grand opening celebration will be held as soon as Open Road Honda receives its first shipment of Civics, which are headed for Port Newark aboard one of Honda's own special freighters. Redeemer Loses Title Game In Overtime Play Redeemer Lutheran School of Westfield played St. John's Lutheran School of Staten Island for the championship of the Lutheran School Basketball League. The championship game was played in St. John's gymnasium on Saturday. The weekend prior to the championship game Redeemer Lutheran School defeated Zion Lutheran School of Westwood, to gain the opportunity to play for the championship of the league. This championship game was the most exciting game of the entire season. Redeemer Lutheran School was down at half time by 2 points. With a minute and 23 seconds to go. lledeemer had been moving the ball well, scoring well from the floor and were ahead by 67 points. With ID seconds to go, St. John's lied the score and the championship game wenl into a two minute overtime period. In the overtime period Redeemer Lutheran froze and just could not score, losing the ehajnpionship game 32 to 27. Scoring in the game was venly divided will] Bryant Green scoring (i points, Patrick Kehwinkel 4 points, Mike Melehiorre 4 points and Steven Meier 4 points. Coach Jeffrey Krempler was well pleased with the boys playing in the cham- Bowling Results Zimmerman Cheesman Reinhardt (i5' 2 50'2 Riccardi G3 53 Cragg 112'a 53'-; Erhard 59 ' s 564 Hyslop 51 > a 64'i; Chazotle Harms 46' a 69' 2 Riess 44'a 71' 2 High game and series, J. Seely, ; D. Erhard YW to Offer WSI Course The Summit Area Chapter, American Red Cross, is offering a water safety instructor (new material ) retraining workshop on Monday evenings, Apr. 5, and 26 from 7 lo 10 o'clock, at the Summit Y.W.C.A., 79 Maple St., Summit. Water safety instructor Irainer, Diana Rosen, will conduct the workshop. The workshop will nol include cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Participants performing at Water Safety Instructor level of skills will be recertified as W-.S.I.'s; others may, at the option of the trainer, be recertified as basic swimming instructors. All attending must parlicipate in pool and discussion sessions. Prerequisites for admission to the workshop are a current W.S.I, authorization and the purchase and review of the new textbooks and manuals in advance of! the course. For registering, phone, the Summit YWCA pool desk. Early registration is recommended, as the number of participants will be limited to 30. j Spillcrs I Steers Bald Ones Riverman Noodles' Jelly Rollers The Hit Men Sparrows Triangle League High game, Larry Grambo, 20fi; high series, Harry Jensen, 539; Larry Grambo, 523; Jim Love. r>19; Dave Seiders, 514. Fubt'Mos I The Trolley Jolly, Baron's Drugs Joe's Market I Tiffany Drugs! Jarvis Drugs ifugmannoil Co Insley to Coach Union Tennis Dennis Insley, head coach of the Union College varsity tennis team in 1973 and 1974 and a Garden State Athletic Conference singles champion while a student at the school, will be back at the coaching reins when the, Owls open the 1976 season today at home against Ocean County College. A 1972 graduate of the College, southpaw Insley was a two-year standout for Winners in a "create-your-own mythological character" contest in.lean Ilarmsen's fifth grade class at Grant School pose in front of bulletin board which displays their characters. The contest resulted from a study of Greek myths. Pictured, left to right, are Itickey Lankford,. Laurie Thihauld and Kny Fornicola. A fourth winner, absent when photo was taken, was Vic Pecorc. ALL BREEDS DOG OBEDIENCE Enroll Now For CLASS IN Complete Course NJ. DOG COLLEGE VV W L L 69':. 42'- l> ' 56' B «43 6!) j High game, P. Cragg, 208; ihigh series, P. Cragg, 559' 11). Reh, 544; JVi. Olfers, 543; M. Petras, 502. Smart-Set League W Pan American Cleaners 53'B 33'< 2 Roger's Speed Shop Jolly Trolley FugmannOilCo Norris Chevrolet N.J. Crankshaft 25'i Gl'a High game and series, G. Shaw, ; A. DeMarco, Pin Up Girls W Glowacky 68' 2 39' 2 Gargiles Riccardi 61 1 a 46>» Decker Zimmerman 53Vi 54'i Preston Adams Sawicki Fry 49''is 58'a Yegian High game and high series E. Yegian ; high series O. Riccardi, 522; high team game and series, Yegian, the Owls' varsity, fashioning a stellar record during his final season. He was undefeated in Garden Stale Athletic Conference competition, setting down 15 consecutive opponents. His! efforts in doubles play were also outstanding with nine victories in Ihe ten matches in which he competed. The returning Union coach's finest outing was on May 11, during the GSAC championships at Ocean County College in Toms River. There ho breezed through Ihe finest singles aces in the league lo walk off with Ihe Conference title. Following his graduation from Union College, Insley gained additional honors while attending Montclair Stale College by winning the 1973 Invitational Tournament. In addition to his reappointmenl as head coach at Union, Insley serves as head tennis professional at Ihe Shackamaxon Country Club, Scotch Plains, and at Ihe Westfield Indoor Tennis Club. L "Opportunities come every twelve years." Hindu proverb L GOLFERS! NAME BRANDS Top Quality Clubs Bags and Balls.. AT A'PRICE I Golfpride Grips Installed' Woods Rofinished Golf Clubs Repaired THE GOLF SHOP 2544 Plainfield Avenue Scotch Plains lutl. lo Sal. U.30«.m. 5 P-m. Cloitd Sun. i. Moo, EvM. by jppl. pionship game being able to make a number of substitutions throughout the game, scoring so evenly divided, defensive play was good but "we just could not come up with the baskets we needed in the overtime period." Redeemer Lutheran School ended Ihe 1976 season with a 6-5 record. Gill School Honors Brown Dave Brown of Westfield, Ihe New Jersey I.S.A. wreslling champion in the 12!l lb. wt. class, was voted the outstanding winter sports athlete at Gill-SI. Bernard's School. Brown, a senior, completed his season with a record and the Most Outstanding Wrestler Trophy from the State Tournament, which the coaches awarded Brown after he swept through the i final rounds with pinsin 0:35 j and.'!:07 and decisions of 14-0 and Dave completed Ihe season not only un.- defealed, but unscored upon. Brown's coach, Frank Kiefer, former Olympic alternate, considers Dave to be the finest wrestler he has coached and thinks that the future will find Dave wrestling at top national levels. Brown is considering offers from several colleges, bul is presently leaning toward the University of Pennsylvania. To Help Firms Fight Alcoholism Formation of an industry committee was announced loday by Mrs. Teresa McGcary, director of the National Council on Alcoholism, North Jersey j Area, Inc., Union County ' Division. The initial goals of the committee, which is composed of representatives from the helping professions, unions and companies in Union County, is to acquaint county em ployers with the impact of the growing employee alcoholism problem on j industry nationally and at the local level, with the various resource and treatment facilities available in Union County and with successful alcoholic recoverv programs being operated in other companies under combined union-management auspices. According lo Mrs. McGeary, every company of any size has some alcoholics in its employ although some companies refuse to admit it Recognition and treatment of employee alcholism through an organized program, she said, is a matter of "good business" since the worker with a drinking problem is frequently a valuable one in whom the company has a considerable investment and whose productivity can often by fully restored. Mrs. McGeary emphasized that a company program to combat the consequences of alcoholism for both employee and employer need nol be unnecessarily involved or 1 expensive although it does required support from top management and cooperation from the union if the company is organized. The National Council on Alcoholism office serving Union County is located at 30(1 North Ave. East Kifth in nation, Westfield YMCA ISIncfins arc seeking $1,5:11 to fly to this year's YMC'A National Championships in Ft. l.auderdale and lop last year's showing. Fins Seek Funding for National Event The Westfield YMCA "liluefins"-still in need of $1,531 to fly South for the YMCA National Championships in April -- plan two weekends of concerted effort to raise the funds. The Bluefins will be canvassing house-to-house as well as appealing to Westfield shoppers on Apr. 4 and Apr. 11 to finance their trip lo the International Swimming Hall of Fame in Ft. Lauderdale for the championships, for which they leave Apr. IB. To dale, the youngsters have raised $2,46(1. This year's fundraiser is a handsome red-white-andblue Bi-Ontennial sticker bearing an eagle and the words "Weslfield 76, YMCA National Championships." Last year's Blue Fin national learn captured fifth place in Ihe championships, and diver Steve Schramm brought home the national crown in both l-meter and 3- meter boards. A total of $4,000 is needed to finance the Blue Fin trip, according lo National Swim Team Chairman Bon Fosvlon. Aquasprites Win Jr. Meet The Westfield Aquasprites synchronized swim team again held first place in the New Jersey Association Junior Indoor Meet. The figure meet ended with Barbara Willis of the Aquasprites in first place wilh a score of 35.B6C and ii gold medal. Jenny Crane took second place silver with a score of Third place bronze medal was won by Vicky Rosenborg wilh n score of The Aquasprite swimmers Suzanne Grote, Peggy Chisholm, Kalherine Monte and Nancy Bacso swept 4th through 7th place medals in figures. Returning later to compete in solo competition, Barbara Willis took another first place gold medal with a top score of Si Jenny Crane look a silver second place medal in solo with a score of Third place M Vin Lally Lnlly to Start For Moravian Vin Lally of Westfield, a sophomore at Moravian College who earned a starting outfield berth in his first year of collegiate play last spring, is expected to anchor one of the outfield berths for the Greyhounds again this spring. Lally, son of Mr. and Mrs. Vincent F. Lally of 50 Tamaques Way, posted a.234 baiting average with 15 hils in 64 at-bats. He's a 0- fooler, weighing 180 pounds and throws and bats righthanded. At Westfield High School, he was named to the All- County team. "Advice is always n confession." Maurois Go To Dave Gildersleeve's Colonial for your Wines and Liquors When you arp shopping the Garwood Malf stop In. When you are not - it's worth the short trip. All loading brands displayed for easy seloctlon In tho shop whero you'll got, a warm welcome. Colonial Liquors Gnrwnod Mall South Avo., Garwood wilh a score of HI.859 was captured by Vicky Rosenborg. Barbara Willis has now won first place in solo, duel and team in Junior Association coin- ; petition.! I.iving taken these I 'op places in each swimming category moans she can no longer compete in future Junior Association competition. Barbara, age 13, is an nth grade student at Edison Junior High School in Westfield. The Aquasprites took first and second place medals in duct competition as! Chisholm and Suzanne! Grote swam in syni chroni/ation to >i high score : of followed by! A q u ii s p r i I e s V i c k y I Knscnborg and Leah Grote j wilh a score of H Beth Hun and Debbie Scharfctler of the Summit Aquelles look third place with a score of BO.ttOU. The 8 girl Aquasprite "A" team took first place gold medals with a final score of while the Summit Aquettes "A" and "B" teams swept 2nd and 3rd place with scores of and G j The "A" team Aquasprites will swim in the j Junior Nationals Duet Competition lo be held in Glen Falls, N.Y. The next New Jersey Association njeel will be Ihe Senior Association Indoor Meet to be held at the Summit YWCA on Apr. 4. Upon return from Glen Falls, the "A" team will start ex-! tensive practice prior to \ flying lo Houston. Tex. to compete in the Senior National Indoor Competition lo be held Apr The finals of this meet will be televised by CBS-TV for presentation al a later dale. Icemen Unbeaten In 20 Games Cninford extended their unbeaten streak lo 20 games in eliminating Koselle Catholic <>-() in first round Union County League playoffs They now face Ironbound who eliminated M.iplewood in two straight f4<itncs and have an opportunity to equaling the NHL T,\ game record set in 1<)I(MI by Boston Bruins if they can sweep the Ironbound series. John DeKovics in Ihe Cranford cage registered his sixth shut-out and came up with his sharpest performance in turning aside Shawn Ensor's penalty shot attempt in Ihe third period. Ian Smil in the nets for the hapless K.C.'s turned aside at of the 35 shots by Ihe "blueshirls"'in a fine effort to keep Ihe score close. Shooters for Cranford were Wyatt Malcolm and Bill McKinlay, both of Westfield and each with 2 goals, and singles lo Hob Bauer and Slu Wcrlhem. Making the plays were Gregg Chaltorlon (3). Dave Breen (2), Tim Browncll of Westfield. Bernard Chowdbury, Kuss Hunehar and Bauer, one each. Diver Betz Wins Letter at Yale Chab Belz, u freshman diver from Westfield, was recently awarded his first varsity swimming letter from Yale University. Betz, who competed on both the one-meter and three-meter boards for Ihe Rlis, was a consistent scorer all season for the 7-G FJis. His top efforl on the threemeter board came against Navy when he scored points and grabbed a first place in the event. On Ihe one-meter board, his point lolal against Columbia and Lafayette was good for Fertilize for a lasting green! This year, give your Inwnwhal it really noeds.. Green Power It's high, in nitrogen lo groun and thicken your lawn now. a rid the com rolled release formula kuops on feeding for weoks and weeks. Apply it anytime, oven when yeeding. 6 Now priced below last year) $C25 La Euwmewi* "IIV Scnnr Greenvfeui & Gundm Citric* ll'/w/ H'r.S'W/' first place, while his total against Harvard was his seasonal best. He finished second against Harvard and helped Yale to a M-49 upset win over Ihe Crimson. A graduate of Westfield High School, Betz was a member of a state championship swim squad and finished in fifth place in Ihe diving as a senior. In the recent Eastern.Seaboard Swimming and Diving Championships at Yale, Betz finished 12th,' Open Diiily ') In d 319 South Avi-.. K. Wi-Ktfi<-ltl»23,')-0363

23 Spring Track Opens Saturday By David lioff This year's Westfield High School springtrack and field leam has (he potential for another successful season, according to Coach Walt Clarkson. He feels the team has "a shot at an undefeated season," bul that most of the dual meets "will give us plenty of competition." The season opens Saturday with the North Bergen Relays, while Ihe first dual meet is a week from today against Summit at home, A roadblock on the way to success in these meets is Ihe fact thai a number of alhletes are sidelined by injuries. But according to Coach Clarkson the Blue Devils "hope they'll all be back in time for the meets." The splints and hurdles, potentially strong events that have lacked depth in the last year or two, look like (hey may come on strong again. Sophomore sprinters Bulch Woolfolk and Frank Kelly will be supported by senior John Aloia in Ihe 440, while lop hurdler Bruce Hoclzcr and velerans Al Morasso, Slu Morse, Tom Byrne and John LeKebrve should provide strength in both the high and intermediate hurdles. Unfortunately, Aloi;i, Hoelzer and Byrne have all been injured, but il is hoped they will be back by (his Saturday. At North IJergen Ihe Devils are entering a sophomore!i8o learn which Peck a Seen Starter For Princeton INinu Paul Pccka of West field is currenlly involved in preseason workouts with thu Princeton University varsity baseball (cam. Pecka, a junior outfielder is Ihe son nf Mr. iind Mrs. Robert G. Pecka of «<)!> Sherbrooke Dr. and is a graduate or Wesl field High School where he played baseball under Dave Cilo and Pete Limn. Pecka is given a strong chance to win Ihe starting right field position this year. He played Ihere consistently in 1975 playing exccllcnl defensive ball late in the year and driving in 15 runs on 15 hits. Whun you buy eiiuplaiits, pick ones that ure dark purple and feet firm iincl heavy. Snapper. Optional 6-bushe! grass catcher vacuums your lawn as you mow. > With proper attachments, Snapper solves many lawn care problems with case. MAPPER Atl Siiiipix'i iiiiiwcr-* imvi ANSI safvivm^-iri^imux hawnmowcr and Garden Center 349 South Ave., E. Westfield, N.J. "We Service What We Sell" open dally 9 to 6 Delicatessen Home Made Baked Goods Hors D'Oeuvres Cold Cut» Salads Cold Cut Platters v VM»«It IM - "I I Uil»M I Coach Clarkson is "very excited" about. Led by Woolfolk and Kelly it should have for support Brian Gray and either Dom Villanceor David Hargrove. With the longer distances, as usual, (he trackmen have a strong veteran squad. Tricaptains Andy Hubsch and Lew Graves with fellow seniors Brian Clancey and Marc Giguere lead the way, with several other team members lending strong support. Coach Clarkson is leaning toward his championship two mile relay leam made up of Hubsch, Graves, Giguere and Clancey for this Saturday. According to him, this should be "our premiere leam." The only field evenl being entered Ihis Saturday is the long jump relay. With such velerans as Graves and Glenn Wright, Coach Walt Lcnnow has a strong veteran squad. Weight Coach lireg Gorski has veterans such as Hob McNally and Bob C/.arny in the throwing evenls, while Rick Sampson Brian iietz and Scott Ashcrofl lead the candidates in Ihe pole vault. Unfor lunutely, Sampson was recenlly injured but hopefully will be back by nexl week. Against Summil next Thursday, the track and field men hope lo avenge last years upset. But according to Coach Clarkson, il will "take superior performances in 1he field than we have now" for Summil has "a very well balanced team." Lourdes Tops In Cheerleading The Suburban Catholic Schools League Chccrlcading Tournamenl was won by Our Lady of Lourdes squad, al its first lournament Mar. 21 at Our Lady of Lourdes School auditorium. Participating schools included: St. Michael's, Union; St. Vincent's, Sliding, St. Agnes, Clark, SI. James, Springfield; Holy Trinity, Weslficld; Holy Sptril, Union and Our Lady of Lourdes. Squads were judged on five calegories: appearance, voice, clarity, precision and overall presents! ion. Each school was represented by one judge. The tournament judges were: Mrs. Pat Cassa, Mrs. Beverly Burkinshaw, Mrs. Winnie Canavan, Mrs. Rosemary Cookc, Ginny Mocllner, Mary Ann laniro, Mary Beth Glinn. Time keepers were Mary Jane Gagliano and Jo-Ann Martin. Our Lady of Lourdes School cheering squad is coached by Mrs. Marge Gardner and includes Captain Jill Gardner and co-captain Patti NicaV.wiecki, Diana Butler, Joanne Ciasulli, Mary Ciasulli, Sally Gallagher, Lisa Jane Grace, Carole Krajcik, Cathy Niedzwiecki, Karen Flynn, Lisa McCarthy, Laura Perez- Santalla, and subs Tommie Ann Gibney, Mary Beth Kyan and Kathy Kennedy. Second place winners coached by Mrs. Anne McMurdo and Mrs. Pat Cadigan, were the girls of St. Agnes of Clark. Third place went to St. Michael's of Union, coached by Lorraine Libby. The "Miss Yell" first place winner was Eileen Frain of St. James, Springfield. Miss Yell's second place honor was awarded to Mimi Boyden of St. Vincents, Stirling and (hird place Miss Yell wenl to Kathy Niedzwiecki of Our Lady of Lourdes. tout ramtiy EATIN' LOCATED NEXT TO ROBERT TREAT LIQUOR! 113 QUIMBY ST. DIAL Pony League Needs Limp ires The Westfield Baseball Pony League is seeking umpires. Anyone having a knowledge of baseball who would like lo help the league by umpiring is I urged to call Ron Taddei of IH:)I Cranford Ave, 140 in New Baseball League Over year old youths have signed up to start off the first year of an organized baseball league in conjunction with the WBL and the PAL. Previously, the 13-year olds went into Ihe Pony or Mustang Leagues, but under the new guidelines will have their own league while the latter now consists of 14 to 16 year old youths from the community. Each of the ten PAL learns will, in addition to Iheir practice sessions, play an 18 game schedule followed by a championship game belwcen the first and second half winners and an All-Star game. All of these activities will be under (he directorship of lialph Honson, league director, and the coaches and (heir assistants as follows: Yale: Randy Richardson and Jerry Peters: Harvard: Mike Crosta and Kicky Crosla; Colgate: Charles Andrews and Ken Murray; Columbia: Ed Cooper and Ken Cooper; Cornell: Vincent Marvosa and Jerry Bonnetfi; Syracuse: Charles McGill. John Patterson and Reed Jajko; Rutgers: Terry Brady and Frank Murphy; Princeton: Jim Harcourt and Bob Munch; Dartmouth: Bernard Tracey and Jim Boyle; Brown : Mike McCabe, Tom McNally, Ron Nachbarr and Bill Lasseter. All-Stars Join County League Two new teams have been admitled in expansion moves by the Union County and Union County Twilight Baseball Leagues. South Plainfield joins Linden Recreation (formerly Linden PAL), Plainfield Driers. Westfield Merchants, and Woodbridge Recreation in the UCL American Division. Westfield All-Stars is Ihe new entry in the National Division which also includes Elizabeth Braves-AA, Elizabeth Colonials. Green Brook AA, and Newark Red Sox. A alwo-round, 18 game schedule opens on Sunday, May 2, and will be followed by playoffs for' the league championship involving the lop two learns in each division. The All-Stars and Ihe Woodbridge Bees are newcomers to the UCTL, with holdovers Elizabeth Colonials, Linden Recreation, Westfield Merchanls, and Woodbridge Recreation returning. A four-round, 20 game schedule will open on Tuesday, May 18. The UCL divisional champions and the UCTL league champion will be eligible lo participate in the New Jersey State Tournament nf Champions slarling Aug. 22. Woodbridge Recreation captured both the UCL and UCTL championships in 1975, bealing Green Brook in a playoff of divisional winners. Woodbridge advanced lo Ihe finals of Ihe T of C before bowing oul. Weslfjeld's tennis buffs eagerly await Ihe completion of Tamaques court resurfacing. "And so do we," noted Town Engineer James Josephs. "The one factor we can't control--weather-is the critical element." Surface tracks underwent extensive repairs by Public Works (toads men last fall, cement bases for new posts have been poured, and new nets and posts are ready. Josephs, above right, checked the progress of the repairs with Supervisor of Maintenance and Construction Dan Kelly, left, and Martin Judd. Kelly detailed the problem: "If we finished today, and the thermometer dropped tomorrow, the playing surface would crack and buckle in no lime. As soon as the temperature remains constant for a period of lime, we can apply the final surface, and the courts will be in mint condition for many seasons to come." WHS to Field Veteran Girls' Softball Squad By Jaiiiefiannon Whitcombe, Ihird baseman; sccondbase; Ann Cosenza, The girls soflbali leam and Diane Henry, rightfielder. Marybelh Ott, another Ihird shorl stop or third base: willswingintolhe 76season Monday. Wilh an 18-2 record Junior letter-winner baseman; and Pemy Birmingham, centerfielder. last year and a 35-5 record returnees adding to the for Ihe lasl iwo years, Coach strength of Ihe leam are Donner expects another pitcher Brenda Ilentley; Adding to the usual excellent performance from llobin Lawyer, playing left schedule! of games, there will ihis year's leam. field; Beth Rennicks, be a county tournament, With Ihe loss of only one ccnterfielder; and Caihy newly started 'his year. graduate, Ihe leam will I'rankenback as second- have nine letler-winner Mrs. MrsDnnner said that the slrin 8 righlfu-lder. Other j,,, returnees. Coach Carol juniors are Kalhy Loder. d d(} il in Ihe juniors are Kalhy Loder second-string second baseman; and Jean Laurent, Donner said, "With all bul one of my players returning, if they do Ihe same kind of job (hat they have done in Ihe past, we should have a very successful season." According (o Coach Donner, co-captains Sue Early and Ann Gable will play at first and second base. Other starling seniors are Kathy Tegcn, catcher; Maryann who will be pitching along wilhbenlley.andis new Ihis year from Holy Trinity. All of the sophomores, wilh the exception of Jackie Booth as shorl slop, will start off the season as second-string players. They include Janice Cosla, first base; Karen (ioski. Soccer League Teams Have Mixed Weekend Westfield soccer league kept Ihe game in control learns had a mixed weekend with both hustle and in Ihe Ihird week of the determination to keep South season as they came up with Plainfield al bay. Goalie five victories and three Andy Morse had another losses with one game not good game in goal as he had called in. Division 1 won its no chance on South Plainfield's scores. game over Berkeley Heights, although the Coach Herb Jofiansen's3A details were nol available. leam defeated Somerset Coach Bcrnic Griffith's 2A Mills by a 3-0 score as leam gave up an early goal GianCarlo DiOrio tallied lo South Plainfield and were twice and Cam Dunnan being dominated for the firsl once. The fronl line of len minutes of play as South Plainfield looked really sharp. Westfield's five man line.started to jell as Wingers Doug Griffiths and Paul Rotker combined with Cenler forward Ralph DiOrio lo knot the score. Paul Rotker gave Westfield Ihe lead as he scored on a corner kick. DiOrio blasted a 20yarderpast the goalie to close Ihe half with Westfield on lop, 3-1. In spite of (he wind, Westfield dominated Ihe play lhanks to some sharp defensive work by Cenler half Mike N'ikolyn and Left Fullback Tim Brownell. DiOrio got his Ihird goal by outleaping the South Plainfield goalie and heading it in. Doug Griffiths gol Westfield's fifth on a short range rebound and DiOriogol his fourth and the team's sixth on a beautiful give and go with Paul Itolker and drilled it into Ihe corner. Right fullback Waller Gotsch and Right Halfback Jamie Roberts Brou.se Scores Ace At Seuview CC Karl Brouse of Westfield, a member of Echo Lake Country Club, had a hole-inone at The Pines course of Ihe Seaview Country Club last Sunday. Brouse had his ace on Ihe difficult 170-yard par Ihreo seven hnle while using a throe iron. Playing partners were Bill Gordon, Warren Rankin and Bill Rose. Sunday's ace was Hrouse's second career hole-in-one. You can ml«^ntlc> ulcl nnd IKJW styles when you cli-corale your MO»H> it' Lhc jtyli-s iirc DI' lh«* s;ttm> (k'hroc of rcirmality. Passport Photos SECOND DAY SERVICE STUDIOS Portrait and Commercial Photographers 121 CENTRAL AVENUE DiOrio, Ken Chin, Jeff Alperl, and Tony Valles had many good shots on goal as Ihe defense kepi Ihe ball in iheir opponenl's and most of the game. Midfielders Bob O'Herron, Cam Dunnan and Russ Jones kept the game under control, while Fullbacks Drew Kronick, Doug Weldon and Art Stokes made sure goalie Tom Buehler had a relaxing day as he was called on to make only Iwo saves. Coach Johansen was able to substitute early and Kevin McPhee, John Giordano, Slewart Buhrendorf, Kenly Sidon, Ben Noslrand and Greg Sliuman made Ihe most of their opportunities by playing well. Coach Walt Sobanski's la leam ran inlo a strong Madison Township team as both squads played very well. Westfield dominated Ihe first half as the ball was in the Madison end 80 percent of Ihe lime. The Irani line of Nikhil Singh, Ron Johnson, Larry Van Kirk, and Jeff Schmalz put on another passing exhibition but had a goal called back on an offsides call, in fhe second half Madison had more scoring opportunities although Westfield still controlled ihe game. Finally, wilh seven minutes left in game, a Madison defender iiilei-rered with Ed Smith and Walter Sobanski took (he indirect kick from twenty county as well as the state tournament. To be eligible for Ihe slate tournamenl. a cam must win at least one more than half of its games. Coach Donner concluded thai ihis year's toughest competition will be againsl Nulley. one of last year's only iwo losses. Mother Selon and Berkeley Heights also pose possible threats. five yards oul. The ball was well hit and deflected in off the head of a Madison defender. Coach Sobasnki was high in praise of the leam effort, bul singled out the play of fullback Mark Telling, halfback Tom Miller and inside lefl Jeff Schmalz as being outstanding. Coach Pete Latertara was disappointed in the score of his game with New Providence Division 4B learn and felt that his team played nowhere near their ability. Coach Latartara felt dial the left side of his squad, led by outside left Sally Stokes, left halfback Doug Jamieson and Lefl fullback Mark Kramer, all performed well, bul Ihe center forces and the right side broke down repeatedly. Goalies Tom Kelly and Ed Harrigan were called on to make sparkling saves time afler lime. Division SB lost a double header over Ihe weekend as they ran inlo an East Brunswick mcatgrindcr on Saturday and came off on Ihe wrong end of a 10-0 score. In spite of Ihe score, Pcle Latartara, Mike Stagaard, Steve Booth, Jill Jamieson and goalie Dennis Kinsella all played very well. On Sunday, the Wesl fielders took on a tough Rahway Wildcat team and gave up an early four goal lead. After halftime, Westfieid pul il together and starled to play a much beller brand of ball. Pete Lalarlara. Brian Jennings, Sieve Booth and Jill Jamieson all played well. Dennis Kinsella moved from his normal goalie slot oul lo righl wing and combined wilh Jill Jamieson lo get Wcslfielrt on the Scoreboard. KENILWORTH ujvst W0 ^ -THE (I*.*.) LEADER, THfRSUAY. APRIL I, 1876 J'ajjr 28 Coach Lima Looks To a Better Year By Hruce IMoran The WHS varsity baseball team opens up its season against Moselle Catholic Tuesday al home at 3:45. This season the Blue Devils, under head coach Pete Lima, will look to a tight defense and good pitching to improve on last year's record. Last season the Devils committed over six errors per game, which was a major factor in some of las! year's losses. So Ihis season Coach Lima will strengthen the defense to cul down on mishaps. Pitching appears strong with the return of senior hurler Jeff Slember One of the lop pitchers in Ihe county, Slember will be Coach Limus number one hurler. One noted improvemenl Ihis season, according lo Lima, is the positive attitude of Ihe Devils. As Ihe second year varsity mentor commented, "We have Ihe potential to win a lot of games Ihis year, bul a big plus is the overall atliiudc of Ihe team which should help in part to win some close games." The infield has been helped greatly by new assistant coach Gary Mellilo, an ex-player'from Brown University. Al first base, Lima will go with either seniors James Vavoulis or Don Assmann. Vavoulis, the rangy 6':s"er. and Assmann will bolh see action in Ihe outfield At second, either senior Tom Graney or junior Joe Delia liadia will gel Ihe starling berth. Malt Hanna, the slick fielding vcleran, will handle shortstop, while junior Frank Mirkow will be at third. In the outfield, Skip Bode will be in left, Bob Tebbetts in center, and over in right, senior Paul Sperduto is ball ling junior Larry Cohen for the starting position. ISode and Tebbetts will see some action in Ihe infield. Hode will play some at first base, while Tebbetts will play Ihe hoi corner as well as do some pitching. Behind PAL Defeats Metuchen All-Stars The Weslfield PAL Tournamenl Team defealed Ihe Metuchen All-Slars Gl lo 50 in Ihe Carteret Invitalional Basketball Tournament Mar. 20 al Carteret High School. The Westfield offense starled the game in high gear, jumping off lo a quick 14 to I lead in the opening minutes of Ihe first quarter. Al Ihis point, it appeared lhai Ihe game would be a rout since Mcluehen could nol control (he Weslfield fast break. Bob Cahill and Tony Hall were crashing lhc boards and (heir quick release passes to Rick Elliott (10 points in Ihe firsl quarter I, Dondi Chambliss and Greg Powell led to numerous easy buckets for ihe Weslfield five. However, Meluchen rallied toward the end of the first quarter to narrow Ihe Westfield margin (o Iwo points 18 to H>. The second and third quarters were closely contested. Whenever Weslfietd made a motion to PLAYER Elliott Hall Cahill Chambliss Powell Maher Gleason Cotter Delia Badia Mondon Totals PLAYER Sin ott Mclaughlin Sinett Jeney 1 Bruno Smith Briggs Cooper Driscol Totals FG FTA FTM PF T D METUCHEN 6 TZS I ( FG FTA FTM PF T t Walton Wins Road Race Buddy Walton, former Westfield High runner, sped to a decisive victory Sunday in Ihe Watchung Reservation fii i-mile road race. The Trenton State freshman was clocked in 34:58. Veteran Fred Besl of Weslfield was runnerup in 35:12. The 40-year old Besl is an ex-stale AAU champion. The 10-and-itnder crown went lo Greg Kasko of Wesl field (43: 5f> I. The evenl was under (he direction nf George Miller and sponsored by Ihe Union County Park Commission. presents NEW DINNER THEATER LAST OF THE RED HOT LOVERS $15 includes Dinner & Fantastic Show April9 OWL and the PUSSYCAT DINNER AT 7:30; SHOW9:00 EXCEPT SUNDAYS DINNER 6:30: SHOW 8:00 Evury SUNDAY Houlward & 31sl St., South Exit Gordon Smtn Pkwv. Rosorvu now Call OI] y ALL YOU CAN EAT *R^5 Q*> Children S3,SO take control of the game, Metuchen would rally. The high poinl of the third quarter came just before Ihe buzzer when Larry Sinotl of Meluchen dropped in a desperation shot from the mid-eourl line to give his team the advantage 40 lo.'ir, Weslfield started Ihe final stanza wilh a bang. Led by ( Kllioll (Hi poinls and greal defense in Ihe second half) ;ind Chambliss (8 poinls and outstanding floor I generalship), Weslfield put Ihe game oul of reach of Meluchen by scoring Ihe firsl 12 poinls of Ihe quarter. This was an outstanding team efforl againsl a fine contingent from Meluchen. Tournamenl Tales: Weslfield has finished second in Ihe Garwood Tournament and Ihird in Ihe Summit Tournament... Leading scorers are Rick Elliott wilh a 15.1 average j and Greg Powell with a 9(> average... Leading rebounders are Jim Maher, Tony Hall and Elliott... Assist leaders are Dondi Chambliss and Greg Powell. -- Cl MEM A ihe plale will be senior Bob Kiningham, while junior Dennis Gibbons will be his backup Senior hurlers Jeff Kole and Phil Good are Lima's lop pitchers behind Stember. Junior pitchers Brad Siep and Jeff Shepard as well as senior Tebbetts, will see some spot starling duly and also some relief action. This season ihe American league's designated hitter rule has been adopted by (he New Jersey High school baseball rules Lima can use any one of lhc backup players as <he Dlf. One negative nole for (he Devil batsmen is Iheir schedule. Year in and year ou', Ihe Devils play one of lhc toughest schedules in the stale. Some of lhc opponents thai Ihe Devils face are Union. H 1 o o m f i e 1 d, Morristown and Essex ; Catholic. With learns like : thai ahead of them. Weslfield must play up lo its full potenial to have a successful season. Green berg Second In Master's Race Harold -Creenberg of Lambert Circle placed second last weekend in a two-mile New Jersey AAU Master's run sponsored by (he New Jersey Alhle'ic Club al Seton Mall University, South Orange. Greenberg ran Ihe course in!1:59. A low drops of oil of cinnamon or oil of lemon in th«vacuum cleaner bay can give tme whole house a (food smell every lime you vacuum. NOW PLAYING! cc Best Film of the Year" STANLEY Ky BRICK O'NEAL, : c MAR4 A < BER NS0N i> LADIES' NIGHT TUESDAY - LADIES SI.25 Now James Coburn nuitfl KlAUU THE SKY RIDERS PLUS 2nd HIT P Robert Culp STARTS FRIDAY FRENCH CONNECTION II ECONOMY MATINEE EVERY WED. ALL SEATS $1.00 HOLIDAYS EXCLUDED

24 THE WKSTriKL.ll (N.J.) IJSAMKII, Tlil'USUAY, AI'KIL 1, The I'rinccion Footnotes, who have been called "Princeton's newest, most innovative, male a cappella singing group," will be featured al the Wesllicld (.lee ( lull's spring concert to he held at Westfirld High School on Saturday. Apr. 24, It is expected that the contrasting styles of the two groups will afford a diversified program of male choral singing. Regional Board Undecided On $250,000 Budget Cuts At its regular adjourned meeting last week, the Board of Education discussed various ways to make the necessary tuts in ihe budget, which must he reduced by $250,0(10. However, no decisions were made at I his time The board approved the following actions: Plans for an articulation workshop in Knglish Composition instruction lor 9th and Kith grade teachers at Arthur L. Johnson and 7th and 8th grade teachers from ihe Clark Public Schools was given Board approval. The workshop will be conducted on Apr. 2(i, at the Johnson library and cafeteria. John Bennett, consultant in English with a specially in English composition, will serve as the workshop leader. The senior classes of David Brearley and Governor Livingston received board approval to conduct their annual class trips. The Brearley students will go lo Ihe Culvermere in Hranchville on June ). The (lovi'rnor L i v i n g s t o n students will visit the llomowack Lodge in Kllensville. N.Y.. June 8. Forty-six students at David Brearley received Hoard approval lo go on a field trip to Washington D.C. Washington on Friday, Apr. 9. The French Clubs of Jonathan Dayton and David Brearley received board approval lo go on a.memorial Day weekend trip lo Canada. Mrs. Marjorie Bosco, French teacher at both schools, arranged the trip. Students from Arthur L. Johnson and Governor Livingston will also be invited to participate. by Mrs Plans for a workshop on j reading History In A Shoe Box -- Fifth grade students in Joseph P. Hawkins' class al Tamaques School show important historical events in a shoe box. No-prcconstructed materials were premitted. Standing, left to right, are Laura Nakulnni, Karina Rosenborg and Terry Gunning. Seated, left to right, are Kim Cleveland. Mitchell Wcincr and Michael Chin. ambassador SERVICES PHONE SOUTH AVENUE, WEST WESTFtELD. NEW JERSEY "A NEWCOMERS WELCOMING SERVICE" choerleading t ryouls received Hoard approval. The workshop will be held al David Hrearlcy today with advisors from all four schools participating. Miss Sandrii Schmidke. of Colonia High School, will lead Ihe workshop. The Arthur L. Johnson Junior Historian Club received Ixiard approval lo go on a field trip lo D.C. on Thursday, Apr. lf>. In addition lo these students, the students and teachers from Weymouth, England, will also be going on the trip. Plans for an in-service workshop in science study skills received Ixiard approval. The first workshop will be scheduled for Ihe Jonathan Dayton and David Hreiirleystaffs II will be led Hose Golden, a specialist-consulin judging students ' i Ian I al ' Kdison Township High School The workshop i will he held iti the Dayton Media Center on Apr. 1, B and 12. The Iward also approved the following personnel j items: William McHale has been placed on the Fireman's salary guide effective Feb. 25. Mr. Mcllale is a member of the custodial staff at 1 Arthur L. Johnson. Jeffrey Marqueen completed his master's degree on Feb. 11. He is a fully certified teacher of biology who is substituting for Mrs. Marcy Kudirka at Jonathan Dayton. Fire Calls Fire Department calls Mar. 15 through 22 were: Mar. 16, 4U9 North Ave., West, Gas leak; Mar. ia. 232 Watchung Fork, oil burner fire; Mar Doris Parkway, gas leak; 515 Trinity PI., automobile gas leak, and 1484 Easl Broad St.. automobile accident. Mar. 20, 121 Benson PI.; smoke condition,street Box No. 75, false alarm; Mar «1 Lamberts Mill lid., wires down; lilt Hazel Ave., wires down; :!!)!> Hazel Ave., wires down; BT>5 Boulevard, wires down; 508 Grove Street, tree fallen on automobile; 919 Summit Ave.. wires down; Hll-lOti Clifton St.. fallen Iree on wires; <>4") Shadowlawn Dr., iree fallen on house; R40 Shadowlawn Dr.. wires down; 080 Westfield Ave., i investigation; II Kirkview Cir., investigation. Mar (1 North Ave.. : grease fire in rooking area. «r «" Attraction At Library Apr. 14 "Eggs. Eggs. Eggs," a program of stories and craft demonstrations will be offered by i he Children's Department of the Westfield Memorial Library Wednesday. Apr. H, from 2:30 lo :S:15 p.m. Mrs. Sally Wehr. children's librarian, will dcmonslralt 1 the decoration of eggs with mod podge and show the children how to make a seder lable terpieee using eggs. Passes for the program will be available at Ihe children's desk beginning Apr. 7. They are available only lo Westfield residents and library card holders. Kcaders to Add lilooins to Li!>rary There'll be leaves and blossoms on Ihe Iree in Ihe Children's Department of the Westfield Memorial Library beginning today, no matter what the weather. That's when the "A Tree is Nice" Mini Reading Club will begin. Each boy or girl who borrows and reads two books and tells the librarian will have a leaf or peach blossom with his or her name on it mounted on the tree on the library bulletin board. The program is open io all children who can read. ti will continue until June 1. caused the moisture in the I air to condense. The con INew Office Building'' densed moisture formed a j'g The following Schedule Er I dense cloud that completely appointments were approved: Robert Taylor, Rising in IMtside. ] surrounded the speaker. intramurals coach, spring; Brounell Kramer, a Resident INamed Diane ICrdmann, intramurals coach, spring; has been appointed as ex- Union-based really firm, Richard Fernandez, tennis clusive renting agent for School Director coach; James Hagan. Plaza 22, a Iwo-story office assistant track coach; Jerry building nearing completion Pror. John F. Wheeler of Allocco, intramurals coach, at Route 22 and Summit Rd. 42 West brook Rd. has been spring. in.mountainside. The j appoinled director of the The board approved the structure is being built by I summer sessions at Union retirement of Alex ihe Torsiello-Musto Company of Kenilworth. A member of the College. Kropinicki at the end of the current school year. Designed by Architect economics, government and Kropinicki is a member of Gabriel Calenda A.I.A., of history department. Prof. he English Department at Linden, Plaza 22 will Wheeler is serving his Jonathan Dayton. provide approximately second year as director of Also approved was the 20,000 square feet of office Ihe summer sessions. retirement of Hubert space on two floors. Construction is primarily be offering two summer Union College will again Tunison, effective at the end of (he school year. Tunison masonry and steel, with sessions with the first is a teacher of industrial broad areas of reflective opening Tuesday, June 1, arts at Arthur L. Johnson. glass. and continuing through NEED A PLUMBER? CALL US FOR ALL YOUR PLUMBING AND HEATING NEEDS, SMALL OR LARGE. RE- PAIRS, HOT-WATER HEATERS, LEAKY FAUCETS AND TOILETS, SEWER-LINE AND SINK STOPPAGES YOU NAME IT, WE FIX IT. SERVING NEW JERSEY HOMEOWNERS FOR OVER 50 YEARS. 24-HOUR EMERGENCY PLUMBING AND HEATING SERVICE FRED A. HUMMEL, INC. 506 ARLINGTON AVE. PLAINFIELD, N.J SINCE SMPL NO.4386 Andy Itothinan I'hoto Linda Mobrrls as Anna "Getting lo Know" the court of the King of Siam, as the Westfield Hen cation Commission's Theatre Group rehearses for its production of Rodgcrs&ll;imiiicrstein's "The King and 1," which will he presented tomorrow and Saturday al Kdison Jr. High. Tickets are available at the Hecreation Commission office or at the door. Temperature Phenomena Explained Dr. Doug Osheruff, a speaker from Bell Labs, lectured recently on low temperature phenomena to members of Ihe Saturday Science program al WHS. He explained some unusual properties of materials at very low ' temperatures, such as conducting electricity with no resistance. This could j mean that, in ihe future,, cen- 'ol'^tricily could foedeliverud I *o homes with virtually no loss of energy. Dr. Osheruff also foresaw the possibility of storing electromagnetic for long periods of time in a large superconducting magnet. During recent years, scientists have been able to achieve very low temperatures. According lo Dr. Osheruff, the lowest temperatures that was achieved so far, was just one thousandth of a degree above absolute zero, or nearly -4C0 F. Dr. Osheruff also carried out experiments and demonstrations. One amazing demonstration involved pouring liquid helium, which was at a temperature of approximately -45G F,out of an insulated flask. The helium evaporated immediately and cooled Ihe atmosphere io such an exlent that it Thursday, July 8. Summer Session 11 will be conducted from Monday, July 12, through Thursday, Aug. 19. In addition, a program of non-credit and continuing education courses will he offered in a special session beginning Monday, June 14, and concluding Thursday, July 22. Summer Session 1 and II courses will be available daysandeveninys with classes meeting Mondays through Thursdays. Each session will include courses in liberal arts, physical and natural sciences, business administration and criminal justice. Prof. Wheeler earned a bachelor of arts degree in history al Lafayette College, Huston, Pa., and a master of arts degree in history from Columbia University, where he has also done work toward a doctorate. His major field of interest is Hrilish and Canadian history. Prior to joining the Union College faculty In 11)72, Prof. Wheeler taught at Upsala College, Kast Orange, Seton Hall University, South Orange, and Brooklyn College. A member of the American Historical Association, he is also a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Phi Alpha Thelo, national history fraternity. Offers Gifts To Club Members Increased dividends and a free Bicentennial serving tray for members of the 1977 Vacation Club were announced today by First Federal Savings and Loan Association. According to Vice President Charles ISiondi, First Federal has increased the dividend for 11)77 Vacation Clubs to 5 percent of the average balance lour completed clubs. Ciliiig specific examples. Biondi $1,000 and receive an additional $25 in dividends. As an added incentive, and to commemorate the nation's 200th birthday, i First Federal will give members a 10-inch diameter Bicentennial serving tray I lor opening their 1977 Vacation Club al First Federal. Two designs are available, and each member will be jiblelo select one Iray while the supply lasls. noted thai club members 1977 Vacation Clubs may selecting a»5 payment plan I»e established at any of the will pay in a total'of $250 and i fight First Federal offices, receive an additional $6.25 : located in Clark, Kdison, in dividends, while mem-! Freehold Mountainside, : hers selecting a $2(1 payment I'lainficld, South I'lainfield, plan will put in a total of WesHjeld, and Woodbridge. "Itoi-k" group at Tamaques School - Dr. Donald B. Krall, associate professor of geology at Kean College, visits fifth grade class taught by Barbara Woerz lo dicuss rocks and minerals. Scott Cermaisc, on the left, invited the guest. Steven Scioscia (right), looks at a rock sample. FUGMANN YOUR LOCAL AUTHORIZED- INDEPENDENT EXXON DEALER READY TO SERVE YOU! Easy Budget Pavmant Plans WE WILL INSTALL A NEW FURNACE OR MODERNIZE YOUR PRESENT HEATING SYSTEM /^WATCHDOG SERVICE \ 361 SOUTH AVENUE E. SUBSCRIBE NOW TO THE LEADER LEADER 50 ELM ST. Send to: Address Apt, No City.State -Zip. Begin Subscription D Check Enclosed D Bill mo Please allow 3 weeks for delivery ONE YEAR just $6.00 in Union County AT BARON'S, """"(jj f^vice $ TABLETS BAYER ASPIRIN M ONLY 49' WITH THIS COUPON ONLY (LIMIT ONE) ONLY 22 OZ. LEMON FRESH JOY The Detergent for Sparkling Dishes 16 OZ. BOUNCE FABRIC SOFTENER "» IT WORKS IN THE DRYER 20 SHEETS 15 OZ. Vaseline Brand //OVSRY\\ INTENSIVE CARE FLEET LOTION For over-dry skin Rag ONLY READY-TO-USE ENEMA Complete enema in. disposable squeeze bottle. REG. 59' SI 19 ONLY 39 tra STORE HOURS Mon. thru Fri. 9 A.M. to 9 P.M. Sat. 9 A.M. to 6 P.M. Sun. ft Holidays 9 A.M. to 9 P.M. U» OUR MAR ENTRANCE from TOWN PARKING IOT NO CHARGES OR DELIVERIES ON SALE ITEMS W* r*mrv*»h» right to limit quanthim, 243 E. BROAD ST. OPPOSITE RIALTO THEATRE PRESCRIPTION CHEMISTS

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